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Aboriginals and the Mining Industry: Case studies of the Australian experience

by David Cousins John Nieuwenhuysen

In 1973, Peter Rogers concluded that 'Australia has not done itself justice in the handling of modern industry versus Aborigines conflict. the lack of preparation. is a disgrace to government, private organisations and unions alike'.What has happened since then? Aboriginals and the mining industry reviews three main questions - to what extent have Aboriginals shared in the fruits of the mining boom? Have new land rights helped Aboriginals protect their interests as affected by mining? And what has been the contribution of mining to the economic development of remote Aboriginal communities? These are vital questions for all concerned with the impact of mining expansion on Aboriginal communities.This book reviews the participation of Aborigines in the mining company employment. It examines the contribution of the recent land rights legislation to protecting Aboriginal interests. And it asks how far the growth of mining in remote parts of Australia has aided the economic development of Aboriginal groups living there. Detailed case studies of mining projects included.

Abortion and Ireland: How the 8th Was Overthrown

by David Ralph

This book asks the crucial question of how it came to pass that on the 25 May 2018, the Irish electorate voted by a landslide in favour of changing its abortion legislation that, for the previous thirty-five years, had been one of the most restrictive regimes in Europe. The author shows how, alongside traditional campaigning tactics such as street demonstrations, door-to-door canvassing, and the distribution of pro-choice merchandise and information leaflets, a key strategy of pro-choice advocacy groups was to encourage first-person abortion story-sharing by women in their efforts to repeal the Eighth Amendment, which had effectively banned abortion provision in the country. The book argues that a normalizing of abortion talk took place in the lead-up to the referendum, with women speaking publicly in unprecedented numbers about their abortion histories. These women storytellers were mirroring certain pro-choice movements in other contexts, where a new ‘sound it loud, say it proud’ narrative around abortion experiences has emerged as a central contemporary strategy for destigmatizing abortion discourse.Students and scholars across a range of disciplines, including law, gender studies, sociology, and human geography, will find this book of interest.

Abortion and Nation: The Politics of Reproduction in Contemporary Ireland

by Lisa Smyth

Abortion politics are contentious and divisive in many parts of the world, but nowhere more so than in Ireland. Abortion and Nation examines the connection between abortion politics and hegemonic struggles over national identity and the nation-state in the Irish Republic. Situating the abortion question in the global context of human rights politics, as well as international social movements, Lisa Smyth analyses the formation and transformation of abortion politics in Ireland from the early 1980s to the present day. She considers whether or not the shifting connections between morality, rights and nationhood promise a new era of gender equality in the context of nation-state citizenship. The book provides a new sociological framework through which the significance of conflict over abortion and reproductive freedom is connected to conflict over national identity. It also offers a distinctive in-depth consideration of the connection between gender and nationhood, particularly in terms of its impact on women's status as citizens; within the nation-state; within the European Union; and as members of a global civil society.

Abortion in the USA and the UK

by Colin Francome

Recent years have revealed the different experiences of abortion in the UK and the USA. The United States has a higher abortion rate accompanied by a higher political profile for the issue. In fact, one of George W. Bush's first acts in 2001 was to ban American funding for overseas organizations carrying out abortions. The USA has also experienced a higher degree of abortion-related violence, with several people linked to abortion services being targeted and even killed. Compelling and enlightening in its approach, this invigorating volume compares the two countries' abortion laws and outlines the distinctions. The usually conservative American society has a much more liberal abortion law than the United Kingdom, whose female citizens can obtain an abortion relatively easily although in fact they do not have the right to choose. This stimulating volume examines the comparative positions taken by each country and makes important suggestions for the future.

About Face: Performing Race in Fashion and Theater

by Dorinne Kondo

From the runways of Paris to the casting controversies over BMiss Saigon, from a local demonstration at the Claremont Colleges in California to the gender-blending of BM. Butterfly, BAbout Face examines representations of Asia and their reverberations in both Asia and Asian American lives. Japanese high fashion and Asian American theater become points of entry into the politics of pleasure, the performance of racial identities, and the possibility of political intervention in commodity capitalism. Based on Kondo's fieldwork, this interdisciplinary work brings together essays, interviews with designer Rei Kawakubo of Comme des Garcons and playwright David Henry Hwang, and "personal" vignettes in its exploration of counter-Orientalisms.

