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The End of Iraq: How American Incompetence Created a War without End

by Peter W. Galbraith

The End of Iraq, definitive, tough-minded, clear-eyed, describes America's failed strategy toward that country and what must be done now. The United States invaded Iraq with grand ambitions to bring it democracy and thereby transform the Middle East. Instead, Iraq has disintegrated into three constituent components: a pro-western Kurdistan in the north, an Iran-dominated Shiite entity in the south, and a chaotic Sunni Arab region in the center. The country is plagued by insurgency and is in the opening phases of a potentially catastrophic civil war. George W. Bush broke up Iraq when he ordered its invasion in 2003. The United States not only removed Saddam Hussein, it also smashed and later dissolved the institutions by which Iraq's Sunni Arab minority ruled the country: its army, its security services, and the Baath Party. With these institutions gone and irreplaceable, the basis of an Iraqi state has disappeared. The End of Iraq describes the administration's strategic miscalculations behind the war as well as the blunders of the American occupation. There was the failure to understand the intensity of the ethnic and religious divisions in Iraq. This was followed by incoherent and inconsistent strategies for governing, the failure to spend money for reconstruction, the misguided effort to create a national army and police, and then the turning over of the country's management to Republican political loyalists rather than qualified professionals. As a matter of morality, Galbraith writes, the Kurds of Iraq are no less entitled to independence than are Lithuanians, Croatians, or Palestinians. And if the country's majority Shiites want to run their own affairs, or even have their own state, on what democratic principle should they be denied? If the price of a unified Iraq is another dictatorship, Galbraith writes in The End of Iraq, it is too high a price to pay. The United States must focus now, not on preserving or forging a unified Iraq, but on avoiding a spreading and increasingly dangerous and deadly civil war. It must accept the reality of Iraq's breakup and work with Iraq's Shiites, Kurds, and Sunni Arabs to strengthen the already semi-independent regions. If they are properly constituted, these regions can provide security, though not all will be democratic. There is no easy exit from Iraq for America. We have to relinquish our present strategy -- trying to build national institutions when there is in fact no nation. That effort is doomed, Galbraith argues, and it will only leave the United States with an open-ended commitment in circumstances of uncontrollable turmoil. Peter Galbraith has been in Iraq many times over the last twenty-one years during historic turning points for the country: the Iran-Iraq War, the Kurdish genocide, the 1991 uprising, the immediate aftermath of the 2003 war, and the writing of Iraq's constitutions. In The End of Iraq, he offers many firsthand observations of the men who are now Iraq's leaders. He draws on his nearly two decades of involvement in Iraq policy working for the U. S. government to appraise what has occurred and what will happen. The End of Iraq is the definitive account of this war and its ramifications.

The End of My Life

by Vance Bourjaily

Vance Bourjaily's classic novel of World War II dramatizes an entire generation's loss of innocence When Thomas "Skinner" Galt leaves Greenwich Village to volunteer as an ambulance driver with the British Army, he anticipates the adventure of a lifetime. What he fails to understand is that no matter where he comes from or how many books he has read, once he dons a military uniform, his life will cease to be his own. Stationed first in the Middle East and then in Italy, Skinner and his fellow American volunteers, Rod, Freak, and Benny, endure boredom, fear, and the exquisite frustration of following orders. They seek solace in their friendship with one another and in the debauched diversions available to men during wartime. But as the days and nights drag on, Skinner begins to drift away from his comrades--and from himself. Too late, he discovers that the path he has chosen leads only to tragedy. Inspired by Vance Bourjaily's experiences as an ambulance driver in the American Field Service and commissioned by legendary editor Maxwell Perkins, The End of My Life marked the arrival of a writer heralded by the New York Times as "a Dostoevsky of the generation that came of age in World War II." Elegant, spare, and fiercely honest, this is a timeless portrait of the devastating effects of war on the human spirit.

The End of the Age of Innocence: Edith Wharton and the First World War

by Alan Price

This book provides an overview of Wharton's life during World War II and how the war affected her writing and world-view. This book includes extensive new information on Wharton - based upon her unpublished letters, archival materials, and the extensive research by the author.

