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Private Screenings: Television and the Female Consumer

by Lynn Spigel Denise Mann

Private Screenings brings together essays that focus on the relationship among women, television, and consumer culture.

Privileged

by Zoey Dean

Recent Yale graduate Megan Smith comes to Manhattan with big plans for a career in journalism and even bigger student loan debt: $75,000. When she flails at her trashy tabloid job, she's given an escape hatch: tutor seventeen-year-old identical twins Rose and Sage Baker-- yes, the infamous Baker heiresses of Palm Beach, Florida, best known for their massive fortunes and their penchant for drunkenly flashing the paparazzi-- and get their SAT scores up enough to get into Duke. Impossible job-- yes. But if she succeeds, her student debts are history. Unfortunately for Megan, the Baker twins aren't about to curtail their busy social schedules for basic algebra. And they certainly aren't thrilled to have to sit down for a study session with dowdy Megan. Megan quickly discovers that if she's going to get her money, she'll have to learn her Pucci from her Prada. And if she can look the part, maybe, just maybe, she can teach the girls something along the way.

Prize Boners for 1932

by Alexander Abingdon

Humorous answers drawn from class rooms and examination papers.

The Problem Body: Projecting Disability on Film

by Sally Chivers Nicole Markotic

Editors Sally Chivers and Nicole Markotic bring together the work of eleven of the best disability scholars from the U.S., the U.K., Canada, and South Korea to explore a new approach to the study of film by concentrating on cinematic representations of what they term "the problem body." The book is a much-needed exploration of the projection of disability on film combined with a much-needed rethinking of hierarchies of difference. The editors turned to the existing corpus of disability theory with its impressive insights about the social and cultural mediation of disabled bodies. They then sought, from scholars at every stage of their careers, new ideas about how disabled bodies coexist with a range of other bodies (gendered, queered, racialized, classed, etc.). To call into question why certain bodies invite the label "problem" more frequently than other bodies, the contributors draw on scholarship from feminist, race, queer, cultural studies, disability, and film studies arenas. In Chivers and Markotic's introduction, they draw on disability theory and a range of cinematic examples to explain the term "problem body" in relation to its projection. In explorations of film noir, illness narratives, classical Hollywood film, and French film, the essays reveal the "problem body" as a multiplication of lived circumstances constructed both physically and socially.

Professor Risley and the Imperial Japanese Troupe

by Frederik L. Schodt

"Frederik L. Schodt has at long last unveiled the fascinating story of 'Professor Risley.' Circus scholars, history buffs, and anyone with an ounce of curiosity should be grateful to him."--Dominique Jando, Circopedia.org "Professor" Risley (Richard Risley Carlisle) introduced the Western circus to Japan in 1864. Three years later, this former acrobat gave many in the West their first glimpse of Japan when he took his "Imperial Japanese Troupe" of acrobats and jugglers on a triumphant tour of North America and Europe. Over the next few years, the Troupe performed before presidents, monarchs, and ordinary citizens. Frederik L. Schodt argues compellingly that such early popular entertainments helped stir a curiosity about all things Japanese that eventually led to japonisme, The Mikado, and, in our time, the boom in manga and anime. Schodt's depiction of Risley and his troupe is enlivened by portraits of the circus demimonde and supported by nineteenth-century photographs, posters, and drawings, many in color. His accounts of these first meetings between Westerners and Japanese shed new light on how different cultures meet, mingle, and influence each other. Descriptions of crowds, dazzling routines, and superstar troupe performers like the famous Little All Right are a delightful revelation to anyone interested in Asia, the circus, and popular entertainment. Frederik L. Schodt has authored numerous books about Japan, including Manga! Manga! and Native American in the Land of the Shogun. In 2009 for his work he was awarded the Order of the Rising Sun, Gold Rays with Rosette.

