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Trauma and Primitive Mental States: An Object Relations Perspective

by Judy K. Eekhoff

Trauma and Primitive Mental States: An Object Relations Perspective offers a clinically based framework through which adult survivors of early childhood trauma can re-engage with painful past events to create meaningful futures for themselves. The book highlights the use of the body and the mind in working with these early unmentalized and unrepresented states, illustrating the value of finding language that embodies emotions, and working in the here and now of transference and counter-transference. Including a range of examples of how early trauma can thus be re-presented and clinically understood, the book illustrates how patients can discover themselves and leave their repetitive patterns of suffering behind. Written by a clinician with over 30 years’ experience, this will be fascinating reading for psychoanalysts and psychotherapists as well as any mental health professional working with childhood trauma.

Trauma and Psychosis: New Directions for Theory and Therapy

by Anthony P. Morrison Warren Larkin

Trauma and Psychosis provides a valuable contribution to the current understanding of the possible relationships between the experience of trauma and the range of phenomena currently referred to as psychosis. Warren Larkin and Anthony P. Morrison bring together contributions from leading clinicians and researchers in a range of fields including clinical psychology, mental health nursing and psychiatry. The book is divided into three parts, providing comprehensive coverage of the relevant research and clinical applications. Part I: Research and Theoretical Perspectives provides the reader with a broad understanding of current and developing theoretical perspectives. Part II: Specific Populations examines the relationship between trauma and psychotic experiences in specific populations. Part III: From Theory to Therapy draws together current knowledge and investigates how it might be used to benefit individuals experiencing psychosis. This book will be invaluable for clinicians and researchers interested in gaining a greater insight into the interaction between trauma and psychosis.

Trauma and Public Memory

by Jane Goodall Christopher Lee

This collection explores the ways in which traumatic experience becomes a part of public memory. It explores the premise that traumatic events are realities; they happen in the world, not in the fantasy life of individuals or in the narrative frames of our televisions and cinemas.

Trauma and Recovery

by Judith L. Herman

When Trauma and Recovery was first published in 1992, it was hailed as a groundbreaking work. In the intervening years, Herman's volume has changed the way we think about and treat traumatic events and trauma victims. In a new afterword, Herman chronicles the incredible response the book has elicited and explains how the issues surrounding the topic have shifted within the clinical community and the culture at large.Trauma and Recovery brings a new level of understanding to a set of problems usually considered individually. Herman draws on her own cutting-edge research in domestic violence as well as on the vast literature of combat veterans and victims of political terror, to show the parallels between private terrors such as rape and public traumas such as terrorism. The book puts individual experience in a broader political frame, arguing that psychological trauma can be understood only in a social context. Meticulously documented and frequently using the victims' own words as well as those from classic literary works and prison diaries, Trauma and Recovery is a powerful work that will continue to profoundly impact our thinking.

Trauma and Recovery: The Aftermath of Violence--from Domestic Abuse to Political Terror

by Judith Lewis Herman

<p>When <i>Trauma and Recovery</i> was first published in 1992, it was hailed as a groundbreaking work. In the intervening years, Herman's volume has changed the way we think about and treat traumatic events and trauma victims. In a new afterword, Herman chronicles the incredible response the book has elicited and explains how the issues surrounding the topic have shifted within the clinical community and the culture at large. <p><i>Trauma and Recovery</i> brings a new level of understanding to a set of problems usually considered individually. Herman draws on her own cutting-edge research in domestic violence as well as on the vast literature of combat veterans and victims of political terror, to show the parallels between private terrors such as rape and public traumas such as terrorism. <p>The book puts individual experience in a broader political frame, arguing that psychological trauma can be understood only in a social context. Meticulously documented and frequently using the victims' own words as well as those from classic literary works and prison diaries, <i>Trauma and Recovery</i> is a powerful work that will continue to profoundly impact our thinking.</p>

Trauma and Recovery: The Aftermath of Violence, from Domestic Abuse to Political Terror

by Judith Lewis Herman

When Trauma and Recovery was first published in 1992, it was hailed as a groundbreaking work. In the intervening years, it has become the basic text for understanding trauma survivors. By placing individual experience in a broader political frame, Judith Herman argues that psychological trauma can be understood only in a social context. Drawing on her own research on incest, as well as on a vast literature on combat veterans and victims of political terror, she shows surprising parallels between private horrors like child abuse and public horrors like war. A new epilogue reviews what has changed--and what has not changed--over two decades. Trauma and Recovery is essential reading for anyone who seeks to understand how we heal and are healed.