The End of the Battle (Sword of Honour Trilogy #3)

by Evelyn Waugh

Guy Crouchback is given one final assignment in Yugoslavia, at the end of WWII. Concluding volume of the Sword of Honour trilogy.

The End of the Beginning

by Sir Winston S. Churchill

1942 was an important turning point in World War II. Britain and its allies had faced considerable challenges thus far. Beset by bombings and devastated by personal loss and the restrictions of war, the British public was losing patience with the war effort--and their prime minister. Churchill faced an uphill battle in his military efforts as well as in gathering political and public support for the struggle to come. But when the US joined the war, at the end of 1941, the tides turned. Churchill has been quoted as saying he felt certain of the Allied victory with the US on his side--and his speeches reflect a renewed sense of hope and conviction. This collection of wartime speeches from 1942 provides an interesting historical commentary on this volatile time in history--from the point of view of one of its most prominent wartime leaders. ABOUT THE AUTHOR Sir Winston Churchill was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1953 "for his mastery of historical and biographical description as well as for brilliant oratory in defending exalted human values." Over a 64-year span, Churchill published over 40 books, many multi-volume definitive accounts of historical events to which he was a witness and participant. All are beautifully written and as accessible and relevant today as when first published. During his fifty-year political career, Churchill served twice as Prime Minister in addition to other prominent positions--including President of the Board of Trade, First Lord of the Admiralty, Chancellor of the Exchequer, and Home Secretary. In the 1930s, Churchill was one of the first to recognize the danger of the rising Nazi power in Germany and to campaign for rearmament in Britain. His leadership and inspired broadcasts and speeches during World War II helped strengthen British resistance to Adolf Hitler--and played an important part in the Allies' eventual triumph. One of the most inspiring wartime leaders of modern history, Churchill was also an orator, a historian, a journalist, and an artist. All of these aspects of Churchill are fully represented in this collection of his works. ABOUT THE SERIES Even decades later, long after the bloody conflict of World War II has been consigned to history, Sir Winston Churchill's words to a country at war still have the power to thrill. Arguably the greatest orator of the last hundred years, Churchill was at his best when leading Britain in times of war--sometimes exhorting, sometimes pleading, sometimes energizing, and always inspiring. Rosetta Books offers a complete set of volumes of the wartime speeches for which Churchill was best known, presented in the original formats in which he authorized them for publication. Churchill's oratory was cited by the Nobel Foundation in granting him the Nobel Prize for Literature. Ranging from the beginning of England's brave stand against Hitler to the surrender of Japan and its aftermath, they bring a long and turbulent period in world history to vibrant life.

End of the Beginning (Pacific War Series #2)

by Harry Turtledove

Six weeks ago, Imperial Japanese military forces conquered and occupied the Hawaiian Islands. A puppet king sits on Hawaii's throne, his strings controlled by the general of the invasion force. American POWs, malnourished and weak, are enslaved as hard laborers until death takes them. Civilians fare little better, struggling to survive on dwindling resources. And families of Japanese origin find their loyalties divided. Meanwhile, across the United States, from Pensacola, Florida, to San Diego, California, the military is marshaling its forces. Steel factories and fuel refineries are operating around the clock. New recruits are enlisting, undergoing rigorous training exercises. All for the opportunity to strike back and drive the enemy from American soil...

End of the Game (Destroyer #60)

by Warren Murphy Richard Sapir

When a California Video game programmer gets board he begins manipulating people's lives for fun. When his boardom, leads him into an attempt at neuclear war, Remo is sent in to provide entertainmet.

