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Working with Adult Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse

by Liezel Anguelova

This book provides a framework for addressing the extended treatment needs of adult survivors of child sexual abuse. It is based on a therapeutic intervention model that provides flexibility for therapists to work according to their training and skills set while incorporating practical techniques structured around the needs of survivors. The book begins by providing therapists with crucial information about sex abuse survivors—such as ethical considerations, types of abuse, the stages of abuse, and the effects of the abuse on the child—as well as a method useful in the putting together of an abuse profile which ultimately assists in identifying treatment needs. The second part of the book provides client homework exercises for treatment and covers working with memories; denial; problematic emotions such as guilt, self-blame, and shame; depression and anxiety; sexuality; as well as parents, partners, and more. This accessible yet comprehensive guide will be of utmost use to mental health professionals who work with adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse.

Working with Aging Families: Therapeutic Solutions for Caregivers, Spouses, & Adult Children

by Kathleen W. Piercy

With today's shifting demographics can arise tricky family issues--here are tips for therapists on how to steer clients through them. As the average lifespan increases, so does the number of living generations, a recipe for some potentially complex family issues. This book offers therapeutic strategies to navigate the unique dynamics and experiences of today's aging families, from the "sandwich generation" and caregiver burdens to divorce, bereavement, and much more.

Working With Alienated Children and Families: A Clinical Guidebook

by Amy J. L. Baker S. Richard Sauber

This edited volume is written by and for mental health professionals who work directly with alienated children and their parents. The chapters are written by leaders in the field, all of whom know how vexing parental alienation can be for mental health professionals. No matter how the professional intersects with families affected by alienation, be it through individual treatment, reunification therapy, a school setting, or support groups, he or she needs to consider how to make proper assessments, how to guard against bias, and when and how to involve the court system, among other challenges. The cutting edge clinical interventions presented in this book will help professionals answer these questions and help them to help their clients. The authors present a range of clinical options such as parent education, psycho-educational programs for children, and reunification programs for children and parents that make this volume a useful reference and practical guide.

Working with Anger and Young People

by Nick Luxmoore

Understanding the roots of anger and encouraging appropriate and acceptable ways of expressing this are essential skills for anyone working with young people. Working with Anger and Young People warns against 'quick fix' solutions to dealing with anger, and draws on the author's experiences of youth counselling and training workshops to propose helpful interventions for addressing anger effectively and moving on from it. From attachment anxieties and feelings of powerlessness, to frustration at difficult family relations, Nick Luxmoore considers the common reasons for young people's anger during this difficult stage of their development. Through accounts of his work with a range of young people, he offers tried-and-tested exercises and talking points to help work through common counterproductive responses to anger such as antisocial behaviour and physical or verbal violence. Crucially, he also recognises the needs of those working with these young people with anger problems and provides advice on working safely, maintaining control and achieving job satisfaction. This sensitive, accessible book will be an informative and engaging resource for anyone working with young people with anger issues.

Working with Asperger Syndrome in the Classroom

by Gill D. Ansell

Having an array of effective strategies at your fingertips and understanding exactly why they work makes supporting children with Asperger Syndrome in the classroom a whole lot easier. This accessible, short and snappy guide to the basics will provide busy teachers and teaching assistants with everything they need to know to make their job easier, and to make a real difference to any student with AS in their care. The book begins by exploring how children with AS operate and the implications this has for mainstream school settings. It goes on to give practical advice for one-on-one working, DIY resources for visual learners, tools for effective assessment, and much more. Information on how personal wellbeing can be maintained in potentially stressful situations is also included, and the concise chapters are ideal for dipping into as and when inspiration is needed. This book will be an essential resource for any teacher or teaching assistant supporting children with Asperger Syndrome.

