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Writing Analytically (6th Edition)

by David Rosenwasser Jill Stephen

Rosenwasser and Stephen (Muhlenberg College, Allentown, PA) show undergraduate students in first-year writing courses, as well as those in more advanced writing-intensive courses in various subjects, how to learn to analyze information and use writing to discover and develop ideas. They explain how to become more observant and push observations to implications and conclusions; use evidence, evolve claims, and converse with sources to write analytical papers; and understand organization, disciplinary formats, introductions and conclusions, and grammar and style. Writing exercises that can be applied to print and visual, text-based, and experiential materials are included, as are tips from professors on differences in disciplines other than English, rhetoric, or composition. This edition has a new introductory chapter previewing key topics, more examples, and more lists and rationales. It has two toolkit chapters on analytical methods instead of one, some reorganization and reformatting, more description of discipline-specific writing (especially the natural and social sciences), and new material in chapters on form. It has new sections on Rogerian argument, practical reasoning, and figurative logic, and expanded treatment of the four documentation styles. It clarifies step-by-step instructions, uncovering assumptions, and the method of looking for patterns of repetition and contrast. Another edition of the book includes readings. Annotation ©2012 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Writing Analytically (8th Edition)

by David Rosenwasser Jill Stephen

WRITING ANALYTICALLY treats writing as a tool of thought, offering prompts that lead students through the process of analysis and help them to generate original, well-developed ideas. The authors of this brief, popular rhetoric believe that learning to write well requires learning to use writing as a tool to think well. Rosenwasser and Stephen emphasize analysis as a mode of enriching understanding that precedes and in some cases supplants argument. Materials in the eighth edition are better integrated, more contextualized and--when possible--condensed. A new chapter, Thinking Like a Writer, contains a broad array of strategies for integrating opportunities for writing into a course. It makes explicit a subtext that pervades the book: that to think of yourself as a writer is to see more, to think differently and to engage the meaning of things more earnestly.

Writing Analytically, Seventh Edition

by David Rosenwasser Jill Stephen

Writing Analytically treats writing as a tool of thought, offering prompts that lead you through the process of analysis and synthesis and help you to generate original, well-developed ideas.

Writing and Personality: Finding Your Voice, Your Style, Your Way (Writing Research Ser. #Vol. 20)

by John K. DiTiberio George H. Jensen

'We cannot separate the writer from the writing. Nor should we try. Both our writing process and our writing products need to carry our unique signature, a bit of our personality.' - From Writing and Personality How you write - what works for you and what makes sense to you - depends on who you are, your personality, your preferences, your style of thinking and feeling. If you're extraverted and grounded in your senses, your natural writing style will be far different from the person who tends to be introverted and intuitive. Not only that, how you learn to write will be different as well. Here's a book that taps into the natural strengths of your personality and helps you use those strengths in your writing. Whether you're a student, businessperson, or professional writer, this book will help you: engage your natural writing voice; adapt to styles that are less natural; overcome writer's block; and find the right words for communicating effectively, whatever your assignment.

Writing Arguments: A Rhetoric And Reader

by Brenda Herbert Harker

A reading companion for both the teachers and the students as they pursue the argumentative writing course; equipped with essays with different styles selected for viewpoint and meaning.

Writing Cures: An Introductory Handbook of Writing in Counselling and Therapy

by Gillie Bolton Colin Lago Stephanie Howlett Jeannie K. Wright

Writing is our cultural medium and can be used to enhance counselling and psychotherapy - just writing in itself can be therapeutic. The onset of online therapy means that increasing numbers of therapists need to know about this valuable means of communication. Writing Cures demonstrates power of expressive and reflective writing in the context of therapy, whether online or text-based, enabling the practitioner to undertake writing methods with clients. It introduces the reader to therapeutic writing in a range of settings and contexts, and from a range of approaches. Chapters from an impressive list of contributors include: • 'Ethical and Practical Dimensions of Online Writing Cures' by Stephen Goss and Kate Anthony • 'Writing by Patients and Therapists in Cognitive and Analytic Therapy' by Anthony Ryle• 'Reflective and Therapeutic Writing in Counsellor Training' by Colin Feltham and Jacquie Daniels. Illustrated throughout from clinical experience Writing Cures will be of benefit to all counsellors and psychotherapists.

