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Contemporary World History (Fifth Edition)

by William J. Duiker

Duiker's comprehensive, balanced history of the world in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries provides you with context for interpreting the events that you hear about in the news each day. You'll view history from the broader global perspective, while at the same time gaining insight into the distinct character of individual civilizations and regions. To ensure that you'll have a well-rounded understanding of the most decisive moments in recent times, Duiker integrates political, economic, social, and cultural history into a smoothly written narrative. The Fifth Edition text includes a special insert that guides you in using the text's many detailed maps and helps you learn how to make important connections between geography and the turn of historic events. Additional tools include timelines that highlight and contrast different cultures and nations--giving you an "at-a-glance," holistic perspective on eras and their defining events; photos from William Duiker's own collection for a closer, more personal look at the world we live in; and primary-source documents that illustrate and clarify key points.

Contemporary's American Civics and Government

by Matthew T. Downey

American Civics and Government provides the framework students need for a strong understanding of the government of the United States. Each of the three branches of government are explored in depth, as are civil liberties and civil rights, public policy, state and local government, participatory government, and comparative political and economic systems. Student Text Engaging four-color design Unit openers with timelines and discussion questions Pre-reading strategies and introduction activities Reading and vocabulary support Small-group activities Writing activities Primary source documents Chapter summaries with review questions End of chapter skill builder

Contemporary's American History 1: Before 1865

by Matthew T. Downey

This textbook is the first part of the story of the American people. It includes Stone Age hunters, Native Americans, European settlers, African slaves, farm families, townspeople, statesmen, and Civil War soldiers. The book covers America's story from its beginning through the end of the Civil War. The 20 chapters provide information about American history from economic, geographic, political, religious, technological, social, and cultural perspectives.

Contemporary's American History 1: Before 1865 [Grade 6-12]

by Matthew T. Downey

American History 1: before 1865covers America's story from its beginning through the end of the Civil War. 20 chapters in provide information about American history from economic, geographic, political, religious, technological, social, and cultural perspectives. Student Edition: Engaging four-color design Unit openers with timelines and discussion questions Pre-reading strategies and introduction activities Reading and vocabulary support Small-group activities Writing activities Primary source documents Chapter summaries with review questions End of chapter skill builder

Contemporary's American History 1: Before 1865 [Grade 6-12]

by Matthew T. Downey

American History 1: before 1865covers America's story from its beginning through the end of the Civil War. 20 chapters in provide information about American history from economic, geographic, political, religious, technological, social, and cultural perspectives. Student Edition: Engaging four-color design Unit openers with timelines and discussion questions Pre-reading strategies and introduction activities Reading and vocabulary support Small-group activities Writing activities Primary source documents Chapter summaries with review questions End of chapter skill builder

Contemporary’s American History 2: After 1865 [Grade 6-12]

by Matthew T. Downey

American History 1covers America's story from its beginning through the end of the Civil War. American History 2begins with Reconstruction and the assassination of President Lincoln, and continues through the modern era. The 20 chapters in each book provide information about American history from economic, geographic, political, religious, technological, social, and cultural perspectives. Highlights: Incorporates the NCSS high school thematic strands Audio and Interactive activities - On the student CD, full audio and interactive activities help the student better comprehend the material, improving their ability to read in the content areas. Reading support - There is extensive attention paid to helping students improve their reading ability. The readability is controlled throughout the program. ELL support - Specific activities target the needs of the second language student Usability - The program is designed to be simple for teachers and students to use. The PDF form of all Teacher CD content makes it easy to print materials as needed. Engaging content - Our series is replete with illustrations, maps, photos and timelines. Value - The program offers a complete, four color social studies curriculum at a very competitive price. Flexibility - the program can be used by a variety of student types, including Adult Ed students.

