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Early Middle Ages, 500-1000

by Robert Brentano

Spanning the years 500 to 1000 A.D., this volume illustrates the conflict between brutality and civilization that seemed to characterize the period so often called--not improperly--the "Dark Ages." Islam and Byzantium, as much as Western Europe, figure in the twenty-two chapters of documents offered in this book, part of the ten-volume series, "Sources of Western Civilization."

Early Modern Europe 1450-1789

by Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks

Covering European history from the invention of the printing press to the French Revolution, this accessible and engaging textbook offers an innovative account of people's lives, from a variety of backgrounds, in the early modern period and within the global context of European developments. Six central topics - individuals in society, politics and power, cultural and intellectual life, religion, economics and technology - are explored in two chronological sections, 1450-1600 and 1600-1789. The text takes in Europe in its entirety, eastward to the Ottoman Empire, northward to Sweden, and southward to Portugal, includes European colonies overseas, and integrates religious, ethnic, gender, class, and regional differences. Students are encouraged to think about continuities as well as changes across this formative period and throughout the text, maps, illustrations, timelines, and textboxes of original sources and featured topics illuminate the narrative. Online resources include primary source material, music examples and regularly updated bibliographies.

Early Modern Jewry

by David B. Ruderman

Early Modern Jewry boldly offers a new history of the early modern Jewish experience. From Krakow and Venice to Amsterdam and Smyrna, David Ruderman examines the historical and cultural factors unique to Jewish communities throughout Europe, and how these distinctions played out amidst the rest of society. Looking at how Jewish settlements in the early modern period were linked to one another in fascinating ways, he shows how Jews were communicating with each other and were more aware of their economic, social, and religious connections than ever before. Ruderman explores five crucial and powerful characteristics uniting Jewish communities: a mobility leading to enhanced contacts between Jews of differing backgrounds, traditions, and languages, as well as between Jews and non-Jews; a heightened sense of communal cohesion throughout all Jewish settlements that revealed the rising power of lay oligarchies; a knowledge explosion brought about by the printing press, the growing interest in Jewish books by Christian readers, an expanded curriculum of Jewish learning, and the entrance of Jewish elites into universities; a crisis of rabbinic authority expressed through active messianism, mystical prophecy, radical enthusiasm, and heresy; and the blurring of religious identities, impacting such groups as conversos, Sabbateans, individual converts to Christianity, and Christian Hebraists. In describing an early modern Jewish culture,Early Modern Jewry reconstructs a distinct epoch in history and provides essential background for understanding the modern Jewish experience.

Early Modern Jewry: A New Cultural History

by David B. Ruderman

Early Modern Jewry boldly offers a new history of the early modern Jewish experience. From Krakow and Venice to Amsterdam and Smyrna, David Ruderman examines the historical and cultural factors unique to Jewish communities throughout Europe, and how these distinctions played out amidst the rest of society. Looking at how Jewish settlements in the early modern period were linked to one another in fascinating ways, he shows how Jews were communicating with each other and were more aware of their economic, social, and religious connections than ever before. Ruderman explores five crucial and powerful characteristics uniting Jewish communities: a mobility leading to enhanced contacts between Jews of differing backgrounds, traditions, and languages, as well as between Jews and non-Jews; a heightened sense of communal cohesion throughout all Jewish settlements that revealed the rising power of lay oligarchies; a knowledge explosion brought about by the printing press, the growing interest in Jewish books by Christian readers, an expanded curriculum of Jewish learning, and the entrance of Jewish elites into universities; a crisis of rabbinic authority expressed through active messianism, mystical prophecy, radical enthusiasm, and heresy; and the blurring of religious identities, impacting such groups as conversos, Sabbateans, individual converts to Christianity, and Christian Hebraists. In describing an early modern Jewish culture, Early Modern Jewry reconstructs a distinct epoch in history and provides essential background for understanding the modern Jewish experience.