The End of the Old Order: Napoleon and Europe, 1801-1805

by Frederick Kagan

Perhaps no person in history has dominated his or her own era as much as Napoleon. Despite his small physical stature, the shadow of Napoleon is cast like a colossus, compelling all who would look at that epoch to chart their course by reference to him. For this reason, most historical accounts of the Napoleonic era-and there are many-tell the same Napoleon-dominated story over and over again, or focus narrowly on special aspects of it. Frederick Kagan, distinguished historian and military policy expert, has tapped hitherto unused archival materials from Austria, Prussia, France, and Russia, to present the history of these years from the balanced perspective of all of the major players of Europe. InThe End of the Old Orderreaders encounter the rulers, ministers, citizens, and subjects of Europe in all of their political and military activity-from the desk of the prime minister to the pen of the ambassador, from the map of the general to the rifle of the soldier. With clear and lively prose, Kagan guides the reader deftly through the intriguing and complex web of international politics and war. The End of the Old Orderis the first volume in a new and comprehensive four-volume study of Napoleon and Europe. Each volume in the series will surprise readers with a dramatically different tapestry of early nineteenth-century personalities and events and will revise fundamentally our ages-old understanding of the wars that created modern Europe.

The End of War: A Novel of the Race for Berlin

by David L. Robbins

In the final months of the Second World War, one strategic question above all occupies the Allies: which liberating army will be the first to march into Berlin? On the western front, Montgomery lobbies for the honour, while Eisenhower becomes more and more determined to thwart him and put an American general -- Bradley or Patton -- in charge of the final thrust; in the east, Stalin's armies advance steadily and ruthlessly towards the apotheosis of their vengeance.

End the Silence

by Dorothy Read Ilse Evelijn Veere Smit

End the Silence tells the story of Ilse, an Indo-European born into an idyllic childhood in the colonial society of the Dutch East Indies. Ilse's privileged life was forever changed when the Japanese invaded her homeland during World War II. She recounts her years of internment in a Japanese concentration camp on Java. Then, at the war's end she walked out of Camp Halmaheira only to walk into the bloody Indonesian revolution where she was targeted for execution by native freedom fighters. Finally, she tells of the pain she suffered trying to cope with her memories in a family that refused to talk about it. As Ilse recalls the scenes in her remarkable journey, Dorothy Read paints them in the words of both the young Ilse who lived them and today's Ilse who reflects upon them.

An End to Evil

by David Frum Richard Perle

An End to Evil charts the agenda for what's next in the war on terrorism, as articulated by David Frum, former presidential speechwriter and bestselling author of The Right Man, and Richard Perle, former assistant secretary of defense and one of the most influential foreign-policy leaders in Washington. This world is an unsafe place for Americans--and the U.S. government remains unready to defend its people. In An End to Evil, David Frum and Richard Perle sound the alert about the dangers around us: the continuing threat from terrorism, the crisis with North Korea, the aggressive ambitions of China. Frum and Perle provide a detailed, candid account of America's vulnerabilities: a military whose leaders resist change, intelligence agencies mired in bureaucracy, diplomats who put friendly relations with their foreign colleagues ahead of the nation's interests. Perle and Frum lay out a bold program to defend America--and to win the war on terror. Among the topics this book addresses: * why the United States risks its security if it submits to the authority of the United Nations * why France and Saudi Arabia have to be treated as adversaries, not allies, in the war on terror * why the United States must take decisive action against Iran--now* what to do in North Korea if negotiations fail* why everything you read in the newspapers about the Israeli-Arab dispute is wrong * how our government must be changed if we are to fight the war on terror to victory--not just stalemate * where the next great terror threat is coming from--and what we can do to protect ourselves An End to Evil will define the conservative point of view on foreign policy for a new generation--and shape the agenda for the 2004 presidential-election year and beyond. With a keen insiders' perspective on how our leaders are confronting--or not confronting--the war on terrorism, David Frum and Richard Perle make a convincing argument for why the toughest line is the safest line.From the Hardcover edition.

