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101 Places in Italy: A Private Grand Tour

by Francis Russell

"The author has achieved the near impossible...a must-squeeze-into-hand-baggage or the back pack."--House and Garden"A minor classic."--The Times Literary SupplementThis personal, and wonderfully well-informed, selection of the most rewarding towns, cities, villages, and individual monuments in Italy is the definitive guidebook for the discerning traveler. The author has been visiting Italy, for study, for work, and for pleasure, for over fifty years, and is the perfect companion for those who want to know about more than the obvious attractions.As well as comprehensively covering the finest sights in the major tourist centers of Rome, Florence, Venice, and elsewhere, Francis Russell discusses and describes the neglected, or little-known, masterpieces that are still to be found the length and breadth of the Italian peninsula. In a book that will educate and astonish the expert as surely as it will guide and inform the first-time visitor, the author chooses and explores palaces and gardens, city squares and lonely churches, frescoes and altarpieces, great museums and tiny ruins that together provide a richly textured portrait of a country where the history and patterns of civilization lie more thickly than anywhere else on earth.This book will immeasurably enhance and enrich the visitor's experience of the most visited country in the world, by virtue of its sensitivity, its wisdom, and its deep knowledge, and by means of its vivid, eloquent, and entertaining exposition.Francis Russell was educated at Oxford. He is deputy chairman of Christies and specializes in Old Master and Italian paintings.

101 Places Not to See Before You Die

by Catherine Price

Because bad places make good stories The Testicle Festival Garbage City Rush Hour on a Samoan Bus Y our Boss's Bedroom Ibiza on a Family Vacation Stonehenge The Road of Death A North Korean Gulag Fucking, Austria And 92 More! From the Grover Cleveland Service Area to the Beijing Museum of Tap Water to, of course, Euro Disney, 101 Places Not to See Before You Die brings you lively tales of the most ill-conceived museums, worst theme parks, and grossest Superfund sites that you'll ever have the pleasure of not visiting. Journalist Catherine Price travels the globe for stories of misadventure to which any seasoned traveler can relate-including guest entries from writers such as Nicholas Kristof, Mary Roach, Michael Pollan, Rebecca Solnit, and A. J. Jacobs-and along the way she discovers that the worst experiences are often the ones we'll never forget.

101 Things You Didn't Know About Ann Arbor, Michigan (But Are About To Find Out)

by Horace Woodhouse

After you've browsed through this little book, you will better understand why Ann Arbor has a greater quirk quotient than most places. To prove his point, your curious author has dug up bits of esoterica - odd, amusing, and little-known strands that make up the city's variegated fabric. Sure, you live here, but how much do you really know about Ann Arbor? Can you name your hometown football legends, Playboy Magazine playmates, 1960s radicals, NASA astronauts, the local boxer who fought Jack Dempsey, the brainy UM graduate who attempted the perfect crime, or the local girl who flirted with Humphrey Bogart in "The Big Sleep"? Who was the native industrialist who helped build the Panama Canal? Or the Ann Arborite who created the world's largest technology company? How did a border dispute lead to the greatest rivalry in college football? Where is the city's only Frank Lloyd Wright-designed house? What is Ann Arbor's connection a Presidential assassination? Readers learn the answers to these intriguing questions and much, much more. Fascinating tangents and tidbits in purposely random sequence (with generous cross-references) create a ready-to-explore trail of knowledge about Ann Arbor and its environs, informing and entertaining, correcting myths and misconceptions, mostly revealing an unexpected treasure trove that brings a culture and a place into sharp focus.

103 Hikes in Southwestern British Columbia

by David Macaree Mary Macaree Jack Bryceland

Since its publication in 1973, 103 Hikes in Southerwestern British Columbia has sold over 120,000 copies, guiding novices and experts alike around lakes, rivers, and mountains from the North Shore and Howe Sound to Squamish, Whistler and Pemberton, and east to the Fraser Valley and Hope-Manning Park. Engagingly written, meticulously detailed, and thoughtfully organized by area, 103 Hikes is the ultimate, indispensable guide for trekking in all seasons. Two-color maps make route finding easier, and comprehensive indexes help ensure that a trail choice is right for the season. For each trail author Jack Bryceland indicates:time frames and suggested fitness levelsinformation on how to get to the trailheaddistance and elevation gainsestimated hiking timespoints of natural or historical interest103 Hikes includes trails from the Ashlu and Elaho valleys, as well as expanded sections on Pemberton and the Chilliwack River, providing fresh paths of discovery for readers of previous editions.

