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Orlando Furioso

by Ludovico Ariosto

Italian poem not in English.

Routledge Revivals: From the Mahabharata (Routledge Revivals)

by Edwin Arnold

First published in 1909, this book presents an English translation of chapters 25-42 of the Bhishma Parva from the epic Sanskrit poem Mahabharata — better known as the Bhagavad-Gita, reckoned as one of the "Five Jewels" of Devanagari literature. The plot consists of a dialogue between Prince Arjuna and Krishna, the Supreme Deity, in a war-chariot prior to a great battle. The conversation that takes place unfolds a philosophical system which remains the prevailing Brahmanic belief, blending the doctrines of Kapila, Patanjali, and the Vedas. Building on a number of preceding translations, this highly-regarded poetic interpretation provides a major work of literature in an accessible popular form.

Browning Studies: Being Select Papers by Members of the Browning Society (Routledge Revivals)

by Edward Berdoe

This title, first published in 1909, presents a selection of the most important essays by members of the renowned Browning Society, which existed to promulgate the works of and appreciation for perhaps the greatest English poet of the Victorian Age. Browning’s poetry deals with themes that are of perennial importance: the nature of the human person, human love, and the source of the love, God. Browning Studies will appeal to Browning enthusiasts and the message his writing communicates: "A profound, passionate, living, triumphant faith in Christ, and in the immortality and ultimate redemption of every human soul in and through Christ."

Shelley: The Man and the Poet (Routledge Revivals)

by A. Clutton-Brock

First published in 1909, with a second edition in 1923, this concise and easily accessible overview of Shelley’s life and work presents the poet not as popular legend would have it, but in a more objective light. A.Clutton-Brock notes his forthright and imperious attitude to life – a life in which Shelley found himself increasingly unhappy – and critically examines many facets of his artistic career which are often overlooked or misrepresented.

The Song of the Stone Wall

by Helen Keller

An unrhymed poem, fashioned from traditional style, first published in 1910 in which a rough, enduring old stone wall, that winds over hill and meadow, becomes a symbol of New England history. Its importance lies in the meaning it held for Helen Keller, and the strength she gained from its existence.

Selected Poems of Edith Wharton

by Edith Wharton Irene Goldman-Price

Edith Wharton, the first woman to win the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction with her novel The Age of Innocence, was also a brilliant poet. This revealing collection of 134 poems brings together a fascinating array of her verse—including fifty poems that have never before been published.The celebrated American novelist and short story writer Edith Wharton, author of The House of Mirth, Ethan Frome, and the Pulitzer Prize–winning The Age of Innocence, was also a dedicated, passionate poet. A lover of words, she read, studied, and composed poetry all of her life, publishing her first collection of poems at the age of sixteen. In her memoir, A Backward Glance, Wharton declared herself dazzled by poetry; she called it her “chiefest passion and greatest joy.” The 134 selected poems in this volume include fifty published for the first time. Wharton’s poetry is arranged thematically, offering context as the poems explore new facets of her literary ability and character. These works illuminate a richer, sometimes darker side of Wharton. Her subjects range from the public and political—her first published poem was about a boy who hanged himself in jail—to intimate lyric poems expressing heartbreak, loss, and mortality. She wrote frequently about works of art and historical figures and places, and some of her most striking work explores the origins of creativity itself. These selected poems showcase Wharton’s vivid imagination and her personal experience. Relatively overlooked until now, her poetry and its importance in her life provide an enlightening lens through which to view one of the finest writers of the twentieth century.

