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Life Drawing

by Michael Grumley

From the plains of the Midwest to the close humidity of New Orleans to the crazy heat of Los Angeles, Michael Grumley's Life Drawing travels the course of love and its destruction, of the fragile balance of commitment and exploration. Born in Iowa to the sounds of Bob and Bing Crosby and the Dorsey Brothers, Mickey grows up to the comforting images of his living room TV and the reassuring ruts of his parents' life. During the restless summer of his senior year in high school, drifting away from the girlfriend he could never quite love, Mickey spends a night with another boy, and his world will never be the same. On a barge floating down the Mississippi, he falls in love with James, a black card player from New Orleans, and in time the two of them settle, bristling with sexual intensity, in the French Quarter--until a brief affair destroys James's trust and sends Mickey to the drugs and images of Los Angeles. Lush with visual detail, told with an unflinching and lyrical honesty, Life Drawing captures the bright agonies of learning to be the person one is born to be.

Men Who Beat the Men Who Love Them: Battered Gay Men and Domestic Violence

by Patrick Letellier David Island

Domestic violence in gay male relationships is the third largest health problem for gay men in America today. Men Who Beat the Men Who Love Them breaks the silence surrounding gay male domestic violence and exposes this hidden yet prevalent and destructive problem. The authors paint a vivid picture of gay men’s domestic violence, bringing its brutality to life by including personal narratives, written by one of the authors, by clearly defining what it is and what it is not through lists of violent acts and criminal code categories, and by thoroughly examining and analyzing the criminal, mental health, medical, political, and interpersonal issues involved. The authors boldly depart from the battered women’s literature by asserting that batterers have a diagnosable mental disorder, that battering is not gender based, and that much further criminalization of domestic violence is necessary.Striving for victim advocacy, the book underscores the idea that gay men’s domestic violence is totally unacceptable and is caused solely by individual abusive gay men who choose to batter. The book builds on and departs from what is known about domestic violence, with the authors challenging several fundamental premises in the literature, unabashedly identifying battering as a mental disorder. The authors explain that victims cannot stop their battering partners from battering and virtually all batterers choose to harm their partners in a premeditated fashion. The authors provide practical steps and suggestions for victims who want to leave and stay away from their violent partners and for friends who want to help battered gay men. Chapters describe the scope of the problem and refute myths and misconceptions. There are several detailed theory chapters in which the authors explain why gay men’s domestic violence occurs, who the batterers are, who the victims are at different stages of victimization, and how domestic violence can be stopped. A visionary, wide-ranging governmental and private plan of action is introduced, including lists of necessary laws and policies, as well as outlines of strong education, training, and advertising problems needed in various sectors of society. As a self-help book, Men Who Beat the Men Who Love Them provides practical information on a never-before discussed topic. As a trainer’s manual or teaching guide, it includes specific criteria for understanding the problem and for providing treatment.

Odd Girls and Twilight Lovers: A History of Lesbian Life in Twentieth-Century America

by Lillian Faderman

As Lillian Faderman writes, there are "no constants with regard to lesbianism," except that lesbians prefer women. In this groundbreaking book, she reclaims the history of lesbian life in twentieth-century America, tracing the evolution of lesbian identity and subcultures from early networks to more recent diverse lifestyles. She draws from journals, unpublished manuscripts, songs, media accounts, novels, medical literature, pop culture artifacts, and oral histories by lesbians of all ages and backgrounds, uncovering a narrative of uncommon depth and originality.

The Only Good Priest: A Mystery (Tom & Scott Mysteries #3)

by Mark Richard Zubro

Father Sebastian, the only good priest everybody knows, is dead. Pastor of a parish outside Chicago, Father Sebastian was also involved in the gay community through his work with Faith, the gay Catholic organization the diocese is trying to drive out of the church.High school teacher Tom mason, who has gained some local notoriety from his involvement in a couple of murder cases, is asked by friends to look into the priest's death; was it murder? Along with his lover Scott Carpenter, a professional baseball player, Tom plunges into ecclesiastical intrigues, the hidden underground of gay Chicago and the tragedies caused by a hypocritical church.

Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit (Bloomsbury Classics Ser.)

by Jeanette Winterson

Winner of the Whitbread Prize for best first fiction, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit is a coming-out novel from Winterson, the acclaimed author of The Passion and Sexing the Cherry. The narrator, Jeanette, cuts her teeth on the knowledge that she is one of God’s elect, but as this budding evangelical comes of age, and comes to terms with her preference for her own sex, the peculiar balance of her God-fearing household crumbles.

Passion's Legacy

by Lori A. Paige

A colorful love story set in pre-Victorian England ... Sarah Lindsay, in refusing the marriage her guardian uncle has arranged with a man she despises, pays a steep price: she learns the stunning truth about her birth. In confusion and despair, she leaves her guardian's home. En route to a temporary haven in Bath, she is rescued from dire peril by the formidable Lady Augusta Pym, who invites Sarah to her estate. At Pym House, Sarah makes the first in a series of astonishing discoveries: the shocking nature of the books under lock and key on Augusta's bookshelves. Then Sarah learns the widow Augusta's actual relationship with the sensitive man who was her husband, and the truth about the coterie of women in Augusta's past and present life--including the delectable Isabel. And, most astonishing of all, as Sarah falls under Augusta's spell, she discovers the uncharted erotic depths in herself. Grave complications arise. Isabel's outraged husband learns of his wife's feeling for Augusta, and the jealous Isabel has treacherously sent word of Sarah's whereabouts to her guardian--who arrives to take Sarah back to her arranged marriage. Can Augusta and Sarah possibly find a way to forestall such a fate?

Peter

by Kate Walker

An ordinary fifteen-year-old Australian kid, who enjoys riding his dirt bike and wants to be a photographer, becomes confused about his sexuality when he finds he is attracted to a gay friend of his older brother.

The Price of Salt, or Carol

by Patricia Highsmith

Now recognized as a masterwork, the scandalous novel that anticipated Nabokov's Lolita. "I have long had a theory that Nabokov knew The Price of Salt and modeled the climactic cross-country car chase in Lolita on Therese and Carol's frenzied bid for freedom," writes Terry Castle in The New Republic about this novel, arguably Patricia Highsmith's finest, first published in 1952 under the pseudonym Clare Morgan. Soon to be a new film, The Price of Salt tells the riveting story of Therese Belivet, a stage designer trapped in a department-store day job, whose salvation arrives one day in the form of Carol Aird, an alluring suburban housewife in the throes of a divorce. They fall in love and set out across the United States, pursued by a private investigator who eventually blackmails Carol into a choice between her daughter and her lover. With this reissue, The Price of Salt may finally be recognized as a major twentieth-century American novel.

The Revolution of Little Girls (Vintage Contemporaries)

by Blanche Mccrary Boyd

No matter how hard she tries, Ellen Burns will never be Scarlett O'Hara. As a little girl in South Carolina, she prefers playing Tarzan to playing Jane. As a teenage beauty queen she spikes her Cokes with spirits of ammonia and baffles her elders with her Freedom Riding sympathies. As a young woman in the 1960s and '70s, she hypnotizes her way to Harvard, finds herself as a lesbian, then very nearly loses herself to booze and shamans. And though the wry, rebellious, and vision-haunted heroine of this exhilarating novel may sometimes seem to be living a magnolia-scented Portrait of the Artist as a Young Woman, Blanche McCrary Boyd's The Revolution Of Little Girls is a completely original arid captivating work.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Still Waters (Helen Black Mysteries #2)

by Pat Welch

An unsettling new case for Helen Black. Helen and Frieda are at a luxury lakeside resort for a weekend that will, hopefully, mark a new beginning. A weekend to heal the growing rift between them. The discovery of the battered body of a news reporter on the sandy beach changes everything. Because the victim is an old friend of Helen's, the weekend suddenly turns into a murder investigation and a new case for Private Investigator Helen Black. Does the story the reporter was working on hold the key? Or is her death an ex-lover's revenge? And what of the attractive, frightened Maria and her link with the enigmatic priest, Father John? Seemingly everyone has secrets. The apparently successful resort is in financial trouble. The hotel guests have their own frictions and deceptions. The angelic beauty of the owner's daughter masks dark needs...and is a new element to threaten the fragile relationship between Helen and Frieda.

Touchwood

by Karin Kallmaker

Lesbian romance.

