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Japanese Kanji Flash Cards Volume 2: Intermediate Level (Downloadable Material Included)

by Emiko Konomi Alexander Kask

Everything you need to learn 200 everyday Japanese kanji characters is here in this ebook!Flash cards are an essential tool in memorizing words when you are learning a new language. In Japanese Kanji Flash Cards Kit, Volume 2, you'll get all the tools needed to learn 200 everyday Japanese kanji, following on from the 200 kanji introduced in Volume 1 of this series.This Japanese language ebook includes: 200 flash cards featuring commonly used characters. Downloadable audio recordings of over 1,200 words and phrases from a native speaker. A 32-page study booklet with sorting indexes and practice tips. Each expertly designed flash card in this ebook offers core information about the meanings, pronunciations, vocabulary, and usage for each character along with memorable phrases and drawings to help you learn the kanji. A stroke-order diagram shows how to write the kanji correctly. You can also sort the cards into smaller sets so you can learn or review them in batches and help to remember the kanji character effectively.

Let's Learn Japanese: 64 Basic Japanese Words and Their Uses (Downloadable Audio Included)

by William Matsuzaki

A kid friendly introduction to Japanese!Let's Learn Japanese is an introductory Japanese language learning tool especially designed to help children from preschool through early elementary level acquire basic words, kanji characters, phrases, and sentences in Japanese in a fun and easy way. The flashcards can be used as a learning tool in a classroom setting, at home, or anywhere that learning takes place, and can easily be taped around the room for an interactive way to learn Japanese. It contains: 64 Japanese flash cards Downloadable audio with recordings of songs, games and activities A wall chart showing the main words and phrases at a glance A learning guide for parents and teachers The flash cards present 64 basic words and phrases representing the full range of sounds in Japanese and organized into thematic categories, including: People Colors Animals Food Body Prts Clothing Going Places Also included in this Japanese for kids is downloadable audio which provides native pronunciation of the words, and sample sentences for practice-sentences that children would use in everyday life. Songs and other activities are also included on the free downloadable audio.

Masked

by Alfred Habegger

A brave British widow goes to Siam and-by dint of her principled and indomitable character-inspires that despotic nation to abolish slavery and absolute rule: this appealing legend first took shape after the Civil War when Anna Leonowens came to America from Bangkok and succeeded in becoming a celebrity author and lecturer. Three decades after her death, in the 1940s and 1950s, the story would be transformed into a powerful Western myth by Margaret Landon's best-selling book "Anna and the King of Siam" and Rodgers and Hammerstein's musical "The King and I. " But who was Leonowens and why did her story take hold? Although it has been known for some time that she was of Anglo-Indian parentage and that her tales about the Siamese court are unreliable, not until now, with the publication of "Masked," has there been a deeply researched account of her extraordinary life. Alfred Habegger, an award-winning biographer, draws on the archives of five continents and recent Thai-language scholarship to disclose the complex person behind the mask and the troubling facts behind the myth. He also ponders the curious fit between Leonowens's compelling fabrications and the New World's innocent dreams-in particular the dream that democracy can be spread through quick and easy interventions. Exploring the full historic complexity of what it once meant to pass as white, "Masked" pays close attention to Leonowens's midlevel origins in British India, her education at a Bombay charity school for Eurasian children, her material and social milieu in Australia and Singapore, the stresses she endured in Bangkok as a working widow, the latent melancholy that often afflicted her, the problematic aspects of her self-invention, and the welcome she found in America, where a circle of elite New England abolitionists who knew nothing about Southeast Asia gave her their uncritical support. Her embellished story would again capture America's imagination as World War II ended and a newly interventionist United States looked toward Asia. "

