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The Druids

by Peter Berresford Ellis

The respected Celtic scholar gives the first authentic account of who the mysterious Druids were and what role they played in Celtic society.


by Morgan Llywelyn

Historical fiction about Caesar's campaign in Gaul, told by a holy and revered man who was the best friend of Vercingetorix, the mighty warrior who became king of the Celts.

Druids, Gods & Heroes From Celtic Mythology (The World Mythology Series)

by Anne Ross

Presents a collection of myths about Fionn, Cu Chuliann, and other Celtic heroes and briefly describes the civilization that created them.

The Drummer Boy of Vicksburg

by G. Clifton Wisler

In this fact-based story, fourteen-year-old drummer boy Orion Howe displays great bravery during a Civil War battle at Vicksburg, Mississippi.

Drummer Hoff

by Barbara Emberley

In this poem seven soldiers create a cannon, but Drummer Hoff has the last chance to "fire it off" Winner of the 1968 Caldecott Medal

Drums Along the Mohawk

by Walter D. Edmonds

The bestselling novel behind John Ford's acclaimed film starring Claudette Colbert, Henry Fonda, and Edna May Oliver. When newlyweds Gilbert and Lana Martin settle in the Mohawk Valley in 1776, they work tirelessly against the elements to build a new life. But even as they clear land and till soil to establish their farm, the shots of the Revolutionary War become a rallying cry for both the loyalists and the patriots. Soon, Gil and Lana see their neighbors choose sides against each other--as British and Iroquois forces storm the valley, targeting anyone who supports the revolution. Originally published in 1936, this classic novel was a bestseller for two years--second only to Gone with the Wind--and was adapted into a motion picture in 1939. Now, some three-quarters of a century later, Drums Along the Mohawk stands as a brilliant account of the majesty of the New York frontier, the timeless rhythms that shape a marriage, and the battles of a revolution that would change the world. Foreword by Diana GabaldonVintage Movie Classics spotlights classic films that have stood the test of time, now rediscovered through the publication of the novels on which they were based.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Drums at Saratoga (Stories of the States Series)

by Lisa Banim

Lured by the glamour and excitement of a soldier's life, eleven-year-old Nathaniel follows the British army down the Hudson Valley during the American Revolution and witnesses the true hardships of war firsthand. This series presents exciting historical novels that show the diversity and strength of our American culture. Each volume concludes with a short "Historical Postscript" that tells more about the real people depicted in the story, provides valuable background information on the era described, and lists other books on the subject suitable for young readers. Each book is reviewed for accuracy by a historical expert.

Drums of Autumn (Outlander #4)

by Diana Gabaldon

The magnificent saga continues. . . . It began in Scotland, at an ancient stone circle. There, a doorway, open to a select few, leads into the past--or the grave. Claire Randall survived the extraordinary passage, not once but twice. Her first trip swept her into the arms of Jamie Fraser, an eighteenth-century Scot whose love for her became legend--a tale of tragic passion that ended with her return to the present to bear his child. Her second journey, two decades later, brought them together again in frontier America. But Claire had left someone behind in the twentieth century. Their daughter, Brianna. . . . Now Brianna has made a disturbing discovery that sends her to the stone circle and a terrifying leap into the unknown. In search of her mother and the father she has never met, she is risking her own future to try to change history. . . and to save their lives. But as Brianna plunges into an uncharted wilderness, a heartbreaking encounter may strand her forever in the past. . . or root her in the place she should be, where her heart and soul belong. . . .

Drums of Autumn (Outlander #4)

by Diana Gabaldon

It began in Scotland, at an ancient stone circle. There, a doorway, open to a select few, leads into the past--or the grave. Claire Randall survived the extraordinary passage, not once buy twice. Her first trip swept her into the arms of Jamie Fraser, an eighteenth-century Scot whose love for her became legend--a tale of tragic passion that ended with her return to the present to bear his child. Her second journey, two decades later, brought them together again in frontier America. But Claire had left someone behind in the twentieth century. Their daughter Brianna...Now, Brianna has made a disturbing discovery that sends her to the stone circle and a terrifying leap into the unknown. In search of her mother and the father she has never met, she is risking her own future to try to change history...and to save their lives. But as Brianna plunges into an uncharted wilderness, a heartbreaking encounter may strand her forever in the past...or root her in the place she should be, where her heart and soul belong...From the Paperback edition.

