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Morrie: In His Own Words

by Morrie Schwartz

From the book: In these remarkable pages are the profound, life-affirming words of Morrie Schwartz (the hero of Tuesdays with Morrie) as he faced his own imminent death. In 1994, at the age of seventy-seven, Schwartz learned he had A L S, commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease. Undaunted, the former professor embraced his illness, choosing to live passionately and calmly until the end. He also embarked on his greatest teaching adventure: sharing his evolving knowledge of living while dying. With warmth, wisdom, and humor, Morrie reveals how fully in the moment...tap into the powers of the mind to transcend physical limitations...grieve for your losses...reach out to family and friends... develop an inner space for meditation and spiritual connection. It's never too late to become the kind of person you'd like to be. Morrie shows the way in his magnificent legacy of love, forgiveness, transcendence, and redemption, a guide to living fully to the end of your days.

Morris and Buddy: The Story of the First Seeing Eye Dog

by Becky Hall Doris Ettlinger

Morris Frank lost his sight in 1924, when he was only sixteen. But it wasn't just his sight that he lost--he lost his independence, too. Morris didn't want to be led around by a paid helper or find work making brooms, as was expected of blind people then. He wanted to lead a normal life.One day in 1928, Morris's dad read him an article about Dorothy Harrison Eustis, an American dog trainer living in Switzerland. She had been training dogs for police and army work, but had recently visited a German school where dogs were taught to help soldiers who had been blinded in World War I. Thrilled with this new possibility, Morris set off on his own to Switzerland to meet with Dorothy Eustis and her head trainer, Jack Humphrey. Morris had big ambitions-not only did he want to learn how to work with a guide dog, but he also wanted to start his own guide dog school in America! Morris began training with his dog, Buddy. While he struggled-stepping on Buddy's paws, not paying attention to her cues, and even walking into a gatepost-Buddy waited patiently at his side, allowing him to learn. At last Morris felt ready to return to America with Buddy at his side. But his biggest adventure still lay ahead-founding The Seeing Eye, an organization that has trained thousands of dogs to help other blind people lead independent lives.

Moses Goes to a Concert

by Isaac Millman

"Moses and his school friends are deaf, but like most children, they have a lot to say. They communicate in American Sign Language, using visual signs and facial expressions. This is called signing. And even though they can't hear, they can enjoy many activities through their other senses. Today, Moses and his classmates are going to a concert. Their teacher, Mr. Samuels, has two surprises in store for them, to make this particular concert a special event."

Moses Goes to School

by Isaac Millman

From the Book jacket: Moses goes to a special school, a public school for the deaf. All his classmates are deaf or hard of hearing, but that doesn't mean they don't have a lot to say to each other! They communicate in American Sign Language, using visual signs and facial expressions. This is called signing. Isaac Millman follows Moses through a school day, telling the story in pictures and written English, and in American Sign Language (ASL), introducing hearing children to the signs for some of the key words and ideas, including a favorite song in sign language. You can sign along! Picture descriptions describe each sign and its movements. ISAAC MILLMAN was born in France to Polish Jewish immigrants, and came to the United States as a teenager in 1948, later becoming a citizen and serving in the U.S. Armed Forces. Millman graduated from the Pratt Institute with a degree in Fine Arts and worked for many years as senior art director at a large sales promotion agency. His first book was Moses Goes to a Concert. He and his wife, who have two grown sons, live in New York City.

Moses Goes to the Circus

by Isaac Millman

Experience the Big Apple's Circus of the Senses Moses and his family are going to the circus. Not just any circus but the Big Apple's Circus of the Senses! In a single ring, there are acts by trapeze artists, acrobats, elephants, horses, and clowns - all specially designed for the deaf and hard-of-hearing and the blind. Moses's little sister, Renee, isn't deaf but is learning sign language, and Moses loves teaching her the signs for their day at the circus.

A Most Noble Benefaction: The Matilda Ziegler Magazine for the Blind

by C. Michael Mellor

From the letter in 1908 that started it all, this book tells the story of the Matilda Ziegler Magazine for the Blind, how it changed history, and has helped change many lives for the better.

Mostly Monty (Monty, Book 1)

by Johanna Hurwitz

Because he suffers from asthma, six-year-old Monty is nervous about starting first grade but he soon learns to cope with his illness and use his special talents to make friends.

Mother Warriors: A Nation of Parents Healing Autism Against All Odds

by Jenny Mccarthy

Mother Warriors shares the heartfelt and deeply personal stories of families navigating through the many autism therapies to heal their children, as well as Jenny's own journey as an autism advocate and a mother.

