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The Equality Act 2010 in Mental Health: A Guide to Implementation and Issues for Practice

by Scott Melba Wilson Sarah Carr Cheryl Brodie Barbara Vincent Sue Waterhouse Eleanor Hope Tony Jameson-Allen Marcel Vige Peter Gilbert Hári Sewell Jo Honigmann Durairaj

The Equality Act 2010 in Mental Health provides a critical guide to the Act: what it means for mental health services and how it should be implemented. It addresses each of the nine characteristics protected by the Act in turn, examining the research and practice issue associated with each and offering positive guidance. Contributors also highlight the broader issues associated with achieving equality in mental health, including conflicts between different forms of discrimination, the impact of budget cuts and the issue of inequality in wider society and how it relates to the mental health services. Finally, the book tackles organisational change and the implications for management practice, organisational structures and staff training. This book will be a valuable resource for those involved in providing mental health services, including managers and frontline workers across health and social care.

Every Fifteen Minutes

by Lisa Scottoline

Dr. Eric Parrish is the Chief of the Psychiatric Unit at Havemeyer General Hospital outside of Philadelphia. Recently separated from his wife Alice, he is doing his best as a single Dad to his seven-year-old daughter Hannah. His work seems to be going better than his home life, however. His unit at the hospital has just been named number two in the country and Eric has a devoted staff of doctors and nurses who are as caring as Eric is. <P><P> But when he takes on a new patient, Eric's entire world begins to crumble. Seventeen-year-old Max has a terminally ill grandmother and is having trouble handling it. That, plus his OCD and violent thoughts about a girl he likes makes Max a high risk patient. Max can't turn off the mental rituals he needs to perform every fifteen minutes that keep him calm. With the pressure mounting, Max just might reach the breaking point. When the girl is found murdered, Max is nowhere to be found. Worried about Max, Eric goes looking for him and puts himself in danger of being seen as a "person of interest" himself. Next, one of his own staff turns on him in a trumped up charge of sexual harassment. <P> Is this chaos all random? Or is someone systematically trying to destroy Eric's life? <P> New York Times best selling author Lisa Scottoline's visceral thriller, Every Fifteen Minutes, brings you into the grip of a true sociopath and shows you how, in the quest to survive such ruthlessness, every minute counts.

Textbook of Transpersonal Psychiatry and Psychology

by Bruce W. Scotton Allan B. Chinen John R. Battista

This important new book brings together the work of top scholars and clinicians at leading universities and medical centers on the benefits and risks of transpersonal therapy. After comparing a variety of multicultural approaches--Zen Buddhism, existential phenomenology, and Christian mysticism, among many others--the book offers a wealth of information on specific disorders and the application of transpersonal psychology techniques such as visualization, breathwork, and "past lives” regression. With solid scholarship, wide scope, and accessible style, Textbook of Transpersonal Psychiatry and Psychology will become the standard work for students, researchers, clinicians, and lay readers interested in extending psychiatry and psychology into sciences that describe the functioning of the human mind, thereby building bridges between those disciplines and spirituality.

Introduction to Forensic Psychology: Essentials for Law Enforcement

by Stephanie Scott-Snyder

Research indicates that there are psychological principles at play in the situations encountered by law enforcement personnel. The book fulfills an important need in the ever-evolving field of criminal justice, providing a working knowledge of forensic psychology and its application to interview strategies, homicide, emotional disturbance, sexual and domestic violence, hostage negotiations, and other situations. It will help law enforcement to understand, interpret, and anticipate behavior, while responding safely and effectively.

My Kind of Sad: What It's Like to Be Young and Depressed

by Kate Scowen

Helping teens deal with depression. "Once you've been through it and you're able to get out of it, then you can handle pretty much anything." - Caroline, age 19. Written to be read by teens themselves, My Kind of Sad lays out the facts on moodiness, depression, and the stresses of teenaged life. From the factors affecting how kids feel to the signs of serious depression, the book explores youth-specific mental health issues and offers teens expert advice on how to find help for themselves or help a friend in need. To help kids differentiate between general worries and something more serious, the topics include: reactive depression (a mood) vs. clinical depression (a mood disorder); bipolar disorder; anxiety disorders (panic attacks, post traumatic stress disorder); disordered eating (how food affects mood) vs. eating disorders (diseases that can kill); self-mutilation (cutting); suicide warning signs and treatment options. Along with constructive guidance from professionals and stats from the latest studies, the book shares thoughts and feelings from teens who have experienced different forms of depression. Complete with pages of resources to help learn more, My Kind of Sad is a valuable ally in the battle against hopelessness.