Trauma and Resilience Among Displaced Populations: A Sociocultural Exploration

by Gail Theisen-Womersley

This open access book provides an enriched understanding of historical, collective, cultural, and identity-related trauma, emphasising the social and political location of human subjects. It therefore presents a socio-ecological perspective on trauma, rather than viewing displaced individuals as traumatised “passive victims”. The vastness of the phenomenon of trauma among displaced populations has led it to become a critical and timely area of inquiry, and this book is an important addition to the literature. It gives an overview of theoretical frameworks related to trauma and migration—exploring factors of risk and resilience, prevalence rates of PTSD, and conceptualisations of trauma beyond psychiatric diagnoses; conceptualises experiences of trauma from a sociocultural perspective (including collective trauma, collective aspirations, and collective resilience); and provides applications for professionals working with displaced populations in complex institutional, legal, and humanitarian settings. It includes case studies based on the author’s own 10-year experience working in emergency contexts with displaced populations in 11 countries across the world. This book presents unique data collected by the author herself, including interviews with survivors of ISIS attacks, with an asylum seeker in Switzerland who set himself alight in protest against asylum procedures, and women from the Murle tribe affected by the conflict in South Sudan who experienced an episode of mass fainting spells. This is an important resource for academics and professionals working in the field of trauma studies and with traumatised groups and individuals.

Trauma and Resilience in the Lives of Contemporary Native Americans: Reclaiming our Balance, Restoring our Wellbeing

by Hilary N. Weaver

Indigenous Peoples around the world and our allies often reflect on the many challenges that continue to confront us, the reasons behind health, economic, and social disparities, and the best ways forward to a healthy future. This book draws on theoretical, conceptual, and evidence-based scholarship as well as interviews with scholars immersed in Indigenous wellbeing, to examine contemporary issues for Native Americans. It includes reflections on resilience as well as disparities. In recent decades, there has been increasing attention on how trauma, both historical and contemporary, shapes the lives of Native Americans. Indigenous scholars urge recognition of historical trauma as a framework for understanding contemporary health and social disparities. Accordingly, this book uses a trauma-informed lens to examine Native American issues with the understanding that even when not specifically seeking to address trauma directly, it is useful to understand that trauma is a common experience that can shape many aspects of life. Scholarship on trauma and trauma-informed care is integrated with scholarship on historical trauma, providing a framework for examining contemporary issues for Native American populations. It should be considered essential reading for all human service professionals working with Native American clients, as well as a core text for Native American studies and classes on trauma or diversity more generally.

Trauma and Serious Mental Illness

by Jon D. Elhai Steven N. Gold

An exploration of the newfound connections between mental illness and trauma For decades, the idea that serious mental illnesses (SMIs) are almost exclusively biologically-based and must be treated pharmacologically has been commonplace in psychology literature. As a result, many mental health professionals have stopped listening to their clients, categorizing their symptoms as manifestations of neurologically-based disturbed thinking. Trauma and Serious Mental Illness is the groundbreaking series of works that challenge this standard view and provides a comprehensive introduction to the emerging perspective of SMIs as trauma-based. This unique collection illustrates how different psychotherapy approaches can lead to reduced symptomatology, decreased psychological distress, and improved functioning in individuals living with SMIs. Each extensively-referenced chapter in Trauma and Serious Mental Illness offers mental health workers a forward-looking theoretical inquiry, empirical study, or critical treatise providing compelling counter evidence to challenge the widespread belief that SMIs are not reactions to the extreme and extremely disturbing circumstances embodied by psychological trauma. In addition to the etiological application, this revealing text proposes ways to incorporate this cutting-edge approach toward treatment options as well. Contributors to Trauma and Serious Mental Illness suggest that: childhood trauma is related to psychotic disorders dissociation can be confounded with psychotic symptoms auditory hallucinations can be diagnostic of dissociation rather than psychosis psychosis is related to the quality of family of origin environment and to age of onset of childhood abuse bipolar and trauma-related disorders sometimes overlap individuals with SMIs suffer related trauma even in treatment facilities and much more!Trauma and Serious Mental Illness is an eye-opening resource for mental health professionals, psychologists, counselors, psychiatrists, social workers, trauma workers, and educators and students in these disciplines.

