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Barron's AP Computer Science A With Bonus Online Tests, 8th edition

by Roselyn Teukolsky

This best-selling guide from Barron's offers practical, proven test-taking strategies and preparation for the Advanced Placement test. This updated manual presents computer science test takers with:Three AP practice tests for the AP Computer Science A test, including a diagnostic testCharts detailing the scoring suggestions for each free-response questionAnswers and explanations for every test questionA subject review includes static variables, the List interface, enhanced for loops, the import statement, many questions on 2-dimensional arrays, and a detailed analysis of the binary search algorithm. The book reflects the fact that the ClassCastException and downcasting have been removed from the AP Java subset. The practice exams reflect the new free-response style used on recent AP exams.BONUS ONLINE PRACTICE TESTS: Students who purchase this book will also get FREE access to three additional full-length online AP Computer Science A tests with all questions answered and explained. These online exams can be easily accessed by smartphone, tablet, or computer.

Computability

by Nigel Cutland

What can computers do in principle? What are their inherent theoretical limitations? These are questions to which computer scientists must address themselves. The theoretical framework which enables such questions to be answered has been developed over the last fifty years from the idea of a computable function: intuitively a function whose values can be calculated in an effective or automatic way. This book is an introduction to computability theory (or recursion theory as it is traditionally known to mathematicians). Dr Cutland begins with a mathematical characterisation of computable functions using a simple idealised computer (a register machine); after some comparison with other characterisations, he develops the mathematical theory, including a full discussion of non-computability and undecidability, and the theory of recursive and recursively enumerable sets. The later chapters provide an introduction to more advanced topics such as Gildel's incompleteness theorem, degrees of unsolvability, the Recursion theorems and the theory of complexity of computation. Computability is thus a branch of mathematics which is of relevance also to computer scientists and philosophers. Mathematics students with no prior knowledge of the subject and computer science students who wish to supplement their practical expertise with some theoretical background will find this book of use and interest.

An Introduction to Information Theory: Symbols, Signals and Noise

by John R. Pierce

Behind the familiar surfaces of the telephone, radio, and television lies a sophisticated and intriguing body of knowledge known as information theory. This is the theory that has permeated the rapid development of all sorts of communication, from color television to the clear transmission of photographs from the vicinity of Jupiter. Even more revolutionary progress is expected in the future.To give a solid introduction to this burgeoning field, J. R. Pierce has revised his well-received 1961 study of information theory for an up-to-date second edition. Beginning with the origins of the field, Dr. Pierce follows the brilliant formulations of Claude Shannon and describes such aspects of the subject as encoding and binary digits, entropy. language and meaning, efficient encoding , and the noisy channel. He then goes beyond the strict confines of the topic to explore the ways in which information theory relates to physics, cybernetics, psychology, and art. Mathematical formulas are introduced at the appropriate points for the benefit of serious students. A glossary of terms and an appendix on mathematical notation are provided to help the less mathematically sophisticated.J. R. Pierce worked for many years at the Bell Telephone Laboratories, where he became Director of Research in Communications Principles. He is currently affiliated with the engineering department of the California Institute of Technology. While his background is impeccable, Dr. Pierce also possesses an engaging writing style that makes his book all the more welcome. An Introduction to Information Theory continues to be the most impressive non-technical account available and a fascinating introduction to the subject for laymen."An uncommonly good study. . . . Pierce's volume presents the most satisfying discussion to be found."- Scientific American.

"Raw Data" Is an Oxymoron

by Lisa Gitelman

We live in the era of Big Data, with storage and transmission capacity measured not just in terabytes but in petabytes (where peta- denotes a quadrillion, or a thousand trillion). Data collection is constant and even insidious, with every click and every "like" stored somewhere for something. This book reminds us that data is anything but "raw," that we shouldn't think of data as a natural resource but as a cultural one that needs to be generated, protected, and interpreted. The book's essays describe eight episodes in the history of data from the predigital to the digital. Together they address such issues as the ways that different kinds of data and different domains of inquiry are mutually defining; how data are variously "cooked" in the processes of their collection and use; and conflicts over what can -- or can't -- be "reduced" to data. Contributors discuss the intellectual history of data as a concept; describe early financial modeling and some unusual sources for astronomical data; discover the prehistory of the database in newspaper clippings and index cards; and consider contemporary "dataveillance" of our online habits as well as the complexity of scientific data curation. Essay authors:Geoffrey C. Bowker, Kevin R. Brine, Ellen Gruber Garvey, Lisa Gitelman, Steven J. Jackson, Virginia Jackson, Markus Krajewski, Mary Poovey, Rita Raley, David Ribes, Daniel Rosenberg, Matthew Stanley, Travis D. Williams

Telecommunication for Health Care (CRC Press Revivals)

by J.H.U. Brown

There are relatively few references in this volume. This occurs for two reasons. In the first place, the Federal government has sponsored most of the communication experiments in health care and many of the results are buried in government reports. Some of these have been included. Secondly, although very large projects have been initiated and some may set a pattern for future health care, they have not attracted merited attention.

