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Showing 1,551 through 1,575 of 1,848 results

Stranger on the Bay

by Adrien Stoutenburg

Don and ned are spending the summer trying to get Frosty a retired german Shepherd guide dog over his fear of fire. At the same time, a young and very quiet boy appears on the Bay claiming to be Grandpa Dan's long lost Grandsoon. But not all is what it seems. Who is living in the abadoned shack on the other side of the bay? Who is Mr. Blackwell, and why does Don get a bad feeling off of him. Is three something going on that they boys and even grandpa Dan don't realize. Good story, about guide dogs, but not about training of them. Good classic, but can be appreciated now as well.

Strawgirl

by Abigail Padgett

This is Book 2 in the Bo Bradley mystery series. (The first book, "Child of Silence", is already in Bookshare collection.) Bo Bradley is a CPS worker who also has manic-depression. The characters are well-rounded, and the story keeps you guessing what might happen next. This one focuses on the death of a small child and many mistakes in the police's and public's choices of the guilty person. Satanic abuse is blamed and debunked, rituals and cults debunked, while Bradley and her cohorts track down the truly guilty person. A possibly-romantic attachment for Bradley is continued in this story, but not yet decided. A quick read, and not depressing, even with the subject matter of child abuse.

Stress Free for Good: 10 Scientifically Proven Life Skills for Health and Happiness

by Fred Luskin Kenneth R. Pelletier

Plan for creating a life with less stress that can lead to better physical and emotional health. These 10 suggested skills were developed over many years that the authors spent doing research at Stanford University's school of medicine.

Strong at the Broken Places: Voices of Illness, a Chorus of Hope

by Richard M. Cohen

The stories of 5 chronically ill people, all different in gender, age, race, and economic status, but all determined to live life on their own terms.

Stuck on Fast Forward: Youth with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (Youth with Special Needs)

by Shirley Brinkerhoff

Connor didn't have too many problems before he started school. That is, if you don't count the little things, like the time he tried to mow the lawn with his dad's riding mower (he ruined the engine when he poured oil in the gas tank); or the time he dressed up like Santa Claus and tried to go down the chimney of the backyard brick barbeque (he got stuck and the fire department had to come pull him out); or the experiment he conducted on the family beagle to see if she liked Tabasco sauce on her dog food (the vet threatened to call the ASPCA). The real trouble didn't start until Connor began kindergarten. The notes started coming home with Connor on his very first day. They said things like: "Does not play well with others," "Is disruptive in class," and "Teacher requests conference with parents." Every day that Connor brought home another note--which was most days--his parents looked a little grayer and a little more tired. Connor couldn't seem to sit still or pay attention; and all too often, his impulsiveness led to inappropriate behavior. Though his parents do not know it yet, Connor has attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. ADHD is an increasingly common diagnosis for school-age and preschool children today. The debate over diagnosis and treatment of symptoms is intense. In Stuck on Fast Forward: Youth with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, you will learn about the many sides of this common and controversial condition. Along the way, you will read more about Connor and how he and his family learn to live with the challenges of ADHD.

Students, Colleges, and Disability Law

by Stephen B. Thomas

This text examines the obligations and rights of students with disabilities and the institutions they attend in higher education, including guidelines for university administrators.

Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Effective Instructional Practices

by L. Juane Heflin Donna Fiorino Alaimo

Broadened public awareness of autism and other associated spectrum disorders, combined with continuing research, means that more students than ever before are being identified with these disabilities. This book is an excellent resource for any teacher working with students who have ASD because it discusses how to identify and describe individuals with autism spectrum disorder, develop effective programs, create contexts for instruction, accommodate sensory issues, use applied behavior analytic instructional strategies and program for challenging behavior. Separate chapters are devoted to communication, socialization, academic skill acquisition and non-academic environments. Information on the use of technology is infused throughout the book and makes this an invaluable reference for educators.