Working with Attachment in Couples Therapy: A Four-Step Model for Clinical Practice

by Jim Donovan

Through an exploration of extensive case studies, this book demonstrates how the discovery and examination of original childhood attachment wounds is crucial to couples therapy. As many as half of all mental health referrals involve interpersonal issues and these very often relate to marital problems. Yet, after a half a century of couples therapy, we still lack a widely accepted treatment model for couples and there are relatively few training programs or graduate courses dedicated to the field. Why does an effective general approach to marital therapy remain so elusive? Working with Attachment in Couples Therapy: A Four-Step Model for Clinical Practice presents a series of in-depth case studies, which illustrate the seeking of the primary wound for each participant as it unfolds session by session and traces improvement in each couple while exploring past injuries. This book represents essential reading for any mental health professional working with couples, as well as those in training.

Working with Autobiographical Memories in Therapy: Assessment and Treatment

by Arnold R. Bruhn

Aggregating 46 years of research, this book proposes a fresh approach on how to conduct assessment and therapy using autobiographical memories. It offers a system to identify and deconstruct major lifetime memories and shows how clinicians can work with the content of these memories to help clients better understand past events as present events are filtered through them. Dr. Bruhn’s first book on this subject, Earliest Childhood Memories: Theory and Application to Clinical Practice (1990), illustrated what could be learned about clients’ present situation from the Early Memories Procedure (EMP), which is designed to identify and explore autobiographical memories of problematic experiences in therapy. The present book, which builds upon Dr. Bruhn’s work with incarcerated women and male parolees, shows what can be done with these key memories by working directly on them in therapy. Dr. Bruhn showcases a new insight-oriented treatment paradigm, "memories work," to help resolve the issues identified in EMP responses. Chapters offer an alternative view of processing trauma and explore each facet of using memories work to design mental health interventions with clients. Included throughout are detailed case studies and techniques to re-engineer dysfunctional perceptions. Clinicians and therapists will come away with the tools necessary to use memories work successfully with clients.

Working with Bereaved Children and Young People

by Brenda Mallon

This book offers a fresh insight into working practices with children and young people who are experiencing the death of a family member, friend, school peer or in their social network. Bridging the gap between theory and practice, the book's practical skills focus is informed by the latest research findings on children and young people's experience of grief. The wide-ranging content includes: - a comprehensive review of theoretical approaches to bereavement - the impact of different types of grief on children - working with children who have been bereaved in traumatic circumstances, such as through criminal behaviour - skills development. The list of resources, case studies and exercises encourage critical engagement with the counselling theory and promote reflexive practice. Trainees in counselling, psychotherapy and social work, as well as teachers and mental health workers, will find this an invaluable resource for working with this vulnerable client group.

Working with Bitches

by Meredith Fuller

What do you do when the queen bee demands to know why you haven’t written the report she never asked for? Or when the colleague who you thought was your friend takes sole credit for the project you worked on together? It’s hard to speak out about catty behavior, especially when it’s insidious or goes on behind your back. But you can usually sense when something’s "off”-particularly if you’re completely stressed out and hate the job you used to love. Let’s face it, ladies: there are plenty of nasty, manipulative, and destructive women in the workplace who fly under the radar while ruthless alpha males get all the bad press. In Working with Bitches, psychologist Meredith Fuller offers practical advice on how to recognize and manage difficult women at work. Dr. Fuller combines actual cases with tips that women can use right away to defuse even the worst situations. Readers will learn how to deal with the eight types of "mean girls” they might face in the office and find powerful reassurance that they are not alone.

Working with Brain Injury: A primer for psychologists working in under-resourced settings

by Rudi Coetzer Ross Balchin

This book provides a hands-on resource for the development of essential skills and competencies in clinical neuropsychology. On a very practical level it addresses a question frequently asked by students, trainees, interns, and newly qualified psychologists: what do I need to know in order to perform the everyday tasks involved in clinical neuropsychology? The authors distil, from a vast knowledge base, the practical skills and knowledge needed to lay the foundations for working with brain-injured patients, especially within the developed and developing world where time and resources are limited. The book is divided into three main sections: Basic Foundations, Clinical Practice, and Professional Issues. Together these sections cover 18 fundamental topics, each representing a key part of the life of a practitioner. Each chapter contains practical tips, points for reflective practice, and suggested further reading, with a particular emphasis on issues pertaining to working in under-resourced clinical environments. The book draws upon landmark academic papers and textbooks, and also the authors’ experiences of working in state hospitals in both South Africa and the National Health Service in the United Kingdom. Working with Brain Injury will be essential reading for clinical psychology trainees and their supervisors, for newly qualified psychologists in clinical settings, and for students and practitioners in other clinical professions seeking an introduction to clinical neuropsychology.