Trauma and the 12 Steps, Revised and Expanded: An Inclusive Guide to Enhancing Recovery

by Jamie Marich

An inclusive, research-based guide to working the 12 steps: a trauma-informed approach for clinicians, sponsors, and those in recovery.Step 1: You admit that you're powerless over your addiction. Now what?12-step programs like Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and Narcotics Anonymous (NA) have helped countless people on the path to recovery. But many still feel that 12-step programs aren't for them: that the spiritual emphasis is too narrow, the modality too old-school, the setting too triggering, or the space too exclusive. Some struggle with an addict label that can eclipse the histories, traumas, and experiences that feed into addiction, or dismisses the effects of adverse experiences like trauma in the first place. Advances in addiction medicine, trauma, neuropsychiatry, social theory, and overall strides in inclusivity need to be integrated into modern-day 12-step programs to reflect the latest research and what it means to live with an addiction today.Dr. Jamie Marich, an addiction and trauma clinician in recovery herself, builds necessary bridges between the 12-step's core foundations and up-to-date developments in trauma-informed care. Foregrounding the intersections of addiction, trauma, identity, and systems of oppression, Marich's approach treats the whole person--not just the addiction--to foster healing, transformation, and growth.Written for clinicians, therapists, sponsors, and those in recovery, Marich provides an extensive toolkit of trauma-informed skills that: • Explains how trauma impacts addiction, recovery, and relapse • Celebrates communities who may feel excluded from the program, like atheists, agnostics, and LGBTQ+ folks • Welcomes outside help from the fields of trauma, dissociation, mindfulness, and addiction research • Explains the differences between being trauma-informed and trauma-sensitive; and • Discusses spiritual abuse as a legitimate form of trauma that can profoundly impede spirituality-based approaches to healing.<

Trauma and the Avoidant Client: Attachment-Based Strategies for Healing

by Robert T. Muller

How to effectively engage traumatized clients, who avoid attachment, closeness, and painful feelings. A large segment of the therapy population consist of those who are in denial or retreat from their traumatic experiences. Here, drawing on attachment-based research, the author provides clinical techniques, specific intervention strategies, and practical advice for successfully addressing the often intractable issues of trauma. Trauma and the Avoidant Client will enhance the skills of all mental health practitioners and trauma workers, and will serve as a valuable, useful resource to facilitate change and progress in psychotherapy.

Trauma and the Body: A Sensorimotor Approach to Psychotherapy (Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology)

by Daniel J. Siegel Bessel van der Kolk Clare Pain Pat Ogden Kekuni Minton

The body, for a host of reasons, has been left out of the "talking cure." Psychotherapists who have been trained in models of psychodynamic, psychoanalytic, or cognitive therapeutic approaches are skilled at listening to the language and affect of the client. They track the clients' associations, fantasies, and signs of psychic conflict, distress, and defenses. Yet while the majority of therapists are trained to notice the appearance and even the movements of the client's body, thoughtful engagement with the client's embodied experience has remained peripheral to traditional therapeutic interventions. Trauma and the Body is a detailed review of research in neuroscience, trauma, dissociation, and attachment theory that points to the need for an integrative mind-body approach to trauma. The premise of this book is that, by adding body-oriented interventions to their repertoire, traditionally trained therapists can increase the depth and efficacy of their clinical work. Sensorimotor psychotherapy is an approach that builds on traditional psychotherapeutic understanding but includes the body as central in the therapeutic field of awareness, using observational skills, theories, and interventions not usually practiced in psychodynamic psychotherapy. By synthesizing bottom-up and top down interventions, the authors combine the best of both worlds to help chronically traumatized clients find resolution and meaning in their lives and develop a new, somatically integrated sense of self. Topics addressed include: Cognitive, emotional, and sensorimotor dimensions of information processing * modulating arousal * dyadic regulation and the body * the orienting response * defensive subsystems * adaptation and action systems * treatment principles * skills for working with the body in present time * developing somatic resources for stabilization * processing