Early Modern Virginia

by Douglas Bradburn John C. Coombs

This collection of essays on seventeenth-century Virginia, the first such collection on the Chesapeake in nearly twenty-five years, highlights emerging directions in scholarship and helps set a new agenda for research in the next decade and beyond. The contributors represent some of the best of a younger generation of scholars who are building on, but also criticizing and moving beyond, the work of the so-called Chesapeake School of social history that dominated the historiography of the region in the 1970s and 1980s. Employing a variety of methodologies, analytical strategies, and types of evidence, these essays explore a wide range of topics and offer a fresh look at the early religious, political, economic, social, and intellectual life of the colony.ContributorsDouglas Bradburn, Binghamton University, State University of New York * John C. Coombs, Hampden-Sydney College * Victor Enthoven, Netherlands Defense Academy * Alexander B. Haskell, University of California Riverside * Wim Klooster, Clark University * Philip Levy, University of South Florida * Philip D. Morgan, Johns Hopkins University * William A. Pettigrew, University of Kent * Edward DuBois Ragan, Valentine Richmond History Center * Terri L. Snyder, California State University, Fullerton * Camilla Townsend, Rutgers University * Lorena S. Walsh, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

Early Observations on Possible Defenses by the Emerging Threat Agent Project

by Bruce W. Bennett Pamela L. Gordon Mcrae Smith Jonathan Kaufman James Byrnes

Adversaries could acquire emerging chemical and biological (CB) agents years before U.S. defense planners recognize those agents, and many more years before the United States establishes a comprehensive defense against them. Gaps in defenses against chemical and biological weapon agents can pose a serious risk to U.S. military operations. This paper summarizes early expert observations about the threat and possible responses.

Early One Morning

by Robert Ryan

Based on actual events, an epic narrative of friendship, rivalry, and fast cars in occupied FranceOn a crisp autumn night in the twenty-first century, a car is pulled from the depths of an Austrian lake. A skeleton grips the wheel. Finally, an answer: William Grover-Williams, the premier English race-car driver of his generation and a hero of the French Resistance, met his end at the bottom of a mountain lake.Or did he?In the Roaring Twenties, Grover-Williams and Frenchman Robert Benoist were teammates and rivals on the Bugatti racing team. Locked in a fierce competition for the world championship, they also raced to win the heart of the gorgeous Eve Aubicq. Then the war changed everything--and nothing. As members of the British Special Operations Executive, Grover-Williams and Benoist dashed across France in support of the Resistance, but it wasn't just the Nazis they had to watch out for. Double agents were everywhere, and friendship--or love, for that matter--was no guarantee of loyalty. Every morning, Will, Robert, and Eve had to look in the mirror and ask: Whom can I trust today? The wrong answer might just have spelled their doom.

Early Roman Warrior 753-321 BC

by Nic Fields Sean O'Brogain

The prototypical 'Roman Legionnaire' often seen on television and in movies is actually the product of nearly a millennium of military development. Far back in the Bronze Age, before the city of Rome existed, a loose collection of independent hamlets eventually formed into a village. From this base, the earliest Roman warriors launched cattle raids and ambushes against their enemies. At some point during this time, the Romans began a period of expansion, conquering land and absorbing peoples. Soon, they had adopted classical Greek fighting methods with militia forming in phalanxes. This book covers the evolution of the earliest Roman warriors and their development into an army that would eventually conquer the known world.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Early Royko: Up Against It in Chicago

by Mike Royko Rick Kogan

Early Royko restores to print the earliest writings of the legendary columnist Jimmy Breslin called the best journalist of his time. Here, Royko chronicles 1960s Chicago with the moral vision, irony, and razor-sharp voice that would remain his trademark.

Early Samurai AD 200-1500

by Angus Mcbride Anthony Bryant

War played a central part in the history of Japan. Warring clans controlled much of the country. The wars were usually about land, the struggle for control of which eventually gave rise to perhaps the most formidable warriors of all time: the Samurai. Ancient Yayoi warriors developed weapons, armour and a code during the ensuing centuries that became the centrepiece for the Japanese Samurai. Anthony Bryant chronicles the history, arms and armour of these truly élite warriors, from the rise of the Yayoi through the Genpei War (1180-1185) between the Minamoto and Taira clans, to the Mongol invasions of the 13th century.

Early Settlement of North Dakota (North Dakota Studies)

by Gwyn S. Herman Laverne A. Johnson

The settlement of North Dakota by Euro-Americans is significantly tied to transportation. The first "highways" were the rivers which brought most of the early explorers and fur traders and the first "white" settlers to North Dakota by boat. Later on, Red River carts, stagecoaches, and trains served people and businesses on the North Dakota frontier and during the time of early settlement.

Early Sunday Morning: The Pearl Harbor Diary of Amber Billows (Dear America)

by Barry Denenberg

Diary of Amber Billows from the World War II era. Part of the Dear America series.