Working with Challenging Youth: Seven Guiding Principles

by Brent Richardson

Working with Challenging Youth, Second Edition is a practical, reader-friendly guide through the pitfalls and problems that arise when working with at-risk youth. As in the first edition, the new Working with Challenging Youth builds on a solid theoretical base in reality therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, solution-focused therapy, systems theory, and humanistic philosophy to answer the question "What distinguishes the really effective professionals from the rest?" This second edition includes new sections on specialized, evidence-based approaches such as dialectical behavior therapy, mindfulness, collaborative problem-solving, motivational interviewing, and multisystemic therapy. This book also offers 7 guiding principles and 50 specific lessons to help bridge the gap between helping professionals and youth.

Working With Children: Journal of Infant, Child, and Adolescent Psychotherapy, 2.2

by Kirkland C. Vaughans

First published in 2003. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Working with Children and Adolescents in Residential Care: A Strengths-Based Approach

by Bob Bertolino

Working with Children and Adolescents in Residential Care: A Strengths-Based Approach is written for professionals who work with children and youth in out of home placements, be they social services workers, child welfare or family court workers, educators, or mental health professionals in general. The book offers an approach that professionals can use to positively impact the lives of young people in residential facilities. The book emphasizes the strengths and abilities of young people from the assessment phase of treatment through discharge, and helps readers to take into account the views and actions of youth in order to provide clients appropriate services. This new volume includes sections on principles of effective youth care work, personal philosophy, positive youth development, teamwork, staffings, and crisis management.

Working with Children and Teenagers Using Solution Focused Approaches

by Judith Milner Jackie Bateman

Solution focused approaches offer proven ways of helping children overcome a whole range of difficulties, from academic problems to mental health issues, by helping them to identify their strengths and achievements. Based on solution focused practice principles, this book illustrates communication skills and playful techniques for working with all children and young people, regardless of any health, learning or development need. It demonstrates how the approach can capture children's views, wishes and worries, and can assist them in identifying their strengths and abilities. The approach encourages positive decision-making, and helps children to overcome challenges, achieve their goals and reach their full potential. The book is packed with case examples, practical strategies, and practice activities. This valuable text will be of great use to a range of practitioners working with children and young people, including social workers, youth workers, counsellors, teachers and nurses.

Working with Children and Youth with Complex Needs: 20 Skills to Build Resilience

by Michael Ungar

Working with Children and Youth with Complex Needs provides a detailed description of techniques and rich stories of how social workers, psychologists, counselors, and child and youth care workers can help young people become more resilient. With ample case studies and fascinating explanations of research, Dr. Ungar shows why we need to work just as hard changing the environments that surround children as we do changing children themselves. Building on lessons learned from clinical, community and residential settings, Dr. Ungar discusses 20 skills that can enhance the effectiveness of frontline mental health services. Along with descriptions of the skills necessary to talk with clients about the factors that put their mental health at risk, Working with Children and Youth with Complex Needs also presents systemic practices clinicians can use in their everyday work. Engaging with children’s extended family, addressing issues of community violence, racism and homophobia, and helping parents and teachers understand children’s maladaptive coping strategies as sometimes necessary are among the many practical strategies that are discussed which clinicians can use to enhance and sustain the therapeutic value of their work.