Drums of Change (Women of the West #12)

by Janette Oke

Running Fawn loved her place of birth, the site of the Blackfoot tribe's winter camp, more than words could express. The stillness of the mountain, the giant spruce and pine that covered the hillsides, and the gurgle of the spring that squeezed its crystal water from the rock crevice-she couldn't even imagine a different kind of life. This was her home. But the coming of white men with their guns and diseases, the prairie fires that swept the grazing lands, and the quick slaughter of the buffalo herds leave her Blackfoot tribe with little choice but to take up residence on the assigned Reserve. All too soon the world that Running Fawn has cherished is left behind.

Drums of Darkness

by Elizabeth Lane

Claire Sagan had originally come to the wild lushness of Panama to join her husband. Now she is there and her husband dead, his name disgraced. In a search to clear his good name, Claire finds herself among the wealthy, yet wildly eccentric, Jarnacs. Panama is a land of strange fauna and flora, of voodoo and plantations, a nexus of energy where two oceans and two continents collide. It is where the two Jarnac brothers, hot-blooded Andre and scheming Philippe, converge over the love of Claire. In this tropical, mystical Eden, nothing is simple, certainly not love, certainly not the bloody murders of several servants. The only one with answers might be the beautiful and mad Angelique. But how will Claire get the truth from this fair-haired jungle witch when it might be Angelique herself behind all the rhythmic midnight meetings and devilish debauchery? Claire need only follow the drums to find the truth in a jungle throbbing and pulsating with treachery and deceit.

Dry Bones

by Peter Quinn

Macavity Award for Best First Mystery Novel Strand Critics Award for Best First Novel Fintan Dunne, the detective at the center of The Man Who Never Returned and Hour of the Cat, is back in this spellbinding story of an ill-fated OSS mission into the heart of the Eastern front and its consequences more than a decade after the war's end. As the Red Army continues its unstoppable march toward Berlin in the winter of 1945, Dunne and his fellow soldier Dick Van Hull volunteer for a dangerous drop behind enemy lines to rescue a team of OSS officers trying to abet the Czech resistance. When the plan goes south, Dunne and Van Hull uncover a secret that will change both of their lives. Years later, Dunne is drawn back into the shadowy realm of Cold War espionage in an effort to clear his friend's good name and right an injustice so shocking that men would, quite literally, kill to keep it quiet. A literary thriller that will keep you guessing until the very end, Dry Bones completes the trilogy started in Hour of the Cat. Peter Quinn has crafted yet another smart and stylish historical mystery, following his longtime hero from the last gasp of the Third Reich to the heady days of the Cuban revolution. Quinn's signature prose--which Pulitzer Prize-winning author Frank McCourt described as "spare but passionate, wry but loving"--shines once again throughout. New York Times bestselling author James Patterson credits Quinn with "perfecting, if not actually creating, a genre you could call the history-mystery." Blending fact and fiction into a thoroughly compelling whole, this is Quinn at his very best.

Dry Bones Rattling: Community Building to Revitalize American Democracy

by Mark R. Warren

Dry Bones Rattling offers the first in-depth treatment of how to rebuild the social capital of America's communities while promoting racially inclusive, democratic participation. The Industrial Areas Foundation (IAF) network in Texas and the Southwest is gaining national attention as a model for reviving democratic life in the inner city--and beyond. This richly drawn study shows how the IAF network works with religious congregations and other community-based institutions to cultivate the participation and leadership of Americans most left out of our elite-centered politics. Interfaith leaders from poor communities of color collaborate with those from more affluent communities to build organizations with the power to construct affordable housing, create job-training programs, improve schools, expand public services, and increase neighborhood safety. In clear and accessible prose, Mark Warren argues that the key to revitalizing democracy lies in connecting politics to community institutions and the values that sustain them. By doing so, the IAF network builds an organized, multiracial constituency with the power to advance desperately needed social policies. While Americans are most aware of the religious right, Warren documents the growth of progressive faith-based politics in America. He offers a realistic yet hopeful account of how this rising trend can transform the lives of people in our most troubled neighborhoods. Drawing upon six years of original fieldwork, Dry Bones Rattling proposes new answers to the problems of American democracy, community life, race relations, and the urban crisis.