Summer of the Swans, The (Puffin Modern Classics)

by Betsy Byars

Sara's fourteenth summer was turning out to be the most confusing time of her life. Up until this summer, things had flowed smoothly, like the gliding swans on the lake. Now she wants to fly away from everything--her beautiful older sister, her bossy Anut Willie, her remote father, and most of all,herself. But can she run away from Charlie? Sara loves her brother so much, and in a way she can't understand, though sometimes she can't stand his neediness. But when Charlie himself flies away, Sara knows what she must do. Winner of the Newberry Medal.

Summer School! What Genius Thought Up That? (Hank Zipzer, the World's Greatest Underachiever #8)

by Henry Winkler Lin Oliver

Hank and his friends are at it again. Will Hank be stuck in a hot classroom all summer and be able to join his friends in some cool activities?

The Summit

by Eric Alexander

It's one of the greatest challenges one can face on Earth: an ascent to the top of the world on the slopes of Mount Everest. Eric Alexander experienced grace and a faith-empowering journey he will never forget as part of a record-setting team in May 2001, scaling the heights of Everest with his friend, blind climber Erik Weihenmayer. Experience some of the most dangerous locations in the world, including abject terror on Ama Dablam, a blind ski descent of Russia's Mount Elbrus, and up Kilimanjaro in Africa with four blind teens Gain wisdom in the application of trust, courage, innovation, teamwork, leadership, and integrity to overcome your own Everests. Discover practical faith lessons learned on the highest peaks of six continents. Here is the powerful story of Eric Alexander and his unique life journey of guiding people with disabilities as they overcome the most perilous places of the world. Follow in their footsteps, and learn about faith, trust, prayer, depending on God, as well as the perseverance needed in your own life. Be inspired and motivated by Eric's insight, not simply to survive but to thrive every day in God's grace.

Summit

by Marc Maurer

In this book you will meet "a blind college student worrying about meeting the challenges of his summer job as a camp counselor, a blind grandmother who wants to share storybooks with her baby granddaughter, a teen-ager fearing the loss of physical freedom she thought would necessarily accompany the loss of eyesight, and a second-grader hurt by his school teacher's obvious disdain for her blind students." Other books in this series are available from Bookshare.

The Sunflower Forest

by Torey L. Hayden

From the Book Jacket: "Torey Hayden has the rare ability to write about love and hate and loyalty in ways which never fail to move the reader. I was deeply touched by The Sunflower Forest. Rabbi Harold Kushner, author of When Bad Things Happen to Good People The stunning fiction debut of a writer whose great compassion for youth and extraordinary narrative power have endeared her to readers everywhere. How do you keep it together when you're a normal, well-adjusted teenager in a family gone mad? Seventeen-year-old Lesley doesn't know. Justifiably preoccupied with high school, the prospect of college, and her first serious romance, she must also deal with a mother whose dark and tragic past in Nazi-occupied Europe drives her closer to insanity every day; with a father unwilling to acknowledge his wife's deteriorating mental state; and with a sister too young to know the difference between craziness and health. Torn between an intimate reality that is insane and the worldly pressures of her own coming of age, Lesley must muster all her strength-to stand firm in the face of the cataclysm that will soon come down on all their heads.

Surpassing Expectations: My Life without Sight

by Lawrence Scadden

The booktells the story of the author's life without sight,a memoir that recalls the activities that brought him international acclaim as a scientist, policymaker, and advocate.

The Survival Guide for Kids with LD*: *Learning Differences

by Gary L. Fisher Rhoda Cummings

This book discusses how children with learning differences can get along better in school, set goals, and plan for the future. With references and index.

Survival Strategies for Going Abroad: A Guide for People with Disabilities

by Laura Hershey

This easy-to-use guide addresses the disability-related aspects of going on an international exchange, including choosing a program, applying, preparing to travel, adjusting to life in a new country, and returning home.

