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De Profundis

by Rita Correia Isabel Robalinho Miguel Vale de Almeida Oscar Wilde

No Verão de 1891, Wilde é apresentado ao jovem Lord Alfred Douglas, familiarmente conhecido como Bosie, estudante de Oxford com aspirações literárias, filho do Marquês de Queensberry. Inicia-se então a tempestuosa amizade que culminará no julgamento e condenação de Oscar Wilde a dois anos de trabalhos forçados, em 1895. A longa carta dirigida a Lord Alfred Douglas foi escrita durante os últimos meses que Wilde passou na prisão de Reading. Esta carta não foi enviada a Bosie da prisão, mas confiada a Robert Ross, amigo de Wilde, várias vezes mencionado ao longo do texto, que dela mandou fazer duas cópias, de acordo com a vontade de Oscar Wilde. Uma das cópias teria como destinatário Lord Alfred Douglas, que sempre negou tê-la recebido, a segunda foi deixada em testamento ao filho de Wilde, Vyvyan Holland.

Fadeout: Dave Brandstetter Investigation 1 (Dave Brandstetter)

by Joseph Hansen

After forty years, Hammett has a worthy successor' The TimesDave Brandstetter stands alongside Philip Marlowe, Sam Spade and Lew Archer as one of the best fictional PIs in the business. Like them, he was tough, determined, and ruthless when the case demanded it. Unlike them, he was gay. Joseph Hansen's groundbreaking novels follow Brandstetter as he investigates cases in which motives are murky, passions run high, and nothing is ever as simple as it looks. Set in 1970s and 80s California, the series is a fascinating portrait of a time and a place, with mysteries to match Chandler and Macdonald.In Fadeout, Dave is sent to investigate the death of radio personality Fox Olsen. His car is found crashed in a dry river bed. But there is no body - and as Dave looks deeper into his life, it seems as though he had good reasons to disappear.

Fadeout (Dave Brandstetter #1)

by Joseph Hansen

Dave Brandstetter stands alongside Philip Marlow, Sam Spade and Lew Archer as one of the best fictional PIs in the business. Like them, he was tough, determined, and ruthless when the case demanded it. Unlike them, he was gay. <P> Joseph Hansen's groundbreaking novels follow Brandstetter as he investigates cases in which motives are murky, passions run high, and nothing is ever as simple as it looks. Set in 1970s and 80s California, the series is a fascinating portrait of a time and a place, with mysteries to match Chandler and Macdonald. <P> In Fadeout, Dave is sent to investigate the death of radio personality Fox Olsen. His car is found crashed in a dry river bed. But there is no body - and as Dave looks deeper into his life, it seems as though he had good reasons to disappear.

For The Pleasure of His Company: An Affair of The Misty City

by Charles Warren Stoddard

For the Pleasure of His Company: An Affair of the Misty City (1903) is a novel by Charles Warren Stoddard. Published toward the end of Stoddard’s career as a poet and travel writer whose friends included Mark Twain and Ambrose Bierce, For the Pleasure of His Company: An Affair of the Misty City is a pioneering novel that explores the ambitions of a young artist while illuminating the struggles of gay men in a society that failed to accept them as equals. At 25 years of age, Paul Clitheroe is “master of himself, but slave to fortune.” A struggling writer, he lives a life of ennui and excess, looking for love and success without being sure of the shape of either. In the Misty City, he has begun making a name for himself among local editors and readers, finally finding publication for his work. Despite this modest success, he remains unsatisfied, unsure of himself, and increasingly restless. Are his mixed feelings merely a symptom of his poetic outlook, or something else altogether? When the debonair Foxlair invites Paul to join him on a voyage to the South Seas, a land of promise where gay men can live without fear of reprisal, he wonders if there is a place for him after all. With a beautifully designed cover and professionally typeset manuscript, this book is a classic work of American literature reimagined for modern readers.