About Star Architecture: Reflecting on Cities in Europe

by Davide Ponzini Alain Thierstein Nadia Alaily-Mattar

Cities across the world have been resorting to star architects to brand their projects, spark urban regeneration and market the city image internationally. This book shifts the attention from star architects to star architecture, arguing that the process of deciding about and implementing relevant architectural and urban projects is not the product of any single actor. Star architecture can, in fact, be better studied and understood as assembled by multiple actors and in its relationship with urban transformation. In its 18 chapters, the book presents a multidisciplinary collection of expert contributions in the fields of urban planning, architecture, media studies, urban economics, geography, and sociology, consistently brought together for the first time to deal with this topic. Through a vast array of case studies and analytical techniques touching over 20 cities in Europe, the book shows the positive and more problematic impacts of star architecture with reference to the preservation of built heritage, tourism and media. The book will be of interest to architects, sociologists, urban planners, and public administrators.

Above the Clouds: A Guide to Trends Changing the Way we Work

by Efqm

Some of us work to live. Some of us live to work. Some of us, by design or default, don't work at all. Whatever your position, as a stakeholder in today's society, there is no avoiding the complex web that is the world of work. Everyone is affected to some degree by issues such as stress and work-life balance, teleworking, offshoring, stakeholder democracy, globalisation – the list goes on. But, as things continue to change at an ever-faster rate, what can we expect work to look like in the next five, ten, or twenty years? Above the Clouds is the result of a future studies project carried out by the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM), a not-for profit foundation that promotes excellence in European business. The project aimed to identify trends that will have an impact on the world of work over the coming decade. Work here is defined in terms of methods, organisation and future challenges. It took two years to create the full picture, which is now available in this book. "Trendspotting" sessions were organised across Europe as a means of gathering ideas on where work was heading in the future. The experience and insights of people from a diverse range of backgrounds were included in the project. Working with raw material from these sessions, researchers investigated each of the trends and their possible ramifications on the world of work. The resulting articles were posted for comment online. People from all around Europe responded and some of these views are quoted in this book. In addition, academics and leading CEOs and executives were asked for their reactions to these trends. Each of the 15 chapters of Above the Clouds analyses a trend in detail and includes perspectives from business, academia and comments from the European public. There are disagreements, but also a surprising amount of convergence on issues such as leadership, outsourcing, global risk, women, age, spirituality, stress and technology. Rather than trying to offer certainty, the book aims to equip people and organisations with the awareness and adaptability they will need to meet tomorrow's challenges to the way we work. It is fascinating reading for anyone interested in how the big issues of work are likely to impact on us all.

Above the Clouds: Status Culture of the Modern Japanese Nobility

by Takie Sugiyama Lebra

This latest work from Japanese-born anthropologist Takie Sugiyama Lebra is the first ethnographic study of the modern Japanese aristocracy. Established as a class at the beginning of the Meiji period, the kazoku ranked directly below the emperor and his family.

Above the Fray: The Red Cross and the Making of the Humanitarian NGO Sector

by Shai M. Dromi

From Lake Chad to Iraq, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) provide relief around the globe, and their scope is growing every year. Policymakers and activists often assume that humanitarian aid is best provided by these organizations, which are generally seen as impartial and neutral. In Above the Fray, Shai M. Dromi investigates why the international community overwhelmingly trusts humanitarian NGOs by looking at the historical development of their culture. With a particular focus on the Red Cross, Dromi reveals that NGOs arose because of the efforts of orthodox Calvinists, demonstrating for the first time the origins of the unusual moral culture that has supported NGOs for the past 150 years. Drawing on archival research, Dromi traces the genesis of the Red Cross to a Calvinist movement working in mid-nineteenth-century Geneva. He shows how global humanitarian policies emerged from the Red Cross founding members’ faith that an international volunteer program not beholden to the state was the only ethical way to provide relief to victims of armed conflict. By illustrating how Calvinism shaped the humanitarian field, Dromi argues for the key role belief systems play in establishing social fields and institutions. Ultimately, Dromi shows the immeasurable social good that NGOs have achieved, but also points to their limitations and suggests that alternative models of humanitarian relief need to be considered.