Adaptive Technologies for Training and Education

by Paula J. Durlach Alan M. Lesgold

This edited volume provides an overview of the latest advancements in adaptive training technology. Intelligent tutoring has been deployed for well-defined and relatively static educational domains such as algebra and geometry. However, this adaptive approach to computer-based training has yet to come into wider usage for domains that are less well defined or where student-system interactions are less structured, such as during scenario-based simulation and immersive serious games. In order to address how to expand the reach of adaptive training technology to these domains, leading experts in the field present their work in areas such as student modeling, pedagogical strategy, knowledge assessment, natural language processing and virtual human agents. Several approaches to designing adaptive technology are discussed for both traditional educational settings and professional training domains. This book will appeal to anyone concerned with educational and training technology at a professional level, including researchers, training systems developers and designers.

Alan Turing: The Enigma

by Douglas Hofstadter Andrew Hodges

A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLERThe official book behind the Academy Award-winning film The Imitation Game, starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Keira KnightleyIt is only a slight exaggeration to say that the British mathematician Alan Turing (1912-1954) saved the Allies from the Nazis, invented the computer and artificial intelligence, and anticipated gay liberation by decades--all before his suicide at age forty-one. This New York Times-bestselling biography of the founder of computer science, with a new preface by the author that addresses Turing's royal pardon in 2013, is the definitive account of an extraordinary mind and life. Capturing both the inner and outer drama of Turing's life, Andrew Hodges tells how Turing's revolutionary idea of 1936--the concept of a universal machine--laid the foundation for the modern computer and how Turing brought the idea to practical realization in 1945 with his electronic design. The book also tells how this work was directly related to Turing's leading role in breaking the German Enigma ciphers during World War II, a scientific triumph that was critical to Allied victory in the Atlantic. At the same time, this is the tragic account of a man who, despite his wartime service, was eventually arrested, stripped of his security clearance, and forced to undergo a humiliating treatment program--all for trying to live honestly in a society that defined homosexuality as a crime. The inspiration for a major motion picture starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Keira Knightley, Alan Turing: The Enigma is a gripping story of mathematics, computers, cryptography, and homosexual persecution.

Alan Turing: The Enigma

by Douglas Hofstadter Andrew Hodges

It is only a slight exaggeration to say that the British mathematician Alan Turing (1912-1954) saved the Allies from the Nazis, invented the computer and artificial intelligence, and anticipated gay liberation by decades--all before his suicide at age forty-one. <P> This acclaimed biography of the founder of computer science, with a new preface by the author that addresses Turing's royal pardon in 2013, is the definitive account of an extraordinary mind and life. Capturing both the inner and outer drama of Turing's life, Andrew Hodges tells how Turing's revolutionary idea of 1936--the concept of a universal machine--laid the foundation for the modern computer and how Turing brought the idea to practical realization in 1945 with his electronic design. The book also tells how this work was directly related to Turing's leading role in breaking the German Enigma ciphers during World War II, a scientific triumph that was critical to Allied victory in the Atlantic. At the same time, this is the tragic account of a man who, despite his wartime service, was eventually arrested, stripped of his security clearance, and forced to undergo a humiliating treatment program--all for trying to live honestly in a society that defined homosexuality as a crime. <P> The inspiration for a major motion picture starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Keira Knightley, Alan Turing: The Enigma is a gripping story of mathematics, computers, cryptography, and homosexual persecution.

