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World at Risk

by Bob Graham Jim Talent

The bipartisan Commission on the Prevention of Weapons of Mass Destruction Proliferation and Terrorism was established by the U.S. Congress to build on the work of the 9/11 Commission by assessing our nation's progress in preventing weapons of mass destruction proliferation and terrorism, and providing a roadmap to greater security with concrete recommendations for improvement. The Commission has interviewed over 200 experts inside and outside of government. They have met with counterterrorism and intelligence officials here at home and abroad who are working to stop proliferation and terrorism The Commission's report examines the government's current policies and programs, identifies gaps in our government's prevention strategy and recommends ways to close them. The threat of terrorist attacks in the United States and elsewhere is still very real. The world remains at risk There is more that can and must be done. Our security depends on it.

A World at Total War: Global Conflict and the Politics of Destruction, 1937-1945

by Roger Chickering Stig Förster Bernd Greiner

This volume presents the results of a fifth and final conference on the history of total war. It is devoted to the Second World War, which many scholars regard as the paradigmatic instance of total war. In considering the validity of this proposition, the authors address a broad range of analytical problems that this vast conflict posed in the arenas of Europe and Asia. They analyze modes of combat, war aims, the mobilization of economies and societies, occupation regimes, the vulnerability of noncombatants, and the legal and moral issues raised by the industrialized warfare of the mid-twentieth century. The volume will be of interest to all students of war and society in the modern era.

World Crisis: The Way Forward After Iraq

by Geoffrey Howe

With no end to the War on Terror in sight, how do we plan for the future? Many recent books address facets of the "world crisis" of today-international relations, energy, poverty, and, of course, the Iraq War and Middle Eastern reconstruction-but they do not engage with the entire post-Iraq situation faced by the West, nor do they give suggestions for moving forward. The World Crisis, with essays by statesmen and thinkers from Jimmy Carter to Henry Kissinger, is a broad treatment of a massive set of problems. Nineteen "wise men" of immense experience in global politics (Nunn and Lugar, Freeman and Brzezinski, Heseltine and Carlucci, and more) tell us what to do next after the debacles of Western intervention in Iraq and Afghanistan have tested our faith in government. The essays in this book address the war, nuclear non-proliferation, Western dependence on Middle Eastern oil, global warming and the environment, humanitarian crises, inequality of wealth, Israel and Palestine, and emergent powers. The World Crisis is non-partisan; what unites these writers is that their eyes are open. In an election year, when the crucial issue dividing (or is it uniting?) the electorate is Iraq, clear vision is more important than ever.

The World Crisis, 1911–1914: 1911-1914 (Winston Churchill World Crisis Collection #1)

by Winston S. Churchill

The causes of the Great War are examined in this first volume of the series that is “essential reading, as fresh and compelling as ever” (Jon Meacham, bestselling author of Franklin and Winston). An absorbing history of the outbreak of World War I from a true insider’s point of view, the first volume of Sir Winston Churchill’s five-volume The World Crisis is unsurpassed as both a historical and personal account of the earth-shaking events leading up to World War I. Beginning in 1911, when Churchill was First Lord of the Admiralty, this report is based on thousands of his personal letters and memos. Churchill’s epic series opens with a chilling description of the Agadir Crisis, and provides an in-depth account of naval clashes in the Dardanelles, one of Churchill’s major military failures. It takes readers from the fierce bloodshed of the Gallipoli campaign to the tragic sinking of the Lusitania and the tide-turning battles of Jutland and Verdun—as well as the USA’s entry into the combat theatre. Written in powerful prose by a great leader who would also go on to receive a Nobel Prize in Literature, The World Crisis provides a perspective you won’t find anywhere else: a dynamic insider’s account of events that would shape the outcome of modern history. “Whether as a statesman or an author, Churchill was a giant; and The World Crisis towers over most other books about the Great War.” —David Fromkin, author of A Peace to End All Peace

