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Twice in a Blue Moon

by Laura Drake

Wanted: one master winemaker Indigo Blue is starting over, again. Following the death of her husband, she's rebuilding her life around her only inheritance-a California winery. There's just one problem: she doesn't know a thing about wine. Enter brooding vintner Danovan DiCarlo. Eager to put his own painful past behind him, Danovan is the perfect partner. And not just in business. As they work side by side, Indigo can feel more than the vineyard coming back to life. Falling for Danovan is a scary prospect. But how do you say no when you find love twice in a blue moon?

Twilight: A Nursing Home Mystery

by Greg Cornwell

A story that unashamedly promotes death with dignity, currently practiced overseas but not widely in Australia. A nursing home in a rural town. Residents are inexplicably dying earlier than expected, much to the concern of Twilight’s Board. Who is behind these mysterious deaths? And why? How will they be held to account? And when will the Australian public be given a voice in this crucial issue of end-of-life choice and empowerment.

Twilight Children: Three Voices No One Heard Until a Therapist Listened

by Torey L. Hayden

Torey Hayden tells of her experiences with three kids in her care.

Twilight of American Sanity: A Psychiatrist Analyzes the Age of Trump

by Allen Frances

A landmark book, from “one of the world’s most prominent psychiatrists” (The Atlantic, June 2017): Eminent psychiatrist Allen Frances analyzes the national psyche, viewing the rise of Donald J. Trump as darkly symptomatic of a deeper societal distress. Equally challenging and profound, Twlilight of American Sanity makes sense of our time and charts the way forward.It is comforting to see President Donald Trump as a crazy man, a one-off, an exception—not a reflection on us or our democracy. But in ways I never anticipated, his rise was absolutely predictable and a mirror on our soul. … What does it say about us, that we elected someone so manifestly unfit and unprepared to determine mankind’s future? Trump is a symptom of a world in distress, not its sole cause. Blaming him for all our troubles misses the deeper, underlying societal sickness that made possible his unlikely ascent. Calling Trump crazy allows us to avoid confronting the craziness in our society—if we want to get sane, we must first gain insight about ourselves. Simply put: Trump isn’t crazy, but our society is. –from TWILIGHT OF AMERICAN SANITYMore than three years in the making: the world's leading expert on psychiatric diagnosis, past leader of the American Psychiatric Association’s DSM (“the bible of psychology”), and author of the influential international bestseller on the medicalization of ordinary life, Saving Normal, draws upon his vast experience to deliver a powerful critique of modern American society’s collective slide away from sanity and offers an urgently needed prescription for reclaiming our bearings. Widely cited in recent months as the man who quite literally wrote the diagnostic criteria for narcissism, Allen Frances, M.D., has been at the center of the debate surrounding President Trump’s mental state—quoted in Evan Osnos’s May 2017 New Yorker article (“How Trump Could Get Fired”) and publishing a much-shared opinion letter in the New York Times (“An Eminent Psychiatrist Demurs on Trump’s Mental State”). Frances argues that Trump is "bad not mad"--that the real question to wrestle with is how we as a country could have chosen him as our leader. To answer this, Frances looks deeply at at the American past and present, in hope of Twilight of American Sanity is an essential work for understanding our national crisis.

The Twilight of the American Enlightenment

by George Marsden

In the aftermath of World War II, the United States stood at a precipice. The forces of modernity unleashed by the war had led to astonishing advances in daily life, but technology and mass culture also threatened to erode the country’s traditional moral character. As award-winning historian George M. Marsden explains in [Title TK], postwar Americans looked to the country’s secular, liberal elites for guidance in this precarious time, but these intellectuals proved unable to articulate a coherent common cause by which America could chart its course. Their failure lost them the faith of their constituents, paving the way for a Christian revival that offered America a firm new moral vision-one rooted in the Protestant values of the founders. A groundbreaking reappraisal of the country’s spiritual reawakening, [Title TK] shows how America found new purpose at the dawn of the Cold War.

