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Showing 10,101 through 10,125 of 13,043 results

Reconstructing America (A History of Us #7)

by Joy Hakim

Covering a time of great hope and incredible change, Reconstruction and Reform is a dramatic look at life after the Civil War in the newly re-United States. Railroad tycoons were roaring across the country. New cities sprang up across the plains, and a new and different American West came into being: a land of farmers, ranchers, miners, and city dwellers. Back East, large scale immigration was also going on, but not all Americans wanted newcomers in the country. Technology moved forward: Thomas Edison lit up the world with his electric light. And social justice was on everyone's mind with Carry Nation wielding a hatchet in her battle against drunkenness and Booker T. Washington and W. E. B. DuBois counseling newly freed African Americans to behave in very different ways. Through it all, the reunited nation struggles to keep the promises of freedom in this exciting chapter in the A History of US. This text is listed as an example that meets Common Core Standards in English language arts in grades 4-5 at http://www.corestandards.org.]

The Recording Engineer's Handbook (2nd edition)

by Bobby Owsinski

Working as a recording engineer presents challenges from every direction of your project. From using microphones to deciding on EQ settings, choosing outboard gear to understanding how, when and why to process your signal, the seemingly never-ending choices can be very confusing. Professional Audio's bestselling author Bobby Owsinski (The Mixing Engineer's Handbook, The Mastering Engineer's Handbook) takes you into the tracking process for all manner of instruments and vocals-- providing you with the knowledge and skill to make sense of the many choices you have in any given project. From acoustic to electronic instruments, mic placement to EQ settings, everything you need to know to capture professionally recorded audio tracks is in this guide.

Recreating Japanese Women, 1600-1945

by Gail L. Bernstein

In thirteen wide-ranging essays, scholars and students of Asian and women's studies will find a vivid exploration of how female roles and feminine identity have evolved over 350 years, from the Tokugawa era to the end of World War II. Starting from the premise that gender is not a biological given, but is socially constructed and culturally transmitted, the authors describe the forces of change in the construction of female gender and explore the gap between the ideal of womanhood and the reality of Japanese women's lives. Most of all, the contributors speak to the diversity that has characterized women's experience in Japan. This is an imaginative, pioneering work, offering an interdisciplinary approach that will encourage a reconsideration of the paradigms of women's history, hitherto rooted in the Western experience.

Red Lines, Black Spaces: The Politics of Race and Space in a Black Middle-class Suburb

by Bruce D. Haynes

Red Lines, Black Spaces is a case study of Nepperhan-Runyon Heights, one of the first middle-class black suburbs in the New York metropolitan region. Runyon Heights is nestled in the northeast section of Yonkers, New York, on the banks of the Hudson River, in the southwest corner of Westchester County, just north of New York City.

Redeeming Economics: Rediscovering The Missing Element

by John D. Mueller

The thesis of this book is straightforward. The most important element in economics is missing, and its rediscovery is priming a revolution the likes of which has occurred only three times in more than 750 years. The Scholastic economics of Thomas Aquinas was comprised of four key elements: the theory of production, or how much gets produced; the theory of justice in exchange, or how one is compensated through the sale of goods for contributing to production; the theory of final distribution, or who gets to consume goods; and the theory of consumption (utility), or which goods people prefer to consume, according to Mueller (director of the Economics and Ethics Program at the Ethics and Public Policy Center, self-described as "Washington, D. C. 's premier institute dedicated to applying the Judeo-Christian moral tradition to critical issues of public policy," and president of a firm specializing in economic forecasting and policy analysis). His central argument in this text is that the oversimplification of Scholastic economics that began with Adam Smith's limiting economics to merely production and exchange and then partially corrected by the neoclassicists reincorporation of the theory of utility needs to be brought full circle by reintroducing the theory of final distribution. His goal then in this wide-ranging work is to describe for the general reader what bringing the theory of final distribution back into consideration would mean for economic theory and particularly for its practical applications. Annotation ©2011 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Redesigning Social Inquiry: Fuzzy Sets and Beyond

by Charles C. Ragin

For over twenty years Charles C. Ragin has been at the forefront of the development of innovative methods for social scientists. In Redesigning Social Inquiry, he continues his campaign to revitalize the field, challenging major aspects of the conventional template for social science research while offering a clear alternative. Redesigning Social Inquiry provides a substantive critique of the standard approach to social research- namely, assessing the relative importance of causal variables drawn from competing theories. Instead, Ragin proposes the use of set-theoretic methods to find a middle path between quantitative and qualitative research. Through a series of contrasts between fuzzy-set analysis and conventional quantitative research, Ragin demonstrates the capacity for set-theoretic methods to strengthen connections between qualitative researchers' deep knowledge of their cases and quantitative researchers' elaboration of cross-case patterns. Packed with useful examples,Redesigning Social Inquiry will be indispensable to experienced professionals and to budding scholars about to embark on their first project.