A Promise to Ourselves: A Journey Through Fatherhood and Divorce

by Mark Tabb Alec Baldwin

Alec Baldwin, one of the best-known actors and Kim Basinger, the Academy Award-winning actress, have a daughter named Ireland. Theirs seemed to be the model of a successful Hollywood marriage until their divorce in 2002. Their split---specifically the custody battle surrounding Ireland---would be the subject of media attention for years to come. This is an important, informative, and deeply felt book on a contentious subject that offers hope of finding a better way.

Pronouncing Shakespeare: The Globe Experiment

by David Crystal

In an unusual blend of autobiography, narrative, and academic content, reflecting the unique nature of the experience, David Crystal recounts the first attempt in over 50 years to mount a full-length Shakespeare play in original pronunciation.

Proof through the Night: Music and the Great War

by Glenn Watkins

Watkins investigates the variable roles of music primarily from the angle of the Entente nations' perceived threat of German hegemony in matters of intellectual and artistic accomplishment--a principal concern not only for Europe but also for the United States, whose late entrance into the fray prompted a renewed interest in defining America as an emergent world power as well as a fledgling musical culture.

Psych: A Mind Is a Terrible Thing to Read

by William Rabkin

Trained to be a detective by his father, blessed with astounding powers of observation and deduction, and cursed with a refusal to take anything seriously, Shaw Spencer has convinced everyone he's psychic. Now, with his best friend, Gus, he's either going to clean up . . . or be found out. With eighty-seven parking tickets to their credit, it doesn't take a psychic to predict what happens when Shawn and Gus go to pick up Gus's impounded car: They get busted. Shawn is convinced they've stumbled across a criminal conspiracy, but Gus just wants to get away intact. Unfortunately, the fleeing Gus is run over by a speeding Mercedes. When he wakes up in the hospital, things have gotten even worse. Because while Gus was unconscious, Shawn picked up a new sidekick: Tara Larison, a beautiful woman who insists she's Shawn's psychic slave . . . and who won't leave them alone until she's fulfilled every one of Shawn's desires. But when Shawn's enemies start turning up dead, the pair must figure out if it's the work of the criminal conspiracy they've discovered--or Shawn's subconscious, sending his new minion out to do his dirty work.

Psych: Mind Over Magic

by William Rabkin

Trained to be a detective by his father, blessed with astounding powers of observation and deduction, and cursed with a refusal to take anything seriously, Shawn Spencer has convinced everyone he's psychic. Now, with his best friend, Gus, he's either going to clean up, or be found out. When a case takes Shawn and Gus into the Fortress of Magic, an exclusive club for professional magicians where outsiders are rarely allowed, they're treated to a private show by the hottest act on the Vegas Strip, seven-foot-tall "Martian Magician" P'tol P'kah. But when the wizard does his signature illusion and dissolves in a tank of water, he never rematerializes. And in his place there's a chubby corpse in a three-piece suit and a bowler hat. Eager to keep his golden boy's image untarnished, the magician's manager hires Shawn and Gus to uncover the identity of the dead man and find out what happened to P'tol P'kah. But to do so, the pair will have to pose as a new mentalist act and go undercover in a world populated by magicians, mystics, Martians, madmen . . . and one murderer.

Psychic Discoveries Behind the Iron Curtain

by Sheila Ostrander Lynn Schroeder

Encounters with Russia's scientifically tested psychics and their research in Soviet Russia, Bulgaria and Czechoslovakia

Public Enemies: The Host of America's Most Wanted Targets the Nation's Most Notorious Criminals