The Early Textual History of Lucretius' De rerum natura

by David Butterfield

This is the first detailed analysis of the fate of Lucretius' De rerum natura from its beginnings in the 50s BC down to the creation of our earliest extant manuscripts during the Carolingian age. A detailed investigation of the knowledge of Lucretius' poem among writers throughout the Roman, and subsequently the medieval, worlds allows fresh insight into the work's readership and reception, and an assessment of the value of the indirect tradition for editing the poem. The first extended analysis of the 170+ subject headings (capitula) that intersperse the text reveals the close engagement of Roman readers. A fresh inspection and assignation of marginal hands in the poem's most important manuscript provides new evidence about the work of Carolingian correctors and the basis for a new Lucretian stemma codicum. Further clarification of the interrelationship of Renaissance manuscripts of Lucretius gives additional evidence of the poem's reception in fifteenth-century Italy.

Early Thunder

by Jean Fritz

"Events rapidly transpiring in Salem, Massachusetts in 1774-1775 force 14-year-old Daniel West to re-examine his loyalties, and finally, to change from Tory to Whig".--School Library Journal

The Early Upper Paleolithic Beyond Western Europe

by P. Jeffrey Brantingham Steven L. Kuhn Kristopher W. Kerry

This volume brings together prominent archaeologists working in areas outside Western Europe to discuss the most recent evidence for the origins of the early Upper Paleolithic and its relationship to the origin of modern humans. With a wealth of primary data from archaeological sites and regions that have never before been published and discussions of materials from difficult-to-find sources, the collection urges readers to reconsider the process of modern human behavioral origins. Archaeological evidence continues to play a critical role in debates over the origins of anatomically modern humans. The appearance of novel Upper Paleolithic technologies, new patterns of land use, expanded social networks, and the emergence of complex forms of symbolic communication point to a behavioral revolution beginning sometime around 45,000 years ago. Until recently, most of the available evidence for this revolution derived from Western European archaeological contexts that suggested an abrupt replacement of Mousterian Middle Paleolithic with Aurignacian Upper Paleolithic adaptations. In the absence of fossil association, the behavioral transition was thought to reflect the biological replacement of archaic hominid populations by intrusive modern humans. The contributors present new archaeological evidence that tells a very different story: The Middle-Upper Paleolithic transitions in areas as diverse as the Levant, Eastern-Central Europe, and Central and Eastern Asia are characterized both by substantial behavioral continuity over the period 45,000-25,000 years ago and by a mosaic-like pattern of shifting adaptations. Together these essays will enliven and enrich the discussion of the shift from archaic to modern behavioral adaptations.

Early Vision

by Samuel Taylor Coleridge Richard Holmes

Richard Holmes edits a collection of poems by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, a pioneer of English Romanticism.

Early Warning

by Jane Smiley

From the Pulitzer Prize-winner: the second installment, following Some Luck, of her widely acclaimed, best-selling American trilogy, which brings the journey of a remarkable family with roots in the Iowa heartland into mid-century America<P> <P> Early Warning opens in 1953 with the Langdon family at a crossroads. Their stalwart patriarch, Walter, who with his wife, Rosanna, sustained their farm for three decades, has suddenly died, leaving their five children, now adults, looking to the future. Only one will remain in Iowa to work the land, while the others scatter to Washington, D.C., California, and everywhere in between. <P> As the country moves out of post-World War II optimism through the darker landscape of the Cold War and the social and sexual revolutions of the 1960s and '70s, and then into the unprecedented wealth--for some--of the early 1980s, the Langdon children each follow a different path in a rapidly changing world. And they now have children of their own: twin boys who are best friends and vicious rivals; a girl whose rebellious spirit takes her to the notorious Peoples Temple in San Francisco; and a golden boy who drops out of college to fight in Vietnam--leaving behind a secret legacy that will send shock waves through the Langdon family into the next generation. <P> Capturing a transformative period through richly drawn characters we come to know and care deeply for, Early Warning continues Smiley's extraordinary epic trilogy, a gorgeously told saga that began with Some Luck and will span a century in America. But it also stands entirely on its own as an engrossing story of the challenges--and rewards--of family and home, even in the most turbulent of times, all while showcasing a beloved writer at the height of her considerable powers.