A Mother's Touch: The Tiffany Callo Story

by Jay Mathews

The author, a journalist, retraces the life of Tiffany Callo and her battle to regain custody of her two children. Tiffany, a teenage mother living on public assistence, was deemed an unfit mother by the children's services of Santa Clara County, CA. Her disability - cerebral palsy - was used as a major strike against her. Callo's case aroused wide publicity and helped arouse interest in the rights and concerns of parents with disabilities.

The Motivation Breakthrough: 6 Secrets to Turning On the Tuned-out Child

by Richard Lavoie

Any child can be motivated to learn. "If he only would apply himself..." "She can do it if she puts her mind to it." "He just doesn't seem to care." "She's just not trying." Motivation is the key to learning. But very few parents and teachers have an effective arsenal of techniques at their disposal. Enter educator and acclaimed author Rick Lavoie, who arms all those who deal with children with proven, effective tools and strategies they can use to encourage any child to learn and achieve success. Lavoie's practical, innovative approach begins with a quiz that helps a parent or teacher identify -- using six different possible models -- a child's motivational style. Is she motivated by power? Does he need prestige? Does praise mean a lot to this child? Does contact with other people inspire this child? Does he like to do projects? Does she enjoy receiving prizes? He then explores each motivational style in depth, presenting proven techniques, strategies, and scripts that can be used in the classroom and at home to break through a child's apathy and discouragement and inspire him to succeed and achieve. Along the way, Lavoie explodes some common myths about motivation: for instance, he demonstrates that rewards, punishment, and competition are not effective motivational tools. He gives specific advice throughout for parents and teachers of children with learning disabilities and provides detailed instructions for how to create a motivated classroom. He outlines the parent's role, the teacher's role, and suggests ways in which they can work together to encourage children to reach their potential. The book's final chapter, "What Does Madison Avenue Know...That Maple Street Elementary School Doesn't," reveals what parents and teachers can learn from some of the most powerful motivators in our children's world: advertisers. With empathy and understanding, backed by decades of experience in the classroom, Rick Lavoie gives parents and teachers the key to unlock any child's enthusiasm and responsiveness. The Motivation Breakthrough will revolutionize the way parents, teachers, and professionals reach out to and motivate all children.

Motorcycles, Sushi and One Strange Book (Real Life #1)

by Nancy Rue

Fifteen-year-old Jessie Hatcher has ADHD and can usually use her bubbly charm to cover up her problems. But when her biological father appears from nowhere and tells her she'll be spending time with him in Florida, Jessie finds she'll need more than charm this time. In fact, a mysterious book might be the answer to her problems

Move Over, Wheelchairs Coming Through!: Seven Young People in Wheelchairs Talk About Their Lives

by Ron Roy

Stories of seven disabled youngsters between the ages of nine and nineteen who use wheelchairs in their fully active lives at home, at school, and on vacation.

Moved to Action

by Hahrie C. Han

Han (political science, Wellesley College and health policy, Harvard U. ) investigates how people without many educational, financial, and civic resources become engaged to participate in politics. Many studies show the most people who participate in politics are interested in it, have the resources, and are asked; she looks at people who have none of that, but dive in anyway. She covers the challenge of political equality, theoretical foundations, issue publics and the distribution of political motivation, an empirical look at issue publics and participation, pathways to participation, and looking ahead. Her case studies come from a wide range of issues, organizations, and campaigns. Annotation c2010 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Movement and Learning in the Early Years: Supporting Dyspraxia (DCD) and Other Difficulties

