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Where the Boys Are: Cinemas of Masculinity and Youth

by Murray Pomerance Frances Gateward

A provocative, contemporary anthology examining the construction of boys' identity in modern cinema.

Where the Girls Are: Growing Up Female with the Mass Media

by Susan J. Douglas

In this insightful study of how the American media has portrayed women over the past 50 years, Douglas (Inventing American Broadcasting: 1899-1922) considers the paradox of a generation of women raised to see themselves as bimbos becoming the very group that found its voice in feminism. Modern American women, she suggests, have been fed so many conflicting images of their desires, aspirations and relationships with men, families and one another that they are veritable cultural schizophrenics, uncertain of what they want and what society expects of them. A single image--Diana Ross of the Supremes, for example, or Gidget from the popular sitcom--can send mixed signals, Douglas shows, at once affirming a woman's right to a voice and cautioning her not to go too far. Thus the media is often both a liberating and an oppressive force. Douglas is particularly attentive to the ways pop culture's messages have responded to shifting social and economic imperatives, including the feminist movement itself. While she asserts that pop culture can have a profound impact on one's self-perceptions, she also stresses that women, by the example of their own lives, have changed--mostly for the better--the way the media represents them.

Where the Heart Beats: John Cage, Zen Buddhism, and the Inner Life of Artists

by Kay Larson

A “heroic” and “fascinating” biography of John Cage showing how his work, and that of countless American artists, was transformed by Zen Buddhism (The New York Times) Where the Heart Beats is the story of the tremendous changes sweeping through American culture following the Second World War, a time when the arts in America broke away from centuries of tradition and reinvented themselves. Painters converted their canvases into arenas for action and gesture, dancers embraced pure movement over narrative, performance artists staged “happenings” in which anything could happen, poets wrote words determined by chance. In this tumultuous period, a composer of experimental music began a spiritual quest to know himself better. His earnest inquiry touched thousands of lives and created controversies that are ongoing. He devised unique concerts—consisting of notes chosen by chance, randomly tuned radios, and silence—in the service of his absolute conviction that art and life are one inseparable truth, a seamless web of creation divided only by illusory thoughts. What empowered John Cage to compose his incredible music—and what allowed him to inspire tremendous transformations in the lives of his fellow artists—was Cage’s improbable conversion to Zen Buddhism. This is the story of how Zen saved Cage from himself. Where the Heart Beats is the first book to address the phenomenal importance of Zen Buddhism to John Cage’s life and to the artistic avant-garde of the 1950s and 1960s. Zen’s power to transform Cage’s troubled mind—by showing him his own enlightened nature—liberated Cage from an acute personal crisis that threatened everything he most deeply cared abouthis life, his music, and his relationship with his life partner, Merce Cunningham. Caught in a society that rejected his art, his politics, and his sexual orientation, Cage was transformed by Zen from an overlooked and marginal musician into the absolute epicenter of the avant-garde. Using Cage’s life as a starting point, Where the Heart Beats looks beyond to the individuals Cage influenced and the art he inspired. His creative genius touched Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns, Andy Warhol, Yoko Ono, Alan Kaprow, Morton Feldman, and Leo Castelli, who all went on to revolutionize their respective disciplines. As Cage’s story progresses, as his collaborators’ trajectories unfurl, Where the Heart Beats shows the blossoming of Zen in the very heart of American culture. .

Where the Light Gets In: Losing My Mother Only to Find Her Again

by Michael J. Fox Kimberly Williams-Paisley

Many know Kimberly Williams-Paisley as the bride in the popular Steve Martin remakes of the Father of the Bride movies, the calculating Peggy Kenter on Nashville, or the wife of country music artist, Brad Paisley. But behind the scenes, Kim was dealing with a tragic secret: her mother, Linda, was suffering from a rare form of dementia that slowly crippled her ability to talk, write and eventually recognize people in her own family. Where the Light Gets In tells the full story of Linda's illness--called primary progressive aphasia--from her early-onset diagnosis at the age of 62 through the present day. Kim draws a candid picture of the ways her family reacted for better and worse, and how she, her father and two siblings educated themselves, tried to let go of shame and secrecy, made mistakes, and found unexpected humor and grace in the midst of suffering. Ultimately the bonds of family were strengthened, and Kim learned ways to love and accept the woman her mother became. With a moving foreword by actor and advocate Michael J. Fox, Where the Light Gets In is a heartwarming tribute to the often fragile yet unbreakable relationships we have with our mothers.