Long Gray Lines

by Rod Andrew

Military training was a prominent feature of higher education across the nineteenth-century South. Virginia Military Institute and the Citadel, as well as land-grant schools such as Texas A&M, Auburn, and Clemson, organized themselves on a military basis, requiring their male students to wear uniforms, join a corps of cadets, and subject themselves to constant military discipline. Several southern black colleges also adopted a military approach. Challenging assumptions about a distinctive "southern military tradition," Rod Andrew demonstrates that southern military schools were less concerned with preparing young men for actual combat than with instilling in their students broader values of honor, patriotism, civic duty, and virtue. Southerners had a remarkable tendency to reconcile militarism with republicanism, Andrew says, and following the Civil War, the Lost Cause legend further strengthened the link in southerners' minds between military and civic virtue. Though traditionally black colleges faced struggles that white schools did not, notes Andrew, they were motivated by the same conviction that powered white military schools--the belief that a good soldier was by definition a good citizen. "[Long Gray Lines] is a valuable resource. It is well researched, well argued and thought provoking. . . . A useful work with important insights into a significant southern tradition.--Civil War Book Review"An important work that engages larger historical questions.--Journal of Military History "This provocative, highly original, and thoughtfully illustrated study is grounded in impressive research. . . . It invites us to rethink the southern military tradition.--Journal of Southern HistoryChallenging assumptions about a distinctive "southern military tradition," Rod Andrew demonstrates that southern military schools were less concerned with preparing young men for actual combat than with instilling in their students broader values of honor, patriotism, civic duty, and virtue. Southerners had a remarkable tendency to reconcile militarism with republicanism, Andrew says, and following the Civil War, the Lost Cause legend further strengthened the link in southerners' minds between military and civic virtue. -->

Oil Painting Techniques and Materials

by Harold Speed

"In any exhibition of amateur work . . . it is not at all unusual to find many charming water-colour drawings, but . . . it is very rarely that the work in the oil medium is anything but dull, dead, and lacking in all vitality and charm." -- Harold SpeedSuch provocative assertions are characteristic of this stimulating and informative guide, written in a highly personal and unique style by a noted painter and teacher. Brimming with pertinent insights into the technical aspects and painting in oils, it is also designed to help students perfect powers of observation and expression.Harold Speed has distilled years of painting and pedagogical experience into an expert instructional program covering painting technique, painting from life, materials (paints, varnishes, oils and mediums, grounds, etc.), a painter's training, and more. Especially instructive is his extensive and perceptive discussion of form, tone, and color, and a fascinating series of detailed "Notes" analyzing the painting styles of Velasquez, Reynolds, Gainsborough, Franz Hals, and Rembrandt.Nearly 70 photographs and drawings illustrate the text, among them prehistoric cave paintings, diagrams of tonal values, stages of portrait painting, and reproductions of masterpieces by Giotto, Vermeer, Ingres, Rembrandt, Titian, Reynolds, Gainsborough, Hals, Giorgione, Poussin, Corot, Veronese, and other luminaries. In addition to these pictorial pleasures, the author further leavens the lessons with thought-provoking opinion.Clear, cogent, and down-to-earth, this time-honored handbook will especially interest serious amateurs studying the technical aspects of oil painting, but its rich insight into the mind and methods of the artist will enlighten and intrigue any art lover.

What Katy Did At School (Katy #2)

by Susan Coolidge

Katy's aunt believes she and her younger sister, Clover, should go to boarding school to learn the social graces. Their father is skeptical, but agrees to send them for a year. This book tells the story of their adventures, and what Katy did at school.