Absence in Science, Security and Policy: From Research Agendas to Global Strategy (Global Issues)

by Brian Rappert Brian Balmer

This book explores the absent and missing in debates about science and security. Through varied case studies, including biological and chemical weapons control, science journalism, nanotechnology research and neuroethics, the contributors explore how matters become absent, ignored or forgotten and the implications for ethics, policy and society.The chapter 'Sensing Absence: How to See What Isn't There in the Study of Science and Security' is open access under a CC BY 4.0 license via link.springer.com.

An Absent Presence: Japanese Americans in Postwar American Culture, 1945-1960

by Caroline Chung Simpson

There have been many studies on the forced relocation and internment of nearly 120,000 Japanese Americans during World War II. But An Absent Presence is the first to focus on how popular representations of this unparalleled episode in U. S. history affected the formation of Cold War culture. Caroline Chung Simpson shows how the portrayal of this economic and social disenfranchisement haunted--and even shaped--the expression of American race relations and national identity throughout the middle of the twentieth century. Simpson argues that when popular journals or social theorists engaged the topic of Japanese American history or identity in the Cold War era they did so in a manner that tended to efface or diminish the complexity of their political and historical experience. As a result, the shadowy figuration of Japanese American identity often took on the semblance of an "absent presence. " Individual chapters feature such topics as the case of the alleged Tokyo Rose, the Hiroshima Maidens Project, and Japanese war brides. Drawing on issues of race, gender, and nation, Simpson connects the internment episode to broader themes of postwar American culture, including the atomic bomb, McCarthyism, the crises of racial integration, and the anxiety over middle-class gender roles. By recapturing and reexamining these vital flashpoints in the projection of Japanese American identity, Simpson fills a critical and historical void in a number of fields including Asian American studies, American studies, and Cold War history.

Absolute Value

by Emanuel Rosen Itamar Simonson

Going against conventional wisdom, Absolute Value reveals what really influences customers today and offers a new framework--the Influence Mix--for thinking about consumer decision making, which should help managers develop more effective marketing strategies.How people buy things has changed profoundly--yet the fundamental thinking about consumer decision making and marketing has not. Most marketers still believe that they can shape consumers' perceptions and drive their behaviors. In this provocative book, Stanford professor Itamar Simonson and best-selling author Emanuel Rosen show why current mantras about branding and loyalty are losing their relevance. When consumers base their decisions on reviews from other users, easily accessed expert opinions, price comparison apps, and other emerging technologies, everything changes. Contrary to what we frequently hear, consumers will (on average) make better choices and act more rationally.Absolute Value answers the pressing question of what influences customers in this new age. Simonson and Rosen identify the old-school marketing concepts that need to change and explain how a company should design its communication strategy, market research program, and segmentation strategy in the new environment. Filled with deep analysis, case studies, and cutting-edge research, this forward-looking book provides an entirely new way of thinking about marketing.

Abstract Barrios: The Crises of Latinx Visibility in Cities

by Johana Londoño

In Abstract Barrios Johana Londoño examines how Latinized urban landscapes are made palatable for white Americans. Such Latinized urban landscapes, she observes, especially appear when whites feel threatened by concentrations of Latinx populations, commonly known as barrios. Drawing on archival research, interviews, and visual analysis of barrio built environments, Londoño shows how over the past seventy years urban planners, architects, designers, policy makers, business owners, and other brokers took abstracted elements from barrio design—such as spatial layouts or bright colors—to safely “Latinize” cities and manage a long-standing urban crisis of Latinx belonging. The built environments that resulted ranged from idealized notions of authentic Puerto Rican culture in the interior design of New York City’s public housing in the 1950s, which sought to diminish concerns over Puerto Rican settlement, to the Fiesta Marketplace in downtown Santa Ana, California, built to counteract white flight in the 1980s. Ultimately, Londoño demonstrates that abstracted barrio culture and aesthetics sustain the economic and cultural viability of normalized, white, and middle-class urban spaces.