Ender's Game (Ender Wiggin #1)

by Orson Scott Card

In order to develop a secure defense against a hostile alien race's next attack, government agencies breed child geniuses and train them as soldiers. A brilliant young boy, Andrew "Ender" Wiggin lives with his kind but distant parents, his sadistic brother Peter, and the person he loves more than anyone else, his sister Valentine. Peter and Valentine were candidates for the soldier-training program but didn't make the cut -- young Ender is the Wiggin drafted to the orbiting Battle School for rigorous military training.<P><P> Ender's skills make him a leader in school and respected in the Battle Room, where children play at mock battles in zero gravity. Yet growing up in an artificial community of young soldiers Ender suffers greatly from isolation, rivalry from his peers, pressure from the adult teachers, and an unsettling fear of the alien invaders. His psychological battles include loneliness, fear that he is becoming like the cruel brother he remembers, and fanning the flames of devotion to his beloved sister.<P> Is Ender the general Earth needs? But Ender is not the only result of the genetic experiments. The war with the Buggers has been raging for a hundred years, and the quest for the perfect general has been underway for almost as long. Ender's two older siblings are every bit as unusual as he is, but in very different ways. Between the three of them lie the abilities to remake a world. If, that is, the world survives.<P> Hugo and Nebula Awards Winner.

Ender's World (Ender Wiggin #1)

by Orson Scott Card Neal Shusterman Mary Robinette Kowal Janis Ian Aaron Johnston Eric James Stone

Experience the thrill of reading Ender's Game all over againGo deeper into the complexities of Orson Scott Card's classic novel with science fiction and fantasy writers, YA authors, military strategists, including:<P><P> Ender prequel series coauthor Aaron Johnston on Ender and the evolution of the child hero. Burn Notice creator Matt Nix on Ender's Game as a guide to life. Hugo award-winning writer Mary Robinette Kowal on how Ender's Game gets away with breaking all the (literary) rules. Retired US Air Force Colonel Tom Ruby on what the military could learn from Ender about leadership. Bestselling YA author Neal Shusterman on the ambivalence toward survival that lies at the heart of Ender's story.<P> Plus pieces by Hilari Bel, John Brown, Mette Ivie Harrison, Janis Ian, Alethea Kontis, David Lubar and Alison S. Myers, John F. Schmitt, Ken Scholes, and Eric James Stone.<P> Also includes never-before-seen content from Orson Scott Card on the writing and evolution of the events in Ender's Game, from the design of Battle School to the mindset of the pilots who sacrificed themselves in humanity's fight against the formics. Hugo and Nebula Awards winner.

The Endgame

by Michael R. Gordon Bernard E. Trainor

Eagerly anticipated in the wake of their national best seller Cobra II ("The superb, must-read military history of the invasion of Iraq"--Thomas L. Friedman), The Endgame is Michael R. Gordon and General Bernard E. Trainor's most ambitious and news-breaking book to date. A peerless work of investigative journalism and historical recreation ranging from 2003 to 2012, it gives us the first comprehensive, inside account of arguably the most widely reported yet least understood war in American history--from the occupation of Iraq to the withdrawal of American troops. Prodigiously researched, The Endgame is not only based on an abundance of highly classified, still-secret government documents but is also brilliantly informed by access to key figures in the White House, the military, the State and Defense departments, the intelligence community, and, most strikingly, by extensive interviews with both Sunni and Shiite leaders, key Kurdish politicians, tribal sheikhs, former insurgents, Sadrists, and senior Iraqi military officers, whose insights about critical turning points and previously unknown decisions made during the war have heretofore been conspicuously missing from the media's coverage of it. The Endgame is riveting as a blow-by-blow chronicle of the fighting. It is also relentlessly revealing, as it deftly pieces together the puzzle of the prosecution of American, Iraqi, and Iranian objectives, and the diplomatic intrigue and political struggle within Iraq since the American invasion.

Endgame, 1945: The Missing Final Chapter of World War II

by David Stafford

"War is too important to be left to the generals," Georges Clemenceau once famously remarked. Stafford (Centre for the Study of the Two World Wars, U. of Edinburgh, UK) adds, "the history of war is too important to be left to the military historians alone," especially as they tend to end their accounts with the immediate cessation of hostilities and neglect the importance of war's aftermath. His method of capturing some of the realities of the final days and immediate aftermath, through mid-summer 1945, of World War II, is to weave together the biographies of "a handful of individuals," including a German mother separated from her sons and imprisoned by the Nazis, a British commando witness to the aftermath of the horrors of the concentration camps, an American soldier in Italy, a war correspondent traveling with Gen. Patton's forces into Germany, a Canadian officer in Holland, a German-Jewish exile serving as a British secret agent in Austria, a New Zealand intelligence officer working in opposition to the communists in the disputed city of Trieste, an American paratrooper in Berlin involved in some the very first manifestations of the Cold War confrontation with the Soviets, and a woman involved with humanitarian work for concentration camp victims. Annotation ©2008 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Ending the US War in Afghanistan: A Primer