Understanding the Male Hustler

by Sam Steward

This book is a serious study of male hustlers using experiential dialogue to introduce the reader to real-life concepts and experiences that otherwise could not be effectively conveyed. An intriguing attempt to get into the mind and personality of the male hustler through a largely imagined series of dialogues between a well-known fictional hustler and his so-called amanuensis, Samuel Steward, this unique book covers all aspects of the hustler’s motivations, activities, life style, adjustments, advantages, and disadvantages. It accomplishes this dispassionately, without prejudgment, moral censure, approbation, or more than cursory involvement. Therapists and counselors in all fields of sexual functioning will find here some understanding of the causes and impulses (beyond the popular “broken home syndrome”) that lead young males into prostitution. It signals some of the signposts to danger and serious threats to health that accompany the profession of prostitution and also explains to counselors some of the activities and practices of the male prostitute, enabling them to have a better understanding of the fascination and peril of the hustler’s life. The brevity of success in such a calling is also considered, with some consideration for the necessity of long-range planning for the hustler’s future.Important contents: interview of a well-known hustler brief look at early male prostitution--Greek, Roman, Burton’s theory the peacock period and youth as a prerequisite for hustling lures of the profession--money, power, other motivations paths and mechanisms leading to hustling characteristics of different types of hustlers types of clients patronizing hustlers literary illuminations the modus operandi of the male hustler extraordinary dangers confronting the male hustler today the attractiveness of the “seeing-through” of a hustler to past clients quo vadis for the hustler after youth passes Readers will be amazed by the daily hazards and drawbacks as well fascinated by the curiosities and rewards of the hustler’s profession. Especially of interest to therapists and counselors, Understanding the Male Hustler is also valuable for sociologists, anthropologists, medical specialists, psychiatrists, psychologists.

Vanishing Rooms

by Melvin Dixon

Prior to Melvin Dixon's death from AIDS in 1992 when he was on the verge of breaking out as an acclaimed novelist, his talent was compared to that of Toni Morrison and James Baldwin. In Vanishing Rooms, the author amply demonstrates his literary promise with a compelling love story of interracial sex and urban violence set in Manhattan's West Village in the 1970s.

28 Barbary Lane: "Tales of the City" Books 1-3

by Armistead Maupin

Armistead Maupin's uproarious and moving Tales of the City novels--the first three of which are collected in this omnibus volume--have earned a unique niche in American literature and are considered indelible documents of cultural change from the seventies through the first two decades of the new millennium."These novels are as difficult to put down as a dish of pistachios. The reader starts playing the old childhood game of 'Just one more chapter and I'll turn out the lights,' only to look up and discover it's after midnight."--Los Angeles Times Book Review Originally serialized in the San Francisco Chronicle, Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City (1978), More Tales of the City (1980), and Further Tales of the City (1982) afforded a mainstream audience of millions its first exposure to straight and gay characters experiencing on equal terms the follies of urban life. Among the cast of this groundbreaking saga are the lovelorn residents of 28 Barbary Lane: the bewildered but aspiring Mary Ann Singleton, the libidinous Brian Hawkins; Mona Ramsey, still in a sixties trance, Michael "Mouse" Tolliver, forever in bright-eyed pursuit of Mr. Right; and their marijuana-growing landlady, the indefatigable Mrs. Madrigal. Hurdling barriers both social and sexual, Maupin leads them through heartbreak and triumph, through nail-biting terrors and gleeful coincidences. The result is a glittering and addictive comedy of manners that continues to beguile new generations of readers.

Afterlife: A Novel

by Paul Monette

A powerful exploration of the way AIDS reshapes relationships and livesAfterlife is a haunting and unforgettable story of men facing loss and seeking love, movingly capturing the moment in the 1980s when the AIDS epidemic was completely devastating the American gay community. Here, National Book Award winner Paul Monette depicts three men of various economic and social backgrounds, all with one thing in common: They are widowers, in a way, and all of their lovers died of AIDS in an LA hospital within a week of one another. Steven, Sonny, and Dell meet weekly to discuss how to go on with their lives despite the hanging sword of being HIV positive. One tries to find a semblance of normalcy; one rebels openly against the disease, choosing to treat his body as a temple that he can consecrate and desecrate at will; and one throws himself into fierce political activism. No matter what path each one takes, they are all searching for one thing: a way to live and love again.Afterlife finds Paul Monette at his most autobiographical, portraying men in a situation that he himself experienced, and one that he described to critical acclaim in the award-winning Borrowed Time: An AIDS Memoir. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Paul Monette including rare images and never-before-seen documents from the Paul Monette papers of the UCLA Library Special Collections.