by Kim Mcvitty Christine Macintyre

`This book achieves what it sets out to do - provide clear guidance to parents and professionals on key aspects of movement in the early years. The book however does more than that - it emphasises that movement in the early years is not the territory of experts, but through the use of this book, the assessment of movement development of activities and programmes are within the range of all - class teachers and parents. I strongly recommend that this book is available in every school' - Educational Review `This book provides a good overview of issues in movement and development and learning, and will stimulate the interested reader to explore this topic further' - Early Years `This book will be a useful addition to any primary staff room bookshelf. It is a practical book based on sound theory. It will provide ideas for the non-specialist teacher and for parents anxious to help. The suggestions will provide a good framework for the staged assessment and support for young children for whom there is a cause for concern' - Support for Learning `For anyone involved in the development of any young child, this should be essential reading. The book is very informative and readable by parents, teachers and students and is simply illustrated with case studies' - Dyslexia Contact `As a behaviour advisory teacher I will certainly be influenced by reading this, and I know our local occupational therapists would be overjoyed if she knew all teachers read books like this' - Special Children `It is always good to be able to welcome a book on such a key factor as movement in early childhood development, and this text has been written to support parents and practitioners who wish to understand how movement contributes to all aspects of learning -intellectual, social and emotional, as well as physical' - Marian Whitehead, Nursery World `This book is an excellent introduction for anybody trying to understand how movement affects child development. It clearly explains the importance movement has on how young children learn and feel. The information and insights in this book can be found elsewhere but I have yet to find such breadth and depth of information on supporting children with movement difficulties as clearly written and accessible as this book' - Spare-Chair `The book is very informative and readable by parents, teachers and students and amply illustrated with case studies' - Judith Stansfield, SEN ICT Consultant Movement is a key factor in young children's development and it can affect how they learn and how they feel. Do you work with young children who have difficulties in this area? This book shows you how to observe a child as they move to allow for early identification of any problem and then tells you how to help. Dyspraxia (DCD) is on the increase in young children and less confident and easy movement can play a part in other specific learning difficulties such as dyslexia, attention deficit disorder (ADD) and with hyperactivity (ADHD). Included is advice on: } observing, analyzing and assessing movement development } building confidence } helping with handwriting } supporting mathematical development Why not ask the child to pop bubble paper as one way of promoting finger awareness? Carefully taught activities can be easy to plan and fun to carry out and there are lots of suggested activities set out in the book. Early years practitioners in nurseries, schools, playgroups and EYDCPs will find this book clear and useful; it also offers advice to parents. Christine Macintyre was formerly Senior Lecturer at Edinburgh University and is now a freelance consultant. Kim McVitty is a nursery school teacher.

Moving over the Edge: Artists with Disabilities Take the Leap

by Pamela K. Walker

A book about the author's coming of age alongside disability activists and artists with disabilities, reflecting the sociological evolution from disability rights to disability culture. It features many of the artists and groups that emerged in the San Francisco Bay Area in the late 1980s, including Axis Dance Company, Bruce Curtis, CJ Jones, David Roche, Cheryl Marie Wade and Wry Crips Disabled Women's Theater.

Moving Violations: War Zones, Wheelchairs and Declarations of Independence

by John Hockenberry

Paraplegic newscaster Hockenberry speaks as a thought-provoking journalist, an insightful iconoclast and a man defined, but never confined by a wheelchair.

Ms. Coco Is Loco! (My Weird School #16)

by Dan Gutman

It's Poetry Month! And Ms. Coco, who runs the gifted and talented program, is poetry crazy! She cries when she sees a sunset! She thinks boys should have feelings! She talks in rhyme! All the time! Will A.J.'s life ever be normal again?

Multiple Journeys to One: Spiritual Stories of Integrating from Dissociative Identity Disorder

by Judy Dragon Terry Popp

This book compiles the accounts of eight women who developed dissociative identity disorder or DID (also called multiple personality disorder, or MPD) as a means of surviving horrific child abuse. The narratives focus on the process of healing and becoming integrated. In addition to traditional psychotherapy, these women report receiving help from spiritual healers and hypnotherapists.

Multiple Sclerosis: Understanding the Cognitive Challenges

by Nicholas Larocca Rosalind Kalb

Written by two clinical psychologists with contributions from two neuropsychologists -- each an MS specialist -- Multiple Sclerosis: Understanding the Cognitive Challenges answers all questions patients may have about their condition, including: A definition of cognition and discussion of the processes that underlie human thought The emotional and social impact of cognitive changes The neuropsychological evaluation of cognitive symptoms Detailed overview of treatment options Vignettes describing the real-life experiences of people with cognitive dysfunction Extensive references to the scientific literature Combining detailed, referenced advice with hands-on strategies for living, this is the only book to provide in-depth information about cognitive dysfunction. It will be an invaluable reference to patients, families, and caregivers, as well as to health professionals who care for people with MS.

Mummy Told Me Not to Tell: The True Story of a Troubled Boy with a Dark Secret

by Cathy Glass

Reece is the last of six siblings to be fostered. Having been in care for four months his aggressive and disruptive behaviour has seen him passed from carer to carer. Although only 7, he has been excluded from school, and bites people so often that his mother calls him 'Sharky'. Cathy wants to find the answers for Reece's distressing behaviour, but he has been sworn to secrecy by his mother, and will not tell them anything. As the social worker prepares for the final hearing, he finds five different files on Reece's family, and is incredulous that he had not been removed from them as a baby. When the darkest of family secrets is revealed to Cathy, Reece's behaviour suddenly starts to make sense, and together they can begin to rebuild his life.