Working with Children and Youth with Complex Needs: 20 Skills to Build Resilience

by Michael Ungar

This new edition of Working with Children and Youth with Complex Needs provides detailed descriptions of techniques, ample case studies, fascinating and easy to understand explanations of research, and rich stories of how social workers, psychologists, counselors, child and youth care workers, and other mental health professionals can help young people become more resilient. Fully updated and including new discussions of trauma, adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), resilience, genetic susceptibility to stress, the impact of migration and natural disasters on families, and much more, Dr. Ungar shows why we need to work just as hard changing the environments that surround children as we do changing children themselves. Building on lessons learned from clinical, community and residential settings, Dr. Ungar discusses a shortlist of 20 essential skills that can enhance the effectiveness of frontline mental health services without relying on expensive, resource heavy programs. Along with descriptions of the skills necessary to talk with clients about the factors that put their mental health at risk, Working with Children and Youth with Complex Needs presents systemic practices clinicians can use in their everyday work to help their clients transform their worlds and improve their access to the resources they need to succeed. Chapters present a variety of practical strategies that clinicians can use to enhance and sustain the therapeutic value of their work, including engaging with children's extended family; addressing issues of community violence, racism and homophobia; and helping parents and teachers understand (and change) childrens' maladaptive coping strategies. A series of videos accompanies the text to help readers see the skills that are discussed being applied to real-life situations mental health professionals and their community allies encounter.

Working with Children in Art Therapy

by Tessa Dalley Caroline Case

Working with Children in Art Therapy is a collection of papers by ten art therapists working in the major child care agencies as part of a professional team. Each paper describes a different theoretical perspective and clinical setting with an emphasis on the language of art in art therapy and ways of understanding non-verbal communication. Contributions cover working with children in psychiatric clinics within the National Health Service, in mainstream and special schools, and in the social services.

Working with Children in Groups

by David Kathryn Geldard

With its effective outcomes, relative speed and reduced costs, the group format is becoming increasingly popular for work with children in counselling and educational settings. Drawing from their extensive experience of running childrens groups and training group leaders, Kathryn and David Geldard describe the entire process of running groups from the initial planning to post-group evaluation. Topics covered include the benefits and disadvantages of running groups and the types of group available, as well as the planning, designing, implementation and evaluation of group programmes. Filled with lots of ideas, activities, games and work-sheets for use in group programmes, as well as examples of complete programmes for particular problems such as domestic violence and low self-esteem, this highly accessible and practical book will be an invaluable resource for anyone wishing to run groups for children.

Working with Children to Heal Interpersonal Trauma

by Eliana Gil

Featuring in-depth case presentations from master clinicians, this volume highlights the remarkable capacity of traumatized children to guide their own healing process. The book describes what posttraumatic play looks like and how it can foster resilience and coping. Demonstrated are applications of play, art, and other expressive therapies with children who have faced such overwhelming experiences as sexual abuse or chronic neglect. The contributors discuss ways to facilitate forms of expression that promote mastery and growth, as well as how to intervene when play becomes stuck in destructive patterns. They share effective strategies for engaging hard-to-reach children and building trusting therapeutic relationships.

Working with Children with Sexual Behavior Problems

by Eliana Gil Jennifer A. Shaw

Based on extensive clinical experience, this book provides authoritative guidance and practical tools in a challenging area for child mental health professionals. The authors explain the many possible causes of problem sexual behaviors and demonstrate assessment and treatment procedures that have been shown to work with 4- to 11-year-olds and their families. Four chapter-length case examples illustrate how to integrate elements of cognitive-behavioral therapy, play and expressive therapies, and family-based approaches. Helpful reproducible worksheets and forms can be downloaded and printed in a convenient 8 1/2" x 11" size.

Working with Co-Parents: A Manual for Therapists

by Mary L. Jeppsen

Working with Co-Parents is a practical manual for therapists and social workers who work with divorced and/or separated parents of children. Unique among other books that focus on therapy with the parents individually, the author’s model brings the divorced couple together to help them understand their child’s experience and to assist them in developing a road to constructive co-parenting. This manual also includes illustrative case vignettes, session outlines and handouts, and homework reflection questions. Therapists and counselors will learn tools and interventions that they can apply immediately and effectively to their work with divorced couples.