Abstract Objects: For and Against (Synthese Library #422)

by José L. Falguera Concha Martínez-Vidal

This volume examines the question “Do abstract objects exist?”, presenting new work from contributing authors across different branches of philosophy. The introduction overviews philosophical debate which considers: what objects qualify as abstract, what do we mean by the word "exist” and indeed, what evidence should count in favor or against the thesis that abstract objects exist. Through subsequent chapters readers will discover the ubiquity of abstract objects as each philosophical field is considered.Given the ubiquitous use of expressions that purportedly refer to abstract objects, we think that it is relevant to attend to the controversy between those who want to advocate the existence of abstract objects and those who stand against them. Contributions to this volume depict positions and debates that directly or indirectly involve taking one position or other about abstract objects of different kinds and categories. The volume provides a variety of samples of how positions for or against abstract objects can be used in different areas of philosophy in relation to different matters.

Abtreibungspolitik in Deutschland: Ein Überblick (essentials)

by Emma T. Budde

Emma T. Budde legt den Fokus auf die Darstellung und Erklärung der Regulierungsgeschichte von Abtreibungen in Deutschland von 1960 bis 2015. Sie kontrastiert die deutsche Entwicklung mit der Gesetzesentwicklung in Westeuropa. Hinsichtlich der Reformgeschwindigkeit und des Regulierungsniveaus ist Deutschland im internationalen Mittelfeld angesiedelt. Eine Besonderheit deutscher Abtreibungspolitik ist die Widersprüchlichkeit des aktuell geltenden Gesetzes, welches den Schwangerschaftsabbruch als gesetzeswidrig, aber gleichzeitig straffrei einstuft.

Abundance for What?

by David Riesman

This classic collection of essays by David Riesman discusses the implications of affluence in America. Riesman maintains that the question that should be raised by wealth has shifted over time from how to obtain wealth to how to make use of it. Another key theme concerns issues relevant to higher education, such as academic freedom. Abundance for What? examines the notion that America is not as open a society as it may appear to be; it then shows how social science may be used to explain why this is so. And now in a brilliant, lengthy reevaluation Riesman both clarifies and revises that earlier assessment with unusual luster and candor., The volume begins with a group of essays that describe the impact of the Cold War. After warning against depending on a war economy, Riesman shifts the focus of discussion to a central characteristic of the Cold War epoch: the uses and abuses of abundance in expanding leisure time. Several essays deal with suburbs as the locale of abundance, while others study the place of the automobile in American life. Riesman describes the impact of American abundance on other nations. Among the many other subjects discussed in Abundance for What? are the education of women, generational shifts in attitudes, and a study of the national character., In his major new 100-page introduction, Riesman also relates the experiences that originally inspired him to write these essays. He then talks about the social and historical changes that have occurred since their publication. His synthesis of old Ideas with contemporary ones makes this a compelling volume. Abundance for What? continues to hold a significant place in the social and cultural critiques of contemporary America and will be of interest to historians, psychologists, educators, and urban policymakers alike.