The Lord Won't Mind: The Lord Won't Mind, One For The Gods, And Forth Into Light (The Peter & Charlie Trilogy #1)

by Gordon Merrick

The classic gay love story that spent sixteen weeks on the New York Times bestseller list is as gripping and sexy today as it was when it hit the bookshelves more than forty years ago <P> Charlie Mills always played the role of the good grandson, and his grandmother rewarded him for it handsomely in the form of all the gifts, money, and attention a boy could want. Entering college in the late 1930s, Charlie just has to keep doing what his grandmother expects of him in order to continue to receive her gifts. He has to find a nice girl, get married, and have a few kids. Then one summer, he meets Peter Martin. Peter is everything that Charlie has ever wanted. Despite all the obstacles, Charlie immediately craves and pursues Peter, who happily obliges him. As they grow closer, Charlie is forced to choose between two options: complying with the expectations of society and family, or following the call of true love. In this, the first book of the Charlie & Peter Trilogy, Gordon Merrick creates an enduring portrait of two young men deeply in love, and the tribulations they endure to express themselves and maintain their relationship.

The Peter & Charlie Trilogy: The Lord Won't Mind, One for the Gods, and Forth into Light (The Peter & Charlie Trilogy #2)

by Gordon Merrick

A passionate love story unfolds between two young men in the 1930s in this “wildly sexy” New York Times bestseller and its two sequels (The Advocate). The Peter & Charlie Trilogy—with its explicit sex scenes and positive affirmation of coming out—is “one of gaydom’s great guilty pleasures” (The Advocate). All three groundbreaking works of gay fiction are collected here, including The Lord Won’t Mind, which stayed on the New York Times bestseller list for sixteen weeks. The Lord Won’t Mind: Charlie Mills wants to be a good boy. That way, his grandmother will give him all the gifts and money he could want. But remaining in her good graces as he heads off to college means finding a nice girl to marry. He wasn’t counting on Peter Martin stepping off a train and into his life. The passion between the two men is undeniable, yet making it last will come at a great price—and there are those who will do anything to make them pay. One for the Gods: It’s ten years later, and Peter and Charlie are shipping off to the sunny Mediterranean for a little business and a lot of pleasure. While traveling from Saint-Tropez to Athens to Mykonos, they meet a sexy French playboy who’s eager to make waves. Suddenly, Peter and Charlie find themselves on a voyage of self-discovery that could change their relationship forever. Forth Into the Light: It’s no surprise Peter and Charlie—two men with the looks of Adonis and Narcissus—have chosen a Greek island for their home. But their lives are far from tranquil: The village is rampant with deceit and lust; beguiling Martha is plotting to steal Charlie away from Peter; and passionate, young Jeff repeatedly tests the couple’s fidelity. The tale of Peter and Charlie’s love has spanned years and the globe, but it could all come to a crashing end on these lush shores.

All You Need Is Love

by Russell J. Sanders

In the era of the Woodstock Festival and the Stonewall Riots, 1969, Dewey Snodgress is in high school in Fort Worth, Texas. He might be far from many of the changes taking place in the world, but they still affect his life. For one, as his school’s theater star, Dewey takes part in a production about a young gay man protesting the Vietnam War. During the play, he meets another uninhibited young actress, Lucretia “Lulu” Belton, and their performances are a hit, changing attitudes about the war—especially the attitude of Dewey’s dad. It’s also the year Dewey meets Jeep Brickthorn, the school’s hippie and a local musician. They quickly become friends, and although Dewey tries to suppress it, they start to fall in love. Though he knows his father won’t condone their relationship, Dewey can’t resist his feelings for Jeep. The times are changing, and maybe the time has come for Dewey and Jeep to escape their repressive town for somewhere more open-minded. Somewhere they can pursue their interests in acting and music. Somewhere they’ll have the freedom to be in love.

The Left Hand of Darkness: A groundbreaking feminist literary masterpiece (S.F. MASTERWORKS #172)

by Ursula K. Le Guin

'A rich and complex story of friendship and love' GUARDIAN'It's a giant thought experiment that's also a cracking good read about gender' Neil Gaiman'Love doesn't just sit there, like a stone, it has to be made, like bread; remade all the time, made new' Two people, until recently strangers, find themselves on a long, tortuous and dangerous journey across the ice. One is an outcast, forced to leave his beloved homeland; the other is fleeing from a different kind of persecution. What they have in common is curiosity, about others and themselves, and an almost unshakeable belief that the world can be a better place. As they journey for over 800 miles, across the harshest, most inhospitable landscape, they discover the true meaning of friendship, and of love.

