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15 Stars: Eisenhower, Macarthur, Marshall: Three Generals Who Saved the American Century

by Stanley Weintraub

In the closing days of World War II, America looked up to three five-star generals as its greatest heroes. George C. Marshall, Dwight D. Eisenhower, and Douglas MacArthur personified victory, from the Pentagon to Normandy to the Far East. Counterparts and on occasion competitors, they had leapfrogged each other, sometimes stonewalled each other, even supported and protected each other throughout their celebrated careers. In the public mind they stood for glamour, integrity, and competence. But for dramatic twists of circumstance, all three -- rather than only one -- might have occupied the White House. The story of their interconnected lives opens a fascinating window onto some of the twentieth century's most crucial events, revealing the personalities behind the public images and showing how much of a difference three men can make. Marshall and MacArthur were contemporaries and competitors. Eisenhower was MacArthur's underling, then Marshall's deputy, before becoming MacArthur's counterpart as a supreme commander, Ike in Western Europe, MacArthur in the Pacific. Each of the three five-star generals would go on to extraordinary postwar careers: MacArthur as a virtual viceroy of Japan, overseeing its transition to a new constitutional democracy, and then leading the UN forces in the Korean War; Marshall as secretary of state, author of the Marshall Plan, and winner of the Nobel Peace Prize; Eisenhower as president. Fifteen Stars presents the intertwined lives of these three great men against the sweeping background of six unforgettable decades, from two world wars to the Cold War. It is history at its most dramatic yet most personal -- a triumph for Stanley Weintraub, our preeminent military historian.

1634: The Galileo Affair

by Eric Flint Andrew Dennis

EUROPEAN CUNNING MEETS AMERICAN COURAGE The Thirty Years War continues to ravage 1 7th century Europe, but a new force is gathering power and influence: the United States of Europe, forged by an alliance between Gustavus Adolphus, King of Sweden, and the West Virginians from the 20th century led by Mike Stearns who were hurled centuries into the past by a mysterious cosmic accident. The democratic ideals of the USE have aroused the implacable hostility of Cardinal Richelieu, effective ruler of France, who has moved behind the scenes, making common cause with old enemies to stop this new threat to the privileged and powerful. But the USE is also working behind the scenes. A group of West Virginians have secretly traveled to Venice where their advanced medical knowledge may prevent the recurrence of the terrible plague which recently killed a third of the city-state's population. At the same time, the group hopes to establish commercial ties with Turkey's Ottoman Empire, then at the height of its power. And, most important, they hope to establish private diplomatic ties with the Vatican, exploiting Pope Urban VIU's misgivings about the actions of Richelieu and the Hapsburgs.

1688: The First Modern Revolution

by Steve Pincus

For two hundred years historians have viewed England's Glorious Revolution of 1688-1689 as an un-revolutionary revolution--bloodless, consensual, aristocratic, and above all, sensible. In this brilliant new interpretation Steve Pincus refutes this traditional view. By expanding the interpretive lens to include a broader geographical and chronological frame, Pincus demonstrates that England's revolution was a European event, that it took place over a number of years, not months, and that it had repercussions in India, North America, the West Indies, and throughout continental Europe. His rich historical narrative, based on masses of new archival research, traces the transformation of English foreign policy, religious culture, and political economy that, he argues, was the intended consequence of the revolutionaries of 1688-1689. James II developed a modernization program that emphasized centralized control, repression of dissidents, and territorial empire. The revolutionaries, by contrast, took advantage of the new economic possibilities to create a bureaucratic but participatory state. The postrevolutionary English state emphasized its ideological break with the past and envisioned itself as continuing to evolve. All of this, argues Pincus, makes the Glorious Revolution--not the French Revolution--the first truly modern revolution. This wide-ranging book reenvisions the nature of the Glorious Revolution and of revolutions in general, the causes and consequences of commercialization, the nature of liberalism, and ultimately the origins and contours of modernity itself.

1688: A Global History

by John E. Wills Jr.

A vivid picture of the world centered around that pivotal year.