Writing Dissertations and Theses in Psychology: A Student’s Guide for Success

by Stephen N. Haynes John D. Hunsley

This accessible guide equips students to succeed in their master’s thesis or doctoral dissertation in psychology. The authors provide concrete assistance to the myriad tasks and requirements that students will encounter as they plan, conduct, and present their dissertation or thesis research. Drawing upon their many years of experience in working with graduate students, the authors address the multiple stages of the dissertation and thesis process. They take you through drafting the proposal, the advisor-advisee relationship, interacting with committee members, the writing process, handling obstacles, and the final presentation. Chapters provide guidance on using a research team, collecting data, conducting a literature review, and even acquiring financial support. Finally, students will find additional resources such as practical information on copyright issues, research methods, case analyses, and teleconferencing. This is an essential book for both graduate psychology students working on their master’s theses or doctoral dissertations and their advisors.

Writing Empirical Research Reports: A Basic Guide for Students of the Social and Behavioral Sciences

by Fred Pyrczak

• Designed for students who will be writing research proposals, reports, theses, and dissertations. • The 15 chapters cover 191 guidelines for effective scientific writing. The guidelines are fully illustrated with easy-to-follow examples. • The guidelines describe the types of information that should be included, how this information should be expressed, and where various types of information should be placed within a research report. • End-of-chapter questions help students master the writing process.

Writing Fantasy and the Identity of the Writer: A Psychosocial Writer’s Workbook (Palgrave Studies in Creativity and Culture)

by Zoe Charalambous

This book presents the innovative pedagogy of Writing Fantasy: a method for exploring and shifting one’s identity as a writer. The book draws on qualitative research with undergraduate creative writing students and fills a gap in the literature exploring creative writing pedagogy and creative writing exercises. Based on the potential to shift writer identity through creative writing exercises and the common ground that these share with the stance of the Lacanian analyst, the author provides a set of guidelines, exercises and case studies to trace writing fantasy, evidenced in one’s creative writing texts and responses about creative writing. This innovative work offers fresh insights for scholars of creativity, Lacan and psychosocial studies, and a valuable new resource for students and teachers of creative writing.

Writing for Conferences: A Handbook for Graduate Students and Faculty

by Leo A. Mallette Clare Berger

The authors present a practical text for graduate students and faculty, as well as professionals working in areas outside academia--businesses, government entities, and nonprofit organizations--that encourage employees to publish at conferences. Organized into sections corresponding to the timeline of a conference paper, the text covers reasons for choosing to publish at conferences versus in journals or magazines, what it will cost, and publishing statistics; steps for selecting the right conference, including finding upcoming conferences, reading a call for papers, and the timeline for submitting a paper to a conference; deciding on solo authorship versus multiple authorship, finding co-authors, and the abstract submission process; writing a paper in a scholarly way; preparing for and giving the conference presentation; social interaction and networking at the conference; and how to be session chair. The material is illustrated throughout with case studies, examples, and vignettes from the literature and the authors' experiences.

Writing for Psychology

by Janina M. Jolley Mark L. Mitchell Robert P. O'Shea

WRITING FOR PSYCHOLOGY, Fourth Edition offers concise assistance for students writing their research analyses using APA style. By providing concrete examples of common errors, the authors show rather than merely tell students what to do and what to avoid. This manual will help students adhere to the basics of APA style; refine critical thinking skills, library search skills, revising skills, editing skills, and proofing skills; and avoid plagiarism. Checklists precede a summary at the end of every chapter, giving students the chance to make sure they have been thorough in their reports.

Writing for Scholarly Publication: Behind the Scenes in Language Education

by Stephanie Vandrick Christine Pearson Casanave

This collection of first-person essays by established authors provides a wealth of support and insights for new and experienced academic writers in language education and multicultural studies. Although writing for publication is becoming increasingly important as these fields become both more professional and more competitive, few scholars talk candidly about their experiences negotiating a piece of writing into print. These essays will help researchers, practitioners, and graduate students expand their understanding of what it means--professionally and personally--to write for publication. Carefully crafted, focused, and provocative, the chapters in this volume document authors' experiences with a range of practical, political, and personal issues in writing for publication. Many portray the hardship and struggle that are not obvious in a finished piece of writing. Readers are encouraged to resonate with the events and issues portrayed, and to connect the narratives to their own lives. Practical information, such as contact information for journal and book publishers, manuscript guidelines, and useful books are included in appendices. Although organized thematically, the essays in Writing for Scholarly Publication: Behind the Scenes in Language Education overlap in many ways as each author considers multiple issues: *In the Introduction, the editors discuss key aspects of writing for scholarly publication, such as writing as situated practice, issues faced by newcomers, the construction of personal identity through writing, writing and transparency, facets of the interactive nature of scholarly writing, and intertwined political issues. *Part I focuses on issues and concerns faced by "Newcomers." *In Part II, "Negotiating and Interacting," the essays closely examine the interactions among authors, editors, manuscript reviewers, and collaborators; these interactions tend to be the least often discussed and these essays therefore offer readers fascinating insights into the sensitive social, political, and personal relationships among the many players in the scholarly writing game. *"Identity Construction" is addressed in Part III, where authors share their experiences with and reflections on the ways that professional writing helps them construct their identities as writers and scholars. *The essays in Part IV, "From the Periphery," help redefine what the notion of "periphery" might mean, from a concept with a negative connotation of "outsider" to a positive connotation of active and unconventional participant.