by John Walsh Philip Lerman

The host of America's Most Wanted, John Walsh has formed a vital partnership with the public, the media, and law enforcement that has led to the capture of hundreds of the worst serial killers, kidnappers, pedophiles, and rapists of our time. In Public Enemies he reveals the cost -- the blood, sweat, and tears -- behind the relentless pursuit of hard justice, in such infamous cases as: Kyle Bell: A lifelong sexual predator whose madness culminated in the slaying of an eleven-year-old North Dakota girl. Bell was one of the only fugitives AMW had to capture twice -- and his case stirred more outrage than any other broadcast in AMW's history. Kathleen Soliah: This accused Symbionese Liberation Army terrorist disappeared in 1969 only to resurface twenty-five years later as suburban housewife and soccer mom Sara Jane Olson. Her arrest, following AMW's profile of Soliah and her former SLA partner James Kilgore, incited a stunning controversy. Rafael Resendez-Ramirez: aka The Railroad Killer. A sociopathic drifter, he rode the Texas rails, stopping only to rape and kill. His case was first brought to the public eye by AMW, and it was a secret call to the program's hot line that ultimately led to his surrender. In those and other gripping true-crime profiles, John Walsh exposes the behind-the-scenes drama of the groundbreaking show, and what actually unfolds between the crimes and the captures -- the vital leads from strangers, the dangerous manhunts, the developments cut from the AMW broadcasts, and the dogged investigations by authorities. He divulges stunning lapses in the judicial process that release monsters to the streets time and again. He takes readers inside the hearts and souls of the grieving families, and gives eyewitness accounts of the dramatic final moments when fugitives are finally taken down. An outspoken and unstoppable crusader, John Walsh ignites Public Enemies with righteous anger and gut-level emotion. But his heartfelt motto echoes throughout: I truly believe, with all my heart and soul, that together we can make a difference. It's a conviction Walsh offers as inspiration to the innocents affected by crime, and to all who feel powerless in the face of unfathomable evil.

Punny Places: Jokes That Make You Mappy (Make Me Laugh)

by June Swanson

Filled with over one hundred playful puns, goofy gigglers, sly spoofs, and more, each joke book in this laugh-out-loud series will keep kids howling for more!

The Puppies Of Terra

by Thomas M. Disch

The 'puppies' are humans who have chosen a life of luxury and leisure as the pets of powerful aliens, as opposed to the wild Dingoes who maintain a crumbling society on Earth. The Puppies of Terra is an expansion of the short story White Fang Goes Dingo.

Pure Drivel

by Steve Martin

From a wildly imaginative meditation on who Lolita would be at age 50 to a skit entitled "I Love Loosely," in which Lucy and Ricky Ricardo play the parts of Hillary and President Clinton, this collection by comic genius Martin is both hilariously funny and intelligent in its skewering of the topic at hand.

The Purple Turkey and Other Thanksgiving Riddles

by David A. Adler

When did Pilgrims first say "God Bless America?" The first time they heard America sneeze. Why did the farmer put suntan lotion on his turkey? He liked dark meat. What are unhappy cranberries called? Blueberries Why did the Indians whisper? The corn had ears. New and original riddles mixed with some old favorites are hilariously illustrated by Marylin Hafner.

Purpose: An Immigrant's Story

by Anthony Bozza Wyclef Jean

Purpose is Wyclef Jean's powerful story of a life rooted in struggle, soul-searching, art, and survival. In his own voice the multi-platinum musician and producer shares everything, from his childhood in Haiti to his rise to the top of the American music scene. For the first time ever, Wyclef reveals the behind-the-scenes story of the Fugees, including his partnership with Lauryn Hill and Pras Michel, the details of their award-winning album The Score, and the solo career that followed. For fans of early Wyclef efforts like The Carnival or later albums like From the Hut, To the Projects, To the Mansion-and for fans of books like Jay-Z's Decoded or Russell Simmons' Super Rich-Wyclef's Purpose is an inspiring, one-of-a-kind look at one of the world's most talented artists.

Put Your Dreams First: Handle Your [entertainment] Business

by Thembisa S. Mshaka

There is a great mystique about the entertainment industry and a fervent desire in many to be part of it. But what many women don't realize is that most entertainment career guides are written from the point of view of the male executive, or are filled with industry and legal jargon-making them difficult to read and understand. Now, in PUT YOUR DREAMS FIRST, Thembisa Mshaka uses her 15 years of experience in the music industry to expose the hidden truths that women need to know as they aspire toward entertainment careers, such as how to avoid compromising one's self-respect and the little-known fact that women run a large part of the business. This highly informative guide is for every woman wanting to know how to navigate the entertainment superhighway and find that job of a lifetime.