Twin: A Memoir

by Allen Shawn

A heartbreaking yet deeply hopeful memoir about life as a twin in the face of autism. When Allen Shawn and his twin sister, Mary, were two, Mary began exhibiting signs of what would be diagnosed many years later as autism. Understanding Mary and making her life a happy one appeared to be impossible for the Shawns. At the age of eight, with almost no warning, her parents sent Mary to a residential treatment center. She never lived at home again. Fifty years later, as he probed the sources of his anxieties in Wish I Could Be There, Shawn realized that his fate was inextricably linked to his sister's, and that their natures were far from being different. Twin highlights the difficulties American families coping with autism faced in the 1950s. Shawn also examines the secrets and family dramas as his father, William, became editor of The New Yorker. Twin reconstructs a parallel narrative for the two siblings, who experienced such divergent fates yet shared talents and proclivities. Wrenching, honest, understated, and poetic, Twin is at heart about the mystery of being inextricably bonded to someone who can never be truly understood.

Twin

by Allen Shawn

A heartbreaking yet deeply hopeful memoir about life as a twin in the face of autismWhen Allen Shawn and his twin sister, Mary, were two years old, Mary began exhibiting signs of what would be diagnosed years later as autism. Understanding Mary and making her life a happy one appeared to be impossible for the Shawns. With almost no warning, her parents sent Mary to a residential treatment center when she was eight years old. She never lived at home again. Fifty years later, as he probed the sources of his anxieties in Wish I Could Be There, Allen realized that his fate was inextricably linked to his sister's and that their natures were far from being different. Twin highlights the difficulties American families coping with autism faced in the 1950s. Allen also examines the secrets and family dramas as his father, William, became editor of the New Yorker. Twin reconstructs a parallel narrative for the two siblings, who experienced such divergent fates yet shared talents and proclivities. Wrenching, honest, understated, and poetic, Twin is at heart about the mystery of being inextricably bonded to someone who can never be truly understood.

Twin and Triplet Psychology: A Professional Guide to Working with Multiples

by Audrey C. Sandbank

Information on the special needs and natures of twins and multiples is often difficult for professionals to obtain. Twin and Triplet Psychology fills this gap, helping professionals to be better-equipped to offer advice to parents and twins alike. Examining the psychology of twinship throughout the lifespan, the book includes chapters on: * twins in-utero temperament development and inter-twin behaviour before and after birth * antenatal and postnatal influences on family relationships * twins with special needs * the death of a twin * twins in secondary school and adolescence.

Twin Dilemmas: Changing Relationships Throughout the Life Span

by Barbara Klein

The development of how twins relate to each other and their single partners is explored through life stories and clinical examples in this telling study of twin interconnections. While the quality of a nurturing family life is crucial, Dr. Klein has found there are often issues with separation anxiety, loneliness, competition with each other, and finding friendships outside of twinship. When twin lives are entwined because of inadequate parenting and estrangement, twin loss is possible and traumatic, creating a crippling fear of expansiveness—an inability to be yourself. Therapists and twins seeking an understanding of twin relationships will find this clinically compelling book a valuable resource.

The Twin Enigma: An Exploration of Our Enduring Fascination with Twins

by Vivienne Lewin

The book offers a unique in-depth understanding of the twin relationship, and the way in which twin development is affected by our attitudes to twins and our enduring fascination with them. It explores our historical fascination with this subject and the origins of this excitement, how our perceptions of twins reflect our own longing for a perfect soul-mate, and the effect this personal projection has on the development in twins. It is a book written with the general reader in mind rather than "experts". Twins share a deep psychic bond that forms the core of their twinship, but they are never identical. Many factors will affect their development, including the early mutual resonances and sensate experiences between them, and parental and societal attitudes in raising them.

The Twin in the Transference: Second Edition

by Vivienne Lewin

The universal phantasy of having a twin originates in our earliest relational experiences. This book is about twins and twinning processes. The existence of an actual twin, alive or dead, may be experienced as an embodiment of the phantasy of having a twin, with developmental consequences. Twinning processes in twins lead to the creation of an internal twin relationship that is enduring. The twin relationship may be at the narcissistic end of the spectrum leading to an enmeshed twinship, or it may be a more mature object relationship. All twin relationships will be manifest in the transference relationship with the analyst. The twin transference has been largely neglected in the psychoanalytic literature, to the detriment of our understanding of dynamic processes in twin patients. In this book, case material is used to explore the nature of the twin transference relationship and the necessity of analysing the twin transference, as well as maternal and paternal transference relationships.