The Education of Historians for Twenty-first Century

by Thomas Bender Colin A. Palmer Philip F. Katz

In 1958, the American Historical Association began a study to determine the status and condition of history education in U.S. colleges and universities. Published in 1962 and addressing such issues as the supply and demand for teachers, student recruitment, and training for advanced degrees, that report set a lasting benchmark against which to judge the study of history thereafter. Now, more than forty years later, the AHA has commissioned a new report. The Education of Historians for the Twenty-first Century documents this important new study's remarkable conclusions. Both the American academy and the study of history have been dramatically transformed since the original study, but doctoral programs in history have barely changed. This report from the AHA explains why and offers concrete, practical recommendations for improving the state of graduate education. The Education of Historians for the Twenty-first Century stands as the first investigation of graduate training for historians in more than four decades and the best available study of doctoral education in any major academic discipline. Prepared for the AHA by the Committee on Graduate Education, the report represents the combined efforts of a cross-section of the entire historical profession. It draws upon a detailed review of the existing studies and data on graduate education and builds upon this foundation with an exhaustive survey of history doctoral programs. This included actual visits to history departments across the country and consultations with scores of individual historians, graduate students, deans, academic and non-academic employers of historians, as well as other stakeholders in graduate education. As the ethnic and gender composition of both graduate students and faculty has changed, methodologies have been refined and the domains of historical inquiry expanded. By addressing these revolutionary intellectual and demographic changes in the historical profession, The Education of Historians for the Twenty-first Century breaks important new ground. Combining a detailed historical snapshot of the profession with a rigorous analysis of these intellectual changes, this volume is ideally positioned as the definitive guide to strategic planning for history departments. It includes practical recommendations for handling institutional challenges as well as advice for everyone involved in the advanced training of historians, from department chairs to their students, and from university administrators to the AHA itself. Although focused on history, there are lessons here for any department. The Education of Historians for the Twenty-first Century is a model for in-depth analysis of doctoral education, with recommendations and analyses that have implications for the entire academy. This volume is required reading for historians, graduate students, university administrators, or anyone interested in the future of higher education.

HarperCollins Study Bible: Fully Revised & Updated (G - Reference, Information and Interdisciplinary Subjects)

by Harold W. Attridge Society Of Biblical Literature

After 10 years of new archeological discoveries and changes in biblical studies, it was time for an overhaul of this classic reference work. With the guidance of the Society of Biblical Literature, an organization of the best biblical scholars world wide, we have selected Dean of Yale Divinity School, Harold Attridge, to oversee the Study Bible's updating and revision. Including up–to–date introductions to the Biblical books, based on the latest critical scholarship, by leading experts in the field concise notes, clearly explaining names, dates, places, obscure terms, and other difficulties in reading the Biblical text careful analysis of the structure of Biblical books abundant maps, tables, and charts to enable the reader to understand the context of the Bible, and to see the relationship among its parts. In this new revised edition every introduction, essay, map, illustration and explanatory note has been reviewed and updated, and new material added. For instance, There are newly commissioned introductory essays on the archaeology of ancient Israel and the New Testament world, the religion of ancient Israel, the social and historical context of each book of the Bible, and on Biblical interpretation. There are completely new introductions and notes for many of the books in the Bible, plus a full revision and updating of all others.

Mature Women Students: Separating Of Connecting Family And Education (Gender And Society Ser.)

by Rosalind Edwards South Bank University.

First Published in 1993. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Honorary Protestants

by David Fraser The Osgoode Society

When the Constitution Act of 1867 was enacted, section 93 guaranteed certain educational rights to Catholics and Protestants in Quebec, but not to any others. Over the course of the next century, the Jewish community in Montreal carved out an often tenuous arrangement for public schooling as "honorary Protestants," based on complex negotiations with the Protestant and Catholic school boards, the provincial government, and individual municipalities. In the face of the constitution's exclusionary language, all parties gave their compromise a legal form which was frankly unconstitutional, but unavoidable if Jewish children were to have access to public schools. Bargaining in the shadow of the law, they made their own constitution long before the formal constitutional amendment of 1997 finally put an end to the issue.In Honorary Protestants, David Fraser presents the first legal history of the Jewish school question in Montreal. Based on extensive archival research, it highlights the complex evolution of concepts of rights, citizenship, and identity, negotiated outside the strict legal boundaries of the constitution.

The History of Pedagogy (Routledge Revivals)

by Gabriel Compayré

Payne’s translation of Compayré’s The History of Pedagogy was initially published in 1886 due to a general lack of historical texts on education in the late nineteenth century. Compayré provides a thorough account of the doctrines and methods used by educators throughout history from educators of antiquity to the early nineteenth century. This text focusses on key thinkers and teachers such as Locke, Luther and Kant as well as considering the educational methods of the Greeks and the Romans. This title will be of interest to students of Education and Philosophy.