Trauma and the Destructive-Transformative Struggle: Clinical Perspectives

by Maureen Murphy Terrence McBride

The impact of trauma can be both destructive and transformative. This important new book presents not only a range of theoretical frameworks through which different trauma can be understood, from the effects of childhood abuse to those of war and catastrophes, but also gives readers insights into how trauma presents itself in the consulting room. In each chapter the author uses clinical vignettes and detailed case histories to discuss the multiplicity and complexity of the trauma involved, eschewing a simple binary conception of internal vs external forces. A wide range of topics are covered, including: the lasting imprint of early trauma such as neglect or abuse on subsequent development; the somatic solution involved in life-threatening illness; unmetabolized mourning and embodied memory; the vibrating relationship between catastrophic external forces such as intergenerational effects; and the 9/11 terrorist attacks and the lasting effect of war on combatants and their families. Each chapter is screened through a different theoretical viewpoint, from Freud and Fairburn to Winnicott, Bion and Ogden, while the work of several contemporary theorists is also discussed. Crucially, the final section of the book looks at those issues faced by analysts when working with traumatized patients, highlighting the key idea of dissociation, the dilemma around empathy and the factors that affect the patient’s unconscious meaning. Trauma and the Destructive-Transformative Struggle: Clinical Perspectives illuminates the resilience needed by both patient and analyst. It will be a vital resource for both clinical practitioners specializing in trauma and psychoanalytic researchers in the field of trauma studies.

Trauma and the Discourse of Climate Change: Literature, Psychoanalysis and Denial

by Lee Zimmerman

The more the global north has learned about the existential threat of climate change, the faster it has emitted greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. In Trauma and the Discourse of Climate Change, Lee Zimmerman thinks about why this is by examining how "climate change" has been discursively constructed, tracing how the ways we talk and write about climate change have worked to normalize a generalized, bipartisan denialism more profound than that of the overt "denialists." Suggesting that we understand that normalized denial as a form of cultural trauma, the book explores how the dominant ways of figuring knowledge about global warming disarticulate that knowledge from the trauma those figurations both represent and reproduce, and by which they remain inhabited and haunted. Its early chapters consider that process in representations of climate change across a range of disciplines and throughout the public sphere, including Al Gore’s An Inconvenient Truth, Barack Obama’s speeches and climate plans, and the 2015 Paris Agreement. Later chapters focus on how literary representations especially, for the most part, participate in such disarticulations, and to how, in grappling with the representational difficulties at the climate crisis’s heart, some works of fiction—among them Cormac McCarthy’s The Road and Russell Hoban’s Riddley Walker—work against that normalized rhetorical violence. The book closes with a meditation centered on the dream of the burning child Freud sketches in The Interpretation of Dreams. Highlighting the existential stakes of the ways we think and write about the climate, Trauma and the Discourse of Climate Change aims to offer an unfamiliar place from which to engage the astonishing quiescence of our ecocidal present. This book will be essential reading for academics and students of psychoanalysis, environmental humanities, trauma studies, literature, and environmental studies, as well as activists and others drawn to thinking about the climate crisis.