Putting on a Play (Vocabulary Readers 5.4.5)

by Carlynn Trout

An introduction to what goes into putting on a play: actors, directors, writers, and costume and stage design.

Q: The Autobiography of Quincy Jones

by Quincy Jones

The first entry in a multivolume set that will be essential reading for aspiring producers and artists everywhere, Q on Producing presents the master's approach to making music.

Q: The Autobiography of Quincy Jones

by Quincy Jones

Quincy Jones has won multiple grammy awards. He has been acknowledged as a masterful jazz, rock, and funk musician, has created some of the most memorable film scores of the pop era, and has sat at the production controls for numerous landmark albums, including Michael Jackson's Thriller, the biggest-selling long-player of all time.

Queen Latifah

by Kathleen Tracy

Queen Latifah was a tomboy in her New Jersey city. But now, she's a rapper, (her CD's have sold millions), she is an actress, (She was nominated for an academy award, the first hip-hop artist to be nominated), and so much more. this children's biography highlights her career moves, from rap to acting, and what she hopes to accomplish in the future.

Queen: The Life and Music of Dinah Washington

by Nadine Cohodas

In this biography of jazz singer Dinah Washington (1924-1963), Cohodas traces her life as a child in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, the beginnings of her career when she sang with Lionel Hampton's band, recordings and songs, and her performances with her trio, as a soloist, and other groups. A discography is provided. Cohodas is the author of other books on music and politics. Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Queer Bergman: Sexuality, Gender, and the European Art Cinema

by Daniel Humphrey

One of the twentieth century's most important filmmakers--indeed one of its most important and influential artists--Ingmar Bergman and his films have been examined from almost every possible perspective, including their remarkable portrayals of women and their searing dramatizations of gender dynamics. Curiously however, especially considering the Swedish filmmaker's numerous and intriguing comments on the subject, no study has focused on the undeniably queer characteristics present throughout this nominally straight auteur's body of work; indeed, they have barely been noted. Queer Bergman makes a bold and convincing argument that Ingmar Bergman's work can best be thought of as profoundly queer in nature. Using persuasive historical evidence, including Bergman's own on-the-record (though stubbornly ignored) remarks alluding to his own homosexual identifications, as well as the discourse of queer theory, Daniel Humphrey brings into focus the director's radical denunciation of heteronormative values, his savage and darkly humorous deconstructions of gender roles, and his work's trenchant, if also deeply conflicted, attacks on homophobically constructed forms of patriarchic authority. Adding an important chapter to the current discourse on GLBT/queer historiography, Humphrey also explores the unaddressed historical connections between post-World War II American queer culture and a concurrently vibrant European art cinema, proving that particular interrelationship to be as profound as the better documented associations between gay men and Hollywood musicals, queer spectators and the horror film, lesbians and gothic fiction, and others.

Queer Cinema: Schoolgirls, Vampires, and Gay Cowboys

by Barbara Mennel

Queer Cinema: Schoolgirls, Vampires, and Gay Cowboys illustrates queer cinematic aesthetics by highlighting key films that emerged at historical turning points throughout the twentieth century. The book traces the representation of gays and lesbians from the sexual liberation movements of the roaring 1920s in Berlin to the Stonewall Rebellion in New York City and the emergence of queer activism and film in the early 1990s. The book explains early tropes of queerness, such as the boarding school or the vampire, and describes the development of camp from 1950s Hollywood to underground art of the late 1960s in New York City. It concludes with an exploration of the contemporary mainstreaming of gay and lesbian films and global queer cinema. Queer Cinema: Schoolgirls, Vampires and Gay Cowboys thus offers an introduction to a gay and lesbian film history, but also contributes to an academic discussion about queer subversion of mainstream film.

Showing 2,126 through 2,150 of 2,978 results

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