The Abundant Community: Awakening the Power of Families and Neighborhoods

by Peter Block John Mcknight

" We need our neighbors and community to stay healthy, produce jobs, raise our children, and care for those on the margin. Institutions and professional services have reached their limit of their ability to help us. The consumer society tells us that we are insufficient and that we must purchase what we need from specialists and systems outside the community. We have become consumers and clients, not citizens and neighbors. John McKnight and Peter Block show that we have the capacity to find real and sustainable satisfaction right in our neighborhood and community. This book reports on voluntary, self-organizing structures that focus on gifts and value hospitality, the welcoming of strangers. It shows how to reweave our social fabric, especially in our neighborhoods. In this way we collectively have enough to create a future that works for all. "

The Abundant Community: Awakening the Power of Families and Neighborhoods

by Peter Block John Mcknight

There is a growing movement of people with a different vision for their local communities. They know that real satisfaction and the good life are not provided by organizations, institutions, or systems. No numbers of great CEOs, central offices, or long range plans produce what a community can produce. People are discovering a new possibility for their lives. They have a calling. They are called. And together they call upon themselves. This possibility is idealistic, and yet it is an ideal within our grasp. It is a possibility that is both idealistic and realistic. Our culture leads us to believe that a satisfying life can be purchased. It tells us that in the place where we live, we don't have the resources to create a good life. This book reminds us that a neighborhood that can raise a child, provide security, sustain our health, secure our income, and care for our vulnerable people is within the power of our community. This book gives voice to our ideal of a beloved community. It reminds us of our power to create a hope-filled life. It assures us that when we join together with our neighbors we are the architects of the future where we want to live.

Abuse and Neglect of the Elderly in India

by S. Irudaya Rajan Mala Kapur Shankardass

This book highlights different aspects of the problem of elder abuse and neglect in India, and discusses its forms as well as means of prevention, intervention and management. It presents a framework for understanding the occurrence of elder abuse and neglect in India, placing the discussion within the global context. Elder abuse and neglect is a growing concern in South Asia, and this is the first comprehensive account of the topic from India. It uses data from different parts of India to describe the various dimensions of elder abuse and neglect among different population categories and sections in society. Covering rural and urban areas in different states, it discusses current perspectives on elder abuse and neglect at the household level, widows, HIV-affected populations, and those residing in institutions. This book comprises views from experts in the field and is of interest to researchers and academics from the social and behavioural sciences, policy makers, and NGOs.

The Abuse of Minors in the Catholic Church: Dismantling the Culture of Cover Ups (Routledge Studies in Religion)

by Lluis Oviedo Anthony J. Blasi

This book offers an academically rigorous examination of the biological, psychological, social and ecclesiastical processes that allowed sexual abuse in the Catholic Church to happen and then be covered up. The collected essays provide a means to better assess systemic wrongdoing in religious institutions, so that they can be more effectively held to account. An international team of contributors apply a necessarily multi-disciplinary approach to this difficult subject. Chapters look closely at the sexual abuse of minors by Roman Catholic clerics, explaining the complexity of this issue, which cannot be reduced to simple misconduct, sexual deviation, or a management failure alone. The book will help the reader to better understand the social, organizational, and cultural processes in the Church over recent decades, as well as the intricate world of beliefs, moral rules, and behaviours. It concludes with some strategies for change at the individual and corporate levels that will better ensure safeguarding within the Catholic Church and its affiliate institutions. This multifaceted study gives a nuanced analysis of this huge organizational failure and offers recommendations for effective ways of preventing it in the future. As such, it will be of keen interest to scholars of Religious Studies, Sociology of Religion, Psychology, Psychiatry, Legal Studies, Ethics, Anthropology, Cultural Studies, History, and Theology.

Abused and Battered: Social and Legal Responses to Family Violence

by Dean D. Kundsen “ JoAnn L. Miller

That family violence injures and kills its victims both physically and psychologically was established over two decades ago by early researchers in this field. Abused and Battered heralds the second generation of domestic abuse research: it examines the implications of the legal and social responses to both victims and offenders by systematically addressing the intended and unintended consequences of programs and procedures designed to ameliorate the effects of spousal and child abuse. Contributors to this multidisciplinary volume represent the leading perspectives in public health, law and criminal justice, psychology, and sociology. They provide new and sophisticated insights regarding the etiology of the multiple forms of family abuse and they suggest innovative strategies for mitigating the anguish resulting from physical and emotional violence against adults and children within households. The results of this research will be of interest to students and practitioners in sociology, public health, psychology and family studies, and to clinicians and therapists who treat victims or offenders.