On the Way to Myself: Communications to a Friend (Collected Works of Charlotte Wolff #4)

by Charlotte Wolff

Originally published in 1969, Dr Charlotte Wolff was the author of three books of psychology: The Human Hand, A Psychology of Gesture and The Hand in Psychological Diagnosis. This book, though it contains much psychology, is not of the same scientific kind as these. It is an autobiography, but not one of the normal kind. It is the history of a mind, not the chronicle of a life. For this reason it is not arranged chronologically but it is constructed round what the author called the creative shock experiences of her life, some of which belong with their consequences rather than with events adjacent in time. The resulting book is one of imaginative psychology. In the course of a life which began on the borders of Poland and carried her to Germany, France, Russia and England, Dr Wolff had met and known many of the most famous writers, artists and thinkers of the time. In Germany she studied under the founding Existentialists, Husserl and Heidegger; in France she carried out psychological research under Professor Henri Wallon and was also assisted by the Surrealists, André Breton, St. Exupéry, Paul Eluard; in England she was aided in her work by Sir Julian Huxley, Aldous Huxley and his wife, Dr William Stephenson, Dr Earle and others. But Dr Wolff’s earliest creative work was as a poet, and though she turned to psychology, her interest in art brought her into touch at different times with Ravel, Virginia Woolf, Bernard Shaw, Lady Ottoline Morrell, Thomas and Heinrich Mann, Baladine Klossowska and many more. Dr Earle wrote of her that she is ‘an artist of psychology’, and it is thus that she appears in this odd and fascinating book. Today it is an interesting glimpse in to the life of an early feminist psychologist. Her later research focused on sexology, her writing on lesbianism and bisexuality were influential early works in the field.

Patience and Sarah

by Isabel Miller

Patience White is a woman of modest means, living under the grudging roof of her brother and his wife. Sarah Dowling has been raised to be her father's boy, as he had no sons, and she is used to the rough work of a Connecticut farm in the early 19th century. When Patience and Sarah meet, they are instantly drawn to one another. After many trials they leave Connecticut to buy a farm and begin a life together. This novel, told from alternating points of view, is filled with humor, warmth, and insights into human nature.

Patience & Sarah

by Emma Donoghue Isabel Miller

Set in the nineteenth century, Isabel Miller’s classic lesbian novel traces the relationship between Patience White, an educated painter, and Sarah Dowling, a cross-dressing farmer, whose romantic bond does not sit well with the puritanical New England farming community in which they live. They choose to live together and love each other freely, even though they know of no precedents for their relationship; they must trust their own instincts and see beyond the disdain of their neighbors. Ultimately, they are forced to make life-changing decisions that depend on their courage and their commitment to one another.<P> First self-published in 1969 in an edition of one thousand copies, the author hand-sold the book on New York street corners; it garnered increasing attention to the point of receiving the American Library Association’s first Gay Book Award in 1971. McGraw-Hill’s version of the book a year later brought it to mainstream bookstores across the country.<P> Patience & Sarah is a historical romance whose drama was a touchstone for the burgeoning gay and women’s activism of the late 1960s and early 1970s. It celebrates the joys of an uninhibited love between two strong women with a confident defiance that remains relevant today.

This Day's Death: A Novel (Books That Changed the World)

by John Rechy

A novel on the legality of love from the author of City of Night, &“one of the few original American writers of the last century&” (Gore Vidal, public intellectual and author of I Told You So). A man confronts the twin nightmares of death and silent injustice in John Rechy&’s third novel. While juggling the care of his ailing mother, a young law student stands trial in Los Angeles on a charge that exposes him to the depths and intricacies of society&’s twisted conceptions of justice and privacy. In This Day&’s Death, &“[Rechy] deals with experience from the inside, and it&’s possible he offers us more unevaluated and uncodified homosexual feeling than any writer in the United States today&” (The New York Times). Praise for John Rechy &“Rechy shows great comic and tragic talent. He is truly a gifted novelist.&” —Christopher Isherwood, author and playwright &“His tone rings absolutely true, is absolutely his own, and he has the kind of discipline which allows him a rare and beautiful recklessness. He tells the truth, and tells it with such passion that we are forced to share in the life he conveys. This is a most humbling and liberating achievement.&” —James Baldwin, novelist, playwright, and activist &“His uncompromising honesty as a gay writer has provoked as much fear as admiration . . . John Rechy doesn&’t fit into categories. He transcends them. His individual vision is unique, perfect, loving and strong.&” —Carolyn See, author of Dreaming: Hard Luck and Good Times in America