Surviving an Eating Disorder: New Perspectives and Strategies for Family and Friends

by Margot Weinshel Michele Siegel Judith Brisman

From the book: The first book of its kind, Surviving an Eating Disorder is an inspiring yet realistic guide written expressly for parents, spouses, friends, relatives, and all others who are the "silent sufferers" of anorexia, bulimia, and compulsive overeating. Whether you've just begun to suspect a problem or have been facing the frightening reality of a serious disorder for some time, this reassuring book will help you to overcome feelings of confusion, helplessness, and anger and to take new actions that will encourage the recovery process. The authors, three leading experts in the field, explain what you can expect from the eating-disordered person--and yourself---and what kind of support is available. Drawing on the authors' extensive experience in counseling individuals, groups, and families, and illustrated throughout with vivid case examples, Surviving an Eating Disorder will help answer all your questions, large and small: Why is this happening? Can I keep sweets in the house? What do I say when she asks if she looks fat? How can I help him with his diet? Should I suggest therapy? Will things get better? In Part I, "Gaining Perspective," the authors discuss the psychological components of eating disorders as well as the family contexts in which they develop. Part II, "Confronting the Problem," offers guidance for bringing the problem out into the open, getting the person into treatment, and coping with the possibility of anger and denial. In Part III, "Using New Strategies," the authors show how the situation can be made better--now--by disengaging from the eating disorder (with practical suggestions for handling such daily issues as mealtimes, messy bathrooms, money, and requests for advice) while reestablishing a relationship with the eating disordered person based on issues other than food and weight. The guide concludes with names and addresses of national organizations and a list of suggested readings.

Sweet Invisible Body: Reflections on a Life with Diabetes

by Lisa Roney

An uncommonly intelligent and honest look at how living with a disease can affect every aspect of a person's life. Diabetes is one of the strangest and most insidious of all diseases: a diabetic can give the appearance of robust health and often lead a long and active life, but within moments can be catastrophically ill, even dead. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, where over 16 million people have the disease. The related statistics are staggering: diabetes makes an individual two to four times more likely to have heart disease or a stroke and it is the leading cause among adults, of blindness, renal disease, and lower-limb amputations. Lisa Roney was diagnosed with diabetes in 1972, just before her twelfth birthday. Sweet Invisible Body is her candid and exquisitely written account of living with a disease that directly impacts the choices she makes in every aspect of her life every day, from food and exercise to career and family. Moreover, and most remarkable, is Roney's willingness to intelligently explore and reveal the usually hidden consequences of living with a disease such as diabetes: how it erodes self-esteem, induces feelings of vulnerability, influences sexual choices, and leads to a heightened awareness of mortality. Full of wisdom, humor, and practical advice, Sweet Invisible Body will be welcomed by diabetics and their friends and families who have never had a spokesperson as articulate, honest, and insightful as Lisa Roney.

Switching Time: A Doctor's Harrowing Story of Treating a Woman with 17 Personalities

by Richard K. Baer

In 1989, Karen Overhill walks into psychiatrist Richard Baer's office complaining of vague physical pains and depression. Odder still, she reveals that she's suffering from a persistent memory problem. Routinely, she "loses" parts of her day, finding herself in places she doesn't remember going to or being told about conversations she doesn't remember having. Her problems are so pervasive that she often feels like an impersonator in her own life; she doesn't recognize the people who call themselves her friends, and she can't even remember being intimate with her own husband. Baer recognizes that Karen is on the verge of suicide and, while trying various medications to keep her alive, attempts to discover the root cause of her strange complaints. It's the work of months, and then years, to gain Karen's trust and learn the true extent of the trauma buried in her past. What she eventually reveals is nearly beyond belief, a narrative of a childhood spent grappling with unimaginable horror. How has Karen survived with even a tenuous grasp on sanity? Under hypnosis, alternate Karen personalities reveal themselves in shocking variety and with undeniable traits - both physical and psychological. One "alter" is a young boy filled with frightening aggression; another an adult male who considers himself Karen's protector; and a third a sassy flirt who seeks dominance over the others. It's only by compartmentalizing her pain, guilt, and fear in this fashion-by "switching time" with alternate selves as the situation warrants - that Karen has been able to function since childhood. Realizing that his patient represents an extreme case of multiple personality disorder, Baer faces the daunting task of creating a therapy that will make Karen whole again. Somehow, in fact, he must gain the trust of each of Karen's seventeen "alters" and convince them of the necessity of their own annihilation. As powerful as Sybil or The Three Faces of Eve, Switching Time is the first complete account of such therapy to be told from the perspective of the treating physician, a devoted healer who worked selflessly for decades so that Karen could one day live as a single human being. This book includes grim and disturbing, though not grisly descriptions of child abuse. It also contains language that is objectionable to many people.