Contemporary's World History: Blackline Masters [Grade 6-12]

by McGraw-Hill

World History, written at the 5 to 8 reading level, is an integrated series of print and electronic resources designed to provide a complete classroom solution for students who need extra support. Every chapter and lesson in the student book contains features and activities to keep students engaged in the learning process. The student CD-ROM, the Annotated Teacher's Edition, and the Teacher's Resource Binder all provide additional materials for English Language Learners. World Historyincorporates the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) high school thematic strands. The book covers events beginning with pre-history and continues through the modern era. ANCILLARY MATERIALS Student Edition CD-ROM PDFs of all student book pages Audio narration of each page in the student book Spanish audio introduction of each key chapter concept Spanish audio ELL activity for each chapter Four instructional, activities per chapter Student Presentation Builder Interactive historical timeline Interactive Glossary Annotated Teacher's Edition Reduced student pages with wrap-around teacher notes Teaching objectives for each lesson Lists of classroom materials Extension activities Vocabulary lessons Literary connections Classroom discussions Teacher's Resource Binder Includes Annotated Teacher's Edition 160 blackline masters, eight per chapter, consisting of a reading comprehension activity a vocabulary reinforcement activity an additional biography an additional primary source document a map activity a chapter activity a chapter review a chapter quiz 20 full-color overhead transparencies CD-ROM consisting of the following PDFs entire Annotated Teacher's Edition one test per unit one full book assessment one ELL reading activity per chapter one ELL vocabulary activity per chapter one puzzle per chapter

Contempt and Pity

by Daryl Michael Scott

For over a century, the idea that African Americans are psychologically damaged has played an important role in discussions of race. In this provocative work, Daryl Michael Scott argues that damage imagery has been the product of liberals and conservatives, of racists and antiracists. While racial conservatives, often playing on white contempt for blacks, have sought to use findings of black pathology to justify exclusionary policies, racial liberals have used damage imagery primarily to promote policies of inclusion and rehabilitation. In advancing his argument, Scott challenges some long-held beliefs about the history of damage imagery. He rediscovers the liberal impulses behind Stanley Elkins's Sambo hypothesis and Daniel Patrick Moynihan's Negro Family and exposes the damage imagery in the work of Ralph Ellison, the leading anti-pathologist. He also corrects the view that the Chicago School depicted blacks as pathological products of matriarchy. New Negro experts such as Charles Johnson and E. Franklin Frazier, he says, disdained sympathy-seeking and refrained from exploring individual pathology. Scott's reassessment of social science sheds new light on Brown v. Board of Education, revealing how experts reversed four decades of theory in order to represent segregation as inherently damaging to blacks. In this controversial work, Scott warns the Left of the dangers in their recent rediscovery of damage imagery in an age of conservative reform.

Contempt and Pity: Social Policy and the Image of the Damaged Black Psyche, 1880-1996

by Daryl Michael Scott

Offers an academic perspective on sociopolitical views of African-Americans from 1880 to 1996

Contemptible [Illustrated Edition]

by Anon “casualty”

Includes the First World War Illustrations Pack - 73 battle plans and diagrams and 198 photos"An 'Old Contemptible' recounts the campaign of 1914.At the outbreak of the First World War, units of the British regular army-the B. E. F-were despatched to the continent to assist the French in an attempt to stem the tide of the advancing Imperial German Army as it marched inexorably towards Paris. The enemy viewed the 'Tommies' as 'that contemptible little army.' In that way peculiar to the British the insult became a byword for courage and honour as the highly trained and motivated soldiers in khaki demonstrated just what a contemptible little army could do. However, this was a war of attrition and despite the 'contemptibles' magnificent performance the 'grey horde' could not initially be halted. What followed was the memorable retreat from Mons. The author of this book was a subaltern officer serving in one of the county regiments of the B. E. F and chose as his title for this book the proudly worn designation 'Contemptible.' Although the book was written under a pseudonym it is widely believed that the writer was Arnold Gyde who served with the South Staffordshire Regiment and was one of the first British soldiers to set foot on the continent. Although the account of this vital aspect of the opening months of the conflict is presented in a 'factional' style it is clearly based on the author's first hand experiences." -Print Ed.