Where Truth Lies: Digital Culture and Documentary Media after 9/11

by Kris Fallon

A free open access ebook is available upon publication. Learn more at www.luminosoa.org. This boldly original book traces the evolution of documentary film and photography as they migrated onto digital platforms during the first decades of the twenty-first century. Kris Fallon examines the emergence of several key media forms—social networking and crowdsourcing, video games and virtual environments, big data and data visualization—and demonstrates the formative influence of political conflict and the documentary film tradition on their evolution and cultural integration. Focusing on particular moments of political rupture, Fallon argues that the ideological rifts of the period inspired the adoption and adaptation of newly available technologies to encourage social mobilization and political action, a function performed for much of the previous century by independent documentary film. Positioning documentary film and digital media side by side in the political sphere, Fallon asserts that "truth" now lies in a new set of media forms and discursive practices that implicitly shape the documentation of everything from widespread cultural spectacles like wars and presidential elections to more invisible or isolated phenomena like the Abu Ghraib torture scandal or the "fake news" debates of 2016.

Where Was I?!: The World According To Wogan

by Terry Wogan

Unadulterated Wogan - the voice of sanity in a world gone gently mad.Until recently, eight million people improved their mornings by tuning into Terry's words of wisdom on Wake up to Wogan. But was their appetite sated by this daily exposure? Not in the slightest. So it's lucky that Terry has been known to turn his hand to the odd bit of writing. This has allowed him to shed light on such weighty matters as how to survive a wedding, what Bank Holidays are for, why Eurovision could be responsible for the Celtic Tiger, whether we should watch out for potatoes, and where exactly it all went pear-shaped... WHERE WAS I? gives his devoted followers exactly what they want - the unadulterated, inimitable Wogan viewpoint; a droll, forthright voice of sanity in a world gone gently mad (or is it them?). Like his broadcasting, his writing is an effortless flow of easy wit and sage opinion. WHERE WAS I? builds up a picture not only of Terry's world, but of Terry himself - a man who somehow manages to be off the wall and on the money all at the same time.

Where we Came In: Seventy Years of the British Film Industry (Routledge Library Editions: Cinema)

by Charles Allen Oakley

Originally published in 1964, this book tells the history of the British cinematograph industry for the first time. It describes moments of splendid triumph and others of shattering failure. The mood switches from reckless optimism to demoralising pessimism, from years in which British films won the highest international awards to those when they were dismissed with scorn. It recalls a score of productions still ranked among the world's best, and the stars whose reputation was established in them. Attention is focused on the directors, those who kept to the fore during two and three decades and those with only one major success to their name. Behind them the men are identified who strove, often to their considerable financial loss, to gain a worthy place for British films in the world’s markets.

Which Lie Did I Tell?

by William Goldman

From the Oscar-winning screenwriter of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and The Princess Bride (he also wrote the novel), and the bestselling author of Adventures in the Screen Trade comes a garrulous new book that is as much a screenwriting how-to (and how-not-to) manual as it is a feast of insider information.If you want to know why a no-name like Kathy Bates was cast in Misery-it's in here. Or why Linda Hunt's brilliant work in Maverick didn't make the final cut-William Goldman gives you the straight truth. Why Clint Eastwood loves working with Gene Hackman and how MTV has changed movies for the worse-William Goldman, one of the most successful screenwriters in Hollywood today, tells all he knows. Devastatingly eye-opening and endlessly entertaining, Which Lie Did I Tell? is indispensable reading for anyone even slightly intrigued by the process of how a movie gets made.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Which President Killed a Man? Tantalizing Trivia and Fun Facts About Our Chief Executives and First Ladies