Liberty Hyde Bailey: Essential Agrarian and Environmental Writings

by Liberty Hyde Bailey

"Nature-study not only educates, but it educates nature-ward; and nature is ever our companion, whether we will or no. Even though we are determined to shut ourselves in an office, nature sends her messengers. The light, the dark, the moon, the cloud, the rain, the wind, the falling leaf, the fly, the bouquet, the bird, the cockroach-they are all ours. If one is to be happy, he must be in sympathy with common things. He must live in harmony with his environment. One cannot be happy yonder nor tomorrow: he is happy here and now, or never. Our stock of knowledge of common things should be great. Few of us can travel. We must know the things at home."—from "The Meaning of the Nature-study Movement""To feel that one is a useful and cooperating part in nature is to give one kinship, and to open the mind to the great resources and the high enthusiasms. Here arise the fundamental common relations. Here arise also the great emotions and conceptions of sublimity and grandeur, of majesty and awe, the uplift of vast desires—when one contemplates the earth and the universe and desires to take them into the soul and to express oneself in their terms; and here also the responsible practices of life take root."—from The Holy EarthBefore Wendell Berry and Aldo Leopold, there was the horticulturalist and botanist Liberty Hyde Bailey (1858–1954). For Wendell Berry, Bailey was a revelation, a symbol of the nature-minded agrarianism Berry himself popularized. For Aldo Leopold, Bailey offered a model of the scholar-essayist-naturalist. In his revolutionary work of eco-theology, The Holy Earth, Bailey challenged the anthropomorphism—the people-centeredness—of a vulnerable world. A trained scientist writing in the lyrical tradition of Emerson, Burroughs, and Muir, Bailey offered the twentieth century its first exquisitely interdisciplinary biocentric worldview; this Michigan farmer's son defined the intellectual and spiritual foundations of what would become the environmental movement.For nearly a half century, Bailey dominated matters agricultural, environmental, and scientific in the United States. He worked both to improve the lives of rural folk and to preserve the land from which they earned their livelihood. Along the way, he popularized nature study in U.S. classrooms, lobbied successfully for women's rights on and off the farm, and bulwarked Teddy Roosevelt's pioneering conservationism.Here for the first time is an anthology of Bailey's most important writings suitable for the general and scholarly reader alike. Carefully selected and annotated by Zachary Michael Jack, this book offers a comprehensive introduction to Bailey's celebrated and revolutionary thinking on the urgent environmental, agrarian, educational, and ecospiritual dilemmas of his day and our own. Culled from ten of Bailey's most influential works, these lyrical selections highlight Bailey's contributions to the nature-study and the Country Life movements. Published on the one-hundredth anniversary of Bailey's groundbreaking report on behalf of the Country Life Commission, Liberty Hyde Bailey: Essential Agrarian and Environmental Writings will inspire a new generation of nature writers, environmentalists, and those who share with Bailey a profound understanding of the elegance and power of the natural world and humanity's place within it.

Path of the Prophets: The Ethics-Driven Life

by Rabbi Barry L. Schwartz

Illuminating the ethical legacy of the biblical prophets, Path of the Prophets identifies the prophetic moment in the lives of eighteen biblical figures and demonstrates their compelling relevance to us today. While the Bible almost exclusively names men as prophets, Rabbi Barry L. Schwartz celebrates heroic, largely unknown biblical women such as Shiphrah, Tirzah, and Hannah. He also deepens readers’ interpretations of more familiar biblical figures not generally thought of as prophets, such as Joseph, Judah, and Caleb. Schwartz introduces the prophets with creative, first-person retellings of their decisive experiences, followed by key biblical narratives, context, and analysis. He weighs our heroes’ and heroines’ legacies—their obstacles and triumphs—and considers how their ethical examples live on; he guides us on how to integrate biblical-ethical values into our lives; and he challenges each of us to walk the prophetic path today.

The Principles of Psychology, Vol. 1

by William James

Volume 1 of the famous long course, complete and unabridged. Stream of thought, time perception, memory, experimental methods -- these are only some of the concerns of a work that was years ahead of its time and is still valid, interesting and useful. Total in set: 94 figures.