by Phyllis Bennis David Wildman

The Bush Administration answered the terror attacks of September 11, 2001 with what it called the "global war on terror," first with the assault on Afghanistan and then the invasion of Iraq. More and more Americans joined the opposition to the Iraq war, but for many, Afghanistan remained "the good war." But was the war on Afghanistan ever a "good war?" And will President Obama's planned escalation of US troop presence in Afghanistan work? In this easy-to-read volume of "frequently asked questions," analysts David Wildman and Phyllis Bennis examine a wide range of key issues regarding the US war in Afghanistan.

Ending the Vietnam War: A History of America's Involvement In and Extrication from the Vietnam War

by Henry Kissinger

The Definitive Account. Many other authors have written about what they thought happened -- or thought should have happened -- in Vietnam, but it was Henry Kissinger who was there at the epicenter, involved in every decision from the long, frustrating negotiations with the North Vietnamese delegation to America's eventual extrication from the war. Now, for the first time, Kissinger gives us in a single volume an in-depth, inside view of the Vietnam War, personally collected, annotated, revised, and updated from his bestselling memoirs and his book Diplomacy. Here, Kissinger writes with firm, precise knowledge, supported by meticulous documentation that includes his own memoranda to and replies from President Nixon. He tells about the tragedy of Cambodia, the collateral negotiations with the Soviet Union and the People's Republic of China, the disagreements within the Nixon and Ford administrations, the details of all negotiations in which he was involved, the domestic unrest and protest in the States, and the day-to-day military to diplomatic realities of the war as it reached the White House. As compelling and exciting as Barbara Tuchman's The Guns of August, Ending the Vietnam War also reveals insights about the bigger-than-life personalities -- Johnson, Nixon, de Gaulle, Ho Chi Minh, Brezhnev -- who were caught up in a war that forever changed international relations. This is history on a grand scale, and a book of overwhelming importance to the public record.

Ending The U.s. War In Iraq

by Jr. Ben Connable Terrence K. Kelly Charles P. Ries Stephanie Young K. Scott Mcmahon Richard R. Brennan Michael J. Mcnerney Larry Hanauer Jason Campbell

Ending the U. S. war in Iraq required redeploying 100,000 military and civilian personnel; handing off responsibility for 431 activities to the Iraqi government, U. S. embassy, USCENTCOM, or other U. S. government entities; and moving or transferring ownership of over a million pieces of property in accordance with U. S. and Iraqi laws, national policy, and DoD requirements. This book examines the planning and execution of this transition.

Endurance and War: The National Sources of Military Cohesion

by Jasen J. Castillo

Scholars and military practitioners alike have long sought to understand why some country's militaries fight hard when facing defeat while others collapse. In Endurance and War, Jasen Castillo presents a new unifying theory--cohesion theory--to explain why national militaries differ in their staying power. His argument builds on insights from the literatures on group solidarity in general and military effectiveness in particular, which argue that the stronger the ties binding together individuals in a group of any kind, the higher the degree of cohesion that a group will exhibit when taking collective action, including fighting in war. Specifically, he argues that two types of ties determine the cohesion, and therefore the resilience, of a nation's armed forces during war: the degree of control a regime holds over its citizens and the amount of autonomy the armed forces possess to focus on training for warfighting. Understanding why armed forces differ in their cohesion should help U.S. military planners better assess the military capabilities of potential adversaries, like Iran and North Korea. For scholars of international politics, cohesion theory can help provide insights into how countries create military power and how they win wars.