Reds or Rackets? The Making of Radical and Conservative Unions on the Waterfront

by Howard Kimeldorf

Why is the American working class different? For generations, scholars and activists alike have wrestled with this question, with an eye to explaining why workers in the United States are not more like their radicalized European counterparts. Approaching the question from a different angle, Reds or Rackets? provides a fascinating examination of the American labor movement from the inside out, as it were, by analyzing the divergent sources of radicalism and conservatism within it. Kimeldorf focuses on the political contrast between East and West Coast longshoremen from World War I through the early years of the Cold War, when the difference between the two unions was greatest. He explores the politics of the West Coast union that developed into a hot bed of working class insurgency and contrasts it with the conservative and racket-ridden East Coast longshoreman's union. Two unions, based in the same industry-- as different as night and day. The question posed by Kimeldorf is, why? Why "reds" on one coast and racketeers on the other? To answer this question Kimeldorf provides a systematic comparison of the two unions, illuminating the political consequences of occupational recruitment, industry structure, mobilization strategies, and industrial conflict during this period. In doing so, Reds or Rackets? sheds new light on the structural and historical bases of radical and conservative unionism. More than a comparative study of two unions, Reds or Rackets? is an exploration of the dynamics of trade unionism, sources of membership loyalty, and neglected aspects of working class consciousness. It is an incisive and valuable study that will appeal to historians, social scientists, and anyone interested in understanding the political trajectory of twentieth-century American labor.

Reduplication: Doubling in Morphology

by Sharon Inkelas Cheryl Zoll

This groundbreaking new study takes a novel approach to reduplication, a phenomenon whereby languages use repetition to create new words. Sharon Inkelas and Cheryl Zoll argue that the driving force in reduplication is identity at the morphosyntactic, not the phonological level, and present a new model of reduplication - Morphological Doubling Theory - that derives the full range of reduplication patterns. This approach shifts the focus away from the relatively small number of cases of phonological overapplication and underapplication, which have played a major role in earlier studies, to the larger class of cases where base and reduplicant diverge phonologically. The authors conclude by arguing for a theoretical shift in phonology, which entails more attention to word structure. As well as presenting the authors' pioneering work, this book also provides a much-needed overview of reduplication, the study of which has become one of the most contentious in modern phonological theory.

Reflections: California: A Changing State

by Priscilla H. Porter

Social studies textbook about the history and geography of California.

Reflections on Learning

by John W. Santrock

This book covers the many ways people learn.

Reflections on the Heartland (Unit 5 America's Heartland)

by Wright Group

This is an academic text for elementary-aged students.

Reflections on the Revolution in France

by Edmund Burke Frank M. Turner

This new and up-to-date edition of a book that has been central to political philosophy, history, and revolutionary thought for two hundred years offers readers a dire warning of the consequences that follow the mismanagement of change. Written for a generation presented with challenges of terrible proportions--the Industrial, American, and French Revolutions, to name the most obvious--Burke's Reflections of the Revolution in France displays an acute awareness of how high political stakes can be, as well as a keen ability to set contemporary problems within a wider context of political theory.

Reflections on the University of California: From the Free Speech Movement to the Global University

by Neil J. Smelser

Neil J. Smelser, who spent thirty-six distinguished years as a professor of sociology at the University of California, Berkeley, sheds new light on a full range of the issues that dominated virtually all institutions of higher learning during the second half of the twentieth century.

Reflections: Our Communities

by Priscilla H. Porter

This book comprises 6 units of 12 chapters and the contents include: Our Geography (Physical and Human Geography; People and their Environment), American Indians (the Land and the First People; California Indians Today), Community History (How Communities Began; Building Communities) Government and Citizenship (the United States Government; Citizenship), Standing United (America's Cherished Ideals; Securing Our Freedoms) and Understanding Economics (Workers and Consumers; Costs and Benefits).

Reflections: People We Know (California Series)

by Harcourt School Publishers

The book is full of beautifully illustrated stories and is in a simple language. The book is for beginning readers. The biggest bonus in this book is cover-to-cover full-color presentation coupled with discussion questions at the end of each story unit.

Reflections (Read On! Go Book IA)

by Harcourt Achieve

20 short stories designed to increase reading comprehension.

Reflections: The United States Making A New Nation, California Series

by Harcourt

This text book contains unit lessons on The First Americans, Cultures Meet, Settling the Colonies, The American Revolution, Governing the Nation and Western Expansion. Skills, Maps, Time Lines, etc are some of the additional features of the book.