Trauma and the Ontology of the Modern Subject: Historical Studies in Philosophy, Psychology, and Psychoanalysis

by John L. Roberts

Recent scholarship has inquired into the socio-historical, discursive genesis of trauma. Trauma and the Ontology of the Modern Subject, however, seeks what has not been actualized in trauma studies – that is, how the necessity and unassailable intensity of trauma is fastened to its historical emergence. We must ask not only what trauma means for the individual person’s biography, but also what it means to be the historical subject of trauma. In other words, how does being human in this current period of history implicate one’s lived possibilities that are threatened, and perhaps framed, through trauma? Foucauldian sensibilities inform a critical and structural analysis that is hermeneutically grounded. Drawing on the history of ideas and on Lacan’s work in particular, John L. Roberts argues that what we mean by trauma has developed over time, and that it is intimately tied with an ontology of the subject; that is to say, what it is to be, and means to be human. He argues that modern subjectivity – as articulated by Heidegger, Levinas, and Lacan – is structurally traumatic, founded in its finitude as self-withdrawal in time, its temporal self-absence becoming the very conditions for agency, truth and knowledge. The book also argues that this fractured temporal horizon – as an effect of an interrupting Otherness or alterity – is obscured through the discourses and technologies of the psy-disciplines (psychiatry, psychology, and psychotherapy). Consideration is given to social, political, and economic consequences of this concealment. Trauma and the Ontology of the Modern Subject will be of enduring interest to psychoanalysts and psychotherapists as well as scholars of philosophy and cultural studies.

Trauma and the Soul: A Psycho-spiritual Approach to Human Development and Its Interruption

by Donald Kalsched

In Trauma and the Soul, Donald Kalsched continues the exploration he began in his first book, The Inner World of Trauma (1996)--this time going further into the mystical or spiritual moments that often occur around the intimacies of psychoanalytic work. Through extended clinical vignettes, including therapeutic dialogue and dreams, he shows how depth psychotherapy with trauma's survivors can open both analytic partners to "another world" of non-ordinary reality in which daimonic powers reside, both light and dark. This mytho-poetic world, he suggests, is not simply a defensive product of our struggle with the harsh realities of living as Freud suggested, but is an everlasting fact of human experience--a mystery that is often at the very center of the healing process, and yet at other times, strangely resists it. <P><P> With these "two worlds" in focus, Kalsched explores a variety of themes as he builds, chapter by chapter, an integrated psycho-spiritual approach to trauma and its treatment including: <P><P> images of the lost soul-child in dreams and how this "child" represents an essential core of aliveness that is both protected and persecuted by the psyche's defenses; Dante's guided descent into the Inferno of Hell as a paradigm for the psychotherapy process and its inevitable struggle with self-destructive energies; childhood innocence and its central role in a person's spiritual life seen through the story of St. Exupéry's The Little Prince; how clinical attention to implicit processes in the relational field, as well as discoveries in body-based affective neuroscience are making trauma treatment more effective; the life of C.G. Jung as it portrays his early trauma, his soul's retreat into an inner sanctuary, and his gradual recovery of wholeness through the integration of his divided self. <P><P>This is a book that restores the mystery to psychoanalytic work. It tells stories of ordinary patients and ordinary psychotherapists who, through working together, glimpse the reality of the human soul and the depth of the spirit, and are changed by the experience. Trauma and the Soul will be of particular interest to practicing psychotherapists, psychoanalysts, analytical psychologists, and expressive arts therapists, including those with a "spiritual" orientation. <P><P> Donald Kalsched is a Jungian analyst in private practice in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and a training analyst with the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts. He is the author of numerous articles in analytical psychology, and lectures widely on the subject of early trauma and its treatment. His books include The Inner World of Trauma (1996).

Trauma and the Struggle to Open Up: From Avoidance To Recovery And Growth

by Robert T. Muller

How to navigate the therapeutic relationship with trauma survivors, to help bring recovery and growth. In therapy, we see how relationships are central to many traumatic experiences, but relationships are also critical to trauma recovery. Grounded firmly in attachment and trauma theory, this book shows how to use the psychotherapy relationship, to help clients find self-understanding and healing from trauma. Offering candid, personal guidance, using rich case examples, Dr. Robert T. Muller provides the steps needed to build and maintain a strong therapist-client relationship –one that helps bring recovery and growth. With a host of practical tips and protocols, this book gives therapists a roadmap to effective trauma treatment.