103 Journeys, Voyages, Trips and Stuff

by Siddhartha Sarma

From ancient civilization to modern times, the experience of journeys by road, water and air is recounted by the author.

109 Walks in British Columbia's Lower Mainland, 6th edition

by David Macaree Mary Macaree

From wooded dales within Vancouver to seaside strolls along Burrard Inlet, from alpine meadows on the North Shore and in the Whistler corridor to rural ambles through the Fraser Valley, 109 Walks offers a route for everyone who likes to be outdoors.In this sixth edition, longtime authors Mary and David Macaree provide walks of four hours or less for visitors and lifelong residents, occasional recreationalists, and avid walkers alike. Virtually every walk is accessible by public transit. Clearly written, carefully detailed, and conveniently organized by area, 109 Walks is an indispensable guide for exploring in all seasons.Mary Macaree, who died just before the publication of this edition, was a longtime member of the British Columbia Mountaineering Club. This book came together with the help, encouragement, and dedicated enthusiasm of friends and family who knew how important its completion was to Mary. With her late husband, David, she originated four editions of both this volume and 103 Hikes in Southwestern British Columbia. Mary and David were avid outdoor adventurers and spirited people. Their legacy continues with this publication.

109 Walks in British Columbia's Lower Mainland, 7th edition

by John Halliday David Macaree Alice Purdey Mary Macaree

From trails to spectacular waterfalls near Squamish and historic urban forests in South Surrey, coastal headlands in Howe Sound and ridgetop meadows in the Fraser Valley,109 Walks offers a route for everyone who likes to be outdoors.In this revised seventh edition are 109 of the region's best walks of four hours or less to suit every taste, whether you're a visitor to the city or life-long resident, occasional recreationalist or avid walker. The trails have been reorganized from north to south, west to east, and the book includes fourteen all-new walks along with another twelve that have been substantially modified or revived from previous volumes. Most of the classics remain and their trail directions and maps have been completely updated with GPS coordinates to make route-finding easier.Unchanged are the comprehensive indexes that help ensure a trail that's right for the season, the time frame and the fitness level of the group; the photographs and notes about points of natural or historical interest plus estimated hiking times and distances; and the clearly written, carefully detailed route descriptions. Accurate, authoritative and highly affordable, 109 Walks is an indispensable guide for exploring British Columbia's Lower Mainland in all seasons.

1421: The Year China Discovered America

by Gavin Menzies

On March 8, 1421, the world's largest fleet set sail from China. When the fleet returned home in October 1423, the emperor had fallen, leaving China in political and economic chaos. The great ships were left to rot at their moorings and the records of their journeys were destroyed. Lost in the long, self-imposed isolation that followed was the knowledge that Chinese ships had reached America seventy years before Columbus and had circumnavigated the globe a century before Magellan.

1493 for Young People

by Rebecca Stefoff Charles Mann

1493 for Young People by Charles C. Mann tells the gripping story of globalization through travel, trade, colonization, and migration from its beginnings in the fifteenth century to the present. How did the lowly potato plant feed the poor across Europe and then cause the deaths of millions? How did the rubber plant enable industrialization? What is the connection between malaria, slavery, and the outcome of the American Revolution? How did the fabled silver mountain of sixteenth-century Bolivia fund economic development in the flood-prone plains of rural China and the wars of the Spanish Empire? Here is the story of how sometimes the greatest leaps also posed the greatest threats to human advancement.Mann's language is as plainspoken and clear as it is provocative, his research and erudition vast, his conclusions ones that will stimulate the critical thinking of young people. 1493 for Young People provides tools for wrestling with the most pressing issues of today, and will empower young people as they struggle with a changing world.From the Hardcover edition.