Writing History: A Professor’s Life

by Michael Bliss

One of Canada’s best-known and most-honoured biographers turns to the raw material of his own life in Writing History. A university professor, prolific scholar, public intellectual, and frank critic of the world he has known, Michael Bliss draws on extensive personal diaries to describe a life that has taken him from small-town Ontario in the 1950s to international recognition for his books in Canadian and medical history. His memoir ranges remarkably widely: it encompasses social history, family tragedy, a critical insider’s view of university life, Canadian national politics, and, above all, a rare glimpse into the craftsmanship that goes into the research and writing of history in our time. Whether writing about pigs and millionaires, the discovery of insulin, sleazy Canadian politicians, or the founders of modern medicine and brain surgery, Michael Bliss is noted for the clarity of his prose, the honesty of his opinions, and the breadth of his literary interests.

Writing in Psychoanalysis

by Giorgio Sacerdoti Parthenope Bion Talamo John E. Gedo Francesco Barale Patrick Mahony Henning Paikin Fausto Petrella Antonio Alberto Semi

A beautiful and thoughtful collection of essays on reading, writing and learning, Writing and Psychoanalysis grows out of a colloquium. The results are wondrous and impact on the reader at many different levels. In the act of writing, we all discover something about what we know previously unknown to us, and we learn more about our inner world that we knew before we set pen to paper (or hand to computer). Patrick Mahony goes so far as to argue that Freud's self-analysis was essentially a "writing cure." Writing in Psychoanalysis is the first volume in the projected Monograph Series, Psychoanalytic Issues, the Rivista di Psicoanalisi (the Journal of the Italian Psychoanalytical Society) is undertaking in conjunction with Karnac Books. This series constitutes a major effort to bring about a dialogue among psychoanalysts who while ultimately bound together by a common psychoanalytic heritage nonetheless are separated in their thinking by different idioms, whether linguistic or theoretical. While featuring writers of very different idioms, this series will also present a venue to make some important Italian voices known to English speaking analysts.

Writing in Psychology

by Scott A. Miller

This book helps readers become better writers of psychology and better writers in general. After reading thousands of course papers, theses, and dissertations, Dr. Miller knows and addresses the issues that students find most challenging when writing about psychology. Written with the utmost flexibility in mind, the chapters can be read in any order. More comprehensive than similar texts, this book provides detailed coverage of how to write empirical reports, research proposals, and literature reviews, and how to read meta-analyses. Readers will also find invaluable strategies for improving one’s writing including how to adopt an engaging yet accurate style, thorough coverage of grammatical and word use rules that govern writing in general, and the APA (American Psychological Association) rules that govern the expression of that content. Readers will appreciate these helpful learning tools: Describes the most common APA style rules encountered and/or highlights references to the Manual when more detailed knowledge is required. Numerous examples from journal articles that help readers gain a clearer understanding of content they will encounter in writing psychological reports. Chapter exercises that provide an opportunity to apply the points conveyed in each chapter. Examples of the most common mistakes made by students and how to avoid them and best practices for improving one’s writing. Tables that help readers gain a clearer understanding of the new standards in the APA Publications Manual, 6th ed (Appendix A). Errors in APA Style exemplified via an improperly formatted paper and another version noting corrections pertaining to APA style and grammar, to highlight the most common pitfalls encountered by students (Appendix B). Ideal for courses on writing in psychology or as a supplement for graduate or advanced undergraduate courses in research design or research methods, this book also serves as a resource for anyone looking for guidance on how to write about psychological content.

Writing Literature Reviews: A Guide for Students of the Social and Behavioral Sciences

by Jose L. Galvan

This easy-to-follow guide instructs students in the preparation of literature reviews for term projects, theses, and dissertations. There are numerous examples from published literature reviews that illustrate the guidelines discussed in this text. New to this edition: Most of the examples have been updated with material from recently published research. Also new: Seven new model literature reviews for discussion and evaluation have been added. Guides students in the preparation of literature reviews for term projects, theses, and dissertations. Chapters are conveniently divided into easy-to-follow guidelines, sequential steps, or checklists. Numerous examples throughout the book show students what should and should not be done when writing reviews. Emphasizes critical analysis of reports of empirical research in academic journals-making it ideal as a supplement for research methods courses. This book makes it possible for students to work independently on a critical literature review as a term project. Nine model literature reviews at the end of the book provide the stimulus for homework assignments and classroom discussions. The activities at the end of each chapter keep students moving toward their goal of writing a polished, professional review of academic literature. New to this edition: Most of the examples have been updated with material from recently published research. Also new: Seven new model literature reviews for discussion and evaluation have been added.