Arabella

by Anonymous

A young woman's sexual adventures in England and Parils in the late 1800's.

Bad Boys and Tough Tattoos: A Social History of the Tattoo With Gangs, Sailors, and Street-Corner Punks 1950-1965

by Samuel M. Steward, PhD

Explore the dark subculture of 1950s tattoos!In the early 1950s, when tattoos were the indelible mark of a lowlife, an erudite professor of English--a friend of Gertrude Stein, Thomas Mann, Andre Gide, and Thornton Wilder--abandoned his job to become a tattoo artist (and incidentally a researcher for Alfred Kinsey). Bad Boys and Tough Tattoos tells the story of his years working in a squalid arcade on Chicago’s tough State Street. During that time he left his mark on a hundred thousand people, from youthful sailors who flaunted their tattoos as a rite of manhood to executives who had to hide their passion for well-ornamented flesh. Bad Boys and Tough Tattoos is anything but politically correct. The gritty, film-noir details of Skid Row life are rendered with unflinching honesty and furtive tenderness. His lascivious relish for the young sailors swaggering or staggering in for a new tattoo does not blind him to the sordidness of the world they inhabited. From studly nineteen-year-olds who traded blow jobs for tattoos to hard-bitten dykes who scared the sailors out of the shop, the clientele was seedy at best: sailors, con men, drunks, hustlers, and Hells Angels. These days, when tattoo art is sported by millionaires and the middle class as well as by gang members and punk rockers, the sheer squalor of Bad Boys and Tough Tattoos is a revelation. However much tattoo culture has changed, the advice and information is still sound: how to select a good tattoo artist what to expect during a tattooing session how to ensure the artist uses sterile needles and other safety precautions how to care for a new tattoo why people get tattoos--25 sexual motivations for body artMore than a history of the art or a roster of famous--and infamous--tattoo customers and artists, Bad Boys and Tough Tattoos is a raunchy, provocative look at a forgotten subculture.

Bad Boys and Tough Tattoos: A Social History of the Tattoo With Gangs, Sailors, and Street-Corner Punks 1950-1965

by Samuel M. Steward, PhD

Explore the dark subculture of 1950s tattoos!In the early 1950s, when tattoos were the indelible mark of a lowlife, an erudite professor of English--a friend of Gertrude Stein, Thomas Mann, Andre Gide, and Thornton Wilder--abandoned his job to become a tattoo artist (and incidentally a researcher for Alfred Kinsey). Bad Boys and Tough Tattoos tells the story of his years working in a squalid arcade on Chicago’s tough State Street. During that time he left his mark on a hundred thousand people, from youthful sailors who flaunted their tattoos as a rite of manhood to executives who had to hide their passion for well-ornamented flesh. Bad Boys and Tough Tattoos is anything but politically correct. The gritty, film-noir details of Skid Row life are rendered with unflinching honesty and furtive tenderness. His lascivious relish for the young sailors swaggering or staggering in for a new tattoo does not blind him to the sordidness of the world they inhabited. From studly nineteen-year-olds who traded blow jobs for tattoos to hard-bitten dykes who scared the sailors out of the shop, the clientele was seedy at best: sailors, con men, drunks, hustlers, and Hells Angels. These days, when tattoo art is sported by millionaires and the middle class as well as by gang members and punk rockers, the sheer squalor of Bad Boys and Tough Tattoos is a revelation. However much tattoo culture has changed, the advice and information is still sound: how to select a good tattoo artist what to expect during a tattooing session how to ensure the artist uses sterile needles and other safety precautions how to care for a new tattoo why people get tattoos--25 sexual motivations for body artMore than a history of the art or a roster of famous--and infamous--tattoo customers and artists, Bad Boys and Tough Tattoos is a raunchy, provocative look at a forgotten subculture.