Trauma and the Twelve Steps: A Complete Guide For Enhancing Recovery

by Jamie Marich

Getting this book to press has been a bit of an uphill battle. In preparing this manuscript for publication, I ran into the same struggles that I encounter working as a clinician in the helping professions. Mental health publishers felt that this book was "too addiction." Addiction publishers felt it was "too mental health." Academic publishers called it too "colloquial," and self-help publishers too "academic."

Trauma and Transcendence: Suffering and the Limits of Theory

by Mary-Jane Rubenstein Eric Boynton Peter Capretto

Trauma theory has become a burgeoning site of research in recent decades, often demanding interdisciplinary reflections on trauma as a phenomenon that defies claims of disciplinary ownership. But while this scholarship has always been challenged by the temporal, affective, and corporeal dimensions of traumatic experience, recent debates have revealed scholarly disagreement over whether trauma is ultimately a phenomenon that transcends theory. Although they may be united by the importance of tending to trauma as a personally and philosophically significant concept, not all scholars who invoke the name “trauma” are having the same conversation. The focus of continental philosophers of religion on the aporia may help resolve certain impasses, yet important questions remain: Do structural parallels between experiences of trauma and transcendence justify thinking trauma in terms of phenomenological event? Given the irreducibility of traumatic experience, how might scholars avoid the double-bind of reductionism and obscurantism? This volume gathers scholars in a variety of disciplines to meet the challenge of how to think trauma in light of its burgeoning interdisciplinarity, and often its theoretical splintering. From distinctive disciplinary approaches, the work of philosophers, social theorists, philosophical psychologists, and theologians consider the limits and prospects of theory when thinking trauma and transcendence. Working at the intersections of trauma theory, phenomenology, psychoanalysis, theology, and especially the continental philosophy of religion, this volume draws attention to the increasing challenge of deciding whether trauma’s transcendent, evental, or unassimilable quality is being wielded as a defense of traumatic experience against reductionism, or whether it is promulgated as a form of obscurantism. The collection of the scholars as a whole and the structure of the sections in particular connect the interdisciplinary reader in trauma theory with overlapping but adjacent research on these shared limitations.

Trauma and Transformation: Growing in the Aftermath of Suffering

by Lawrence G. Calhoun Dr Richard Tedeschi

That personal growth often occurs in people who have experienced traumatic events is an acknowledged but under-researched phenomenon. This book fills the gap: the authors use a cognitive framework to explore this finding, focusing upon changes in belief systems reported by trauma survivors. Tedeschi and Calhoun weave together literature from fields as diverse as philosophy, religion and psychology, and incorporate major research findings into the effect of trauma. With case examples from the authors' research and clinical work, information is presented in a manner accessible to clinicians. In addition, one chapter is written specifically for trauma survivors.

Trauma And The Unbound Body: The Healing Power Of Fundamental Consciousness

by Judith Blackstone

“Just as an open hand is hidden within a fist, our true nature, with its innate capacities for happiness, love, and wisdom, is hidden within our pain and numbness. Just as we can open a fist to reveal a hand, our unbound, unconstructed being can emerge from our pain and breathe again.” —Dr. Judith Blackstone, Trauma and the Unbound Body Heal trauma. Reclaim your body. Live with wholeness. These are the gifts of utilizing the power of fundamental consciousness—a subtle field of awareness that lies within each of us. In Trauma and the Unbound Body, Dr. Judith Blackstone explores how we can resolve the mental, physical, and emotional struggles of trauma through the power of fundamental consciousness. Dr. Blackstone weaves her 30-plus years of psychotherapy practice to present a simple yet revolutionary approach to healing trauma. She writes, “All of the constrictions in our fascia (the connective tissue surrounding muscles and organs) are moments of our past that we have stopped in their tracks and held in that way, unconsciously. They are frozen moments of our past.” Trauma and the Unbound Body explains how and why the body constricts in response to trauma, causing physical and emotional pain. Dr. Blackstone guides us through step-by-step processes to unwind those constrictions by attuning to fundamental consciousness, setting the body free of trauma once and for all by uncovering an unbreakable, unified ground of being. In Trauma and the Unbound Body, Dr. Blackstone discusses: ? The five main purposes for bodily constriction—and how to release them to return to wholeness ? How to inhabit the body as fundamental consciousness to liberate trauma-based constrictions ? The Realization Process—a meditative practice for embodied spiritual awakening ? Discovering the unified ground of being within the body that enables lasting change