Working with Dangerous People: The Psychotherapy of Violence

by Jones David

‘This book, written by people with an intimate knowledge of prisons and dangerous prisoners and their mental health and welfare, offers something of an antidote to the simply coercive and repressive. In the words of the editor, it offers ‘a humane approach to working with dangerous people… It should be a basic tenet of psychological work with clients that we are prepared and able to be in sympathy with them, to have some understanding of their despair’. This volume offers a contribution to ways of thinking about dangerous people and their behavior and working with them constructively, respectfully and possibly redemptive. I sincerely hope that this book will be read by all those concerned with offenders in whatever capacity, from clinicians to politicians, from policy makers to managers. It will well reward their interest and attention.’ Christopher Cordess, Psychoanalyst and Emeritus Professor of Forensic Psychiatry University of Sheffield

Working with Developmental Anxieties in Couple and Family Psychotherapy: The Family Within

by Penny Jools Noela Byrne Jenny Berg

The family begins with the parental couple; it is they who create the family. This book explores the way in which the child or any member of the family can carry unresolved projections arising from the parents’ families of origin: their family within, and the difficulties this internal family presents for the therapist. The model developed in this book explores psychoanalytically based ideas about infant development and applies them to the internal world of couples and families. It presents both a clear explanation of these theories as well as case histories that show how these ideas work in practice. The developmental model presented offers an original perspective on the wide range of problems that many couple and family therapists struggle with. These problems can be understood in the context of the family within, the way in which the family of origin dynamics have been internalised. This shared understanding between the couple and family and the therapist provides a path to greater maturity and therefore a greater capacity to cope with life’s vicissitudes. Working with Developmental Anxieties in Couple and Family Psychotherapy presents both a clear theoretical framework for understanding the development of the couple and family, and a practical application for these ideas. Case studies bring the model to life through illustrating both the problems of the family or couple and the difficulties of the work. It will appeal to psychoanalysts, psychotherapists, couples and family therapists.

Working With Difficult Patients: From Neurosis to Psychosis

by Franco De Masi

In this book the author examines the series of connections that give rise to the intimate relationship between environment and individual in the construction of emotional suffering, emphasising both the undisputed pathogenic action of environmental stimuli and the active participation of whoever is obliged to suffer the negative situation. The author shows that the way in which one tries to escape suffering is what often seriously jeopardises growth. Working with Difficult Patients points out the intrinsic link between some forms of mental suffering and the distorted responses that the patient has received from his or her original environment. For this reason the author explores the concept of the emotional trauma in particular, since this trauma, which occurs in the primary relationship, often impels the child into relational withdrawal and towards constructing pathological structures that will accompany him or her for the rest of their life. The chapters are ordered according to a scale of increasing treatment difficulty, which is proportional to the potential pathogenicity of the underlying psychopathological structure.

Working with Dreams (Routledge Library Editions: Sleep and Dreams)

by Montague Ullman Nan Zimmerman

Originally published in 1979, this is a dream book with an outstanding difference: it takes the interpretation of dreams out of the realm of the professionals and gives it to the ultimate expert – the dreamer. Working with Dreams stresses the uniqueness of every dream and dreamer. With anecdotes and examples from their own dream groups, the authors show how to deal with the intimacy and honesty of a dream; how to explore its meanings without distorting them; how to let a dream tell us about ourselves and add to our understanding. Dr Ullman and Mrs Zimmerman start with the question of what is in a dream – what is real and what is symbolic? – and then go on to explain what happens during sleep and the way a dream develops. They cover remembering and recording dreams and dealing with the imagery of dreams. They illustrate the many predicaments that dreams depict, the self-deceptions we practice in relation to our dreams, and then show how dream groups – whether a family or a group of strangers – can work together to uncover the meaning of dreams. And they enrich their book by discussing everything from the history of dreams to the possibilities of dreams across space and time. The result is a storehouse of information about the world of dreams.

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Showing 34,851 through 34,875 of 35,265 results