Twins in Session: Case Histories in Treating Twinship Issues

by Joan A. Friedman

Why would a twin sacrifice her own needs to make sure her same-age sibling is always cared for? What would cause a twin to have panic attacks when he and his brother go away to separate colleges? Why do some twins find it so difficult to develop friendships and romantic relationships? The "twin mystique" and twins' own expectations of their relationship contribute to their difficulties. A therapist who understands the psychology of twins can articulate what's going on between the siblings. Clients will feel validated as well as relieved to gain clarity about a defining aspect of their identity. Twins in Session shows therapists how important the twin connection is, what it means, why it's sometimes more important than the relationship to either parent, and why some twins don't know who they are apart from the twinship. It will help therapists become a trusted outsider who can give twin clients perspective about their twinship issues and assist them in developing healthy relationships.

Twirling Naked In The Streets And No One Noticed: Growing up with undiagnosed autism

by Jeannie Davide-Rivera

Jeannie grew up with autism, but no one around her knew it. <P><P>Twirling Naked in the Streets will take you on a journey into the mind of a child on the autism spectrum; a child who grows into an adolescent, an adult, and becomes a wife, mother, student, and writer with autism. <P><P>This is a gripping memoir of a quirky, weird, but gifted child who grows up never quite finding her niche. <P><P>It took 38 years to discover that all the issues, problems, and weirdness she experienced were because she had Asperger's Syndrome (AS), a form of high-functioning autism. <P><P>The tale begins at age three and takes us all the way through her diagnosis. Along the way she explains autism in a way that will have fellow "Aspies" crying tears of joy at being understood, and "neuro-typical" people really starting to grasp the challenges that autistic people face every moment of every day.

Twisted Rails, Sunken Ships: The Rhetoric of Nineteenth Century Steamboat and Railroad Accident Investigation Reports, 1833-1879

by John R. Brockman

Contemporary disaster investigation reports into the Shuttle, Three Mile Island, or the World Trade Centre did not happen by chance, but were the result of an evolution of the discourse communities involved with investigating technological accidents. The relationships of private companies, coroners, outside experts, and government investigators all had to be developed and experimented with before a genre of investigation reports could exist. This book is the story of the evolution of these investigation discourse communities in published reports written between 1833 and 1879. Using the reports generated by seven different accidents on railroads and steamboats between 1833 and 1876, it is possible to observe the changes in how these reports interacted and changed over the course of the nineteenth century: The Explosion of the Steamboat New England in the Connecticut River, 1833; The Explosion of the Locomotive Engine Richmond near Reading Pennsylvania, 1844; The Explosion of the Steam Boat Moselle in Cincinatti, 1838; The Camden and Amboy Railroad Collision in Burlington, New Jersey, 1855; The Gasconade Bridge Collapse on the Pacific Railroad in Missouri, 1855; The Eastern Railroad Collision in Revere, Massachusetts, 1871; The Ashtabula Railroad Bridge Collapse in Ohio, 1876

Twisted Triangle

by Caitlin Rother John Hess

Praise for Twisted Triangle"This book will haunt you. It will move you to look at some of the harsh realities of life in a new way. A powerful story-and masterfully written."-Aphrodite Jonesbest-selling author, All She Wanted and Cruel Sacrifice"A harrowing tale of one woman's struggle to maintain a balance between being a mother, an FBI agent, and dealing with a corrupt husband also an FBI agent. A must-read."-Joseph D. Pistoneaka Donnie Brasco"Hitchcock wishes he'd dreamed it up. Capote wishes he'd written it. Rother's mesmerizing narrative chronicles a wife's heroic struggle against great odds to survive her psychopathic husband's elaborate scheme to make her murder the perfect crime. This spellbinding tale offers an added treat-it's true."-Marcus SternPulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author, The Wrong Stuff: The Extraordinary Saga of Randy "Duke" Cunningham, the Most Corrupt Congressman Ever Caught"This in-depth account brought back memories of a most bizarre case, proving once again that the truth can be stranger than fiction."-Paul B. EbertCommonwealth's attorney, County of Prince William, Virginia