The World Crisis, Vol. 1: The Aftermath (Winston Churchill World Crisis Collection #4)

by Winston S. Churchill

An absorbing history of the outbreak of World War I from a true insider's point of view, the first volume of Sir Winston Churchill's five-volume The World Crisis is unsurpassed as both a historical and personal account of the earth-shaking events leading up to World War I. Beginning in 1911, when Churchill was First Lord of the Admiralty, this report is based on thousands of his personal letters and memos. This first volume of Churchill's epic series opens with a chilling description of the Agadir Crisis, and provides an in-depth account of naval clashes in the Dardanelles, one of Churchill's major military failures. It takes readers from the fierce bloodshed of the Gallipoli campaign to the tragic sinking of the Lusitania and the tide-turning battles of Jutland and Verdun--as well as the USA's entry into the combat theatre. Written in epic, powerful prose, Churchill provides a perspective you won't find anywhere else: a dynamic insider's account of events that would shape the outcome of modern history.

The World Crisis, Vol. 1: The Eastern Front (Winston Churchill World Crisis Collection #5)

by Winston S. Churchill

An absorbing history of the outbreak of World War I from a true insider's point of view, the first volume of Sir Winston Churchill's five-volume The World Crisis is unsurpassed as both a historical and personal account of the earth-shaking events leading up to World War I. Beginning in 1911, when Churchill was First Lord of the Admiralty, this report is based on thousands of his personal letters and memos. This first volume of Churchill's epic series opens with a chilling description of the Agadir Crisis, and provides an in-depth account of naval clashes in the Dardanelles, one of Churchill's major military failures. It takes readers from the fierce bloodshed of the Gallipoli campaign to the tragic sinking of the Lusitania and the tide-turning battles of Jutland and Verdun--as well as the USA's entry into the combat theatre. Written in epic, powerful prose, Churchill provides a perspective you won't find anywhere else: a dynamic insider's account of events that would shape the outcome of modern history.

The World Crisis, Vol. 2: 1915 (Winston Churchill World Crisis Collection #2)

by Winston S. Churchill

This second volume in Churchill's five-volume series The World Crisis is by far the most personal--dealing frankly with Churchill's failures as a military leader and his ultimately unsuccessful battle to break the European deadlock. After the disastrous Gallipoli landings on the Dardanelles, Winston Churchill served for several months as commander of the 6th Battalion of the Royal Scots Fusiliers. During this time, he served on one of the most violent stretches of the front lines, making a total of 36 courageous expeditions into No Man's Land. Here, Churchill provides an unflinching narrative of a particularly challenging time in World War I and in his own career--providing fascinating insight into the mental and psychological challenges faced by a major historical leader.

The World Crisis, Vol. 3 Part 1 and Part 2: 1916-1918 (Winston Churchill World Crisis Collection #3)

by Winston S. Churchill

This epic volume--third in a five-volume history of World War I from the perspective of a highly-placed political insider--details Churchill's development of the Ten Year Rule, which gave the Treasury unprecedented power over financial, foreign, and strategic policy for years to come. In March 1916, Winston Churchill returned to England to speak once more in the House of Commons. Appointed first Minister of Munitions, then later Secretary of State for War and Secretary of State for Air, Churchill was in a prime position to observe and document the violent end of World War I. This volume provides context for the events that came before Churchill's return, including the intense battles of Jutland and Verdun. And it provides a rare perspective--the unbiased observances of a political leader, with a journalist's eye for the truth and a historian's sense of significance.

The World Crisis, Volume I: 1911-1914 (Dover Thrift Editions)

by Winston Churchill

Best known as the Prime Minister who guided Britain through World War II, Winston Churchill also played an active role in the preceding war, during which he served as his country's First Lord of the Admiralty and the leader of its aerial defense. After masterminding the disastrous Gallipoli campaign, he resigned from the government and sought to rehabilitate his reputation by serving with the army on the Western Front. Before and after World War I, Churchill wrote several books that remain popular with students and historians. Written with his customary flair and enriched by his firsthand knowledge of events, Churchill's The World Crisis series remains the greatest history of World War I. This unabridged first volume vividly recounts the status of the world's nations at the war's outbreak, It traces the international tensions over the Balkan states that triggered the conflict as well as the arms race between the British and German navies.