Alan Turing: The Enigma (The Centenary Edition)

by Andrew Hodges

It is only a slight exaggeration to say that the British mathematician Alan Turing (1912-1954) saved the Allies from the Nazis, invented the computer and artificial intelligence, and anticipated gay liberation by decades--all before his suicide at age forty-one. This classic biography of the founder of computer science, reissued on the centenary of his birth with a substantial new preface by the author, is the definitive account of an extraordinary mind and life. A gripping story of mathematics, computers, cryptography, and homosexual persecution, Andrew Hodges's acclaimed book captures both the inner and outer drama of Turing's life. Hodges tells how Turing's revolutionary idea of 1936--the concept of a universal machine--laid the foundation for the modern computer and how Turing brought the idea to practical realization in 1945 with his electronic design. The book also tells how this work was directly related to Turing's leading role in breaking the German Enigma ciphers during World War II, a scientific triumph that was critical to Allied victory in the Atlantic. At the same time, this is the tragic story of a man who, despite his wartime service, was eventually arrested, stripped of his security clearance, and forced to undergo a humiliating treatment program--all for trying to live honestly in a society that defined homosexuality as a crime.

Making Democracy Fun

by Josh Lerner

Anyone who has ever been to a public hearing or community meeting would agree that participatory democracy can be boring. Hours of repetitive presentations, alternatingly alarmist or complacent, for or against, accompanied by constant heckling, often with no clear outcome or decision. Is this the best democracy can offer? In Making Democracy Fun, Josh Lerner offers a novel solution for the sad state of our deliberative democracy: the power of good game design. What if public meetings featured competition and collaboration (such as team challenges), clear rules (presented and modeled in multiple ways), measurable progress (such as scores and levels), and engaging sounds and visuals? These game mechanics would make meetings more effective and more enjoyable -- even fun. Lerner reports that institutions as diverse as the United Nations, the U.S. Army, and grassroots community groups are already using games and game-like processes to encourage participation. Drawing on more than a decade of practical experience and extensive research, he explains how games have been integrated into a variety of public programs in North and South America. He offers rich stories of game techniques in action, in children's councils, social service programs, and participatory budgeting and planning. With these real-world examples in mind, Lerner describes five kinds of games and twenty-six game mechanics that are especially relevant for democracy. He finds that when governments and organizations use games and design their programs to be more like games, public participation becomes more attractive, effective, and transparent. Game design can make democracy fun -- and make it work.

Mind at Play: The Psychology of Video Games

by Geoffrey. R. Loftus Elizabeth F. Loftus

Examines the psychological processes involved in playing video games, discusses behavior problems frequent players can develop, and compares video games to other fads of the past.

Modern Warfare, Intelligence and Deterrence

by Benjamin Sutherland

The Panzerfaust-3, a German shoulder-fired heat-seeking antitank missile, can punch through a metre of solid steel-far more than any armoured vehicle could carry. The MPR-500, an Israeli precision bomb, can hammer through several storeys of a building and explode on a chosen floor. These and myriad other military and intelligences technologies are changing the world. This Economist book describes these emerging technologies and places them in the larger context of today's politics, diplomacy, business and social issues. It shows how efforts to win wars or keep the peace are driving enormous and multifold technological advances. Broadly speaking, defence technologies will continue to provide enormous advantages to advanced, Western armed forces. The book is organised into five parts: land and sea, air and space, the computer factor, intelligence and spycraft, and the road ahead, which examines the coming challenges for western armies, such as new wars against insurgents operating out of civilian areas. Comprising a selection of the best writing on the subject from the Economist, each part has an introduction linking the technological developments to political, diplomatic, business and other civilian matters. For anyone who wants to know just how smart the global war, defence and intelligence machine is, this will be revealing and fascinating reading.

Programming Microsoft® .NET

by Jeff Prosise

The Microsoft .NET initiative builds on industry standards to make interoperable software services available anywhere, on any device, over the Internet. Behind the initiative is the Microsoft .NET Framework, which combines a managed run-time environment with one of the richest class libraries ever invented to make building and deploying Web-enabled applications easier than ever. Find out how to leverage the full power of the .NET Framework with this definitive, one-stop resource, wri tten by a leading authority in his trademark easy-to-follow, conversational style. You'll learn about the key programming models embodied in the .NET Framework, including Windows® Forms, Web Forms, and XML Web services. And you'll benefit from a wealth of how-to examples, code samples, and complete working programs in C#. Topics covered in this guide include: Hello, .NET Types and Exceptions The .NET Framework Class Library Windows Forms Web Forms Web Controls User Controls Custom Controls Web Applications Microsoft ASP.NET Security XML Web Services Microsoft ADO.NET XML Multithreading Remoting CD-ROM FEATURES: A fully searchable electronic version of the book Source code for more than 60 complete sample programs and components written in C# The Microsoft .NET Framework SDK, plus Service Pack 1 A Note Regarding the CD or DVD The print version of this book ships with a CD or DVD. For those customers purchasing one of the digital formats in which this book is available, we are pleased to offer the CD/DVD content as a free download via O'Reilly Media's Digital Distribution services. To download this content, please visit O'Reilly's web site, search for the title of this book to find its catalog page, and click on the link below the cover image (Examples, Companion Content, or Practice Files). Note that while we provide as much of the media content as we are able via free download, we are sometimes limited by licensing restrictions. Please direct any questions or concerns to booktech@oreilly.com.