The Contenders

by James Ridgeway Dean Kuipers Richard Goldstein Laura Flanders Eli Sanders

When you get beyond the spin, the campaign spending, the YouTube spots, and the paid advertisements, what did the Democratic contenders in the 2008 Presidential election stand for, really? What did Hillary Clinton learn from Nixon? What does Barack Obama have in common with Justin Timberlake? Who are the two John Edwardses? Is America ready for the vegan presidency of Dennis Kucinich? What makes Al Gore rock and roll? Why do Joe Biden, Christopher Dodd, Bill Richardson, and Mike Gravel bother? Find out in this irreverent guide to the 2008 presidential candidates.

Contending Visions of the Middle East

by Zachary Lockman

Lockman (modern Middle Eastern history, New York U.) examines the broad trends of Oriental, Islamic, and Middle East studies in the West, considering developments from ancient Greece to the present, but particularly concentrating on practices in the United States from the mid-20th century. He discusses the Cold War contexts of the emergence of modern US Middle East studies and considers critiques of the field and its intellectual paradigms, especially Edward Said's influential Orientalism. Lockman is chiefly concerned with the way different theories or modes of interpretation shape the questions asked and the sources used in conducting research; the social, political, economic, and cultural factors that influence the selection and acceptance of these theories; and the social and political interests served by adopting one way of interpretation over another. Annotation ©2004 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

The Content of Our Character: Race in America

by Shelby Steele

In this controversial collection of essays, award-winning writer Shelby Steele tackles the tough question "Why, after 25 years of legal change and ebbing prejudice, are blacks worse off today?" A critically acclaimed national bestseller and winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award.

Contention in Context

by Jeff Goodwin James M. Jasper

Despite extensive theoretical debates over the utility of "political opportunities" as an explanation for the rise and success of social movements, there have been surprisingly few serious empirical tests. Contention in Context provides the most extensive effort to date to test the model, analyzing a range of important cases of revolutions and protest movements to identify the role of political opportunities in the rise of political contention. With evidence from more than fifty cases, this book explores the role of the state in protest, the frequent overemphasis on political opportunities in recent research, and the extent to which opportunity models ignore the cultural and emotional triggers for collective action. By examining new directions in the study of protest and contention, this book shows that although political opportunities can help explain the emergence of certain kinds of movements, a new strategic language can ultimately tell us far more.

Contentious Activism and Inter-Korean Relations

by Danielle L. Chubb

In South Korea, debate over relations with the North is a contentious subject that transcends traditional considerations of physical and economic security. Political activists play a critical role in shaping the discourse as they pursue the separate yet connected agendas of democracy, human rights, and unification. Providing international observers with a better understanding of how South Korean policy makers manage inter-Korean relations, this volume traces the debate from the 1970s through South Korea's democratic transition. Focusing on four case studies -- the 1980 Kwangju uprising, the June 1987 uprising, the move toward democracy in the 1990s, and the decade of "progressive" government that began with the election of Kim Dae Jung in 1997 -- Danielle Chubb unravels South Korean activists' complex views on reunification, with the more radical voices promoting a North Korean-style form of socialism. While these arguments have dissipated over the years, traces remain in discussions over engaging with North Korea to bring security and peace to the peninsula.