by James Humes

From the Book jacket: Which president had the lowest approval rating in the twentieth century? Which president fathered a child at age seventy? Which first lady was responsible for bringing the cherry trees to Washington? Which president wrote bawdy limericks as a hobby? Who was the first president of the United States? (Hint: It's not George Washington.) Which president enlisted Elvis Presley in the war against drugs? Who was the only first lady to be committed to a mental institution? And, do you know ... WHICH PRESIDENT KILLED A MAN??? The commander in chief has always made headlines-but what about the tantalizing tidbits that don't make it into the history books? After serving several generations of presidents, author and former White House speechwriter James Humes now offers a delightful smorgasbord of little-known facts and figures about our presidents and their first ladies. James Humes was a White House speechwriter for Presidents Eisenhower, Nixon, Ford, Reagan, and George H. W. Bush. He assisted former President Ford in writing his memoirs, A Time to Heal, and is the author of more than thirty books, including his autobiography: Confessions of a White House Ghost Writer. Currently Ryals Professor of Leadership and Language at the University of Southern Colorado, he has appeared on "Today," "Good Morning America," CNN, "Larry King Live," and hundreds of radio shows. Humes makes his home in Pueblo, Colorado.

While We Were Getting High: Britpop & the ‘90s in photographs with unseen images

by Kevin Cummins

Remember Britpop and the '90s through hundreds of its most striking images - with many seen here for the very first time. Taken by renowned photographer Kevin Cummins, chief photographer at the NME for more than a decade, the images in this book explore the rise and fall of Cool Britannia and all that came with it.Nostalgic, anarchic and featuring contributions from icons of the Britpop era including Noel Gallagher and Brett Anderson, While We Were Getting High is a seminal portrait of a decade like no other.Artists featured include:OasisBlurSuedePulpElasticaSupergrassThe CharlatansGeneSleeperKula ShakerEchobellyThe Bluetones...and many more

Whiskey in a Teacup: What Growing Up in the South Taught Me About Life, Love, and Baking Biscuits

by Reese Witherspoon

Academy award–winning actress, producer, and entrepreneur Reese Witherspoon invites you into her world, where she infuses the southern style, parties, and traditions she loves with contemporary flair and charm.Reese Witherspoon’s grandmother Dorothea always said that a combination of beauty and strength made southern women “whiskey in a teacup.” We may be delicate and ornamental on the outside, she said, but inside we’re strong and fiery. Reese’s southern heritage informs her whole life, and she loves sharing the joys of southern living with practically everyone she meets. She takes the South wherever she goes with bluegrass, big holiday parties, and plenty of Dorothea’s fried chicken. It’s reflected in how she entertains, decorates her home, and makes holidays special for her kids—not to mention how she talks, dances, and does her hair (in these pages, you will learn Reese’s fail-proof, only slightly insane hot-roller technique). Reese loves sharing Dorothea’s most delicious recipes as well as her favorite southern traditions, from midnight barn parties to backyard bridal showers, magical Christmas mornings to rollicking honky-tonks. It’s easy to bring a little bit of Reese’s world into your home, no matter where you live. After all, there’s a southern side to every place in the world, right?

Whisper

by Chris Struyk-Bonn

Sixteen-year-old Whisper, who has a cleft palate, lives in an encampment with three other young rejects and their caregiver, Nathanael. They are outcasts from a society (in the not-too-distant future) that kills or abandons anyone with a physical or mental disability. Whisper's mother visits once a year. When she dies, she leaves Whisper a violin, which Nathanael teaches her to play. Whisper's father comes to claim her, and she becomes his house slave, her disfigurement hidden by a black veil. But when she proves rebellious, she is taken to the city to live with other rejects at a house called Purgatory Palace, where she has to make difficult decisions for herself and for her vulnerable friends.

White Fox

by Sara Faring

After their world-famous actor mother disappeared under mysterious circumstances, Manon and Thaïs left their remote Mediterranean island home—sent away by their pharma-tech tycoon father. Opposites in every way, the sisters drifted apart in their grief. Yet their mother's unfinished story still haunts them both, and they can't put to rest the possibility that she is still alive.Lured home a decade later, Manon and Thaïs discover their mother’s legendary last work, long thought lost: White Fox, a screenplay filled with enigmatic metaphors. The clues in this dark fairytale draw them deep into the island's surreal society, into the twisted secrets hidden by their glittering family, to reveal the truth about their mother—and themselves. An Imprint Book