Total Mobilization: World War II and American Literature

by Roy Scranton

Since World War II, the story of the trauma hero—the noble white man psychologically wounded by his encounter with violence—has become omnipresent in America’s narratives of war, an imaginary solution to the contradictions of American political hegemony. In Total Mobilization, Roy Scranton cuts through the fog of trauma that obscures World War II, uncovering a lost history and reframing the way we talk about war today. Considering often overlooked works by James Jones, Wallace Stevens, Martha Gellhorn, and others, alongside cartoons and films, Scranton investigates the role of the hero in industrial wartime, showing how such writers struggled to make sense of problems that continue to plague us today: the limits of American power, the dangers of political polarization, and the conflicts between nationalism and liberalism. By turning our attention to the ways we make war meaningful—and by excavating the politics implicit within the myth of the traumatized hero—Total Mobilization revises the way we understand not only World War II, but all of postwar American culture.

Entropy of Mind and Negative Entropy: A Cognitive and Complex Approach to Schizophrenia and its Therapy

by Tullio Scrimali

Schizophrenia is the central problem in the sciences of the mind, not only for its etiological, psychopathological and clinical aspects, but also because of its implications for therapy and rehabilitation. In this volume the author describes a series of new scientific and clinical perspectives for schizophrenia influenced by cognitivist and constructivist approaches and informed by the logic of complexity and non-linear, dynamic systems. The author delineates a new complex theory of the brain and a procedural theory of the mind, founded on the concept of the modular brain and the coalitional mind. Subsequently, the author develops a multi-factorial conceptualization of the etiological dynamic and an original, complex, and evolutionary perspective concerning the psychotic condition, which has been redefined, in this case, as Entropy of the Mind or Phrenentropy. In conclusion, the author illustrates an innovative, integrated protocol, denominated Negative Entropy, for the treatment and rehabilitation of patients with schizophrenia.

Neuroscience-based Cognitive Therapy

by Tullio Scrimali

A pioneer of CBT explores recent advances in neuroscience, showing how they can be applied in practice to improve the effectiveness of cognitive therapy for clients with a wide range of diagnoses including mood disorders, anxiety disorders, eating disorders and schizophrenia Utilizes the latest advances in neuroscience to introduce tools that allow clinicians, for the first time, to directly 'measure' the effectiveness of cognitive therapy interventions Rigorously based in neuroscientific research, yet designed to be readable and jargon-free for a professional market of CBT practitioners Covers theory, assessment, and the treatment of a wide range of specific disorders including anxiety disorders, mood disorders, eating disorders, addictions and schizophrenia Written by a respected pioneer in the field

The Quick-Fix Hangover Detox

by Jane Scrivner

Escape the Hangover From Hell If you wake up after a night out and reach for pain relievers before even opening your eyes, help is at hand. Bestselling detox author Jane Scrivner reveals strategies for preventative measures before you drink, damage limitation while you drink, and recovery remedies after you drink, including: Which drinks to enjoy and when you should just say no Natural remedies you already own that-shockingly-will make that nausea disappear Permission to eat. All day. Seriously. The Quick-Fix Hangover Detox is your ticket out of morning regret-without missing any of the nighttime fun.

Becoming Insomniac

by Lee Scrivner

A study of the history of modern insomnia, this book explores how poets, journalists, and doctors of the Victorian period found themselves in near-universal agreement that modernity and sleep were somehow incompatible. It investigates how psychologists, philosophers and literary artists worked to articulate its causes, and its potential cures.

Relationship Enhancement Therapy: Healing Through Deep Empathy and Intimate Dialogue

by Robert F. Scuka

Relationship Enhancement Therapy (RE) is a couples-therapy system conceived of, designed, and first implemented by Bernard Guerney Jr., who integrated the client-centered theory of Carl Rogers, the interpersonal theory of Henry Stack Sullivan, the behavior modification and learning theories of Skinner and Bandura, and the psychodynamic theory of Freud, in formulating RE. In this book Dr. Scuka presents an up-to-date, comprehensive theoretical and practical treatment of RE, in which he gives the reader a guide to implementing the principles of this dynamic theory. The book is written principally with couples therapy in mind, although there is an acknowledged relevance to family therapy, and the author calls attention the many skills and therapy techniques that would be applicable to family therapy. Though designed to allow a therapist of any level of experience to begin working with the RE model, this book is more than a standard cookbook, as it considers a variety of special RE therapy techniques, discusses the entire clinical intake process, the application of the RE model to the treatment of affairs, use with difficult clients, and family therapy issues such as domestic violence and stepfamilies.