Abusing Religion: Literary Persecution, Sex Scandals, and American Minority Religions

by Megan Goodwin

Sex abuse happens in all communities, but American minority religions often face disproportionate allegations of sexual abuse. Why, in a country that consistently fails to acknowledge—much less address—the sexual abuse of women and children, do American religious outsiders so often face allegations of sexual misconduct? Why does the American public presume to know “what’s really going on” in minority religious communities? Why are sex abuse allegations such an effective way to discredit people on America’s religious margins? What makes Americans so willing, so eager to identify religion as the cause of sex abuse? Abusing Religion argues that sex abuse in minority religious communities is an American problem, not (merely) a religious one.

Academe Degree Zero: Reconsidering the Politics of Higher Education (Cultural Politics And The Promise Of Democracy Ser.)

by Jeffrey R. Di Leo

Academe Degree Zero brings together ten essays that identify and critically examine the key issues facing professionals in higher education today. These include the nature and limits of anonymity in academic discourse, the ways in which affiliation and prestige temper academic judgement, and the role of collegiality in academic life. Through numerous essays, edited books and journal issues, Jeffrey R. Di Leo's cross-disciplinary work has consistently been at the edge of current thinking and critical efforts to lay bare the reality of contemporary academic life. Academe Degree Zero provides a snapshot of academic identity and relations in a time of major technological and economic transformation and in the context of growing corporatisation of higher education.

Academic Bildung in Net-based Higher Education: Moving beyond learning (Routledge Research in Higher Education)

by Trine Fossland Helle Mathiasen Mariann Solberg

The explosive emergence of net-based learning in higher education brings with it new possibilities and constraints in teaching and learning environments.This edited collection considers how the concept of Academic Bildung - a term suggesting a personal educational process beyond actual educational learning - can be applied to net-based higher education. The book is drawing on Scandinavian research to address the topic from both a theoretical and practical standpoint.Chapters explore the facilitation of online courses and argue how and why universities should involve dimensions of Academic Bildung on both a strategic and technological pedagogical content level. The book is structured in three parts: Part I frames the current state of net-based learning and introduces Bildung as a concept; Part II contains a set of four case studies in Norway, Sweden and Denmark, also including a fifth study that looks at Scandinavian approaches to teaching and learning in comparison with data from the USA, the UK, Australia and Canada; Part III provides a synthesis of theories and cases to examine whether a Scandinavian orientation can be discerned. Contributions suggest that in order to address one of the fundamental functions of higher education, the ability to produce new knowledge, the Academic Bildung of the students has to be in focus. Grounded in theoretical and empirical discussion, this book will appeal to researchers and academics in the field of higher education as well as personnel who work with teaching and learning with technology, and academics interested in the question of Academic Bildung.

Academic Capitalism: Universities in the Global Struggle for Excellence (Routledge Advances in Sociology)

by Richard Münch

This book investigates the intensifying struggle for excellence between universities in a globalized academic field. The rise of the entrepreneurial university and academic capitalism are superimposing themselves on the competition of scientists for progress of knowledge and recognition by the scientific community. The result is a sharpening institutional stratification of the field. This stratification is produced and continuously reproduced by the intensified struggle for funds with the shrinking of block grants and the growing significance of competitive funding, as well as the increasing impact of international and national rankings on academic research and teaching. The increased allocation of funds on the basis of performance leads to overinvestment of resources at the small top and underinvestment for the broad mass of universities in the middle and lower ranks. There is a curvilinear inverted u-shaped relationship of investments and returns in terms of knowledge production. Paradoxically, the intrusion of the economic logic and measures of managerial controlling into the academic field imply increasing inefficiency in the allocation of resources to universities. The top institutions suffer from overinvestment, the rank-and-file institutions from underinvestment. The economic inefficiency is accompanied by a shrinking potential for renewal and open knowledge evolution.

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