Two Cases from Jung’s Clinical Practice: The Story of Two Sisters and the Evolution of Jungian Analysis

by Vicente L. de Moura

Two Cases from Jung’s Clinical Practice places two key cases, those of Mischa Epper and Maggy Reichstein, into the context of Jung’s work in the 1920s and provides a complete assessment of their place within his writings. Presented in three parts, it first examines Jung’s disappointment with contemporary treatments and theories and his break from Freud and the development of his own ideas, and then summarises the history of his more famous patients. In Part 2, de Moura examines Epper’s case, which is recognised as an essential part of the development of the concept of active imagination, as well as how it is connected to the work of Jung’s collaborator Maria Moltzer. Finally, Part 3 assesses the case of Reichstein, which emerges as a key contribution to Jung’s writings on Eastern and Western psychology, transference and countertransference, mandalas and, in particular, synchronicity. Two Cases from Jung’s Clinical Practice provides a comprehensive and personable picture of Jung and his interactions with these two patients, giving us valuable data about a time when his practice was still evolving. A unique and insightful study, this book will be an essential work for academics and students of Jungian and post-Jungian theory, analytical psychology, and the history of psychoanalysis and psychology. These cases will also be of great interest to analytical psychologists and Jungian analysts in practice and in training.

Two Essays on Analytical Psychology (Collected Works of C.G. Jung)

by C.G. Jung

This volume from the Collected Works of C.G. Jung has become known as perhaps the best introduction to Jung's work. In these famous essays he presented the essential core of his system. This is the first paperback publication of this key work in its revised and augmented second edition. The earliest versions of the essays are included in an Appendices, containing as they do the first tentative formulations of Jung's concept of archetypes and the collective unconscious, as well as his germinating theory of types.

The Two Halves of the Brain

by Kenneth Hugdahl

Hemispheric asymmetry is one of the basic aspects of perception and cognitive processing. The different functions of the left and right hemispheres of the brain have been studied with renewed interest in recent years, as scholars explore applications to new areas, new measuring techniques, and new theoretical approaches. This volume provides a comprehensive view of the latest research in brain asymmetry, offering not only recent empirical and clinical findings but also a coherent theoretical approach to the subject. In chapters that report on the field at levels from the molecular to the clinical, leading researchers address such topics as the evolution and genetics of brain asymmetry; animal models; findings from structural and functional neuroimaging techniques and research; sex differences and hormonal effects; sleep asymmetry; cognitive asymmetry in visual and auditory perception; and auditory laterality and speech perception, memory, and asymmetry in the context of developmental, neurological, and psychiatric disorders. ContributorsKatrin Amunts, Ulrike Bayer, Alfredo Brancucci, Vince D. Calhoun, Maria Casagrande, Marco Catani, Michael C. Corballis, Patricia E. Cowell, Timothy J. Crow, Tom Eichele, Stephanie Forkel, Patrick J. Gannon, Isabelle George, Onur G nt rk n, Heikki H m l inen, Markus Hausmann, Joseph B. Hellige, Kenneth Hugdahl, Masud Husain, Gr goria Kalpouzos, Bruno Laeng, Martina Manns, Chikashi Michimata, Deborah W. Moncrieff, Lars Nyberg, Godfrey Pearlson, Stefan Pollmann, Victoria Singh-Curry, Iris E. C. Sommer, Tao Sun, Nathan Swanson, Fiia Takio, Michel Thiebaut de Schotten, Ren Westerhausen