1493: Uncovering the New World Columbus Created

by Charles Mann

From the author of1491--the best-selling study of the pre-Columbian Americas--a deeply engaging new history of the most momentous biological event since the death of the dinosaurs. More than 200 million years ago, geological forces split apart the continents. Isolated from each other, the two halves of the world developed radically different suites of plants and animals. When Christopher Columbus set foot in the Americas, he ended that separation at a stroke. Driven by the economic goal of establishing trade with China, he accidentally set off an ecological convulsion as European vessels carried thousands of species to new homes across the oceans. The Columbian Exchange, as researchers call it, is the reason there are tomatoes in Italy, oranges in Florida, chocolates in Switzerland, and chili peppers in Thailand. More important, creatures the colonists knew nothing about hitched along for the ride. Earthworms, mosquitoes, and cockroaches; honeybees, dandelions, and African grasses; bacteria, fungi, and viruses; rats of every description--all of them rushed like eager tourists into lands that had never seen their like before, changing lives and landscapes across the planet. Eight decades after Columbus, a Spaniard named Legazpi succeeded where Columbus had failed. He sailed west to establish continual trade with China, then the richest, most powerful country in the world. In Manila, a city Legazpi founded, silver from the Americas, mined by African and Indian slaves, was sold to Asians in return for silk for Europeans. It was the first time that goods and people from every corner of the globe were connected in a single worldwide exchange. Much as Columbus created a new world biologically, Legazpi and the Spanish empire he served created a new world economically. As Charles C. Mann shows, the Columbian Exchange underlies much of subsequent human history. Presenting the latest research by ecologists, anthropologists, archaeologists, and historians, Mann shows how the creation of this worldwide network of ecological and economic exchange fostered the rise of Europe, devastated imperial China, convulsed Africa, and for two centuries made Mexico City--where Asia, Europe, and the new frontier of the Americas dynamically interacted--the center of the world. In such encounters, he uncovers the germ of today's fiercest political disputes, from immigration to trade policy to culture wars. In1493,Charles Mann gives us an eye-opening scientific interpretation of our past, unequaled in its authority and fascination.

1494

by Stephen R. Bown

When Columbus triumphantly returned from America to Spain in 1493, his discoveries inflamed an already-smouldering conflict between Spain's renowned monarchs, Ferdinand and Isabella, and Portugal's João II. Which nation was to control the world's oceans? To quell the argument, Pope Alexander VI - the notorious Rodrigo Borgia - issued a proclamation laying the foundation for the Treaty of Tordesillas, an edict that created an imaginary line in the Atlantic Ocean dividing the entire known (and unknown) world between Spain and Portugal.Just as the world's oceans were about to be opened by Columbus's epochal voyage, the treaty sought to limit the seas to these two favoured Catholic nations. The edict was to have a profound influence on world history: it propelled Spain and Portugal to superpower status, steered many other European nations on a collision course and became the central grievance in two centuries of international espionage, piracy and warfare.At the heart of one of the greatest international diplomatic and political agreements of the last five centuries were the strained relationships and passions of a handful of powerful individuals. They were linked by a shared history, mutual animosity and personal obligations.

18% Gray

by Angela Rodel Zachary Karabashliev

After Stella disappears, Zack sets off on a trip across America with his memories, a camera, and a duffle bag of dope. Through the lens of the old camera, he starts rediscovering himself by photographing an America we rarely see. His journey unleashes a series of erratic, hilarious, and life-threatening events interspersed with flashbacks to his relationship with Stella.

18 in America

by Dylan Dethier

An exhilarating account of one remarkable teenager's solo trek to play golf in each of the lower forty-eight states--a compelling coming-of-age story and a surprising look at the equalizing power of the sport in America. At seventeen, Dylan Dethier couldn't help but think he'd never really done anything with his life. So, two months before his freshman year was set to begin, he deferred admission to Williams College. With the reluctant blessing of his parents, Dylan set out on his idea of the Great American Road Trip: play a round of golf in each of the forty-eight contiguous states. What began as the teenage wanderlust of a sheltered New England kid soon became a journey to find America's heart and soul, "to figure out where--and why--golf fit in," and to explore what it means to be a young man today. From a three-dollar nine-holer in rural West Virginia to a municipal course amid the failing factories of Flint, Michigan, and to the manicured greens of Pebble Beach, Dylan explored the variety of the nation's golf courses, the multiplicity of its towns and cities, and, most strikingly of all, the diversity of its people. Hoping to shatter golf's elitist reputation, he would play with war veterans, autoworkers, and a livestock auctioneer and discovered golf's unique capacity to serve as an equalizer. In Wyoming, he decided the state's courses matched his own style of play: "unbridled, rough and tumble in a T-shirt and jeans sort of way." Over one year, 35,000 miles, and countless nights alone in his dusty Subaru, Dylan would shower at truck stops, sleep with an axe beside him, lose his virginity, and meet legends like Phil Mickelson and Michael Jordan. Dylan's eighteenth year was one of many firsts--venturing into the world alone, exploring serious questions about his future, and fulfilling an ambitious quest. In crisp prose and with a wry, engaging voice, this precocious writer takes us beyond his own reflections to weave a poignant portrait of America and its golfers, making 18 in America the perfect gift for the golf enthusiast in your family.