Systematic Instruction of Functional Skills for Students and Adults with Disabilities

by Keith Storey Craig Miner

A text on vocational guidance of individuals with disabilities.

Take A Bow Krissy! ( Here Come the Brownies Book 7)

by Marcia Leonard

While Krissy is busy trying to earn money to go to the play, she often finds herself trying to see as Kate does. "She's an ordinary kid. Treat her that way. That had been her mom's advice. And it had worked! But her mom had been wrong about one thing. Kate was not ordinary. She was special." At the end of this book is a cool treasure chest which kids can make.

Take Charge: A Strategic Guide for Blind Job Seekers

by Diane Croft Rami Rabby

Here is guidance for blind job seekers

Take Control of Asperger's Syndrome: The Official Strategy Guide for Teens with Asperger's Syndrome and Nonverbal Learning Disorder

by Jennifer Engel Fisher Janet Price

Take Control of Asperger's Syndrome: The Official Strategy Guide for Teens With Asperger's Syndrome and Nonverbal Learning Disorder is a unique handbook for kids and teens on living successful lives with these disorders by taking control of their strengths to overcome their weaknesses. Drawing on their experiences as parents and teachers of students with Asperger's syndrome (AS) and Nonverbal Learning Disorders (NLD), the authors provide tips on understanding the disorders, living with the symptoms, succeeding in school, completing homework, talking to others about strengths and needs, making friends and socializing, and using technology to connect with other kids and teens with these disorders. By interviewing dozens of kids and teens who live with AS and NLD, the authors include ideas, information, and advice for students, by students just like them. This handy guidebook is sure to help any child or teen with AS or NLD navigate life's challenges with successful outcomes.

Take Up Thy Bed and Walk: Death, Disability and Cure in Classic Fiction for Girls

by Lois Keith

Many Victorian children's books written for girls show a lively, rebellious heroine who, by the end of the story, is tamed and ready to take on the role of submissive young woman. In a number of works, a temporary disability is the crucible which teaches these headstrong girls lessons in patience and humility. Sometimes goodness and will-power are rewarded with a miraculous cure. In other works a dying child serves as a lesson to the living, modeling endurance and faith. Lois Keith explores such themes in children's classics including Little Women, Heidi, The Secret Garden, and Pollyanna. In her final chapter she considers depictions of illness and disability and children's literature of the mid to late 20th century.

Taking Hold: My Journey into Blindness

by Sally Hobart Alexander

A true story of the author's loss of vision as a young woman and of her adaptation to blindness.

Talking Hands: What Sign Language Reveals About the Mind

by Margalit Fox

(front flap) Imagine a village where everyone "speaks" sign language. Just such a village - an isolated Bedouin community in Israel with an unusually high rate of deafness - is at the heart of Talking Hands: What Sign Language Reveals About the Mind. There, an indigenous sign language has sprung up, used by deaf and hearing villagers alike. It is a language no outsider has been able to decode, until now. A New York Times reporter trained as a linguist, Margalit Fox is the only Western journalist to have set foot in this remarkable village. In Talking Hands, she follows an international team of scientists that is unraveling this mysterious language. Because the sign language of the village has arisen completely on its own, outside the influence of any other language, it is a living demonstration of the "language instinct," man's inborn capacity to create language. If the researchers can decode this language, they will have helped isolate ingredients essential to all human language, signed and spoken. But as Talking Hands grippingly shows, their work in the village is also a race against time, because the unique language of the village may already be endangered. Talking Hands offers a fascinating introduction to the signed languages of the world- languages as beautiful, vital and emphatically human as any other- explaining why they are now furnishing cognitive scientists with long-sought keys to understanding how language works...

Showing 1,551 through 1,575 of 1,848 results

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