The Dry Grass of August

by Anna Jean Mayhew

In this beautifully written debut, Anna Jean Mayhew offers a riveting depiction of Southern life in the throes of segregation, what it will mean for a young girl on her way to adulthood--and for the woman who means the world to her. . .On a scorching day in August 1954, thirteen-year-old Jubie Watts leaves Charlotte, North Carolina, with her family for a Florida vacation. Crammed into the Packard along with Jubie are her three siblings, her mother, and the family's black maid, Mary Luther. For as long as Jubie can remember, Mary has been there--cooking, cleaning, compensating for her father's rages and her mother's benign neglect, and loving Jubie unconditionally.Bright and curious, Jubie takes note of the anti-integration signs they pass, and of the racial tension that builds as they journey further south. But she could never have predicted the shocking turn their trip will take. Now, in the wake of tragedy, Jubie must confront her parents' failings and limitations, decide where her own convictions lie, and make the tumultuous leap to independence. . .Infused with the intensity of a changing time, here is a story of hope, heartbreak, and the love and courage that can transform us--from child to adult, from wounded to indomitable. "A beautiful book that fans of The Help will enjoy." --Karen White, New York Times bestselling author "Mayhew keeps the story taut, thoughtful and complex, elevating it from the throng of coming-of-age books." --Publishers Weekly "A must-read for fans of The Help." --Woman's World "Written with unusual charm, wonderful dialogue, and a deeply felt sense of time and place, The Dry Grass of August is a book for adults and young people both--a beautifully written literary novel that is a real page-turner, I have to add. Fast, suspenseful, and meaningful. I read this book straight through." --Lee Smith, author of Last Girls and Fair and Tender Ladies "Because the novel is totally true to Jubie's point of view, it generates gripping drama as we watch her reach beyond authority to question law and order." --Booklist "A masterful work of blending time and place." --The Charlotte Observer "A beautifully written and important novel. Set in the 1950s South, it deals with race relations in an original, powerful way. It's also a great story about complicated family relationships, told with humor, delicacy, and penetrating insight. I wish I had written this book." -- Angela Davis-Gardner, author of Butterfly's Child "Anna Jean Mayhew has a true ear for Southern speech. . .The Dry Grass of August is a carefully researched, beautifully written, quietly told tale of love and despair and a look backward at the way it was back then in the South." --The Pilot (Southern Pines, North Carolina)"Deeply felt, lasting relationships formed in the mid-20th century South between white families and the African-American women who took care of them. In The Dry Grass of August, Mayhew explores the love and conflicting loyalties in one such extended family, adult and child, black and white. She does so with honesty and sympathy, intimate knowledge and valuable perspective, as well as beautiful writing. This is an important story about the Southern experience and the women who helped to form the American generation now at the peak of its powers." --Peggy Payne, author of Sister India "Once you've experienced The Dry Grass of August, you'll swiftly see that Anna Jean Mayhew's debut novel deserves all the early praise it's getting. . .the power, bravery and beauty of Mayhew's narrative is beyond contestation and well-deserving of a wide readership." --BookPage "An extraordinary, absorbing novel." --Historical Novel Reviews

Dry Storeroom No. 1

by Richard Fortey

Dry Store Room No. 1 is an intimate biography of the Natural History Museum, celebrating the eccentric personalities who have peopled it and capturing the wonders of scientific endeavour, academic rigour and imagination. This book is a kind of museum of the mind. It is my own collection, a personal archive, designed to explain what goes on behind the polished doors in the Natural History Museum. The lustre of a museum does not depend only on the artefacts or objects it contains the people who work out of sight are what keeps a museum alive. I want to bring those invisible people into the sunlight. Behind the public facade of any great museum there lies a secret domain: one of unseen galleries, locked doors, priceless specimens and hidden lives. Through the stories of the numerous eccentric individuals whose long careers have left their mark on the study of evolutionary science, Richard Fortey, former senior paleontologist at London's Natural History Museum, celebrates the pioneering work of the Museum from its inception to the present day. He delves into the feuds, affairs, scandals and skulduggery that have punctuated its long history, and formed a backdrop to extraordinary scientific endeavour. He explores the staying power and adaptability of the Museum as it responds to changes wrought by advances in technology and molecular biology -- 'spare' bones from an extinct giant bird suddenly become cutting-edge science with the new knowledge that DNA can be extracted from them, and ancient fish are tested with the latest equipment that is able to measure rises in pollution. Dry Store Room No. 1 is a fascinating and affectionate account of a hidden world of untold treasures, where every fragment tells a story about time past, by a scientist who combines rigorous professional learning with a gift for prose that sparkles with wit and literary sensibility.