The Asylum as Utopia: W.A.F. Browne and the Mid-Nineteenth Century Consolidation of Psychiatry (Psychology Revivals)

by Andrew Scull

What Asylums Were, Are, and Ought to Be, first published in 1837, was of considerable significance in the history of lunacy reform in Britain. It contains perhaps the single most influential portrait by a medical author of the horrors of the traditional madhouse system. Its powerful and ideologically resonant description of the contrasting virtues of the reformed asylum, a hive of therapeutic activity under the benevolent but autocratic guidance and control of its medical superintendent, provided within a brief compass a strikingly attractive alternative vision of an apparently attainable utopia. Browne’s book thus provided important impetus to the efforts then under way to make the provision of county asylums compulsory, and towards the institution of a national system of asylum inspection and supervision. This edition, originally published in 1991 as part of the Tavistock Classics in the History of Psychiatry series, contains a lengthy introductory essay by Andrew Scull. Scull discusses the social context within which What Asylums Were, Are, and Ought to Be came to be written, examines the impact of the book on the progress of lunacy reform, and places its author’s career in the larger framework of the development of Victorian psychiatry as an organised profession. Through an examination of Browne’s tenure as superintendent of the Crichton Royal Asylum in Dumfries, Scull compares the theory and practice of asylum care in the moral treatment era, revealing the remorseless processes through which such philanthropic foundations degenerated into more or less well-tended cemeteries for the still-breathing – institutions almost startlingly remote from Browne’s earlier visions of what they ought to be.

Madhouse: A Tragic Tale of Megalomania and Modern Medicine

by Andrew Scull

Madhouse reveals a long-suppressed medical scandal, shocking in its brutality and sobering in its implications. It shows how a leading American psychiatrist of the early twentieth century came to believe that mental illnesses were the product of chronic infections that poisoned the brain. Convinced that he had uncovered the single source of psychosis, Henry Cotton, superintendent of the Trenton State Hospital, New Jersey, launched a ruthless campaign to "eliminate the perils of pus infection." Teeth were pulled, tonsils excised, and stomachs, spleens, colons, and uteruses were all sacrificed in the assault on "focal sepsis." Many patients did not survive Cotton's surgeries; thousands more were left mangled and maimed. Cotton's work was controversial, yet none of his colleagues questioned his experimental practices. Subsequent historians and psychiatrists too have ignored the events that cast doubt on their favorite narratives of scientific and humanitarian progress. In a remarkable feat of historical detective work, Andrew Scull exposes the full, frightening story of madness among the mad-doctors. Drawing on a wealth of documents and interviews, he reconstructs in vivid detail a nightmarish, cautionary chapter in modern psychiatry when professionals failed to police themselves.

Madness in Civilization

by Andrew Scull

The loss of reason, a sense of alienation from the commonsense world we all like to imagine we inhabit, the shattering emotional turmoil that seizes hold and won't let go--these are some of the traits we associate with madness. Today, mental disturbance is most commonly viewed through a medical lens, but societies have also sought to make sense of it through religion or the supernatural, or by constructing psychological or social explanations in an effort to tame the demons of unreason. Madness in Civilization traces the long and complex history of this affliction and our attempts to treat it.Beautifully illustrated throughout, Madness in Civilization takes readers from antiquity to today, painting a vivid and often harrowing portrait of the different ways that cultures around the world have interpreted and responded to the seemingly irrational, psychotic, and insane. From the Bible to Sigmund Freud, from exorcism to mesmerism, from Bedlam to Victorian asylums, from the theory of humors to modern pharmacology, the book explores the manifestations and meanings of madness, its challenges and consequences, and our varied responses to it. It also looks at how insanity has haunted the imaginations of artists and writers and describes the profound influence it has had on the arts, from drama, opera, and the novel to drawing, painting, and sculpture.Written by one of the world's preeminent historians of psychiatry, Madness in Civilization is a panoramic history of the human encounter with unreason.

Psychiatry and Its Discontents

by Andrew Scull

Written by one of the world’s most distinguished historians of psychiatry, Psychiatry and Its Discontents provides a wide-ranging and critical perspective on the profession that dominates the treatment of mental illness. Andrew Scull traces the rise of the field, the midcentury hegemony of psychoanalytic methods, and the paradigm’s decline with the ascendance of biological and pharmaceutical approaches to mental illness. The book’s historical sweep is broad, ranging from the age of the asylum to the rise of psychopharmacology and the dubious triumphs of “community care.” The essays in Psychiatry and Its Discontents provide a vivid and compelling portrait of the recurring crises of legitimacy experienced by “mad-doctors,” as psychiatrists were once called, and illustrates the impact of psychiatry’s ideas and interventions on the lives of those afflicted with mental illness.