Betrayed by Rita Hayworth

by Manuel Puig

Manuel Puig's "dazzling and wholly original debut" (New York Times Book Review) is a startling anatomy of a small town in thrall to its own petty lusts, betrayals, scandals, thefts, and gossip--but most of all, to the movies. When it appeared in 1968, Manuel Puig&’s debut—a portrait of the artist as a child in small-town Argentina—was hailed as revolutionary. Borrowing from the language of "true romance" and movie magazines, the techniques of American modernism, and Hollywood montage, Puig created an exuberant queer aesthetic while also celebrating the secret lives of women. Hanging on the conversations of his mother, friends, and neighbors, Puig's stand-in Toto pieces together stories as full of passion, desire, and revenge as anything dreamed up for the silver screen. &“A screamingly funny book, with scenes of such utter bathos that only a student of final reels such as Puig could possibly have verbally recreated for us&” (Alexander Coleman, New York Times), it is also a bittersweet love letter to the the golden age of Hollywood.

Emmanuelle II

by Emmanuelle Arsan Anselm Hollo

Second volume of the Emmanuelle series. In this classic of hedonistic literature the young heroine is guided by Mario, her new teacher and mentor, into a trip of self acknowledgement and discovery of her sexuality. Sexuality is seen as the ultimate instrument to gain spiritual freedom and personal growth.

Eric's Body

by Jason Fury

When Eric's Body was published in l993, it became an overnight sensation and has sold steadily through the present day. Hailed as "powerful . . . unforgettable . . . phenomenal," it launched the writing powerhouse of Southern author Jery Tillotson, a former prize-winning journalist. The 25 stories deal with everything from heartbreak ("Barbed Wire") and humor ("The Bastard of the County") to the haunting ("The Last of the Seven Beauties") and present a dazzling gallery of complex men you won't forget. Jocks, convicts, bad boys, and evangelists--they're all here. Read Eric's Body and discover why tens of thousands of readers around the world have hailed it as one of gay literature's most enduring classics!

My Father and Myself

by W. H. Auden J. R. Ackerley

When his father died, J. R. Ackerley was shocked to discover that he had led a secret life. And after Ackerley himself died, he left a surprise of his own--this coolly considered, unsparingly honest account of his quest to find out the whole truth about the man who had always eluded him in life. But Ackerley's pursuit of his father is also an exploration of the self, making My Father and Myself a pioneering record, at once sexually explicit and emotionally charged, of life as a gay man. This witty, sorrowful, and beautiful book is a classic of twentieth-century memoir.

Picnic on Paradise: Past Master / Picnic On Paradise / Nova / Emphyrio (Macdonald Science Fiction Ser.)

by Joanna Russ

A new kind of sci-fi heroine, the tough-as-nails Alyx, is introduced in this Nebula Award finalist that Poul Anderson called an “extraordinary” novel. Set in a semi-utopian world, Joanna Russ’s groundbreaking debut novel is the story of Alyx, a female soldier, survival guide, and agent of the Trans-Temporal Authority. Displaced in time from her ancient Greece, Alyx is tasked with safely leading a group of pampered human vacationers—including some unconventional nuns and a detached teenager known as the Machine—across an uninhabited scenic terrain to a relief station. But the journey proves more challenging than anticipated as they confront one another’s failings; the physical dangers of an icy, hostile wilderness; and Alyx’s own personal demons. Long before the kick-ass heroines of current science fiction and fantasy, Russ unapologetically introduced readers to a short, strong, middle-aged (for her world/time) woman of twenty-six who knows how to survive but struggles with the emotional nuances of her charges and the confusion of her own mixed feelings. With iconic characters like Alyx, Russ “four decades ago helped deliver science fiction into the hands of the most alien creatures the genre had yet seen—women . . . [and] helped inaugurate the now flourishing tradition of feminist science fiction” (The New York Times).