Dryden's Bride

by Margo Maguire

A Knight With A Dark Soul Sir Hugh Dryden undertook his quest for a bride with a guarded heart. But two years of captivity had deadened his desire for any woman. So why, then, did the sight of a mere country girl in distress stir such tenderness in him? And why did simply carrying her from danger set his pulse pounding? Without a proper dowry, no gentleman would ask to marry Sin Tudor. Most made less respectable offers -- excepting the knight who'd rescued her from certain death. The man was strong and dangerous looking -- and she'd had the most unfamiliar longing to touch him. But what sense were flights of fancy when he was surely bound for battle -- and Sin about to be banished to a nunnery... ?

Drylongso: A Self-portrait of Black America

by John L. Gwaltney

Revealing oral histories of black Americans collected in the 1970's by a blind, African American anthropologist.

Du Bois and his Rivals

by Raymond Wolters

Although focusing primarily on W. E. B. Du Bois, this book gives biagraphical information and criticisms of a few Civil Rights leaders, including Booker T. Washington and Marcus Garvey. It describes the similarities and differences between these men's views.

The du Mauriers

by Daphne Du Maurier

"Daphne du Maurier creates on the grand scale; she runs through the generations, giving her family unity and reality . . . a rich vein of humor and satire . . . observation, sympathy, courage, a sense of the romantic, are here." --The ObserverWhen Daphne du Maurier wrote The du Mauriers she was only thirty years old and had already established herself as both a biographer and a novelist. She wrote this epic biography during a vintage period in her career, between two of her best-loved novels: Jamaica Inn and Rebecca. Her aim was to write the story of her family 'so that it reads like a novel.' Spanning nearly three quarters of a century, The du Mauriers is a saga of artists and speculators, courtesans and military men. From England to Paris and back again, their fortunes varied as wildly as their ambitions. An extraordinary family of writers, artists and actors they are...The du Mauriers.

Du Pont Dynasty

by Mark Crispin Miller Gerard Colby

Award-winning journalist Gerard Colby takes readers behind the scenes of one of America's most powerful and enduring corporations; now with a new introduction by the author Their name is everywhere. America's wealthiest industrial family by far and a vast financial power, the Du Ponts, from their mansions in northern Delaware's "Chateau Country," have long been leaders in the relentless drive to turn the United States into a plutocracy. The Du Pont story in this country began in 1800. Éleuthère Irénée du Pont, official keeper of the gunpowder of corrupt King Louis XVI, fled from revolutionary France to America. Two years later he founded the gunpowder company that called itself "America's armorer"--and that President Wilson's secretary of war called a "species of outlaws" for war profiteering. Du Pont Dynasty introduces many colorful characters, including "General" Henry du Pont, who profited from the Civil War to build the Gunpowder Trust, one of the first corporate monopolies; Alfred I. du Pont, betrayed by his cousins and pushed out of the organization, landing in social exile as the powerful "Count of Florida"; the three brothers who expanded Du Pont's control to General Motors, fought autoworkers' right to unionize, and then launched a family tradition of waging campaigns to destroy FDR's New Deal regulatory reforms; Governor Pete du Pont, who ran for president and backed Newt Gingrich's 1994 Republican Revolution; and Irving S. Shapiro, the architect of Du Pont's ongoing campaign to undermine effective environmental regulation. From plans to force President Roosevelt from office, to munitions sales to warlords and the rising Nazis, to Freon's damage to the planet's life-protecting ozone layer, to the manufacture of deadly gases and the covered-up poisoning of Du Pont workers, to the reputation the company earned for being the worst polluter of America's air and water, the Du Pont reign has been dappled with scandal for centuries. Culled from years of painstaking research and interviews, this fully documented book unfolds like a novel. Laying bare the bitter feuds, power plays, smokescreens, and careless unaccountability that erupted in murder, Colby pulls back the curtain on a dynasty whose formidable influence continues to this day. Suppressed in myriad ways and the subject of the author's landmark federal lawsuit, Du Pont Dynasty is an essential history of the United States.