Endure (Need Pixies #4)

by Carrie Jones

Rescuing Nick should have made all of Zara's problems disappear. Bedford's greatest warrior is back, not to mention Zara's true soul mate. But it seems it isn't enough. Nick isn't enough. Bedford is being ravaged by evil pixies and they need much more than one great warrior; they need an army to stop the impended apocalypse. Zara isn't sure what her role is anymore. She's not just fighting for her friends, she's also a pixie queen. And to align her team of pixies with the humans she loves will be one of her greatest battles yet. Especially since she can't even reconcile her growing, heart-pounding feelings for her pixie king.... Unexpected turns, surprising revelations, and one utterly satisfying romantic finale make Endure a thrilling end to this acclaimed series.

Enduring Freedom, Enduring Voices

by Michael G. Walling

The war in Afghanistan has become one of the most complex, challenging operations in the history of the US military. Using first-hand accounts of the men and women who fought in Operation Enduring Freedom, this book presents an intensely personal history of the war in Afghanistan, revealing the determination, heroism, sacrifice, and strength of spirit that came to form the fabric of the conflict.Enduring Freedom, Enduring Voices places the first-hand accounts of serving men and women into the context of the military operations. Drawing on gripping oral histories, from theater commanders, Special Forces troops, reconstruction teams, and everyday soldiers, Michael G. Walling analyzes operations as they were experienced by individuals, from those immediately following 9/11 through to those in 2014 as US troops prepared to withdraw. Written following a research trip to the region, in which the author spent considerable time embedded with the US forces, Walling's unique and intensely personal history offers a timely insight into the conflict as the majority of NATO forces are withdrawn - the final chapter in the story of US military operations in Afghanistan.He also charts the evolution of US military structure as it was forced to adapt to cope with the non-conventional, but nonetheless deadly threats of asymmetric warfare, as well as detailing covert ops, infrastructure rebuilding, and the training of Afghan forces.Resonating across gender, age, nationality, and ethnicity, this book is not just a document of US fortunes in a far-flung conflict. It is a tribute to the determination, heroism, sacrifice, and the strength of the human spirit. From the Hardcover edition.

Enduring Love: The Civil War Diaries of Benjamin Franklin Pierce (14th New Hampshire Vol. Inf.) and His Wife Harriett Jane Goodwin Pierce

by Sheila M. Cumberworth Daniel V. Biles

While a Minnesota family was remodeling their home in the 1950s, they discovered a set of Civil diaries stuffed inside a wall. This book presents the edited diaries, along with material that places these personal accounts in context. The diaries included in this book were largely written from 1863 to 1865, while Frank Pierce was fighting in Virginia. At home in Bradford, New Hampshire, Harriette Pierce cared for her children and supported the family by sewing. The diaries reveal the love between Frank and Harriett and the stress of the long period of separation and uncertainty.

Enduring the Great War

by Alexander Watson

This 2008 book is an innovative comparative history of how German and British soldiers endured the horror of the First World War. Unlike existing literature, which emphasises the strength of societies or military institutions, this study argues that at the heart of armies' robustness lay natural human resilience. Drawing widely on contemporary letters and diaries of British and German soldiers, psychiatric reports and official documentation, and interpreting these sources with modern psychological research, this unique account provides fresh insights into the soldiers' fears, motivations and coping mechanisms. It explains why the British outlasted their opponents by examining and comparing the motives for fighting, the effectiveness with which armies and societies supported men and the combatants' morale throughout the conflict on both sides. Finally it challenges the consensus on the war's end, arguing that not a 'covert strike' but rather an 'ordered surrender' led by junior officers brought about Germany's defeat in 1918.

Enemy Agents

by Don Pendleton

When California's Mojave Desert becomes the training ground for a homegrown militia group with a deadly scheme to "take back" America, Mack Bolan is sent in to unleash his own form of destruction. But first he'll have to infiltrate the unit and unravel their plot before it's too late. With less than forty-eight hours to go, the stakes have suddenly been raised and millions of Americans are about to be caught in the cross fire of a terrorist attack. As the militia sets its plan in motion, Bolan has only one opportunity to strike back and shut them down forever. Timing will be tight, but if these right-wing extremists want a war, then the Executioner is there to oblige.

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