A World Destroyed: Hiroshima and Its Legacies, Third Edition (Stanford Nuclear Age Series)

by Martin J. Sherwin

Continuously in demand since its first, prize-winning edition was published in 1975, this is the classic history of the development of the American atomic bomb, the decision to use it against Japan, and the origins of U.S. atomic diplomacy toward the Soviet Union. In his Preface to this new edition, the author describes and evaluates the lengthening trail of new evidence that has come to light concerning these often emotionally debated subjects. The author also invokes his experience as a historical advisor to the controversial, aborted 1995 Enola Gay exhibit at the National Air and Space Museum of the Smithsonian Institution. This leads him to analyze the impact on American democracy of one of the most insidious of the legacies of Hiroshima: the political control of historical interpretation. Reviews of Previous Editions "The quality of Sherwin's research and the strength of his argument are far superior to previous accounts." —New York Times Book Review "Probably the definitive account for a long time to come. . . . Sherwin has tackled some of the critical questions of the Cold War's origins—and has settled them, in my opinion." —Walter LaFeber, Cornell University "One of those rare achievements of conscientious scholarship, a book at once graceful and luminous, yet loyal to its documentation and restrained in its speculations." —Boston Globe

World History of Warfare

by Christon Archer John Ferris Holger Herwig Timothy Travers

This book is designed as a text-book for introductory college courses in military history. The text covers worldwide military history from ancient times to the present. Its principal theme is an exploration of change and continuity, revolution and tradition, in three thousand years of warfare. The work teaches students and general readers how warfare evolved and how that evolution affected human society, with emphasis on major turning points in the conduct of warfare rather than superficial general history of wars.

World in Crisis: Classic Accounts of World War II

by Richard Tregaskis Walter Lord William Craig

Three New York Times–bestselling World War II histories, including the true story of the miraculous evacuation portrayed in the Christopher Nolan film Dunkirk. The monumental scope and breathtaking heroism of World War II are brought to vivid life in three riveting accounts that span the conflict’s Western Front, Eastern Front, and Pacific Theater. The Miracle of Dunkirk: The definitive account of the evacuation of 338,000 British and French soldiers from the beaches of Dunkirk. Based on interviews with hundreds of survivors and masterfully woven together into a cinematic portrait, The Miracle of Dunkirk captures a pivotal moment when the outcome of World War II hung in the balance. “Stunning . . . The difference between the Lord technique and that of any number of academic historians is the originality of his reportage” (The New York Times). Enemy at the Gates: New York Times bestseller and the inspiration for the 2001 film starring Joseph Fiennes and Jude Law. The siege of Stalingrad lasted five months, one week, and three days. Nearly two million men and women died, and Germany’s 6th Army was completely destroyed. Considered by many historians to be the turning point of World War II in Europe, the Soviet Army’s victory foreshadowed Hitler’s downfall and the rise of a communist superpower. Crafted from five years of exhaustive research and interviews with hundreds of survivors, Enemy at the Gates is “probably the best single work on the epic battle of Stalingrad . . . An unforgettable and haunting reading experience” (Cornelius Ryan, author of The Longest Day). Guadalcanal Diary: #1 New York Times bestseller and the basis for the 1943 film starring Anthony Quinn and Richard Conte. Volunteer combat correspondent Richard Tregaskis was one of two journalists to witness the invasion of Guadalcanal, the first major Allied offensive against Japanese forces and the first time in history that a combined air, land, and sea assault had ever been attempted. Hailed by the New York Times as “one of the literary events of its time,” Guadalcanal Diary is “a superb example of war reporting at its best” (Mark Bowden, author of Black Hawk Down).