Murder in Grub Street (Sir John Fielding Mystery #2)

by Bruce Alexander

This second in the Sir John Fielding mystery series involves a mass murder and the determining of the guilt of the man holding a bloody axe. At the same time a new religious sect is causing problems in London, taking their vengeance out on the Jews.

Murphy's Boy: He Was a Frightened Boy Who Refused to Speak - Until a Teacher's Love Broke Through the Silence

by Torey L. Hayden

He sounded like a lost case right from the beginning. A fifteen year old boy who had not said a word since he was seven. And that wasn't the worst of it. When therapist Torey Hayden accepted this assignment others had long dismissed as futile, she knew she was in for a major challenge. But when she actually confronted Kevin, an institutionalized, retarded boy on the brink of manhood, who hid under tables, who feared highways and door hinges and spirals on notebooks and odd bits of string, who feared water too much to bathe and nakedness too much to change his clothes, she saw that bringing him back would take a miracle. And when the miracle happened, and Torey managed to penetrate Kevin's terrible silence, it was only to discover, lurking beneath a past littered with violence and mental cruelty, a dreadful secret, made all the worse by the bureaucracy that had recorded it, then filed it away.

Music, Disability, and Society

by Alex Lubet

Musical talent in Western culture is regarded as an extraordinary combination of technical proficiency and interpretative sensitivity. In Music, Disability, and Society, Alex Lubet challenges the rigid view of technical skill and writes about music in relation to disability studies. He addresses the ways in which people with disabilities are denied the opportunity to participate in music. Elaborating on the theory of "social confluence," Lubet provides a variety of encounters between disability and music to observe radical transformations of identity. Considering hand-injured and one-handed pianists; the impairments of jazz luminaries Django Reinhardt, Horace Parlan, and "Little" Jimmy Scott; and the "Blind Orchestra" of Cairo, he shows how the cultural world of classical music contrasts sharply with that of jazz and how musicality itself is regarded a disability in some religious contexts. Music, Disability, and Society also explains how language difference can become a disability for Asian students in American schools of music, limiting their education and careers. Lubet offers pungent criticism of the biases in music education and the music profession, going so far as to say that culture disables some performers by adhering to rigid notions of what a musician must look like, how music must be played, who may play it, and what (if any) is the legitimate place of music in society. In Music, Disability, and Society, he convincingly argues that where music is concerned, disability is a matter of culture, not physical impairment.

The Music of Silence: A Memoir

by Andrea Bocelli Stanislao Pugliese

You don't have to be an opera fan to appreciate this beautifully written memoir by world-famous tenor Andrea Bocelli. Born among the vineyards of Tuscany, Bocelli was still an infant when he developed glaucoma. Music filtering into his room soothed the unsettled child. By the age of twelve he was completely blind, but his passion for music brought light back into his life. Here Bocelli reveals the anguish of his blindness and the transcendent experience of singing. He writes about his loving parents, who nurtured his musical interests, the challenges of learning to read music in Braille and of competing in talent shows, his struggles with law school, and his desire to turn an avocation into a way of life. He describes falling in love and singing in piano bars until his big break in 1992, when a stunned Pavarotti heard him sing "Miserere." The international acclaim and success that have followed Bocelli ever since have done nothing to dull his sense of gratitude and wonder about the world. No classical music fan can afford to be without this engaging and humble memoir of a fascinating and triumphant star. ANDREA BOCELLI wrote this memoir himself on a special Braille computer, without a ghostwriter. He chose to tell his own life story through the eyes of a boy called Amos, a charming and unusual device characteristic of this modest man. Bocelli lives in Monte Carlo and summers in Tuscany.

Mutants: On Genetic Variety and the Human Body

by Armand Marie Leroi

Stepping effortlessly from myth to cutting-edge science, Mutants gives a brilliant narrative account of our genetic code and the captivating people whose bodies have revealed it--a French convent girl who found herself changing sex at puberty; children who, echoing Homer's Cyclops, are born with a single eye in the middle of their foreheads; a village of long-lived Croatian dwarves; one family, whose bodies were entirely covered with hair, was kept at the Burmese royal court for four generations and gave Darwin one of his keenest insights into heredity. This elegant, humane, and engaging book "captures what we know of the development of what makes us human" (Nature).

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