by Michael Veal

When Jamaican recording engineers Osbourne "King Tubby" Ruddock, Errol Thompson, and Lee "Scratch" Perry began crafting "dub" music in the early 1970s, they were initiating a musical revolution that continues to have worldwide influence. Dub is a sub-genre of Jamaican reggae that flourished during reggae's "golden age" of the late 1960s through the early 1980s. Dub involves remixing existing recordings--electronically improvising sound effects and altering vocal tracks--to create its unique sound. Just as hip-hop turned phonograph turntables into musical instruments, dub turned the mixing and sound processing technologies of the recording studio into instruments of composition and real-time improvisation. In addition to chronicling dub's development and offering the first thorough analysis of the music itself, author Michael Veal examines dub's social significance in Jamaican culture. He further explores the "dub revolution" that has crossed musical and cultural boundaries for over thirty years, influencing a wide variety of musical genres around the globe.Ebook Edition Note: Seven of the 25 illustrations have been redacted.


by Syed Ali

In less than two decades, Dubai has transformed itself from an obscure Gulf emirate into a global center for business, tourism, and luxury living. It is a fascinating case study in light-speed urban development, hyperconsumerism, massive immigration, and vertiginous inequality. Its rulers have succeeded in making Dubai into a worldwide brand, publicizing its astonishing hotels and leisure opportunities while at the same time successfully downplaying its complex policies towards guest workers and suppression of dissent. In this enormously readable book, Syed Ali delves beneath the dazzling surface to analyze how--and at what cost--Dubai has achieved such success. Ali brings alive a society rigidly divided between expatriate Westerners living self-indulgent lifestyles on short-term work visas, native Emiratis who are largely passive observers and beneficiaries of what Dubai has become, and workers from the developing world who provide the manual labor and domestic service needed to keep the emirate running, often at great personal cost.

Dubious Allegiance

by Don Gutteridge

Autumn 1837: the provinces of Upper and Lower Canada are on the eve of open revolt. Lieutenant Marc Edwards has been sent with a force of British soldiers to subdue the increasingly hostile French rebels. But as the smoke from the battle clears and political pressures build, Marc begins to question whether the sacrifices he has made in the name of Crown and country have been worth the cost. On his return trip to Toronto, Marc is accompanied by a group of seemingly innocent civilians. But as tensions in the provinces escalate and personal grievances within the group arise, it becomes clear that not everyone Marc is traveling with is who he appears to be. Soon, mysterious death threats are issued and Marc finds himself the target of an unknown assassin. And when a member of the group is found murdered in the woods, Marc realizes that he may have more than one killer to worry about.

The Dubious Miss Dalrymple

by Kasey Michaels

Harlequin's Reader's Choice program brings back four favorite Regency romances by Kasey Michaels. Forced to assume a false identity, "John Bates" travels to the Ear of Hythe's home to uncover a murderous plot. There, he finds Elinor Dalrymple, sister to the earl and mistress of the estate. Dismissing her as a spinster at first, John realizes this feisty damsel is dubious of his devilish rogue persona.

Duchamp and the Aesthetics of Chance: Art as Experiment

by Herbert Molderings John Brogden

Marcel Duchamp is often viewed as an "artist-engineer-scientist," a kind of rationalist who relied heavily on the ideas of the French mathematician and philosopher Henri Poincaré. Yet a complete portrait of Duchamp and his multiple influences draws a different picture. In his 3 Standard Stoppages (1913-1914), a work that uses chance as an artistic medium, we see how far Duchamp subverted scientism in favor of a radical individualistic aesthetic and experimental vision. Unlike the Dadaists, Duchamp did more than dismiss or negate the authority of science. He pushed scientific rationalism to the point where its claims broke down and alternative truths were allowed to emerge. With humor and irony, Duchamp undertook a method of artistic research, reflection, and visual thought that focused less on beauty than on the notion of the "possible. " He became a passionate advocate of the power of invention and thinking things that had never been thought before. The 3 Standard Stoppages is the ultimate realization of the play between chance and dimension, visibility and invisibility, high and low art, and art and anti-art. Situating Duchamp firmly within the literature and philosophy of his time, Herbert Molderings recaptures the spirit of a frequently misread artist--and his thrilling aesthetic of chance.

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