The Rise of the Computer State

by David Burnham

The Rise of the Computer State is a comprehensive examination of the ways that computers and massive databases are enabling the nation's corporations and law enforcement agencies to steadily erode our privacy and manipulate and control the American people. This book was written in 1983 as a warning. Today it is a history. Most of its grim scenarios are now part of everyday life. The remedy proposed here, greater public oversight of industry and government, has not occurred, but a better one has not yet been found. While many individuals have willingly surrendered much of their privacy and all of us have lost some of it, the right to keep what remains is still worth protecting.

Artificial Intelligence (2nd edition)

by Patrick H. Winston

This is an eagerly awaited revision of the single bestselling introduction to Artificial Intelligence ever published. It retains the best features of the earlier works including superior readability, currency, and excellence in the selection of the examples.

The Berenstain Bears and Too Much TV (First Time Books(R))

by Stan Berenstain Jan Berenstain

Come for a visit in Bear Country with this classic First Time Book® from Stan and Jan Berenstain. Papa, Brother, and Sister have a new favorite hobby . . . watching TV. But when Mama feels like they are missing out on all the wonderful things around them, she makes a plan to get them away from the TV and into the outdoors. This beloved story is a perfect way to teach children that there can be too much of a good thing.

The Computer Nut

by Betsy Byars

Ten-year-old Kate begins a communication exchange on a computer with someone purporting to be from outer space, who says he is going to pay a visit to Earth soon.

Solving Enterprise Applications Performance Puzzles

by Leonid Grinshpan

Poorly performing enterprise applications are the weakest links in a corporation's management chain, causing delays and disruptions of critical business functions. This groundbreaking book frames enterprise application performance engineering not as an art but as applied science built on model-based methodological foundation. The book introduces queuing models of enterprise application that visualize, demystify, explain, and solve system performance issues. Analysis of these models will help to discover and clarify unapparent connections and correlations among workloads, hardware architecture, and software parameters.

Windows® 7 Plain & Simple

by Jerry Joyce Marianne Moon

Get the fast facts that make learning Windows 7 plain and simple! This no-nonsense guide uses easy, numbered steps and concise, straightforward language to show the most expedient way to perform tasks and solve problems in Windows 7. Here's what you'll learn to do: Run programs, control gadgets, play games. Send e-mail, browse the Web, and share your files. Organize your digital media, including photos, music, and videos. Burn CDs and DVDs; make your own movies. Set up your printer and a simple home network. Manage security settings and perform easy tune-ups and fixes. Here's how you'll learn it: Jump in wherever you need answers. Easy-to-follow steps and screenshots show you exactly what to do. Handy tips teach you new techniques and shortcuts. Quick TRY THIS! exercises help you apply what you've learned right away. offer the CD/DVD content as a free download via OReilly Medias Digital Distribution services. To download this content, please visit OReillys web site, search for the title of this book to find its catalog page, and click on the link below the cover image (Examples, Companion Content, or Practice Files). Note that while we provide as much of the media content as we are able via free download, we are sometimes limited by licensing restrictions. Please direct any questions or concerns to booktech@oreilly.com.

Can Animals And Machines Be Persons?: A Dialogue

by Justin Leiber

"This is a dialogue about the notion of a person, of an entity that thinks and feels and acts, that counts and is accountable. Equivalently, it's about the intentional idiom --the well-knit fabric of terms that we use to characterize persons. Human beings are usually persons (a brain-dead human might be considered a human but not a person). However, there may be persons, in various senses, that are not human beings. Much recent discussion has focused on hypothetical computer-robots and on actual nonhuman great apes. The discussion here is naturalistic, which is to say that count and accountability are, at least initially, presumed to be naturally well-knit with the possession of a cognitive and affective life. " --Justin Leiber, from the Introduction