New Impressions of Africa:

by Raymond Roussel Mark Ford

Poet, novelist, playwright, and chess enthusiast, Raymond Roussel (1877-1933) was one of the French belle époque's most compelling literary figures. During his lifetime, Roussel's work was vociferously championed by the surrealists, but never achieved the widespread acclaim for which he yearned. New Impressions of Africa is undoubtedly Roussel's most extraordinary work. Since its publication in 1932, this weird and wonderful poem has slowly gained cult status, and its admirers have included Salvador Dalì--who dubbed it the most "ungraspably poetic" work of the era--André Breton, Jean Cocteau, Marcel Duchamp, Michel Foucault, Kenneth Koch, and John Ashbery. Roussel began writing New Impressions of Africa in 1915 while serving in the French Army during the First World War and it took him seventeen years to complete. "It is hard to believe the immense amount of time composition of this kind of verse requires," he later commented. Mysterious, unnerving, hilarious, haunting, both rigorously logical and dizzyingly sublime, it is truly one of the hidden masterpieces of twentieth-century modernism. This bilingual edition of New Impressions of Africa presents the original French text and the English poet Mark Ford's lucid, idiomatic translation on facing pages. It also includes an introduction outlining the poem's peculiar structure and evolution, notes explaining its literary and historical references, and the fifty-nine illustrations anonymously commissioned by Roussel, via a detective agency, from Henri-A. Zo.

What Love Comes To

by Ruth Stone Sharon Olds

"A collection of poems that give rich drama to ordinary experience, deepening our sense of what it means to be human."-Pulitzer Prize finalist citation"There is a broad, powerful streak of independence-even disobedience-that runs through Stone's writing and has inspired a great number of women after her."-GuardianFinalist for the 2009 Pulitzer Prize, this retrospective of Ruth Stone's poetry combines the best work from twelve previous volumes with an abundance of new poems. This comprehensive selection includes early formal lyrics, fierce political poems, and meditations on her husband's suicide and her own blindness. As Sharon Olds says in her foreword, "A Ruth Stone poem feels alive in the hands-ardent, independent, restless." What Love Comes To is a necessary collection from an American original.Can it be thatmemory is useless,like a torn webhanging in the wind?Sometimes it billowsout, a full high gauze-like a canopy.But the air passesthrough the rentsand it falls again and flapsshapelesslike the ghost rag that it is-hanging at the windowof an empty room.Ruth Stone is the author of twelve books of poetry. Among her many awards are the National Book Award, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Eric Mathieu King Award, a Whiting Award, and she was a finalist for the 2009 Pulitzer Prize. She taught creative writing at many universities, finally settling at SUNY Binghamton. She lives in Vermont.

The Letters of Robert Frost

by Robert Frost

One of the acknowledged giants of twentieth-century American literature, Robert Frost was a public figure much celebrated in his day. Although his poetry reached a wide audience, the private Frost--pensive, mercurial, and often very funny--remains less appreciated. Following upon the publication of Frost's notebooks and collected prose, "The Letters of Robert Frost" is the first major edition of the poet's written correspondence. The hundreds of previously unpublished letters in these annotated volumes deepen our understanding and appreciation of this most complex and subtle of verbal artists. Volume One traverses the years of Frost's earliest poems to the acclaimed collections "North of Boston "and "Mountain Interval "that cemented his reputation as one of the leading lights of his era. The drama of his personal life--as well as the growth of the audacious mind that produced his poetry--unfolds before us in Frost's day-to-day missives. These rhetorical performances are at once revealing and tantalizingly evasive about relationships with family and close friends, including the poet Edward Thomas. We listen in as Frost defines himself against contemporaries Ezra Pound and William Butler Yeats, and we witness the evolution of his thoughts about prosody, sound, style, and other aspects of poetic craft. In its literary interest and sheer display of personality, Frost's correspondence is on a par with the letters of Emily Dickinson, Robert Lowell, and Samuel Beckett. "The Letters of Robert Frost" holds hours of pleasurable reading for lovers of Frost and modern American poetry.

Ole Miss Juvenilia (Dover Thrift Editions)

by William Faulkner

Faulkner's prolific publication history began at the age of 16 with poems and sketches for the Ole Miss campus newspaper, The Mississippian. The author continued to contribute to the publication throughout his student days at the university as well as after dropping out. These early works of poetry and prose reflect his gift for keen observations and the growing refinement of his voice as one of the greatest of America's Southern authors. Eighteen of Faulkner's elegant pen-and-ink drawings provide an atmospheric complement to the selections. An Introduction by noted Faulkner scholar Carvel Collins is also included.Mississippi native William Faulkner (1897–1962) made his reputation with such psychologically intense and technically innovative novels as The Sound and the Fury, As I Lay Dying, and Light in August, and he received the 1949 Nobel Prize for Literature in addition to two Pulitzer Prizes. Faulkner is especially noted for the rich literary landscape he created in the fictional setting of Yoknapatawpha County, from which he drew characters, places, and themes that reappeared throughout his fiction.