The Principles of Psychology, Vol. 2

by William James

This is the first inexpensive edition of the complete Long Course in Principles of Psychology, one of the great classics of modern Western literature and science and the source of the ripest thoughts of America’s most important philosopher. As such, it should not be confused with the many abridgements that omit key sections.The book presents lucid descriptions of human mental activity, with detailed considerations of the stream of thought, consciousness, time perception, memory, imagination, emotions, reason, abnormal phenomena, and similar topics. In its course it takes into account the work of Berkeley, Binet, Bradley, Darwin, Descartes, Fechner, Galton, Green, Helmholtz, Herbart, Hume, Janet, Kant, Lange, Lotze, Locke, Mill, Royce, Schopenhauer, Spinoza, Wundt, and scores of others. It examines contrasting interpretations of mental phenomena, treating introspective analysis, philosophical interpretations, and experimental research.Although the book originally appeared nearly 75 years ago, it remains unsurpassed today as a brilliantly written survey of William James’ timeless view of psychology.

Good-natured Man With Introduction And Notes

by Goldsmith Edited By K. Deighton.

SHORTLY after the publication of The Vicar of Wakefield, in 1766, Goldsmith began to think of writing a comedy, and in 1767 The Good-Natured Man was submitted for Garrick’s approval. Garrick, however, insisted upon great alterations being made, and Goldsmith declining to comply, the comedy was declined. It was, however, accepted by George Colman, the elder, then manager of Covent Garden Theatre, and there produced in January 1768, the Prologue being written by Dr Johnson. The result was fairly suc-cessful, though the scene of the bailiffs was objected to as being “ low,” and was afterwards cut out on the stage, to be restored, however, shortly afterwards, when the play was published. The Good-Natured Man ran for ten nights, and Goldsmith’s share of the profits was £400. A further sum of £100 was received by him from the publication of the pla

Becoming Teachers: Texts and Testimonies, 1907-1950 (Woburn Education Series)

by Peter Cunningham Philip Gardner

There is an extraordinary gap in the published history of schooling in the twentieth century. Nowhere is the voice of the teacher, telling his or her own story, extensively to be heard. This book, drawing not only upon the official documentary record, but also upon the previously untapped recollections of more than 100 former classroom teachers, aims to fill this gap. In Becoming Teachers, the nation's teachers from more than half a century ago tell what twentieth century education has looked like and felt like from their side of the classroom. The book concentrates particularly on the years between the end of the First World War and the passing of the landmark 1944 Education Act. All of the former state school teachers whose testimony stands at the centre of the book began their teaching careers in this period, and most completed the bulk of their classroom teaching in these years.Oral testimony is set alongside more conventional documentary sources and thematic analysis and individual life histories are brought together. In this respect, the work will break new ground in terms of its methodological approach as well as in terms of its substantive historical concerns.

An Introduction to the History of Educational Theories (Routledge Revivals)

by Oscar Browning

An Introduction to the History of Educational Theories, first published in 1881, offers a comprehensive overview of the most notable approaches to education throughout Western history, from Athens and Rome to the Victorian public school. Exploring not only the still famous theories of Plato and Aristotle, this work also touches on techniques in education which are either no longer prevalent – Roman Oratory, the Jesuits – or in some cases were never widely adopted or appreciated: John Milton, for example. This title will be of value to those intrigued by the potential of past attitudes for present-day application, as well as to those unconvinced by contemporary approaches.

Bhashashuddhi - Novel: भाषाशुद्धी - कादंबरी

by Shri. Balarao Savarkar

या पुस्तकांत वीर सावरकरांच्या भाषाशुद्धि या विषयावरील काही निवडक लेखांचे पुनर्मुद्रण करीत आहों. ह्यांतील बहुतेक लेखांचे पुस्तकरूपाने हे तिसरे पुनर्मुद्रण आहे यावरून या लेखांविषयींची मराठी वाचकवर्गाला वाटणारी अभिरुचि आणि आवश्यकता व्यक्त होत आहे. वीर सावरकर लिखित भाषा शुद्धी या पुस्तकामध्ये हिंदी, मराठी, संस्कृत, अरबी, फारशी, इंग्रजी, परराष्ट्रीय, उर्दू, पारशी, इत्यादी भाषांचे महत्व व त्या भाषांचे एकमेकांशी असलेले वेगवेगळे अर्थ आणि एकमेकांमधील फरक कसा आहे हे सविस्तर पणे दाखवले आहे.