Contentious Curricula: Afrocentrism and Creationism in American Public Schools

by Amy J. Binder

This book compares two challenges made to American public school curricula in the 1980s and 1990s. It identifies striking similarities between proponents of Afrocentrism and creationism, accounts for their differential outcomes, and draws important conclusions for the study of culture, organizations, and social movements.Amy Binder gives a brief history of both movements and then describes how their challenges played out in seven school districts. Despite their very different constituencies--inner-city African American cultural essentialists and predominately white suburban Christian conservatives--Afrocentrists and creationists had much in common. Both made similar arguments about oppression and their children's well-being, both faced skepticism from educators about their factual claims, and both mounted their challenges through bureaucratic channels. In each case, challenged school systems were ultimately able to minimize or reject challengers' demands, but the process varied by case and type of challenge. Binder finds that Afrocentrists were more successful in advancing their cause than were creationists because they appeared to offer a solution to the real problem of urban school failure, met with more administrative sympathy toward their complaints of historic exclusion, sought to alter lower-prestige curricula (history, not science), and faced opponents who lacked a legal remedy comparable to the rule of church-state separation invoked by creationism's opponents.Binder's analysis yields several lessons for social movements research, suggesting that researchers need to pay greater attention to how movements seek to influence bureaucratic decision making, often from within. It also demonstrates the benefits of examining discursive, structural, and institutional factors in concert.

Contentious Republicans: Popular Politics, Race, and Class in Nineteenth-Century Colombia

by James E. Sanders

Contentious Republicans explores the mid-nineteenth-century rise of mass electoral democracy in the southwestern region of Colombia, a country many assume has never had a meaningful democracy of any sort. James E. Sanders describes a surprisingly rich republicanism characterized by legal rights and popular participation, and he explains how this vibrant political culture was created largely by competing subaltern groups seeking to claim their rights as citizens and their place in the political sphere. Moving beyond the many studies of nineteenth-century nation building that focus on one segment of society, Contentious Republicans examines the political activism of three distinct social and racial groups: Afro-Colombians, Indians, and white peasant migrants. Beginning in the late 1840s, subaltern groups entered the political arena to forge alliances, both temporary and enduring, with the elite Liberal and Conservative Parties. In the process, each group formed its own political discourses and reframed republicanism to suit its distinct needs. These popular liberals and popular conservatives bargained for the parties' support and deployed a broad repertoire of political actions, including voting, demonstrations, petitions, strikes, boycotts, and armed struggle. By the 1880s, though, many wealthy Colombians of both parties blamed popular political engagement for social disorder and economic failure, and they successfully restricted lower-class participation in politics. Sanders suggests that these reactionary developments contributed to the violence and unrest afflicting modern Colombia. Yet in illuminating the country's legacy of participatory politics in the nineteenth century, he shows that the current situation is neither inevitable nor eternal.

Contentious Spirits: Religion in Korean American History, 1903-1945

by David Yoo

This is the first book-length study of religion in the early history of Korean immigrants and their descendants in the United States. Yoo (history, Claremont McKenna College) focuses on the Protestant experience in the greater Honolulu and Los Angeles areas for the period 1903 to 1945. He builds his analysis on the themes of religion and the racialization of Koreans in the US, the impact of religion on networks of migration and exile, and issues of colonialism and independence in Korea and the US. Annotation ©2010 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Contested Boundaries: Itinerancy and the Reshaping of the Colonial American Religious World

by Timothy D. Hall

The First Great Awakening in eighteenth-century America challenged the institutional structures and raised the consciousness of colonial Americans. These revivals gave rise to the practice of itinerancy in which ministers and laypeople left their own communities to preach across the countryside. In Contested Boundaries, Timothy D. Hall argues that the Awakening was largely defined by the ensuing debate over itinerancy. Drawing on recent scholarship in cultural and social anthropology, cultural studies, and eighteenth-century religion, he reveals at the center of this debate the itinerant preacher as a catalyst for dramatic change in the religious practice and social order of the New World.This book expands our understanding of evangelical itinerancy in the 1740s by viewing it within the context of Britain's expanding commercial empire. As pro- and anti-revivalists tried to shape a burgeoning transatlantic consumer society, the itinerancy of the Great Awakening appears here as a forceful challenge to contemporary assumptions about the place of individuals within their social world and the role of educated leaders as regulators of communication, order, and change. The most celebrated of these itinerants was George Whitefield, an English minister who made unprecedented tours through the colonies. According to Hall, the activities of the itinerants, including Whitefield, encouraged in the colonists an openness beyond local boundaries to an expanding array of choices for belief and behavior in an increasingly mobile and pluralistic society. In the process, it forged a new model of the church and its social world.As a response to and a source of dynamic social change, itinerancy in Hall's powerful account provides a prism for viewing anew the worldly and otherworldly transformations of colonial society. Contested Boundaries will be of interest to students and scholars of colonial American history, religious studies, and cultural and social anthropology.