18 in America: A Young Golfer's Epic Journey to Find the Essence of the Game

by Dylan Dethier

A "winning" (Parade) and "well-conceived" (The New York Times) account of one teenager's solo trek to play golf in each of the lower forty-eight states--"two parts coming-of-age story, one part golf travel adventure, and one part survival test" (Golfweek).Shortly before his freshman year of college was set to begin, seventeen-year-old Dylan Dethier--hungry for an adventure beyond his small town--deferred his admission and, "like Jack Kerouac and Ken Kesey before him, packed his used car and meager life savings and set off to see and write about America" (ABC News/ Yahoo). His goal: play a round of golf in each of the lower forty-eight states. From a gritty municipal course in Flint, Michigan, to rubbing elbows with Phil Mickelson at Quail Hollow, Dylan would spend a remarkable year exploring the astonishing variety of the nation's golf courses--and its people. Over one year, thirty-five thousand miles, and countless nights alone in his dusty Subaru, Dylan showered at truck stops, slept with an ax under his seat, and lost his virginity, traveling "wherever the road took him, with golf as a vehicle for understanding America" (The New York Times). The result is a book that "would be considered fine work by any writer, let alone one so young" (Maine Edge).

180° South

by Jeff Johnson Yvon Chouinard Doug Tompkins Chris Malloy

180° South takes readers behind the scenes of the film, 180° South, made by Chris Malloy, to learn more about the people who made the original overland journey to Patagonia in 1968, and the repeat journey over ocean and land 40 years later. The book includes stories of events and experiences that inspired Chris Malloy, Yvon Chouinard, and Doug Tompkins to choose paths committed to saving what's left of the wild world. Open it anywhere and enjoy the photographs by the world's leading surf and climbing photographers Jeff Johnson, Jimmy Chin, Scotty Soen, and Danny Moder.

1912

by Chris Turney

"The South Pole discovered" trumpeted the front page of The Daily Chronicle on March 8, 1912, marking Roald Amundsen's triumph over the tragic Robert Scott. Yet behind all the headlines there was a much bigger story. Antarctica was awash with expeditions. In 1912, five separate teams representing the old and new world were diligently embarking on scientific exploration beyond the edge of the known planet. Their discoveries not only enthralled the world, but changed our understanding of the planet forever. Tales of endurance, self-sacrifice, and technological innovation laid the foundations for modern scientific exploration, and inspired future generations.To celebrate the centenary of this groundbreaking work, 1912: The Year the World Discovered Antarctica revisits the exploits of these different expeditions. Looking beyond the personalities and drawing on his own polar experience, Chris Turney shows how their discoveries marked the dawn of a new age in our understanding of the natural world. He makes use of original and exclusive unpublished archival material and weaves in the latest scientific findings to show how we might reawaken the public's passion for discovery and exploration

The 1935 Republican River Flood

by Joy Hayden

On May 31, 1935, a storm system surged along the Republican River, bursting its banks in a matter of minutes with a roar that could be heard miles away. The greatest flood to hit the tri-state area of Colorado, Kansas and Nebraska, it left behind a landscape rearranged beyond recognition and claimed more than one hundred casualties. However, amid all the destruction and sorrow, amazing acts of heroism and unwavering courage were reported throughout the valley. Author Joy Hayden reveals the historic disaster and the steadfast resolve of those who witnessed it.

1936 ... On the Continent

by Eugene Fodor

This guide takes you on a prewar journey through 30 European countries, including the British Isle.

1960 Winter Olympics, The

by David C. Antonucci

The 1960 Olympic Winter Games were a long-shot effort that succeeded beyond the wildest expectations. Working in a sparsely populated valley in the Sierra Nevada with only rudimentary facilities, organizers created a world-class Olympic site in four short years. For the only time in Olympic history, the venues and athlete residence halls were located in a compact, intimate setting that encouraged sportsmanship and interaction between athletes. There was elaborate pageantry in the ceremonies and decorations. The underdog American ice hockey team won the first-ever USA gold medal in that sport. American figure skaters swept gold in the individual events. Well-trained Soviet and Scandinavian athletes dominated the speed skating and cross-country skiing events. American women proved their mettle in the Alpine skiing events. German skiers made surprise upsets in the Nordic combined and ski jumping contests. And CBS-TV was there to capture the most exciting moments and make groundbreaking live broadcasts to American audiences.