The Future Was Here: The Commodore Amiga

by Jimmy Maher

Long ago, in 1985, personal computers came in two general categories: the friendly, childish game machine used for fun (exemplified by Atari and Commodore products); and the boring, beige adult box used for business (exemplified by products from IBM). The game machines became fascinating technical and artistic platforms that were of limited real-world utility. The IBM products were all utility, with little emphasis on aesthetics and no emphasis on fun. Into this bifurcated computing environment came the Commodore Amiga 1000. This personal computer featured a palette of 4,096 colors, unprecedented animation capabilities, four-channel stereo sound, the capacity to run multiple applications simultaneously, a graphical user interface, and powerful processing potential. It was, Jimmy Maher writes in The Future Was Here, the world's first true multimedia personal computer. Maher argues that the Amiga's capacity to store and display color photographs, manipulate video (giving amateurs access to professional tools), and use recordings of real-world sound were the seeds of the digital media future: digital cameras, Photoshop, MP3 players, and even YouTube, Flickr, and the blogosphere. He examines different facets of the platform--from Deluxe Paint to AmigaOS to Cinemaware--in each chapter, creating a portrait of the platform and the communities of practice that surrounded it. Of course, Maher acknowledges, the Amiga was not perfect: the DOS component of the operating systems was clunky and ill-matched, for example, and crashes often accompanied multitasking attempts. And Commodore went bankrupt in 1994. But for a few years, the Amiga's technical qualities were harnessed by engineers, programmers, artists, and others to push back boundaries and transform the culture of computing.

Introduction to Artificial Intelligence (Dover Books on Mathematics)

by Philip C. Jackson Jr.

Can computers think? Can they use reason to develop their own concepts, solve complex problems, play games, understand our languages? This comprehensive survey of artificial intelligence ― the study of how computers can be made to act intelligently ― explores these and other fascinating questions. Introduction to Artificial Intelligence presents an introduction to the science of reasoning processes in computers, and the research approaches and results of the past two decades. You'll find lucid, easy-to-read coverage of problem-solving methods, representation and models, game playing, automated understanding of natural languages, heuristic search theory, robot systems, heuristic scene analysis and specific artificial-intelligence accomplishments. Related subjects are also included: predicate-calculus theorem proving, machine architecture, psychological simulation, automatic programming, novel software techniques, industrial automation and much more.A supplementary section updates the original book with major research from the decade 1974-1984. Abundant illustrations, diagrams and photographs enhance the text, and challenging practice exercises at the end of each chapter test the student's grasp of each subject.The combination of introductory and advanced material makes Introduction to Artificial Intelligence ideal for both the layman and the student of mathematics and computer science. For anyone interested in the nature of thought, it will inspire visions of what computer technology might produce tomorrow.

Performance Evaluation Software

by Serdar Korukoglu Bahadir Karasulu

Performance Evaluation Software: Moving Object Detection and Tracking in Videos introduces a software approach for the real-time evaluation and performance comparison of the methods specializing in moving object detection and/or tracking (D&T) in video processing. Digital video content analysis is an important item for multimedia content-based indexing (MCBI), content-based video retrieval (CBVR) and visual surveillance systems. There are some frequently-used generic algorithms for video object D&T in the literature, such as Background Subtraction (BS), Continuously Adaptive Mean-shift (CMS), Optical Flow (OF), etc. An important problem for performance evaluation is the absence of any stable and flexible software for comparison of different algorithms. In this frame, we have designed and implemented the software for comparing and evaluating the well-known video object D&T algorithms on the same platform. This software is able to compare them with the same metrics in real-time and on the same platform. It also works as an automatic and/or semi-automatic test environment in real-time, which uses the image and video processing essentials, e.g. morphological operations and filters, and ground-truth (GT) XML data files, charting/plotting capabilities, etc. Along with the comprehensive literature survey of the abovementioned video object D&T algorithms, this book also covers the technical details of our performance benchmark software as well as a case study on people D&T for the functionality of the software.

Short Season

by Scott Eller

[from the back cover] "Striking Out For Brad, it's always been great having an older brother like Dean--to play stickball with, to have as a buddy or just to talk to. And on the baseball field, Dean's golden glove and Brad's hitting eye can't be beat. They're more than brothers--they're a team. But Dean's been acting different lately, and Brad doesn't know why. He hardly talks to Brad anymore--all of a sudden he's just too busy. Things are bad enough, but the league play-offs are coming up, and Brad doesn't have Dean to cover for him in the outfield anymore. Brad's spent his life being part of a team--can he really make it on his own?"

Compilers: Principles, Techniques, and Tools

by Alfred V. Aho Ravi Sethi Jeffrey D. Ullman

The authors present updated coverage of compilers based on research and techniques that have been developed in the field over the past few years.

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