Understanding Sexual Violence: A Study of Convicted Rapists

by Diana Scully

Understanding Sexual Violence examines the structural supports for rape in sexually violent cultures and dispels a number of myths about sexual violence--for example, that childhood abuse, alcohol, and drugs are direct causes of rape.

Healing War Trauma: A Handbook of Creative Approaches (Psychosocial Stress Series)

by Raymond Monsour Scurfield Katherine Theresa Platoni

Healing War Trauma details a broad range of exciting approaches for healing from the trauma of war. The techniques described in each chapter are designed to complement and supplement cognitive-behavioral treatment protocols—and, ultimately, to help clinicians transcend the limits of those protocols. For those veterans who do not respond productively to—or who have simply little interest in—office-based, regimented, and symptom-focused treatments, the innovative approaches laid out in Healing War Trauma will inspire and inform both clinicians and veterans as they chart new paths to healing.

War Trauma and Its Wake: Expanding the Circle of Healing (Psychosocial Stress Series)

by Raymond Monsour Scurfield Katherine Theresa Platoni

Decades after Charles Figley’s landmark Trauma and Its Wake was published, our understanding of trauma has grown and deepened, but we still face considerable challenges when treating trauma survivors. This is especially the case for professionals who work with veterans and active-duty military personnel. War Trauma and Its Wake, then, is a vital book. The editors—one a Vietnam veteran who wrote the overview chapter on treatment for Trauma and Its Wake, the other an Army Reserve psychologist with four deployments—have produced a book that addresses both the specific needs of particular warrior communities as well as wider issues such as battlemind, guilt, suicide, and much, much more. The editors’ and contributors’ deep understanding of the issues that warriors face makes War Trauma and Its Wake a crucial book for understanding the military experience, and the lessons contained in its pages are essential for anyone committed to healing war trauma.

Reclaiming Your Body: Healing from Trauma and Awakening to Your Body’s Wisdom

by Suzanne Scurlock-Durana

A guided tour through the body’s innate healing powersMany of us have learned to ignore, deny, or even mistrust the wise messages our bodies give us. The result is that when trauma strikes, a time when we need every aspect of our beings to master the challenge, we may find ourselves disconnected from our greatest strengths. Suzanne Scurlock-Durana, who has spent thirty years studying the gifts of the body and teaching thousands how to reclaim them, began to recognize this strength, which she likens to a GPS, when she herself experienced a life-threatening trauma. Here she walks readers through different areas of the body, revealing the wisdom they hold and how to reconnect with that wisdom. As she shows in this warm, compassionate book, the body’s abilities are always available; we must simply reconnect with them.

Cycling and Motorcycling Tourism: An Analysis of Physical, Sensory, Social, and Emotional Features of Journey Experiences (Tourism, Hospitality & Event Management)

by Anna Scuttari

This book explores the understanding, description, and measurement of the physical, sensory, social, and emotional features of motorcycle and bicycle journey experiences in tourism. Novel insights are presented from an original case study of these forms of tourism in the Sella Pass, a panoramic road close to the Dolomites UNESCO World Heritage Site. A comprehensive mixed-methods strategy was employed for this research, with concurrent use of quantitative and qualitative methods including documentation and secondary data analysis, mobile video ethnography, and emotion measurement. The aim was to create a holistic knowledge of the features of journey experiences and a new definition of the mobility space as a perceptual space. The book is significant in that it is among the first studies to explore the concept of journey experiences and to develop an interdisciplinary theoretical foundation of mobility spaces. It offers a comprehensive understanding and a benchmarking of the features of motorcycling and cycling journey experiences, a deeper market knowledge on motorcycling and cycling tourists, and a set of tools, techniques, and recommendations for future research on tourist experiences.

Psychology (Seventh Edition)

by Lester M. Sdorow Cheryl A. Rickabaugh Adrienne J. Betz

<p>If you have not adopted this book in the past, we believe that you will find that your students will be eager to read it and to learn from it. You will find that the book achieves interest and readability while also accomplishing the following goals: <p> <li>Portraying psychology as a science <li>Demonstrating the superiority of science over common sense <li>Showing that psychological research occurs in a sociocultural context <li>Illustrating the relevance of psychology to everyday life <li>Encouraging critical thinking in all aspects of life, particularly in regard to the media <li>Placing psychology in its intellectual, historical, biographical, and sociocultural contexts</li> </p>