The Two Halves of the Brain: Information Processing in the Cerebral Hemispheres

by Kenneth Hugdahl Rene Westerhausen

State-of-the-art research on brain asymmetry, explained from molecular to clinical levels. Hemispheric asymmetry is one of the basic aspects of perception and cognitive processing. The different functions of the left and right hemispheres of the brain have been studied with renewed interest in recent years, as scholars explore applications to new areas, new measuring techniques, and new theoretical approaches. This volume provides a comprehensive view of the latest research in brain asymmetry, offering not only recent empirical and clinical findings but also a coherent theoretical approach to the subject. In chapters that report on the field at levels from the molecular to the clinical, leading researchers address such topics as the evolution and genetics of brain asymmetry; animal models; findings from structural and functional neuroimaging techniques and research; sex differences and hormonal effects; sleep asymmetry; cognitive asymmetry in visual and auditory perception; and auditory laterality and speech perception, memory, and asymmetry in the context of developmental, neurological, and psychiatric disorders. Contributors Katrin Amunts, Ulrike Bayer, Alfredo Brancucci, Vince D. Calhoun, Maria Casagrande, Marco Catani, Michael C. Corballis, Patricia E. Cowell, Timothy J. Crow, Tom Eichele, Stephanie Forkel, Patrick J. Gannon, Isabelle George, Onur Güntürkün, Heikki Hämäläinen, Markus Hausmann, Joseph B. Hellige, Kenneth Hugdahl, Masud Husain, Grégoria Kalpouzos, Bruno Laeng, Martina Manns, Chikashi Michimata, Deborah W. Moncrieff, Lars Nyberg, Godfrey Pearlson, Stefan Pollmann, Victoria Singh-Curry, Iris E.C. Sommer, Tao Sun, Nathan Swanson, Fiia Takio, Michel Thiebaut de Schotten, René Westerhausen

The Two of Me: The Rational Outer Me and the Emotional Inner Me

by John Birtchnell

How much of what we do is directed by conscious, deliberate decisions and how much originates in unconscious, automatic directives? This is the question explored in The Two of Me via an engaging combination of phenomenological subjective investigation and objective considerations of mental processes and specific structures. John Birtchnell puts forward the thesis that many more of our actions than we might imagine are determined unconsciously. Not only are unnoticed automatic actions motivated unconsciously, but also seemingly conscious or 'thought out' behaviours are actually determined and reinforced by unconscious exigencies. Even where we produce a reasoned discourse taking responsibility for why we hold certain thoughts, there is always the possibility that these explanations serve and follow from an unconscious driving force. The conscious mind seems to act as spokesperson for both itself and the unconscious mind. Investigating this dual aspect of the person, the book addresses the issue across a range of mental processes including memory, language, problem-solving, dreams, delusions, hallucinations and more complex constructs such as the arts, humour and religion.

Two Papers: 'The Grid' and 'Caesura'

by Wilfred R. Bion

The Grid, an instrument devised to help the analyst record and elaborate observations arising from the analytic encounter, demonstrates how mathematics can be applied to locate the development, evolution and transformation of psychic elements and events. Caesura takes its title from Freud's observation: "There is much more continuity between intra-uterine life than the impressive caesura of the act of birth would have us believe". Here Bion speculates on the relationship between physiological and psychological birth, and the possibility that a pre-natal "primitive sensitiveness" may carry over and inform later psychological life.

Two Plus Two: Couples and Their Couple Friendships

by Geoffrey L. Greif Kathleen Holtz Deal

Friendships are undeniably important to an individual’s health, longevity and wellbeing, but they can be equally important for the health and happiness of a couple. Just as a friend can provide a mirror to the self, another couple can provide a reflecting team that supports or impedes a relationship’s growth. Two Plus Two: Couples and Their Couple Friendships offers an important framework for helping couples to have conversations about their friendships with other couples and to enrich their own relationships. When couples agree about how to spend their time alone and with others, they are more likely to have a happy marriage or relationship. Couple friendships have not been researched previously, despite their numerous benefits. Authors Geoffrey Greif and Kathleen Deal take an in-depth approach to this important topic. Based on interviews with more than 400 people--some of whom were interviewed with their partners, some who were interviewed alone, and some who have divorced--they find that couples fall into three general categories of making couple friendships: Seekers, Keepers, and Nesters. Drs. Greif and Deal discuss the different styles of interaction they've observed in couples as well as the findings from their research. Readings from their interviews illustrate what characteristics define Seekers, Keepers, and Nesters. Couples at any stage of their relationship will get a fresh understanding of how to seek, foster and sustain positive, healthy friendships.