White Line Fever: The Autobiography

by Lemmy Garza Janiss Kilmister

One of music's most notorious frontmen leads a headbanging, voyeuristic odyssey into sex, drugs, and rock 'n' roll that rivals Motley Crue's The Dirt and Aerosmith's Walk This Way. <P><P>He made Keith Richards look like a choirboy and Mick Jagger look like a nun. And as the head of the legendary band Motorhead, he ploughed his way through so many drugs, so many women, and so much alcohol, that he gave a whole new meaning to the term Debauchery. And he changed the face of music, conquering the rock world with such songs as Ace of Spades, Bomber, and Overkill and inventing a whole new form of music--speed metal. At the age of 57, Lemmy Kilmister remains a rock icon, both for his monumental talent and his hedonistic lifestyle. In White Line Fever, he recounts his incredible, pleasure-filled, and death-defying journey through music history. Born on Christmas Eve, 1945, in Wales, to a vicar and a librarian, Ian Fraser Kilmister learned early, he as he forthrightly puts it, what an incredible pussy magnet guitars were. A teenager at the birth of rock 'n' roll, Lemmy idolized Elvis and Buddy Holly and soon joined a band of his own. He would eventually head to London, where he became a roadie for Jimi Hendrix, played in Opal Butterfly, and joined space rockers Hawkwind's lineup in 1971. Four years later, speedfreak Lemmy was fired from the band for doing the wrong drugs. Vowing to form the dirtiest rock 'n' roll band in the world, he formed Motorhead, arguably the heaviest and loudest heavy metal band to ever take the stage. During their twenty-seven-year history, Motorhead would go on to release twenty-one albums, including the #1 record No Sleep 'Til Hammersmith and would earn a Grammynomination. Lemmy would also cheat death on more than one occasion, most notoriously in 1980, when his doctor told him, I cannot give you a blood transfusion because normal blood will kill you. . . and your blood would kill another human being, because you're so toxic. But through more than two decades of notorious excess, Lemmy has lived to tell the warts-and-all tale of a life lived over the edge. White Line Fever, a tour of overindulgence, metal, and the search for musical integrity, offers a sometimes hilarious, often outrageous, and always unbridled ride with the leader of the loudest rock band in the world. "

White Robes, Silver Screens

by Tom Rice

The Ku Klux Klan was reestablished in Atlanta in 1915, barely a week before the Atlanta premiere of The Birth of a Nation, D. W. Griffith's paean to the original Klan. While this link between Griffith's film and the Klan has been widely acknowledged, Tom Rice explores the little-known relationship between the Klan's success and its use of film and media in the interwar years when the image, function, and moral rectitude of the Klan was contested on the national stage. By examining rich archival materials including a series of films produced by the Klan and a wealth of documents, newspaper clippings, and manuals, Rice uncovers the fraught history of the Klan as a local force that manipulated the American film industry to extend its reach across the country. White Robes, Silver Screens highlights the ways in which the Klan used, produced, and protested against film in order to recruit members, generate publicity, and define its role within American society.

White Trash Etiquette

by Verne Edstrom

The definitive guide to high-class trailer park living. White Trash Etiquette contains everything you need to know to live like decent trash, including: The proper way to fake a back injury How to prevent your in-laws from stealing the silverware at wedding receptions The 10 Hottest White Trash Career Opportunities How to improve your drunk driving skills Sound advice on everything from lying to your boss to making your next convenience store robbery fun for the whole family There's also troubleshooting for troublemakers: I'm getting married; can I still wear white if I'm a tramp? Can chicks ever really respect an accountant? How do I pick a good bail bondsman? How can I get my 14-year-old cousin unpregnant? And much more.