A World in Flames: A Short History of the Second World War in Europe and Asia 1939-1945

by Martin Kitchen

A concise account of the war - including the war in Asia and the Pacific as well as the European arena. Covers the formation of the victorious Grand Alliance and to the problems that beset it, and to Nazi Germany's relations with its allies.

A World of Hurt: Between Innocence and Arrogance in Vietnam

by Mary Reynolds Powell

From the prologue: What follows is an account of my own experience in Vietnam as well as the stories of seven friends who served with me. Though we came from diverse backgrounds and held different positions in the military, we shared the Vietnam War of 1971.

The World of Patrick O'Brian: A Sea of Words, A Life Revealed, Harbors and High Seas, and Every Man Will Do His Duty

by Dean King

In these three companion books to Patrick O'Brian's novels, and a biography of the author, Dean King proves himself an authority on maritime writers and their work. What is a sandgrouse, and where does it live? What are the medical properties of lignum vitae, and how did Stephen Maturin use it to repair his viola? Who is Adm. Lord Keith, and why is his wife so friendly with Capt. Jack Aubrey? More than any other contemporary author, Patrick O'Brian knew the past. His twenty Aubrey-Maturin novels, beginning with Master and Commander (1969), are distinguished by deep characterization, heart-stopping naval combat, and an attention to detail that enriches and enlivens his stories. In the revised edition of A Sea of Words, Dean King and his collaborators dive into Jack Aubrey's world. In the revised edition of Harbors and High Seas, King details not just where Aubrey and Maturin went, but how they got there. Packed with maps and illustrations from the greatest age of sail, it is an incomparable reference for devotees of O'Brian's novels and anyone who has dreamed of climbing aboard a warship, as well as a captivating portrait of life on the sea during a time when nothing stood between man and ocean but grit, daring, and a few creaking planks of wood. At the dawn of the nineteenth century, the British navy was the mightiest instrument of war the world had ever known. The Royal Navy patrolled the seas from India to the Caribbean, connecting an empire with footholds in every corner of the earth. Such a massive navy required the service of more than 100,000 men--from officers to deckhands to surgeons. Their stories are collected in Every Man Will Do His Duty. The inspiration for the bestselling novels of Patrick O'Brian and C. S. Forester, these twenty-two memoirs and diaries, edited by Dean King, provide a true portrait of life aboard British warships during one of the most significant eras of world history. Patrick O'Brian was well into his seventies when the world fell in love with his greatest creation: the maritime adventures of Royal Navy Capt. Jack Aubrey and ship's surgeon Stephen Maturin. But despite his fame, little detail was available about the life of the reclusive author, whose mysterious past King uncovers in this groundbreaking biography. King traces O'Brian's personal history from his beginnings as a London-born Protestant named Richard Patrick Russ to his tortured relationship with his first wife and child to his emergence from World War II with the entirely new identity under which he would publish twenty volumes in the Aubrey-Maturin series. What King unearths is a life no less thrilling than the seafaring world of O'Brian's imagination. Patrick O'Brian: A Life Revealed is a penetrating and insightful examination of one of the modern world's most acclaimed historical novelists.

The World of the Battleship: The Design and Careers of Capital Ships of the World's Navies, 1880–1990

by Bruce Taylor

This new volume is intended to present a global vision of the development of the world's battleships. In a collection of chapters by international, the design, building, and career of a significant battleship from each of the world's navies is explored that illuminates not just the ships but also the communities of officers and individuals that served in them and, more broadly, the societies and nations that built them. Each chapter explains the origins of a ship, her importance as a national symbol, and her place in the fleet. This is a highly original and significant book on the great capital ships of the world.