Ovid Metamorphoses: Books 1-8

by Frank Justus Miller Ovid G. P. Goold

The Loeb Classical Library edition of Ovid is in six volumes.

Robert Frost

by Jay Parini

This fascinating reassessment of America's most popular and famous poet reveals a more complex and enigmatic man than many readers might expect. Jay Parini spent over twenty years interviewing friends of Robert Frost and working in the poet's archives at Dartmouth, Amherst, and elsewhere to produce this definitive and insightful biography of both the public and private man. While he depicts the various stages of Frost's colorful life, Parini also sensitively explores the poet's psyche, showing how he dealt with adversity, family tragedy, and depression. By taking the reader into the poetry itself, which he reads closely and brilliantly, Parini offers an insightful road map to Frost's remarkable world.

Lifetime Visions

by Mac Fleming

Mac Fleming has been a photographer all his life. In his senior years, he broadened his range of self-expression from the concrete reality of photographs to the realm of critical thoughts and feelings expressed in poetry. In this book, he uses poetry to trace his maturing ideas and feelings from youthful years in Oregon and middle years in the Midwest to senior years on the coast of California. Along this journey, he occasionally adds a touch of the concrete through related color photos. Weaving years of experience with youthful turns of phrase, Lifetime Visions is an exploration of a life well-lived, spanning over a century.

The Collected Poems of Wilfred Owen

by Wilfred Owen C. Day Lewis Edmund Blunden

"The very content of Owen's poems was, and still is, pertinent to the feelings of young men facing death and the terrors of war." --The New York Times Book Review Wilfred Owen was twenty-two when he enlisted in the Artists' Rifle Corps during World War I. By the time Owen was killed at the age of 25 at the Battle of Sambre, he had written what are considered the most important British poems of WWI. This definitive edition is based on manuscripts of Owen's papers in the British Museum and other archives.

The Poetry of Dante (Collected Works #4)

by Benedetto Croce

Originally published in 1922 and partly from periodicals this book provides a methodological introduction to the reading of Dante’s The Divine Comedy, with the aim of removing the confusion surrounding much Dantean literature and helping the reader to focus attention on the essential qualities of Dante’s work.

Edna St. Vincent Millay: Selected Poems

by J. D. McClatchy Edna St. Millay

The Selected Poetry of Edna St. Vincent Millay is a collection of some of her most loved poems. Brought together in this volume are the individual works of Renascence and Other Poems, A Few Figs From Thistles, Second April, and The Ballad of the Harp-Weaver.

Goethe: Con Una Scelta Delle Liriche Nuovamente Tradotte (classic Reprint) (Collected Works)

by Benedetto Croce

Croce admired Goethe partly because the latter possessed a knowledge of human nature in all its aspects but nonetheless kept his mind above and beyond political sympathies and the quarrels of nations. In this volume originally published in English in 1923, Croce distils his critical ideas about Goethe with the aim of helping readers to better understand the German poet’s work.

New Hampshire: Poems (Dover Thrift Editions Ser.)

by Robert Frost

This Pulitzer Prize–winning poetry collection from 1923 features some of the most enduring works by one of the finest American poets of the twentieth century. One of the most beloved and influential poets in American letters, Robert Frost won his first of four Pulitzer Prizes for this collection of poems inspired by the cold and wild places of New Hampshire in winter. From vivid depictions of provincial life to wry accounts of city dwellers to striking contemplations of the end of the world, the poems collected here are quintessential Frost. Along with the lengthy title poem, this volume boasts some of Frost&’s most famous and significant works, including &“Fire and Ice,&” &“Nothing Gold Can Stay,&” and &“Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening,&” which Frost himself called &“my best bid for remembrance.&”

The Marble Faun and A Green Bough

by William Faulkner

Poems

Barren Ground

by Ellen Glasgow

Set in Virginia, Dorinda Oakley is a passionate, intelligent, and independent young woman struggling to define herself.