Contested Commemorations

by Benjamin Ziemann

This innovative study of remembrance in Weimar Germany analyses how experiences and memories of the Great War were transformed along political lines after 1918. Examining the symbolism, language and performative power of public commemoration, Benjamin Ziemann reveals how individual recollections fed into the public narrative of the experience of war. Challenging conventional wisdom that nationalist narratives dominated commemoration, this book demonstrates that Social Democrat war veterans participated in the commemoration of the war at all levels: supporting the 'no more war' movement, mourning the fallen at war memorials and demanding a politics of international solidarity. It describes how the moderate Socialist Left related the legitimacy of the Republic to their experiences in the Imperial army and acknowledged the military defeat of 1918 as a moment of liberation. This is the first comprehensive analysis of war remembrances in post-war Germany and a radical reassessment of the democratic potential of the Weimar Republic.

Contested Communities: Class, Gender, and Politics in Chile’s El Teniente Copper Mine, 1904-1951

by Thomas Miller Klubock

In Contested Communities Thomas Miller Klubock analyzes the experiences of the El Teniente copper miners during the first fifty years of the twentieth century. Describing the everyday life and culture of the mining community, its impact on Chilean politics and national events, and the sense of self and identity working-class men and women developed in the foreign-owned enclave, Klubock provides important insights into the cultural and social history of Chile. Klubock shows how a militant working-class community was established through the interplay between capitalist development, state formation, and the ideologies of gender. In describing how the North American copper company attempted to reconfigure and reform the work and social-cultural lives of men and women who migrated to the mine, Klubock demonstrates how struggles between labor and capital took place on a gendered field of power and reconstituted social constructions of masculinity and femininity. As a result, Contested Communities describes more accurately than any previous study the nature of grassroots labor militancy, working-class culture, and everyday politics of gender relations during crucial years of the Chilean Popular Front in the 1930s and 1940s.

Contested Conversions to Islam

by Tijana Krstic

This book explores how Ottoman Muslims and Christians understood the phenomenon of conversion to Islam from the 15th to the 17th centuries, when the Ottoman Empire was at the height of its power and conversions to Islam peaked. Because the Ottomans ruled over a large non-Muslim population and extended greater opportunities to converts than to native-born Muslims, conversion to Islam was a contentious subject for all communities, especially Muslims themselves. By producing narratives about conversion, Ottoman Muslim and Christian authors sought to define the boundaries and membership of their communities while promoting their own religious and political agendas. Krstic argues that the production and circulation of narratives about conversion to Islam was central to the articulation of Ottoman imperial identity and Sunni Muslim "orthodoxy" in the long 16th century. Placing the evolution of Ottoman attitudes toward conversion and converts in the broader context of Mediterranean-wide religious trends and the Ottoman rivalry with the Habsburgs and Safavids,Contested Conversions to Islamalso introduces new sources, such as first-person conversion narratives and Orthodox Christian neomartyologies, to reveal the interplay of individual, (inter)communal, local, and imperial initiatives that influenced the process of conversion.