1776

by David Mccullough

In this stirring book, David McCullough tells the intensely human story of those who marched with General George Washington in the year of the Declaration of Independence -- when the whole American cause was riding on their success, without which all hope for independence would have been dashed and the noble ideals of the Declaration would have amounted to little more than words on paper. Based on extensive research in both American and British archives, 1776 is a powerful drama written with extraordinary narrative vitality. It is the story of Americans in the ranks, men of every shape, size, and color, farmers, schoolteachers, shoemakers, no-accounts, and mere boys turned soldiers. And it is the story of the King's men, the British commander, William Howe, and his highly disciplined redcoats who looked on their rebel foes with contempt and fought with a valor too little known. Here also is the Revolution as experienced by American Loyalists, Hessian mercenaries, politicians, preachers, traitors, spies, men and women of all kinds caught in the paths of war. At the center of the drama, with Washington, are two young American patriots, who, at first, knew no more of war than what they had read in books -- Nathanael Greene, a Quaker who was made a general at thirty-three, and Henry Knox, a twenty-five-year-old bookseller who had the preposterous idea of hauling the guns of Fort Ticonderoga overland to Boston in the dead of winter. But it is the American commander-in-chief who stands foremost -- Washington, who had never before led an army in battle. The book begins in London on October 26, 1775, when His Majesty King George III went before Parliament to declare America in rebellion and to affirm his resolve to crush it. From there the story moves to the Siege of Boston and its astonishing outcome, then to New York, where British ships and British troops appear in numbers never imagined and the newly proclaimed Continental Army confronts the enemy for the first time. David McCullough's vivid rendering of the Battle of Brooklyn and the daring American escape that followed is a part of the book few readers will ever forget. As the crucial weeks pass, defeat follows defeat, and in the long retreat across New Jersey, all hope seems gone, until Washington launches the "brilliant stroke" that will change history. The darkest hours of that tumultuous year were as dark as any Americans have known. Especially in our own tumultuous time, 1776 is powerful testimony to how much is owed to a rare few in that brave founding epoch, and what a miracle it was that things turned out as they did. Written as a companion work to his celebrated biography of John Adams, David McCullough's 1776 is another landmark in the literature of American history. [This text is listed as an example that meets Common Core Standards in English language arts in grades 11-12 at http://www.corestandards.org.]

1787: A Novel

by Joan Anderson

As James Madison's aide during the 1787 Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, young Jared Mifflin experiences a summer filled with adventure, intrigue, and romance. The story of a teenager who became James Madison's aide during the 1787 Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia.

1791: Mozart's Last Year

by H. C. Landon

Biography of Mozart's last year, in which he wrote The Magic Flute, La Clemenza di Tito, and the Clarinet Concerto, as well as most of the Requiem.

1812

by David Nevin

The war of 1812 would either make America a global power sweeping all the way to the Pacific--or break it into small pieces bound to mighty England. It was a second revolution of sorts to prove to the British that America had to be taken seriously. The principal actors in this drama were James and Dolley Madison, and Andrew and Rachel Jackson. Their courage and determination would shape America's destiny.

The 1812 Aponte Rebellion in Cuba and the Struggle Against Atlantic Slavery (Envisioning Cuba)

by Matt D. Childs

Childs explains how slaves and free people of color responded to the nineteenth-century "sugar boom" in the Spanish colony by planning a rebellion against racial slavery and plantation agriculture. Striking alliances among free people of color and slaves, blacks and mulattoes, Africans and Creoles, and rural and urban populations, rebels were prompted to act by a widespread belief in rumors promising that emancipation was near. Taking further inspiration from the 1791 Haitian Revolution, rebels sought to destroy slavery in Cuba and perhaps even end Spanish rule. By comparing his findings to studies of slave insurrections in Brazil, Haiti, the British Caribbean, and the United States, Childs places the rebellion within the wider story of Atlantic World revolution and political change.

1812: War with America

by Jon Latimer

The British viewed the War of 1812 as an ill-fated attempt by the young American republic to annex Canada. For British Canada, populated by many loyalists who had fled the American Revolution, this was a war for survival. The Americans aimed both to assert their nationhood on the global stage and to expand their territory northward and westward. Americans would later find in this war many iconic moments in their national story--the bombardment of Fort McHenry (the inspiration for Francis Scott Key's "Star Spangled Banner"); the Battle of Lake Erie; the burning of Washington; the death of Tecumseh; Andrew Jackson's victory at New Orleans--but their war of conquest was ultimately a failure. Even the issues of neutrality and impressment that had triggered the war were not resolved in the peace treaty. For Britain, the war was subsumed under a long conflict to stop Napoleon and to preserve the empire. The one lasting result of the war was in Canada, where the British victory eliminated the threat of American conquest, and set Canadians on the road toward confederation. Latimer describes events not merely through the eyes of generals, admirals, and politicians but through those of the soldiers, sailors, and ordinary people who were directly affected. Drawing on personal letters, diaries, and memoirs, he crafts an intimate narrative that marches the reader into the heat of battle.