Trauma And The Vietnam War Generation: Report Of Findings From The National Vietnam Veterans Readjustment Study

by Kulka

First published in 1990. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Trauma, Attachment and Family Permanence: Fear Can Stop You Loving

by Daniel Hughes Caroline Archer Alan Burnell

Fostered and adopted children can present major challenges resulting from unresolved attachment issues and early traumatic experiences. In this much-needed book, the contributors provide a variety of complementary perspectives on the needs of these children and their families, focusing on ways of integrating attachment theory and developmental psychology into effective practice. Examining multiple aspects of work with children who are unable to live with their birth families, the book includes contributions on the assessment, preparation and support needs of children and families, attachment and the neurobiological effects of trauma, effective management of contact with birth families and developmental challenges in school settings. The use of creative arts therapies, alongside developmental reparenting strategies as part of a long-term attachment therapy `package', are explored in some detail. A fictionalised family, used as a working example throughout Part 2, brings practical interventions to life: illustrating the Family Futures' inclusive approach, where adoptive and foster parents become pivotal members of the therapeutic team. In addition, contributions from real-life user families illustrate some of the challenges they face and demonstrate how the developmental attachment-based approach has worked for them. Bringing together a rich and innovative selection of ideas for adoption and fostering practice across the disciplines, this book will be a valuable resource for all involved in supporting substitute families.

Trauma-Attachment Tangle: Modifying EMDR to Help Children Resolve Trauma and Develop Loving Relationships

by Joan Lovett

Trauma-Attachment Tangle offers informative and inspiring clinical stories of children who have complex trauma and attachment issues from experiences such as adoption, hospitalization, or death of a parent. Some of these children display puzzling or extreme symptoms like prolonged tantrums, self-hatred, attacking their parents or being fearful of common things like lights, solid foods or clothing. Dr. Lovett presents strategies for unraveling the traumatic origins of children’s symptoms and gives a variety of tools for treating complex trauma and for promoting attunement and attachment.

Trauma, Autism, and Neurodevelopmental Disorders: Integrating Research, Practice, and Policy

by Jason M. Fogler Randall A. Phelps

This book examines the diagnostic overlap and frequent confusion between the newly named DSM-5 diagnostic categories of neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs), which include autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and trauma and stressor related disorders (TSRDs). These conditions are similar in that a) children with developmental disorders are particularly vulnerable to traumatic events and b) all have pervasive effects on the brain and development. Chapters provide a wealth of effective clinical, family, and school-based interventions, developed from established studies and important new findings. In addition, chapters use illustrative case studies to survey assessment challenges in today’s healthcare climate and consider alternative routes for improving correct diagnoses, identifying appropriate interventions, and referring proper targeted, evidence-based treatment and services. The book concludes with the editors’ recommendations for needs-based service access, including a more widespread use and acceptance of the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) framework.Topics featured in this book include:The neurobiological contributors to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) and its diagnosis in children with a history of trauma.Interventions for trauma and stressor-related disorders in preschool-aged children.Reactive attachment disorder (RAD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnosis and care in a cultural context.Special population consideration in ASD identification and treatment.Challenges associated with the transition to adulthood. Trauma and neurodevelopmental disorders from a public health perspective. Trauma, Autism, and Neurodevelopmental Disorders is a must-have resource for researchers, clinicians and related professionals, and graduate students in developmental psychology, child and adolescent psychiatry, public health, social work, pediatrics, and special education.

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