A World on Fire

by James Heneage

An epic novel set during one of the most savage and dramatic moments in European history.Greece 1824In the wild south, the people of the Mani have risen up against four hundred years of Ottoman rule. But initial triumph leads to bitter feuding among the Greek victors and the Sultan sends his vassal, Ibrahim Pasha of Egypt, to invade. Burning everything in his path, he is on the point of victory. Only the intervention of the Great Powers of France, Russia and Britain can save Greece.Hara, young daughter of a Maniot chief, is the fearless symbol of her people's spirit. When she rescues Greek Prince Tzanis from a shipwreck, on his way to deliver secret gold for the revolution, they fall in love but are forced apart by events.Yet a shared resolve to wreak vengeance on Turkish rule unites them again, and their heroism and sacrifice will ultimately inspire an unlikely band of men and women to join them in rescuing Greece. Will their plan to involve the Great Powers succeed before Greece is destroyed by fire?

World Order

by Andrew Goliszek

A novel.

World Out of Mind

by J. T. Mcintosh

The earth is doomed!Only ten people out of every 3,000 will escape aboard space ships to begin a new colony on Mars. For the rest of humanity . . . inevitable destruction.Bill Easson is a conscientious, straightforward guy. But as pilot of one of the ships, he holds the power of life and death in his hands. As the time grows nearer, violent mobs swarm through the streets, and the ten names on Bill’s list change and change again.The authorities only give Bill a 60 percent chance of survival. He knows in his bones he’s got to lengthen the odds.Or die trying.

World Peace Through Law: Replacing War with the Global Rule of Law

by James Taylor Ranney

This book deals with the history and future of the concept of ‘world peace through law’ (WPTL), which advocates replacing the use of international force with the global rule of law. WPTL calls for replacing war with the global rule of law by arms reductions, including the abolition of nuclear weapons, global alternative dispute resolution mechanisms, and various enforcement mechanisms. This book sets forth a three-part proposal: 1) arms reductions – primarily the abolition of nuclear weapons, with necessarily concomitant reductions in conventional forces; 2) a four-stage system of global alternative dispute resolution (ADR), utilizing both law and equity; 3) adequate enforcement mechanisms, including a UN Peace Force. The core of this proposal is alternative dispute resolution mechanisms—international ADR. International ADR would consist of a four-stage process of compulsory negotiation, compulsory mediation, compulsory arbitration., and compulsory adjudication by the World Court. The fundamental proposition of this book is that the use of alternatives to war, global ADR, is the ultimate solution to the problem of peace. The full implementation of WPTL will entail a vast array of progressive initiatives on many fronts, including abolition of nuclear weapons, with the global rule of law being the capstone to all of these developments. This book will be of great interest to students of peace studies, arms control, international law, and world politics.

The World Remade: America in World War I

by G. J. Meyer

A bracing, indispensable account of America’s epoch-defining involvement in the Great War, rich with fresh insights into the key issues, events, and personalities of the period After years of bitter debate, the United States declared war on Imperial Germany on April 6, 1917, plunging the country into the savage European conflict that would redraw the map of the continent—and the globe. The World Remade is an engrossing chronicle of America’s pivotal, still controversial intervention into World War I, encompassing the tumultuous politics and towering historical figures that defined the era and forged the future. When it declared war, the United States was the youngest of the major powers and militarily the weakest by far. On November 11, 1918, when the fighting stopped, it was not only the richest country on earth but the mightiest. With the mercurial, autocratic President Woodrow Wilson as a primary focus, G. J. Meyer takes readers from the heated deliberations over U.S. involvement, through the provocations and manipulations that drew us into the fight, to the battlefield itself and the shattering aftermath of the struggle. America’s entry into the Great War helped make possible the defeat of Germany that had eluded Britain, France, Russia, and Italy in three and a half years of horrendous carnage. Victory, in turn, led to a peace treaty so ill-conceived, so vindictive, that the world was put on the road to an even bloodier confrontation a mere twenty years later. On the home front, Meyer recounts the break-up of traditional class structures, the rise of the progressive and labor movements, the wave of anti-German hysteria, and the explosive expansion of both the economy and federal power, including shocking suspensions of constitutional protections that planted the seeds of today’s national security state. Here also are revealing portraits of Theodore Roosevelt, Henry Cabot Lodge, Robert La Follette, Eugene Debs, and John J. “Black Jack” Pershing, among others, as well as European leaders such as “Welsh Wizard” David Lloyd George of Britain, “Tiger” Georges Clemenceau of France, and Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany. Meyer interweaves the many strands of his story into a gripping narrative that casts new light on one of the darkest, most forgotten corners of U.S. history. In the grand tradition of his earlier work A World Undone—which centered on the European perspective—The World Remade adds a new, uniquely American dimension to our understanding of the seminal conflict of the twentieth century.