Revival: On the Study of Words (Routledge Revivals)

by Richard Chenevix Trench

First published in 1904, this book contains the conclusions of a series of lectures exploring the moral and historical value of single words. The author argues that, just as wisdom and knowledge are discoverable in books, so too are these treasures to be found in individual words themselves.

What is the Bible? (Routledge Revivals)

by J.A. Ruth

First published in 1904, this volume questioned whether the Bible is in its entirety the literal Word of God. The author’s strong background in evangelical Christianity led them to question numerous theological experts and ministers on the topic and conclude that the Bible is as purely and entirely a human production as any other work of literature. Ruth argues instead that humanity’s knowledge of God has come about through developing the faculties with which God has endowed them and that the Bible is a history of humanity’s discovery of God. First considering whether the Bible can be considered the Word of God, the author moves on to cover topics including the evolution of Hebrew monotheism, the Bible canon, contraditions and miracles.

Revival: Eight lectures delivered to the students of the Royal Academy (Routledge Revivals)

by George Clausen

George Clausen delivers these eight lectures to the students of The Royal Academy of Arts about the aims and ideals of art. He includes the truth to nature and style within art and explores the imagination and taste in drawing and using colour.

Piano Tuning: A Simple and Accurate Method for Amateurs

by J. Cree Fischer

If you have a note that has dropped in pitch, do you have to call in the tuner? A stuck key? Sympathetic rattle? Missing bridles? A broken hammer shank? An unglued ivory? The answer, in each case, is no: you can make all of these repairs yourself!This is the clearest and most complete book available for beginning tuners and amateur pianists. It explains all the basic processes practically and with model clarity. A non-musician can use this book without too much difficulty.You will learn how upright, grand, and square actions work, and how to take care of the smallest repairs -- repairing stuck keys, poorly adjusted bottoms and capstans, crowded back checks, felts and leather on the hammers, hammer stems; softening damper and hammer felts; installing new bridles; eliminating "sympathetic rattle"; all with a minimum of tools and training.You will learn a professional method of tuning based on slightly flattened fifths, where only the octave and the upward fifth intervals are used. This is one of the easiest systems to learn, one capable of a great deal of control, and one perfectly suited to adjusting one or two keys. It is a tested method especially right for amateurs working without a teacher, and a method that trains the ear for other recommended systems. The author also explains "beats," the theory of the tempered scale, and useful experiments you can make with harmonic phenomena.If you want to experiment with tuning a piano, there is no better book to start with. It will help performers and teachers make occasional repairs and learn the structure and scale of the piano. Those who want to know how pianos work will find this book both clear and useful.

The Substance of Faith Allied with Science: A Catechism for Parents and Teachers (Routledge Revivals)

by Oliver Lodge

Originally published in 1907, this book provides information to parents and teachers wishing to teach their children about Christianity as well as science. Lodge details his fear of mandatory secularism in schools and advises how to instruct children in science without allowing any doubt of Christian doctrine and stresses the importance of reconciliation between religion and science for future generations. This title will be of interest to students of Education and Religion.

The English Grammar Schools to 1660: Their Curriculum and Practice (Routledge Revivals)

by Foster Watson

First published in 1908, this important work on the history of education traces the development of teaching in English Grammar Schools from the invention of printing up to 1660. It is not a history of the theories of educational reformers as to what should or should not be taught, but a history of the actual practices of the schools, of their curricula and of the differentiated subjects of instruction. The author relies heavily on the textbooks used in schools in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, in particular the ‘Ludus Literarius’ of John Brinsley and the ‘New Discovery of the Old Art of Teaching School’ of Charles Hoole, and makes free use of the School Statutes which state the express intention of the Founder as to what was to be taught. The period covered is one of great significance in which the Encyclopaedia of the medieval curriculum was abandoned for the modern practice of the differentiation of school subjects. The new knowledge of the Renaissance and the introduction of critical methods and of close analysis gave students a detailed knowledge which could not be fitted into the rigid confines of the medieval Encyclopaedia, while the invention of printing enormously facilitated the increase and spreading of text books for both teachers and pupils.

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