Whitney and Bobbi Kristina: The Deadly Price Of Fame

by Ian Halperin

Shocking new revelations emerge about superstar Whitney Houston and her only daughter, Bobbi Kristina Brown, in #1 New York Times bestselling author Ian Halperin’s account of their tumultuous lives.<P><P> On January 31, 2015, Bobbi Kristina Brown, daughter of musical megastars Whitney Houston and Bobby Brown, was found facedown and unresponsive in a bathtub in her suburban Atlanta home. Harrowing rumors and accusations ensued, particularly around Bobbi Kristina’s longtime boyfriend, Nick Gordon, who has been a part of the family since Whitney took him in as a teenager.<P> But #1 New York Times bestselling author and investigative journalist Ian Halperin takes the story much, much further—back to the early days of Whitney’s career, exploring the devastating, self-destructive secrets that plagued the singer and led Whitney—and now her daughter—down a dark and dangerous road.<P> Drawing on evidence from trusted Houston family members, friends, and other inside sources, Halperin paints a portrait of Bobbi Kristina’s downward spiral following her mother’s death, including drug abuse and abusive relationships. How did Bobbi Kristina end up facedown and unresponsive in a bathtub, almost exactly three years after her mother’s mysterious death? What was her relationship with Nick Gordon really like? How did a childhood in the spotlight as the daughter of controversial pop royalty lead to her troubling fate? Halperin offers readers a fascinating and candid behind-the-scenes look at the glamorous world, personal demons, and never-before-told life of Bobbi Kristina Brown.

Whitney Houston!: The Spectacular Rise and Tragic Fall of the Woman Whose Voice Inspired a Generation

by Mark Bego

Whitney Houston (1963-2012) was a superstar. Few in the world of show business reach the career heights that she attained with what seemed such ease. Her megastardom peaked in 1992 with the release of the hit movie The Bodyguard and the international Number One hit "I Will Always Love You." The movie soundtrack still stands as one of the bestselling albums of all time. She won six Grammy Awards, two Emmy Awards, thirty Billboard Music Awards, and twenty-two American Music Awards, and amassed a vast fortune. Her death has shocked the entertainment world and her fans.Whitney Houston! traces the life of this American icon. Here is her childhood in Newark, New Jersey, growing up in a family with a strong musical legacy. Her mother, Cissy, sang professionally with such stars as Aretha Franklin. Her cousin was Dionne Warwick. Share the joy as Whitney signs with Arista Records and the legendary Clive Davis and becomes an international star. Here superstar biographer Mark Bego offers a unique look at her family and immense talent, the secrets behind her years of erratic behavior, the truth about her tumultuous marriage to bad boy Bobby Brown, her mother's desperate attempt to control her, her dynamic final film role in Sparkle (which will be released posthumously), and the events that led up to her tragic death.Whitney Houston! will stand as a singular tribute to, and a revealing look at, one of the great superstars of our time.

Who Framed Mary Bubnik? (Bad News Ballet #4)

by Jahnna N. Malcolm

Whodunit? Mary Bubnik may be the crummiest ballerina at the Deerfield Academy of Dance, but she loves taking lessons and hanging out with the gang. Only now the Bubniks are having money problems, and Mary may have to quit lessons at the Academy. What will the gang do without dizzy little Mary Bubnik? Then Zan reads about a contest with a cash prize she's sure the girls can win. All they have to do is solve a real-live mystery in their town. The girls find one sooner than they think. Someone's taking things from the Academy dressing room--and Courtney thinks Mary Bubnik is the thief! Prize or no prize--this is one case the gang has to crack! RL 4 Ages 8-12.

Who I Am: A Memoir

by Pete Townshend

The most highly anticipated autobiography of the year, and the story of a man who... is a Londoner and a Mod.... wanted The Who to be called The Hair.... loved The Everly Brothers, but not that "drawling dope" Elvis.... wanted to be a sculptor, a journalist, a dancer and a graphic designer.... became a musician, composer, librettist, fiction writer, literary editor, sailor.... smashed his first guitar onstage, in 1964, by accident.... heard the voice of God on a vibrating bed in rural Illinois.... invented the Marshall stack, feedback and the concept album.... once speared Abbie Hoffman in the neck with the head of his guitar.... inspired Jimi Hendrix's pyrotechnical stagecraft.... is partially deaf in his left ear.... stole his windmill guitar playing from Keith Richards.... followed Keith Moon off a hotel balcony into a pool and nearly died.... did too much cocaine and nearly died.... drank too much and nearly died.... detached from his body in an airplane, on LSD, and nearly died.... helped rescue Eric Clapton from heroin.... is banned for life from Holiday Inns.... was embroiled in a tabloid scandal that has dogged him ever since.... has some explaining to do.... is the most literary and literate musician of the last 50 years.... planned to write his memoir when he was 21.... published this book at 67.