A World Restored: Metternich, Castlereagh, and the Problems of Peace, 1812-22 (Weidenfeld And Nicolson 50 Years Ser.)

by Henry Kissinger

Originally published in 1957—years before he was Secretary of State and winner of the Nobel Peace Prize—, Henry Kissinger wrote A World Restored, to understand and explain one of history’s most important and dramatic periods; a time when Europe went from political chaos to a balanced peace that lasted for almost a hundred years.After the fall of Napoleon, European diplomats gathered in a festive Vienna with the task of restoring stability following the French Revolution, the Napoleonic Wars, and the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire. The central figures at the Congress of Vienna were the Foreign Secretary of the United Kingdom, Viscount Castlereagh and the Foreign Minister of Austria Klemens Wenzel von Mettern Metternich. Castlereagh was primarily concerned with maintaining balanced powers, while Metternich based his diplomacy on the idea of legitimacy—that is, establishing and working with governments that citizens accept without force. The peace they brokered lasted until the outbreak of World War I.Through trenchant analysis of the history and forces that create stability, A World Restored gives insight into how to create long-lasting geopolitical peace-lessons that Kissinger saw as applicable to the period immediately following World War II, when he was writing this book.But the lessons don’t stop there. Like all good insights, the book’s wisdom transcends any single political period. Kissinger’s understanding of coalitions and balance of power can be applied to personal and professional situations, such as dealing with a tyrannical boss or co-worker or formulating business or organizational tactics.Regardless of his ideology, Henry Kissinger has had an important impact on modern politics and few would dispute his brilliance as a strategist. For anyone interested in Western history, the tactics of diplomacy, or political strategy, this volume will provide deep understanding of a pivotal time.

The World Sea Power Guide

by David Wragg

Compiled by the author of Janes Air Forces of the World, this book is a must for naval experts and enthusiasts. In one volume the reader will find the composition and details of all naval elements of a staggering 137 nations armed forces including paramilitary organizations as the US Coast Guard Service. The book starts with an introduction based on the situation today and the response of the leading maritime powers. This is an interesting period with considerable uncertainty for the Royal Navy following the Strategic Defense Review. Many other countries, including Australia and Spain are boosting their naval strength to achieve strategic reach, while piracy has become a major problem in at least four different areas of the world. In each case, the history is followed by details of current fleet sizes, composition and deployments.

The World Since 1945: A History Of International Relations

by Harry Piotrowski Wayne C. McWilliams

New emphasis on the impacts of globalization, events in the Middle East, and political and economic changes in East Asia - as well as new information and maps throughout - are among the features of this thoroughly revised edition. The text traces the political, economic, and ideological patterns that have evolved in the global arena from the end of World War II to the present, providing the background needed for a solid understanding of contemporary international relations.

World Special Forces Insignia

by Gordon Rottman Simon Mccouaig

There exists among the world's armies a proliferation of special forces groups. Today's smaller armies, especially those of developing nations, demand maximum efficiency in force structure and employment. Mountain, jungle, arctic and desert areas require special purpose units trained, conditioned, and equipped to master these environments. This volume by ex-weapons specialist in the US 7th Special Forces Group, Gordon L. Rottman, details the insignia of a myriad of special forces groups from all parts of the globe, from Portugal's Commando Regiment to the North Yemen 'Al Mithalaat' Brigade, with a wealth of illustrations and photographs, including 12 full page colour plates by Simon McCouaig.

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