Reflexive Democracy: Political Equality and the Welfare State

by Kevin Olson

Since the Reagan and Thatcher revolutions of the 1980s, there has been little consensus on what welfare ought to do or how it ought to function. At the same time, post-Wall continental Europe searches for a "third way" between state-planned socialism and laissez-faire capitalism. In Reflexive Democracy, Kevin Olson takes on this contemporary conceptual crisis. He calls for a "political turn" in considerations of the welfare state, arguing that it should no longer be understood in primarily economic terms--as a redistributive and regulatory mechanism--but in political terms, as a means of living up to deep-seated values of political equality. Drawing on arguments by T. H. Marshall and Jurgen Habermas, Olson proposes a conception of political equality as the normative basis of the welfare state. He argues that there are inextricable connections between democracy and welfare: the welfare state both promotes political equality and depends on it for its own political legitimacy. The paradox of political equality as a precondition for political equality is best solved, Olson argues, by guaranteeing citizens the means for equal participation. This is a reflexive conception of democracy, in which democratic politics circles back to sustain the conditions of equality that make it possible. This view, Olson writes, is meant not to replace traditional economic concerns but to reveal deep interconnections between democratic equality and economic justice. It counters paternalistic ideas of welfare reform by focusing on citizen participation. This conception moves beyond simple equality in the possession of goods and resources to propose a rich, materially grounded conception of democratic equality.

The Reformation of the English Parish Church

by Robert Whiting

In the sixteenth century, the people of England witnessed the physical transformation of their most valued buildings: their parish churches. This is the first ever full-scale investigation of the dramatic changes experienced by the English parish church during the English Reformation. By drawing on a wealth of documentary evidence, including court records, wills and church wardens' accounts, and by examining the material remains themselves such as screens, fonts, paintings, monuments, windows and other artefacts found in churches today, Robert Whiting reveals how, why and by whom these ancient buildings were transformed. He explores the reasons why Catholics revered the artefacts found in churches as well as why these objects became the subject of Protestant suspicion and hatred in subsequent years. This richly illustrated account sheds new light on the acts of destruction as well as the acts of creation that accompanied religious change over the course of the 'long' Reformation.

A Reformation Reader: Primary Texts with Introductions

by Denis R. Janz

* More than 100 carefully edited primary Refomation documents *Key theological writings from Luther, Calvin, Zwingli, and more * Companion Web site features professor-and student-friendly resources

Reforming Liberalism: J. S. Mill's Use of Ancient, Religious, Liberal, and Romantic Moralities

by Robert Devigne

Robert Devigne challenges prevailing interpretations of the political and moral thought of John Stuart Mill and the theoretical underpinnings of modern liberal philosophy. He explains how Mill drew from ancient and romantic thought as well as past religious practices to reconcile conflicts and antinomies (liberty and virtue, self-interest and morality, equality and human excellence) that were hobbling traditional liberalism. The book shows that Mill, regarded as a seminal writer in the liberal tradition, critiques liberalism's weaknesses with a forcefulness usually associated with its well-known critics. Devigne explores Mill's writings to demonstrate how his thought has been misconstrued--as well as oversimplified--to the detriment of our understanding of liberalism itself.

Reforming The North: The Kingdoms and Churches of Scandinavia, 1520-1545

by James L. Larson

The turbulence of the Protestant Reformation marks a turning point in European history, but the Scandinavian contribution to this revolution is not well known outside the Northern world. Reforming the North focuses on twenty-five years (1520-1545 A.D.) of this history, during which Scandinavians terminated the medieval Union of Kalmar, toppled the Catholic Church, ended the commercial dominance of the German Hanse, and laid the foundations for centralized states on the ruins of old institutions and organizations. This book traces the chaotic and often violent transfer of resources and authority from the decentralized structures of medieval societies to the early modern states and their territorial churches. Religious reform is regarded as an essential element in the process - in the context of social unrest, political conflict, and long-term changes in finance, trade, and warfare. Reforming the North offers a broad perspective on this turbulent period and on the implications of the Protestant Reformation for Northern history.

Reforming Suburbia: The Planned Communities of Irvine, Columbia, and the Woodlands

by Ann Forsyth

The "new community" movement of the 1960s and 1970s attempted a grand experiment in housing. This book examines the results of those experiments in three of the most successful new communities: Irvine Ranch in Southern California, Columbia in Maryland, and The Woodlands in the suburbs of Houston, Texas. Based on new research and interviews with developers, designers, and residents, Ann Forsyth traces the evolution, the successes, and the shortcomings of these experiments in urban innovation.

Showing 10,101 through 10,125 of 13,043 results

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