Early Warning

by Jane Smiley

From the Pulitzer Prize-winner: the second installment, following Some Luck, of her widely acclaimed, best-selling American trilogy, which brings the journey of a remarkable family with roots in the Iowa heartland into mid-century America Early Warning opens in 1953 with the Langdon family at a crossroads. Their stalwart patriarch, Walter, who with his wife, Rosanna, sustained their farm for three decades, has suddenly died, leaving their five children, now adults, looking to the future. Only one will remain in Iowa to work the land, while the others scatter to Washington, D.C., California, and everywhere in between. As the country moves out of post-World War II optimism through the darker landscape of the Cold War and the social and sexual revolutions of the 1960s and '70s, and then into the unprecedented wealth--for some--of the early 1980s, the Langdon children each follow a different path in a rapidly changing world. And they now have children of their own: twin boys who are best friends and vicious rivals; a girl whose rebellious spirit takes her to the notorious Peoples Temple in San Francisco; and a golden boy who drops out of college to fight in Vietnam--leaving behind a secret legacy that will send shock waves through the Langdon family into the next generation. Capturing a transformative period through richly drawn characters we come to know and care deeply for, Early Warning continues Smiley's extraordinary epic trilogy, a gorgeously told saga that began with Some Luck and will span a century in America. But it also stands entirely on its own as an engrossing story of the challenges--and rewards--of family and home, even in the most turbulent of times, all while showcasing a beloved writer at the height of her considerable powers. From the Hardcover edition.

Earnestly Contending: Religious Freedom and Pluralism in Antebellum America

by Dickson D. Bruce Jr.

In Earnestly Contending, Dickson Bruce examines the ways in which religious denominations and movements in antebellum America coped with the ideals of freedom and pluralism that exerted such a strong influence on the larger, national culture. Despite their enormous normative power, these still-evolving ideals--themselves partly religious in origin--ran up against deeply entrenched concerns about the integrity of religious faith and commitment and the role of religion in society. The resulting tensions between these ideals and desires for religious consensus and coherence would remain unresolved throughout the period.Focusing on that era's interdenominational competition, Bruce explores the possibilities for and barriers to realizing ideals of freedom and pluralism in antebellum America. He examines the nature of religion from the perspectives of anthropology and cognitive sciences, as well as history, and uses this interdisciplinary approach to organize and understand specific tendencies in the antebellum period while revealing properties inherent in religion as a social and cultural phenomenon. He goes on to show how issues from that era have continued to play a role in American religious thinking, and how they might shed light on the controversies of our own time.

Earth and Its People: A Global History (AP edition)

by Daniel R. Headrick Pamela Kyle Crossley Richard W. Bulliet Lyman L. Johnson David Northrup Steven W. Hirsch

The book explores the common challenges and experiences that unite the human past.

The Earth and its Peoples: A Global History

by Richard W. Bulliet

In this updated and reorganized edition, Bulliet (Middle Eastern history, Columbia U. ) and historians with other US colleges trace the emergence and growth of civilizations in various regions up to the present globalized world. They examine such major themes as technology and the environment, climate and population, and questions of identity. The well-illustrated text newly includes original essays, a primary source feature, and an auxiliary online study guide. Dates are not given for previous editions.

The Earth and Its Peoples: A Global History

by Daniel R. Headrick Pamela Kyle Crossley Richard W. Bulliet Lyman L. Johnson David Northrup Steven W. Hirsch

Although this brief edition is two-thirds the length of its full-length counterpart, it retains coverage of all major themes and provides a truly global perspective on world history, without over-emphasizing Europe or the U. S. The Earth and Its Peoples focuses on the interaction of human beings and the environment, using this central theme to compare different times, places, and societies. Special emphasis is given to technology and how technological development underlies all human activity. Ideal for one-semester survey courses or courses for which instructors want to supplement their textbook with many primary sources, this text has been carefully abbreviated to maintain the essential narrative of world history. Key pedagogical elements have also been retained.

The Earth and Its Peoples: A Global History

by Daniel R. Headrick Pamela Kyle Crossley Richard W. Bulliet Lyman L. Johnson David Northrup Steven W. Hirsch

This is a textbook that not only speaks for the past but speaks to today's student and today's teacher. The book explores the common challenges and experiences that unite the human past. The Earth and Its Peoples is a truly global text that employs a fundamental theme, the interaction of human beings and the environment, as a point of comparison for different times, places, and societies.

The Earth and Its Peoples: A Global History (2nd Edition)

by Daniel R. Headrick Pamela Kyle Crossley Richard W. Bulliet Lyman L. Johnson David Northrup Steven W. Hirsch

The book explores the common challenges and experiences that unite the human past and contains The Emergence of Human Communities, To 500 B.C.E., The Formation of New Cultural Communities, 1000 B.C.E-400 C.E., Growth and Interaction of Cultural Communities, 300 B.C.E.-1200 C.E., Interregional Patterns of Culture and Contact, 1200-1550, The Globe Encompassed, 1500-1750, Revolutions Reshape The World, Global Dominance and Diversity, The Perils and Promises of A Global Community, 1945-2000.

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