Contested Democracy: Freedom, Race, and Power in American History

by Sinha Manisha Penny Von Eschen

With essays on U.S. history ranging from the American Revolution to the dawn of the twenty-first century, Contested Democracy illuminates struggles waged over freedom and citizenship throughout the American past. Guided by a commitment to democratic citizenship and responsible scholarship, the contributors to this volume insist that rigorous engagement with history is essential to a vital democracy, particularly amid the current erosion of human rights and civil liberties within the United States and abroad. Emphasizing the contradictory ways in which freedom has developed within the United States and in the exercise of American power abroad, these essays probe challenges to American democracy through conflicts shaped by race, slavery, gender, citizenship, political economy, immigration, law, empire, and the idea of the nation state. In this volume, writers demonstrate how opposition to the expansion of democracy has shaped the American tradition as much as movements for social and political change. By foregrounding those who have been marginalized in U.S society as well as the powerful, these historians and scholars argue for an alternative vision of American freedom that confronts the limitations, failings, and contradictions of U.S. power. Their work provides crucial insight into the role of the United States in this latest age of American empire and the importance of different and oppositional visions of American democracy and freedom. At a time of intense disillusionment with U.S. politics and of increasing awareness of the costs of empire, these contributors argue that responsible historical scholarship can challenge the blatant manipulation of discourses on freedom. They call for careful and conscientious scholarship not only to illuminate contemporary problems but also to act as a bulwark against mythmaking in the service of cynical political ends.

The Contested Plains: Indians, Goldseekers and the Rush to Colorado

by Elliott West

Deftly retracing a pivotal chapter in one of America's most dramatic stories, Elliott West chronicles the struggles, triumphs, and defeats of both Indians and whites as they pursued their clashing dreams of greatness in the heart of the continent. The Contested Plains recounts the rise of the Native American horse culture, white Americans' discovery and pursuit of gold in the Rocky Mountains, and the wrenching changes and bitter conflicts that ensued. After centuries of many peoples fashioning many cultures on the plains, the Cheyennes and other tribes found in the horse the power to create a heroic way of life that dominated one of the world's great grasslands. Then the discovery of gold challenged that way of life and led finally to the infamous massacre at Sand Creek and the Indian Wars of the late 1860s. Illuminating both the ancient and more recent history of the plains and eastern Rocky Mountains, West weaves together a brilliant tapestry interlaced with environmental, social, and military history. He treats the "frontier" not as a morally loaded term-either in the traditional celebratory sense or the more recent critical sense-but as a powerfully unsettling process that shattered an old world. He shows how Indians, goldseekers, haulers, merchants, ranchers, and farmers all contributed to and in turn were consumed by this process, even as the plains themselves were utterly transformed by the clash of cultures and competing visions. Exciting and enormously engaging, The Contested Plains is the first book to examine the Colorado gold rush as the key event in the modern transformation of the central great plains. It also exemplifies a kind of history that respects more fully our rich and ambiguous past-a past in which there are many actors but no simple lessons.

Contested Waters

by April R. Summit

"To fully understand this river and its past, one must examine many separate pieces of history scattered throughout two nations--seven states within the United States and two within Mexico--and sort through a large amount of scientific data. One needs to be part hydrologist, geologist, economist, sociologist, anthropologist, and historian to fully understand the entire story. Despite this river's narrow size and meager flow, its tale is very large indeed." --From the conclusion The Colorado River is a vital resource to urban and agricultural communities across the Southwest, providing water to 30 million people. Contested Waters tells the river's story-a story of conquest, control, division, and depletion. Beginning in prehistory and continuing into the present day, Contested Waters focuses on three important and often overlooked aspects of the river's use: the role of western water law in its over-allocation, the complexity of power relationships surrounding the river, and the concept of sustainable use and how it has been either ignored or applied in recent times. It is organized in two parts, the first addresses the chronological history of the river and long-term issues, while the second examines in more detail four specific topics: metropolitan perceptions, American Indian water rights, US-Mexico relations over the river, and water marketing issues. Creating a complete picture of the evolution of this crucial yet over-utilized resource, this comprehensive summary will fascinate anyone interested in the Colorado River or the environmental history of the Southwest.

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