Plant Dreaming Deep: A Journal

by May Sarton

The author&’s tribute to the 18th-century New England farmhouse she called home: &“[A] tender and often poignant book by a woman of many insights&” (The New York Times Book Review). In Plant Dreaming Deep, Sarton shares an intensely personal account of transforming a house into a home. She begins with an introduction to the enchanting village of Nelson, where she first meets her house. Sarton finds she must &“dream the house alive&” inside herself before taking the major step of signing the deed. She paints the walls white in order to catch the light and searches for the precise shade of yellow for the kitchen floor. She discovers peace and beauty in solitude, whether she is toiling in the garden or writing at her desk. This is a loving, beautifully crafted memoir illuminated by themes of friendship, love, nature, and the struggles of the creative life. This ebook features an extended biography of May Sarton.

Plant Dreaming Deep: A Journal

by May Sarton

The author&’s tribute to the 18th-century New England farmhouse she called home: &“[A] tender and often poignant book by a woman of many insights&” (The New York Times Book Review). In Plant Dreaming Deep, Sarton shares an intensely personal account of transforming a house into a home. She begins with an introduction to the enchanting village of Nelson, where she first meets her house. Sarton finds she must &“dream the house alive&” inside herself before taking the major step of signing the deed. She paints the walls white in order to catch the light and searches for the precise shade of yellow for the kitchen floor. She discovers peace and beauty in solitude, whether she is toiling in the garden or writing at her desk. This is a loving, beautifully crafted memoir illuminated by themes of friendship, love, nature, and the struggles of the creative life. This ebook features an extended biography of May Sarton.

Talk

by Linda Rosenkrantz Stephen Koch

Talk is a hilariously irreverent and racy testament to dialogue: the gossip, questioning, analysis, arguments, and revelations that make up our closest friendships. It's the summer of 1965 and Emily, Vincent, and Marsha are at the beach. All three are ambitious and artistic; all are hovering around thirty; and all are deeply and mercilessly invested in analyzing themselves and everyone around them. The friends discuss sex, shrinks, psychedelics, sculpture, and S and M in an ongoing dialogue where anything goes and no topic is off limits. Talk is the result of these conversations, recorded by Linda Rosenkrantz and transformed into a novel whose form and content put it well ahead of its time. Controversial upon its first publication in 1968, Talk remains fresh, lascivious, and laugh-out-loud funny nearly fifty years later.

World of Women

by Carol Caine

Why do women keep trying to pin Kat down? She's a free spirit. When she returns to Manhattan from a winter holiday with her latest conquest -- bored and desperate to escape those sweet words and caresses -- she learns that her landlady has allowed her apartment to become occupied by another tenant. How can she get it back? Bribery, blackmail, seduction -- nothing is too much for clever Kat. Meanwhile, Kat's sexual restlessness leads her into tryst after tryst, searching for the man, woman, or couple who can finally satisfy her. Like a female counterpart to John Rechy's Numbers, World of Women is a feast of moving bodies and brief encounters.

Einstein Intersection

by Neil Gaiman Samuel R. Delany

The Einstein Intersection won the Nebula Award for best science fiction novel of 1967 -- now with a foreword by Neil Gaiman. The surface story tells of the problems a member of an alien race, Lo Lobey, has assimilating the mythology of earth, where his kind have settled among the leftover artifacts of humanity.<P><P> The deeper tale concerns, however, the way those who are "different" must deal with the dominant cultural ideology. The tale follows Lobey's mythic quest for his lost love, Friza. In luminous and hallucinated language, it explores what new myths might emerge from the detritus of the human world as those who are "different" try to seize history and the day.

Numbers (Rechy, John Ser.)

by John Rechy

Johnny Rio, a handsome narcissist but no longer a pretty boy, travels to Los Angeles, the site of past sexual conquest and remembered youthful radiance, in a frenzied attempt to recreate his younger self. Johnny has ten precious days to draw the numbers, the men who will confirm his desirability, and with the hungry focus of a man on borrowed time, he stalks the dark balconies of all-night theaters, the hot sands of gay beaches, and shady glens of city parks, attempting to attract shadowy sex-hunters in an obsessive battle against the passing of his youth.