Who I Am

by Pete Townshend

From the voice of a generation: The most highly anticipated autobiography of the year, and the story of a man who. . . is a Londoner and a Mod. . . . wanted The Who to be called The Hair. . . . loved The Everly Brothers, but not that "drawling dope" Elvis. . . . wanted to be a sculptor, a journalist, a dancer and a graphic designer. . . . became a musician, composer, librettist, fiction writer, literary editor, sailor. . . . smashed his first guitar onstage, in 1964, by accident. . . . heard the voice of God on a vibrating bed in rural Illinois. . . . invented the Marshall stack, feedback and the concept album. . . . once speared Abbie Hoffman in the neck with the head of his guitar. . . . inspired Jimi Hendrixs pyrotechnical stagecraft. . . . is partially deaf in his left ear. . . . stole his windmill guitar playing from Keith Richards. . . . followed Keith Moon off a hotel balcony into a pool and nearly died. . . . did too much cocaine and nearly died. . . . drank too much and nearly died. . . . detached from his body in an airplane, on LSD, and nearly died. . . . helped rescue Eric Clapton from heroin. . . . is banned for life from Holiday Inns. . . . was embroiled in a tabloid scandal that has dogged him ever since. . . . has some explaining to do. . . . is the most literary and literate musician of the last 50 years. . . . planned to write his memoir when he was 21. . . . published this book at 67.

Who Is Alex Trebek?: A Biography

by Lisa Rogak

After a contestant wrote “We love you, Alex!” as his Final Jeopardy! answer, fans around the world quickly chimed in to proclaim their own love and support for beloved Jeopardy! host Alex Trebek. In the wake of his devastating cancer diagnosis, the moment provided the perfect opportunity to reflect on what the show — and the man – meant to them.It was no surprise, since millions of devoted viewers have long considered Alex Trebek to be a part of their daily lives ever since he began hosting the show in 1984. Now, bestselling biographer Lisa Rogak gives readers a look at Trebek's early life, his career, and his personal life throughout the years, drawing on many sources to tell his full story for the first time.There are many surprises, like the fact that Trebek was almost 50 when he discovered that he had a half brother, as well as the revelation that for a short time he actually dreamed of becoming a priest. The native Canadian also struggled with depression after the failure of his first marriage, and for years afterward he despaired of ever having a family of his own until he met the woman who would become his soulmate.Who Is Alex Trebek? is the first biography of the much-loved game show host, and as such, celebrates the man who has created a remarkable legacy that will live on in popular culture for generations to come.

Who Is George Lucas?

by Meg Belviso Pamela D. Pollack Ted Hammond Kevin Mcveigh

As a child his passions were comics and cars, but George Lucas grew up to be one of the most successful filmmakers of all time. He is a producer, screenwriter, director and entrepreneur whose company Lucasfilms pioneered the movie effects that changed the world of animation. He founded Industrial Light and Magic, which transformed special sound and visual effects throughout the Hollywood film industry. He is best known, of course, as the creator of the Star Wars movie, television, gaming, toy and merchandise empire, as well as the archeologist-adventure series Indiana Jones. Discover the man behind the magic in Who Is George Lucas?

Who Is The Greatest: Elvis Or The Beatles

by Mike Shellans Bill Slater

Mike Shellans and Bill Slater have come together in their life-long interests in Elvis and The Beatles to create the first comparison of these influential Pop icons. Who is the Greatest: Elvis or The Beatles? is a relevant and engaging textbook for a Music History or Popular Culture survey course. It provides a wealth of information and context about the music, lives, and careers of Elvis and The Beatles.

Who Is Jackie Chan? (Who Was?)

by Who HQ Jody Jensen Shaffer

How did Jackie Chan become one of the most recognizable and beloved actors in the world? Find out in this exciting biography of this martial artist turned international film superstar.When Kong-sang was a young boy in Hong Kong, he enjoyed practicing martial arts with his dad but hated going to school. He was eventually enrolled in the China Drama Academy, where he improved his martial arts skills and became a stuntman. That training led to a successful career as an actor. Kong-sang, now known as Jackie Chan, never gave up on his passion for screwball physical comedy. Luckily for Jackie, his determination paid off. His humor and dangerous stuntwork in films like Cannonball Run, Rush Hour, Shanghai Noon, and Karate Kid have made him an international star, and it doesn't look like he'll be leaving the big screen anytime soon.

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