1848: Year of Revolution

by Mike Rapport

In 1848, a violent storm of revolutions ripped through Europe. The torrent all but swept away the conservative order that had kept peace on the continent since Napoleon's defeat at Waterloo in 1815--but which in many countries had also suppressed dreams of national freedom. Political events so dramatic had not been seen in Europe since the French Revolution, and they would not be witnessed again until 1989, with the revolutions in Eastern and Central Europe. In1848, historian Mike Rapport examines the roots of the ferment and then, with breathtaking pace, chronicles the explosive spread of violence across Europe. A vivid narrative of a complex chain of interconnected revolutions,1848tells the exhilarating story of Europe's violent "Spring of Nations" and traces its reverberations to the present day.

1858: Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee, Ulysses S. Grant and the War They Failed to See

by Bruce Chadwick

1858 explores the events and personalities of the year that would send the America's North and South on a collision course culminating in the slaughter of 630,000 of the nation's young men, a greater number than died in any other American conflict. The record of that year is told in seven separate stories, each participant, though unaware, is linked to the oncoming tragedy by the central, though ineffective, figure of that time, the man in the White House, President James Buchanan. The seven figures who suddenly leap onto history's stage and shape the great moments to come are: Jefferson Davis, who lived a life out of a Romantic novel, and who almost died from herpes simplex of the eye; the disgruntled Col. Robert E. Lee, who had to decide whether he would stay in the military or return to Virginia to run his family's plantation; William Tecumseh Sherman, one of the great Union generals, who had been reduced to running a roadside food stand in Kansas; the uprising of eight abolitionists in Oberlin, Ohio, who freed a slave apprehended by slave catchers, and set off a fiery debate across America; a dramatic speech by New York Senator William Seward in Rochester, which foreshadowed the civil war and which seemed to solidify his hold on the 1860 Republican Presidential nomination; John Brown's raid on a plantation in Missouri, where he freed several slaves, and marched them eleven hundred miles to Canada, to be followed a year later by his catastrophic attack on Harper's Ferry; and finally, Illinois Senator Steven Douglas' seven historic debates with little-known Abraham Lincoln in the Illinois Senate race, that would help bring the ambitious and determined Lincoln to the Presidency of the United States. As these stories unfold, the reader learns how the country reluctantly stumbled towards that moment in April 1861 when the Southern army opened fire on Fort Sumter.

1898: The Birth of the American Century

by David Traxel

Historian Traxel narrates the extraordinary events of 1898 to unfold the story of America's metamorphosis from a rural, isolationist society into a commanding presence on the world stage. The account centers upon America's first foray into international military affairs, the Spanish-American War, but also covers worker uprisings, racial conflict, the last battle between Native Americans and the US Army, advances in technology, and the growing importance of advertising. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc. , Portland, Or.

The 1900s: (American Popular Culture Through History)

by Bob Batchelor

This is a delightful history of twentieth century culture. Some of the topcis covered: music, dance, fashion, commercials. Informative and fun.

The 1900s: From Teddy Roosevelt to Flying Machines (Decades of the 20th Century)

by Stephen Feinstein

The 1900s. . . What do the novel The Jungle, Jim Crow laws, the Model T Ford, and Madame Curie have in common? Each, in its own way, helped define the 1900s, a period in which the United States was changing from a predominantly rural country into an industrial power with powerful factories and booming cities. In The 1900s From Teddy Roosevelt to Flying Machines, Revised Edition, author Stephen Feinstein describes the triumphs, tragedies, fads, and fashions of the 1900s. From vaudeville theaters to the San Francisco earthquake, from teddy bears to the Great White Fleet, Feinstein examines the people and events that made the 1900s one of the most unique periods in American history.

The 1910s from World War I to Ragtime Music (Decades of the 20th Century)

by Stephen Feinstein

The Decades of the 20th Century series uses short articles and numerous photos to introduce young readers to the people and events that made news and changed history in the twentieth century. -- Highlighting important happenings in politics, science, sports, the arts and entertainment, and environmental issues, the series also focuses on interesting topics like the lifestyles, fashions, and fads that have made each decade of the century unique and memorable. -- Curriculum based and useful for reports.