The Boy Who Was Buried This Morning (Dave Brandstetter #9)

by Joseph Hansen

When a paintball player gets hit with a real bullet, Dave Brandstetter catches the case<P> Insurance investigator Dave Brandstetter has spent the last few years drifting in and out of retirement. For the sake of his boyfriend, Cecil, he has attempted to forgo dangerous jobs. But when a close friend's death sends Dave into a depressive funk, Cecil recognizes that work is the only cure. During a high-stakes paintball game, a hardcore supremacist gets hit by a very real bullet. Although the police claim the death was accidental--nothing but a stray round from a nearby hunting preserve--Dave knows that a man this hated seldom dies by chance. His investigation takes him into the strange world of make-believe war--a grown-up version of cowboys and Indians whose players sometimes have trouble distinguishing fantasy from reality. If Dave isn't careful, he'll find himself stained with something more permanent than paint. <P> The Boy Who Was Buried This Morning is book eleven in the Dave Brandstetter Mystery series, which also includes Troublemaker and The Man Everybody Was Afraid Of.

The Boy Who Was Buried This Morning (A Dave Brandstetter Mystery #11)

by Joseph Hansen

While investigating a suicide, Dave Brandstetter discovers a dead reporter's final scoop. Journalist Adam Streeter covered some of the most dangerous stories of the last quarter century, ranging from Cambodia to Siberia and anywhere troubled in between. Fearless, dashing, and more than a little resourceful, Streeter was renowned as much for his virtuosic writing as the shocking reality of what he uncovered along the way. Why would someone who lived so purposefully and with such demonstrable bravery turn a pistol on himself? Insurance investigator Dave Brandstetter has seen enough suicides to know this isn&’t one. Suspecting treachery, he digs into Adam's last story — an unpublished investigation into the whereabouts of a vanished South American strongman, called El Carnicero, the Butcher — and finds that Adam's death shows every hallmark of his bloody style. Dave quickly realized that some very powerful people would like him to drop the case. Dave&’s own lover, Cecil, would like to see him take it easy for once. But Cecil knows Brandstetter is not so unlike the man whose death he&’s investigating. The truth, to someone like Brandstetter or Streeter, is worth the ultimate price. As he attempts to finish Adam&’s story and get to the bottom of the journalist&’s death, Dave will find more than a few people willing to make him pay it.

The Cassandra Reilly Mysteries: Gaudí Afternoon, Trouble in Transylvania, The Death of a Much-Travelled Woman, and The Case of the Orphaned Bassoonists (The Cassandra Reilly Mysteries #4)

by Barbara Wilson

All four mysteries starring the lesbian translator, globetrotter, and amateur sleuth —including Gaudí Afternoon—from the Lambda Literary Award–winning author. “[Cassandra Reilly] has a restless nature, a facility for languages, and a lively curiosity about foreign cultures. Toss in her offbeat sense of humor and you have a terrific road pal.” —The New York Times Book Review “[Cassandra Reilly] has a mind like a steel trap; a literate, uplifting voice; and a wicked sense of humor.” —Library Journal Gaudí Afternoon: In this “high-spirited comic adventure,” professional translator and amateur detective Cassandra Reilly travels to Barcelona to find the missing spouse of Frankie Stevens—but soon learns no one is who they seem (The New York Times). Wilson’s award-winning novel was the basis for the movie directed by Susan Seidelman and starring Judy Davis as Cassandra. Gaudí Afternoon won the Lambda Literary Award for Best Lesbian Mystery. “In the same way that she works issues of sexual politics into her madcap plot, Ms. Wilson also makes the city of Barcelona a lively party to the action.” —The New York Times Trouble in Transylvania: In this “very funny second outing,” the London-based lesbian translator and part-time sleuth gets embroiled in a murder in a run-down Transylvanian health spa (Kirkus Reviews). As the mystery unfolds, Cassandra and her cohorts—including her friend Jacqueline and potential love interest, Eva—are steeped in the history of Romania, from the devastating relics of Ceausescu’s tyrannical reign to the vampire folklore born in the region centuries ago. “Travel-writing so compelling that you’ll be reaching for your passport. Wilson is smart, tart, and knows how to write from a feminist perspective without once stooping to polemic.” —Kirkus Reviews The Death of a Much-Travelled Woman: These nine madcap stories follow the wayfaring translator and amateur sleuth around the globe to picturesque locales such as Maui, the English moors, and the Icelandic coast. Stories include “Murder at the International Feminist Book Fair,” in which the exploits of a mudslinging women’s magazine lead to death at the convention, and “An Expatriate Death,” in which a local Mexican writer appropriates Cassandra’s identity for a character in his novel—and then promptly kills off the character. “Well-drawn characters and colorful settings . . . recommended.” —Library Journal The Case of the Orphaned Bassoonists: At the Venice-based symposium on women musicians of Vivaldi’s time, an invaluable antique bassoon has been stolen—and bassoonist Nicky Gibbons stands accused. As Cassandra investigates, she immerses herself in the world of Baroque music, the tangle of personal intrigues at the symposium, and a second mystery involving the orphaned bassoonists of eighteenth-century Venice. “Venice, Vivaldi, international intrigue, lesbians with bassoons—if you have a hankering for any of these, this book is for you!” —The Bloomsbury Review