Changing Sexualities and Parental Functions in the Twenty-First Century: Changing Sexualities, Changing Parental Functions (Psychoanalysis and Women Series)

by Candida Se Holovko

Recent societal changes have challenged long-established concepts in psychoanalysis, including the Oedipus complex, parental functions, and male and female psychosexuality. 'Postmodern families', based on sexual and emotional exchanges independent of gender, now include homoerotic couples who adopt children, or who create them through assisted fertilisation, as well as single parent families and blended families. A number of highly-renowned Latin American psychoanalysts have drawn attention to the urgency of revising theoretical and clinical concepts in the light of these new scenarios. In this book, they open up ideas which cover familiar territory of current concerns in psychoanalytic work, as well as other little-explored areas, with the emphasis on evolving sexualities and new experiences of parenthood. The first section revisits psychoanalytic theories, particularly parental functions in the area of sexuality and gender. The following section discusses new family configurations, and vicissitudes of the desire to have a child in men and women, with the authors presenting some psychic consequences for parents in therapy who have turned to assisted fertilisation.

The Company of Strangers

by Paul Seabright

The Company of Strangers shows us the remarkable strangeness, and fragility, of our everyday lives. This completely revised and updated edition includes a new chapter analyzing how the rise and fall of social trust explain the unsustainable boom in the global economy over the past decade and the financial crisis that succeeded it. Drawing on insights from biology, anthropology, history, psychology, and literature, Paul Seabright explores how our evolved ability of abstract reasoning has allowed institutions like money, markets, cities, and the banking system to provide the foundations of social trust that we need in our everyday lives. Even the simple acts of buying food and clothing depend on an astonishing web of interaction that spans the globe. How did humans develop the ability to trust total strangers with providing our most basic needs?

The War of the Sexes

by Paul Seabright

As countless love songs, movies, and self-help books attest, men and women have long sought different things. The result? Seemingly inevitable conflict. Yet we belong to the most cooperative species on the planet. Isn't there a way we can use this capacity to achieve greater harmony and equality between the sexes? In The War of the Sexes, Paul Seabright argues that there is--but first we must understand how the tension between conflict and cooperation developed in our remote evolutionary past, how it shaped the modern world, and how it still holds us back, both at home and at work. Drawing on biology, sociology, anthropology, and economics, Seabright shows that conflict between the sexes is, paradoxically, the product of cooperation. The evolutionary niche--the long dependent childhood--carved out by our ancestors requires the highest level of cooperative talent. But it also gives couples more to fight about. Men and women became experts at influencing one another to achieve their cooperative ends, but also became trapped in strategies of manipulation and deception in pursuit of sex and partnership. In early societies, economic conditions moved the balance of power in favor of men, as they cornered scarce resources for use in the sexual bargain. Today, conditions have changed beyond recognition, yet inequalities between men and women persist, as the brains, talents, and preferences we inherited from our ancestors struggle to deal with the unpredictable forces unleashed by the modern information economy. Men and women today have an unprecedented opportunity to achieve equal power and respect. But we need to understand the mixed inheritance of conflict and cooperation left to us by our primate ancestors if we are finally to escape their legacy.

Social Psychology - A Complete Introduction: Teach Yourself

by Paul Seager

Written by Dr Paul Seager, a social psychology specialist who teaches at the University of Central Lancashire in Preston, 'Social Psychology: A Complete Introduction' is designed to give you everything you need to succeed, all in one place. It covers key areas that students are expected to be confident in, outlining the basics in clear jargon-free English, and then provides added-value features like summaries of key studies, lists of questions to test your understanding of the concepts covered, and a 'Food for thought' section at the end of each chapter which challenges you to put the academic theories to practical use. The book uses a structure that mirrors many university courses on social psychology - starting off by explaining what social psychology is and how it is researched, before exploring a wide variety of the fascinating areas social psychologists have looked at in both classic and lesser-known studies. Areas covered include: the self; attributions; social cognition; interpersonal attraction; social influence; attitudes and persuasion; prosocial behaviour; aggression; groups; leadership; group decision making; intergroup behaviour; and prejudice. A final chapter looks at how social psychology can, and has been, applied in the real world to make a difference. 'Teach Yourself' titles employ the 'Breakthrough method', which is designed specifically to overcome problems that students face. - Problem: "I find it difficult to remember what I've read."; Solution: this book includes end-of-chapter summaries and questions to test your understanding. - Problem: "Most books mention important other sources, but I can never find them in time."; Solution: this book includes fully referenced quotes ready to use in your essay or exam, and each chapter lists further suggested readings for each topic. - Problem: "Lots of introductory books turn out to cover totally different topics than my course."; Solution: this book is written by a current university lecturer who understands what students are expected to know.

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