Straight Jacket

by Matthew Todd

'This is an essential read for every gay person on the planet' - Elton John'A really brilliant and moving read for everybody, especially LGBTQI+ people' - Olly Alexander, star of It's A SinStraight Jacket is a revolutionary clarion call for gay men, the wider LGBT community, their friends and family. Part memoir, part ground-breaking polemic, it looks beneath the shiny facade of contemporary gay culture and asks if gay people are as happy as they could be - and if not, why not? Meticulously researched, courageous and life-affirming, Straight Jacket offers invaluable practical advice on how to overcome a range of difficult issues. It also recognizes that this is a watershed moment, a piercing wake-up-call-to-arms for the gay and wider community to acknowledge the importance of supporting all young people - and helping older people to transform their experience and finally get the lives they really want.WINNER BOYZ BEST LGBT BOOK 2017SHORTLISTED FOR THE POLARI BOOK PRIZE 2017'Insightful, inclusive, clever and engaging' - Jeremy Langmead'Utterly brilliant' - The Guardian

Daughters of Latin America: An International Anthology of Writing by Latine Women

by Sandra Guzman

Spanning time, styles, and traditions, a dazzling collection of essential works from 140 Latine writers, scholars, and activists from across the world—from warrior poet Audre Lorde to novelist Edwidge Danticat and performer and author Elizabeth Acevedo and artist/poet Cecilia Vicuña—gathered in one magnificent volume.Daughters of Latin America collects the intergenerational voices of Latine women across time and space, capturing the power, strength, and creativity of these visionary writers, leaders, scholars, and activists—including 24 Indigenous voices. Several authors featured are translated into English for the first time. Grammy, National Book Award, Cervantes, and Pulitzer Prize winners as well as a Nobel Laureate and the next generation of literary voices are among the stars of this essential collection, women whose work inspires and transforms us.An eclectic and inclusive time capsule spanning centuries, genres, and geographical and linguistic diversity, Daughters of Latin America is divided into 13 parts representing the 13 Mayan Moons, each cycle honoring a different theme. Within its pages are poems from U.S. Poet Laureate Ada Limón and celebrated Cervantes Prize–winner Dulce María Loynaz; lyric essays from New York Times bestselling author Naima Coster, Pulitzer prize-winning playwright Quiara Alegría Hudes, and Guggenheim Fellow Maryse Condé; rousing speeches from U.S. Representative Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez, and Lencan Indigenous land and water protector Berta Caceres; and a transcendent Mazatec chant from shaman and poet María Sabina testifying to the power of language as a cure, which opens the book.More than a collection of writings, Daughters of Latin America is a resurrection of ancestral literary inheritance as well as a celebration of the rising voices encouraged and nurtured by those who came before them. In addition to those mentioned above, contributors include Elizabeth Acevedo, Julia Alvarez, Albalucia Angel, Marie Arana, Ruth Behar, Gioconda Belli, Miluska Benavides, Carmen Bouollosa, Giannina Braschi, Norma Cantú, Ana Castillo, Sandra Cisneros, Ingrid Rojas Contreras, Angie Cruz, Edwidge Danticat, Julia de Burgos, Lila Downs, Laura Esquivel, Conceição Evaristo, Mayra Santos Febres, Sara Gallardo, Cristina Rivera Garza, Reyna Grande, Sonia Guiñasaca, Georgina Herrera, María Hinojosa, Claudia Salazar Jimenez, Jamaica Kincaid, María Clara Sharupi Jua, Amada Libertad, Josefina López, Gabriela Mistral, Celeste Mohammed, Cherrié Moraga, Angela Morales, Nancy Morejón, Anaïs Nin, Achy Obejas, Alejandra Pizarnik, Yolanda Arroyo Pizarro, Elena Poniatowska, Laura Restrepo, Ivelisse Rodriguez, Mikeas Sánchez, Esmeralda Santiago, Rita Laura Segato, Ana María Shua, Natalia Toledo, Julia Wong, Elisabet Velasquez, Karla Cornejo Villavicencio, Helena María Viramontes, and many more.

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