Collected Poems 1912-1944

by Hilda Doolittle Louis L. Martz

The Collected Poems 1912-1944 of H. D. brings together all the shorter poems and poetical sequences of Hilda Doolittle (1886-1961) written before 1945. Divided into four parts, this landmark volume, now available as a New Directions Paperbook, includes the complete Collected Poems of 1925 and Red Roses for Bronze (1931). Of special significance are the "Uncollected and Unpublished Poems (1912-1944)," the third section of the book, written mainly in the 1930s, during H. D.'s supposed "fallow" period. As these pages reveal, she was in fact writing a great deal of important poetry at the time, although publishing only a small part of it. The later, wartime poems in this section form an essential prologue to her magnificent Trilogy (1944), the fourth and culminating part of this book. Born in Pennsylvania in 1886, Hilda Doolittle moved to London in 1911 in the footsteps of her friend and one-time fiancé Ezra Pound. Indeed it was Pound, acting as the London scout for Poetry magazine, who helped her begin her extraordinary career, penning the words "H. D., Imagiste" to a group of six poems and sending them on to editor Harriet Monroe in Chicago. The Collected Poems 1912-1944 traces the continual expansion of H. D.'s work from her early imagistic mode to the prophetic style of her "hidden" years in the 1930s, climaxing in the broader, mature accomplishment of Trilogy. The book is edited by Professor Louis L. Martz of Yale, who supplies valuable textual notes and an introductory essay that relates the significance of H. D.'s life to her equally remarkable literary achievement.

Letters to a Young Poet

by Rainer Maria Rilke

In 1903, Rilke replied in a series of 10 letters to a student who had submitted some verses to the well-known Austrian poet for an assessment. Written during an important stage in Rilke's artistic development, these letters contain many of the themes that later appeared in his best works. Essential reading for scholars, poetry lovers.

Observations: Poems

by Marianne Moore Linda Leavell

Marianne Moore's Observations stands with T. S. Eliot's The Waste Land, Ezra Pound's early Cantos, and Wallace Stevens's Harmonium as a landmark of modern poetry. But to the chagrin of many admirers, Moore eliminated a third of its contents from her subsequent poetry collections while radically revising some of the poems she retained. This groundbreaking book has been unavailable to the general reader since its original publication in the 1920s.Presented with a new introduction by Linda Leavell, the author of the award-winning biography Holding On Upside Down: The Life and Work of Marianne Moore, this reissue of Observations at last allows readers to experience the untamed force of Moore's most dazzling innovations. Her fellow modernists were thrilled by her originality, her "clear, flawless" language--to them she was "a rafter holding up . . . our uncompleted building." Equally forceful for subsequent generations, Observations was an "eye-opener" to the young Elizabeth Bishop, its poems "miracles of language and construction." John Ashbery has called "An Octopus" the finest poem of "our greatest modern poet." Moore's heroic open-mindedness and prescient views on multiculturalism, biodiversity, and individual liberty make her work uniquely suited to our times.Impeccably precise yet playfully elusive, emotionally complex but stripped of all sentiment, the poems in Observations show us one of America's greatest poets at the height of her powers.

Selves

by Philip Booth

Booth's eighth poetry collection, with its evocations of compassion, tenderness and invading darkness, implies that redemption will come only from having loved well and wisely. PW remarked, Booth is a traveler keenly, almost mystically, aware that 'how you get there is where you'll arrive. '

Selves

by Philip Booth

Booth's eighth poetry collection, with its evocations of compassion, tenderness and invading darkness, implies that redemption will come only from having loved well and wisely. Publishers Weekly remarked, "Booth is a traveler keenly, almost mystically, aware that 'how you get there is where you'll arrive.' "

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