1911 The First 100 Years

by Patrick Sweeney

In 1911, the history of firearms changed forever with the adoption of the greatest pistol ever designed, the Automatic Pistol, Caliber . 45, M1911 - known today simply as the 1911. Now, in one fascinating, illustrated volume, authority Patrick Sweeney celebrates the 100th anniversary of the greatest fighting handgun ever designed, John M. Brownings legendary 1911 . 45. From the predecessors of the 1911 and its contemporaries to the best of today's semi- and -full-custom models, you'll find it in 1911: The First 100 Years. Lavishly illustrated with photographs collected from around the world, 1911: The First 100 Years is a fitting centennial tribute to a pistol that is today more popular than ever. For the collector, for the shooter, for the historian - for anyone interested in big-bore handguns or the evolution of this truly American classic, this is a must-have volume.

1912: Wilson, Roosevelt, Taft & Debs - the Election That Changed the Country

by James Chace Ellen R. Sasahara

Beginning with former president Theodore Roosevelt's return in 1910 from his African safari, Chace brilliantly unfolds a dazzling political circus that featured four extraordinary candidates. When Roosevelt failed to defeat his chosen successor, William Howard Taft, for the Republican nomination, he ran as a radical reformer on the Bull Moose ticket. Meanwhile, Woodrow Wilson, the ex-president of Princeton, astonished everyone by seizing the Democratic nomination from the bosses who had made him New Jersey's governor. Most revealing of the reformist spirit sweeping the land was the charismatic socialist Eugene Debs, who polled an unprecedented one million votes. Wilson's "accidental" election had lasting impact on America and the world. The broken friendship between Taft and TR inflicted wounds on the Republican Party that have never healed, and the party passed into the hands of a conservative ascendancy that reached its fullness under Reagan and George W. Bush. Wilson's victory imbued the Democratic Party with a progressive idealism later incarnated in FDR, Truman, and LBJ. 1912 changed America.

1916

by Morgan Llywelyn

Historical novel of the struggle for Irish independence, seen through the eyes of a young Irish partisan.

1920: The Year of the Six Presidents

by David Pietrusza

The presidential election of 1920 was one of the most dramatic ever. For the only time in the nation's history, six once-and-future presidents hoped to end up in the White House: Woodrow Wilson, Warren G. Harding, Calvin Coolidge, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Herbert Hoover, and Theodore Roosevelt. It was an election that saw unprecedented levels of publicity - the Republicans outspent the Democrats by 4 to 1 - and it was the first to garner extensive newspaper and newsreel coverage. It was also the first election in which women could vote. Meanwhile, the 1920 census showed that America had become an urban nation - automobiles, mass production, chain stores, and easy credit were transforming the economy and America was limbering up for the most spectacular decade of its history, the roaring '20s. Award-winning historian David Pietrusza's riveting new work presents a dazzling panorama of presidential personalities, ambitions, plots, and counterplots - a picture of modern America at the crossroads.

The 1920s: From Prohibition to Charles Lindbergh (Decades of the 20th Century)

by Stephen Feinstein

The Decades of the 20th Century series uses short articles and numerous photos to introduce young readers to the people and events that made news and changed history in the twentieth century. -- Highlighting important happenings in politics, science, sports, the arts and entertainment, and environmental issues, the series also focuses on interesting topics like the lifestyles, fashions, and fads that have made each decade of the century unique and memorable. -- Curriculum based and useful for reports.

1921

by Morgan Llywelyn

Novel about the beginning of Irish independence from England, and the subsequent civil war, seen through the eyes of a fictional journalist. Some violence.

1922

by Jean-Michel Rabaté

1922: Literature, Culture, Politics examines key aspects of culture and history in 1922, a year made famous by the publication of several modernist masterpieces, such as T. S. Eliot's The Waste Land and James Joyce's Ulysses. Individual chapters written by leading scholars offer new contexts for the year's significant works of art, philosophy, politics, and literature. 1922 also analyzes both the political and intellectual forces that shaped the cultural interactions of that privileged moment. Although this volume takes post-World War I Europe as its chief focus, American artists and authors also receive thoughtful consideration. In its multiplicity of views, 1922 challenges misconceptions about the 'Lost Generation' of cultural pilgrims who flocked to Paris and Berlin in the 1920s, thus stressing the wider influence of that momentous year.

The 1930s from the Great Depression to the Wizard of Oz (Decades of the 20th Century)

by Stephen Feinstein

Author Stephen Feinstein describes the amazing era of the 1930s. From Roosevelt's New Deal, through the HINDENBURG disaster, to Jesse Owen's inspirational triumph at the Olympics, Feinstein examines the fads, fashions, people, and events that marked the 1930s as one of the most pivotal periods in American history.

1936 ... On the Continent

by Eugene Fodor

This guide takes you on a prewar journey through 30 European countries, including the British Isle.

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