1967 Red Sox: The Impossible Dream Season

by Raymond Sinibaldi Billy Rohr

The Impossible Dream became a fitting moniker for the Boston Red Sox season of 1967, a summer that still evokes memories of a time that united a city and transformed a franchise. Led by 1967 MVP Carl Yastrzemski and Boston's first Cy Young Award winner, Jim Lonborg, the youngest Red Sox team since the days of Babe Ruth went from ninth to first place in what remains the closest pennant race in baseball history. Tony Conigliaro, Rico Petrocelli, George Scott, Reggie Smith, Billy Rohr, Jerry Adair, and their teammates became household names to the Fenway Faithful as they carried the Red Sox to their first World Series in 21 years under manager Dick Williams.

1969 and Then Some

by Robert Wintner

The year when everything needed to be experienced and tried, when innocence was tempted, played, and lost.1969 was that pivotal year for the baby boomers. Young and innocent, they were given the ultimate freedoms and were faced with growing up.This touching, hilarious memoir is the true story of a late sixties grand tour of Europe-a life-defining parable, for those who remember and for those who can't. Never before and not since have a handful of seasons so exquisitely defined the difference between right and wrong. With the gift of youth they saw, sensed, and savored the laughably clear distinction between profit motive and greed, between truth and propaganda, between national interest and defense contractors, between a lovely cloud of smoke and the smoke of napalm, and between the phantoms of security and the dangers of complacency and atrophy.Stoned to the gills and then some, these adventurers saw and felt and knew things that no generation before did. Some fully engaged in the counterculture while others merely observed, sticking a left foot in, pulling a left foot out, but not quite jumping to the full hokeypokey.It was an incredible time of self-discovery, of love, and of finding out what you were made of.

The 1975 Portland Timbers: The Birth of Soccer City, USA

by Michael Orr

Relive the magic of the Portland Timbers' 1975 season and the birth of Soccer City, USA. This is the story of seventeen players and two coaches who came from different clubs and different countries to form a team just days before their inaugural game. In this fast-paced account, Michael Orr weaves together player interviews, news coverage, and game statistics to capture the Timbers' single-season journey from expansion team to championship contender. From the first televised game against Pele's New York Cosmos to the seven-game winning streak that vied for a league record and the post-season battle for the game's highest prize, rediscover how, in just four months, the Timbers won the hearts of Portlanders and left an indelible stamp on the Rose City's sporting landscape.

1975 Red Sox: American League Champions

by Raymond Sinibaldi Fred Lynn

The 1975 American League Champion Boston Red Sox squared off with the Cincinnati Reds in what is widely recognized as one of the best World Series ever played. The Major League Baseball Network has named its sixth game "the greatest game ever played." The Red Sox were led by two rookies, 21-year-old Jim Rice and 22-year-old Fred Lynn, who formed a rookie duo the likes of which baseball had never seen. They combined with a budding superstar in Carlton Fisk and his aging counterpart Carl Yastrzemski to lead the Red Sox attack, while a wily Luis Tiant anchored the pitching staff. After a first-round sweep of the three-time World Champion Oakland A's, they advanced to a Fall Classic that echoes through the ages, and in the words of Carlton Fisk, the Red Sox won "three games to four.

19th Century Baseball in Chicago

by Mark Rucker John Freyer

The Chicago area today hosts two of the most historic major league franchises and half a dozen minor or independent league teams. Baseball's roots run deep in the Windy City. Indeed, it was Chicago businessman William "I'd rather be a lamp-post in Chicago than a millionaire in any other city" Hulbert, who, according to baseball lore, staged the coup that in 1876 would put the National League on the map. The Chicago White Stockings (now ironically called the Cubs) were one of eight charter members, winning the inaugural NL Championship with such legendary names as A.G. Spalding, "Cap" Anson, and Roscoe Barnes.But The National Pastime arrived in Chicago well before the 1876 season, as is proven in this fascinating new book, 19th Century Baseball in Chicago, illustrated with over 150 vintage images.Any local fan of the modern game-whether the action takes place at the "Friendly Confines," 35th & Shields, or the cozy setting of a minor league ballpark out in Kane or suburban Cook County-will enjoy the wealth of information offered in 19th Century Baseball in Chicago.

20 Short Walks near Calais, France

by Lezli Rees

Many of us are now using the Pet Passport scheme to take our pets with us across the Channel for day trips or holidays in France. This handy guide shows you where to find really good walk places for drivers, families and the dog within easy driving distance of Calais, and to discover some of the extraordinary, and dog-friendly, visitor attractions of this often overlooked part of France.

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