The Cat Sanctuary

by Patrick Gale

An entertaining, warm and quirky novel of families, secrets and the truth of love - 'A powerful and moving novel' Independent on Sunday'Engrossing . . . Gale is a charmingly idiosyncratic writer who could not write a cliché if he tried' Daily TelegraphJudith shares her life with her partner Joanna on the lonely wilds of Bodmin Moor, far from the memories and trauma of her childhood. But when Judith's sister, Deborah, is tragically widowed, the women agree to meet. And what is intended to be a harmonious reunion turns into an entanglement of resentment, jealousy and desire, as aspects of the past force themselves into an uneasy present, with some surprising results.(P)2018 Headline Publishing Group Ltd

The Cat Sanctuary

by Patrick Gale

An entertaining, warm and quirky novel of families, secrets and the truth of love - 'A powerful and moving novel' Independent on SundayJudith shares her life with her partner Joanna on the lonely wilds of Bodmin Moor, far from the memories and trauma of her childhood. But when Judith's sister, Deborah, is tragically widowed, the women agree to meet. And what is intended to be a harmonious reunion turns into an entanglement of resentment, jealousy and desire, as aspects of the past force themselves into an uneasy present, with some surprising results.'Engrossing . . . Gale is a charmingly idiosyncratic writer who could not write a cliché if he tried' Daily Telegraph

A Country of Old Men (A Dave Brandstetter Mystery #12)

by Joseph Hansen

Dave Brandstetter&’s best days are behind him, but for the sake of a frightened child, Dave takes on his very last case. The wear and tear of a life spent pursuing the truth into harm&’s way is catching up with Dave. In fact, it has already caught him. The aged death claims investigator is old enough for his body to hurt even without all the compiled injuries he&’s sustained throughout his career. Yet when presented with a puzzle-like mystery, Dave can&’t help but be drawn in. Walking on the beach, a friend finds a bedraggled child who claims he has witnessed a murder. The victim is a drug-addicted pop star, and the obvious suspect is the dead man&’s ex-girlfriend—a drug addict whom the child saw standing over the body, gun in hand. In the final installment of Joseph Hansen&’s groundbreaking series, Dave looks for justice once more, hoping that he will also find a lasting measure of peace. Over the course of twelve novels spanning four decades of American culture—from the 1960s to the late 1980s—Joseph Hansen gave readers one of the truly great heroes of detective fiction.

Creative Arts With Older People

by Janice Mcmurray

With this insightful and intelligent book, professionals can help institutionalized older adults express themselves creatively. One of only a few books on expressive arts for older people, this unique, new volume is ideal for professionals who provide art activities for residents in adult homes and retirement communities.Creative experience can facilitate the expression of ideas and feelings, increase sensory stimulation, improve self-esteem, and improve social relationships. Creative Arts With Older People provides time-tested suggestions to stimulate the creative process among older adults, resulting in numerous physical, psychological, and social benefits. The author, an artist and a social worker, describes dozens of activities that have proven effective in her many years of working with older people--painting, movement, poetry, sculpting, puppetry, dramatic expression, and more. She explains the goals and advantages of each activity, includes a list of materials needed, and details the step-by-step process for conducting each activity.Creative Arts With Older People is a practical and valuable book for activity directors in adult homes and adult health care units, and workers in adult day care centers, adult psychiatric facilities, and senior centers.

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