‘Two Scrubby Travellers’: A psychoanalytic view of flourishing and constraint in religion through the lives of John and Charles Wesley

by Pauline Watson

The ways in which people change and grow, and learn to become good, are not only about conscious decisions to behave well, but about internal change which allows a loving and compassionate response to others. Such change can take place in psychotherapy; this book explores whether similar processes can occur in a religious context. Using the work of Julia Kristeva and other post-Kleinian psychoanalysts, change and resistance to change are examined in the lives of John Wesley, the founder of Methodism, and his brother Charles, the greatest English hymn-writer. Their mother’s description of them as young men as ‘two scrubby travellers’, was a prescient expression indicating their future pilgrimage, which they negotiated through many struggles and compromises; it points towards the ‘wounded healer’, a description which could be applied to John in later years. The use of psychoanalytic thought in this study allows the exploration of unconscious as well as conscious processes at work and interesting differences emerge, which shed light on the elements in religion that promote or inhibit change, and the influence of personality factors. ‘Two scrubby travellers’: A psychoanalytic view of flourishing and constraint in religion through the lives of John and Charles Wesley enriches our understanding of these two important historical figures. It questions the categorising of forms of religion as conducive to change and so ‘mature’, and other forms as ‘immature’, at a time when many, particularly young people, are attracted by fundamentalist, evangelical forms of belief. This book will be essential reading for researchers working at the intersection of psychoanalysis and religious studies; it will also be of interest to psychotherapists and psychoanalysts more generally, and to researchers in the philosophy of religion.

The Two-Second Advantage

by Kevin Maney Vivek Ranadive

What made Wayne Gretzky the greatest hockey player of all time wasn't his speed on the ice or the uncanny accuracy of his shots, but rather his ability to predict where the puck was going to be an instant before it arrived. In other words, it was Gretzky's brain that made him exceptional. Over the past fifteen years, scientists have found that what distinguishes the greatest musicians, athletes, and performers from the rest of us isn't just their motor skills or athletic abilities--it is the ability to anticipate events before they happen. A great musician knows how notes will sound before they're played, a great CEO can predict how a business decision will turn out before it's made, a great chef knows what a recipe will taste like before it's prepared.In a powerful narrative that takes us from the research in the labs to the implementation of predictive technology inside companies, Vivek Ranadivé and Kevin Maney reveal how our understanding of human mastery is being applied to the way computers "think." In the near future, the authors argue, the most advanced computer systems and the most successful businesses will anticipate the future much like Wayne Gretzky's brain does. As a result, companies will be able to use a new generation of technology to anticipate customer needs before customers even know what they want, and see production snafus before they occur, traffic jams before they materialize, and operational problems before they arise. Forward-thinking companies will be able to predict the future just a fraction ahead of everyone else with a little bit of the right information at the right time--what the authors call the two-second advantage--and it will transform the way businesses are run and offer companies an enormous competitive edge in the marketplace.In the bestselling tradition of Blink, Sway, and How We Decide, The Two-Second Advantage will change our understanding of what makes a company successful.From the Hardcover edition.

The Two Sexes: Growing Up Apart, Coming Together

by Eleanor Maccoby

"This book is about sex (or gender) in the broadest sense: about how an individual's development from infancy into adulthood is affected by being either a male or a female. Although some individuals are hermaphrodites, the vast majority of human beings are biologically clearly either male or female. And, again in the vast majority of cases, the sex identity assigned to an individual by society, as well as the sex identity adopted by the individual, corresponds to the person's biological sex. This book will be concerned with the development of people who are unambiguously members of one gender category or the other. In many respects, males and females take quite similar developmental paths. But in some important respects, their paths diverge. In this book I begin by showing that when boys and girls are engaged in social play, they congregate primarily with others of their own sex during the preschool and middle-childhood years, and that different childhood "cultures" prevail in these gender-segregated playgroups. I will consider the set of possible reasons why this divergence occurs, and discuss the implications of childhood divergence for the ways in which males and females interact when the two sexes converge in adolescence and adulthood. In particular, I will consider how the different social histories of the two sexes affect the relationships of heterosexual couples, the way men and women relate to each other as co-parents, and the nature of same-sex and cross-sex interactions that occur in the workplace." The Family and Public Policy Series

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