Writing Literature Reviews: A Guide for Students of the Social and Behavioral Sciences

by Jose L. Galvan Melisa C. Galvan

This useful guide educates students in the preparation of literature reviews for term projects, theses, and dissertations. The authors provide numerous examples from published reviews that illustrate the guidelines discussed throughout the book. New to the seventh edition: Each chapter breaks down the larger holistic review of literature exercise into a series of smaller, manageable steps Practical instructions for navigating today’s digital libraries Comprehensive discussions about digital tools, including bibliographic and plagiarism detection software Chapter activities that reflect the book’s updated content New model literature reviews Online resources designed to help instructors plan and teach their courses (www.routledge.com/9780415315746).

Writing Logically, Thinking Critically

by Sheila Cooper Rosemary Patton

This concise, accessible text teaches students how to write logical, cohesive arguments and how to evaluate the arguments of others. Integrating writing skills with critical thinking skills, this practical book teaches students to draw logical inferences, identify premises and conclusions and use language precisely. Students also learn how to identify fallacies and to distinguish between inductive and deductive reasoning. Ideal for any composition class that emphasizes argument, this text includes coverage of writing style and rhetoric, logic, literature, research and documentation.

Writing Logically, Thinking Critically (6th Edition)

by Sheila Cooper Rosemary Patton

This concise, accessible text teaches students how to write logical, cohesive arguments and how to evaluate the arguments of others. Integrating writing skills with critical thinking skills, this practical book teaches students to draw logical inferences, identify premises and conclusions and use language precisely. Students also learn how to identify fallacies and to distinguish between inductive and deductive reasoning. Ideal for any composition class that emphasizes argument, this text includes coverage of writing style and rhetoric, logic, literature, research and documentation.

Writing on Both Sides of the Brain: Breakthrough Techniques for People Who Write

by Henriette A. Klauser

A revolutionary approach to writing that will teach you how to express yourself fluently and with confidence for the rest of your life.

Writing Performance, Identity, and Everyday Life: The Selected Works of Ronald J. Pelias

by Ronald J. Pelias

Writing Performance, Identity, and Everyday Life invites the reader into Ronald J. Pelias’ world of artistic and everyday performance. Calling upon a broad range of qualitative methods, these selected writings from Pelias submerge themselves in the evocative and embodied, in the material and consequential, often creating moving accounts of their topics. The book is divided into four sections: Foundational Logics, Performance, Identity, and Everyday Life. Part I addresses the methodological underpinnings of the book, focusing on the ‘touchstones’ that inform Pelias’ work: performative, autoethnographic, poetic, and narrative methods. These directions push the researcher toward empathic engagement, a leaning toward others; using the literary to evoke the cognitive and affective aspects of experience; and an ethical sensibility located in social justice. Parts II–IV focus on artistic and everyday life performances, including discussions of the disciplinary shift from the oral interpretation of literature to the field of performance studies; empathy and the actor’s process; conceptions of performance; the performance of race, gender, and sexuality; and performances in interpersonal relations and academic circles. By the end, readers will see Pelias demonstrate the power of qualitative methods to engage and to present alternative ways of being. Pelias’ work shows us how to understand and feel the evocative strength of thinking performatively.

Writing Qualitative Inquiry: Self, Stories, and Academic Life (Writing Lives Ser. #6)

by H.L. Goodall Jr

Now issued as a Routledge Education Classic Edition, Bud Goodall’s Writing Qualitative Inquiry responds to the rapid growth of personal narrative as a method of inquiry among qualitative scholars by offering a concise volume of practical advice for scholars and students seeking to work in this tradition. He provides writing tips and strategies from a well-published, successful author of creative nonfiction and concrete guidance on finding appropriate outlets for your work. For readers, he offers a set of criteria to assess the quality of creative nonfiction writing. Goodall suggests paths to success within the academy—still rife with political sinkholes for the narrative ethnographer—and ways of building a career as a public scholar. Goodall’s work serves as both a writing manual and career guide for those in qualitative inquiry. A new foreword by Christopher N. Poulos reflects on Bud Goodall’s life and work, and the impact of this book on narrative writing.

Writing Qualitative Inquiry: Self, Stories, and Academic Life (Writing Lives: Ethnographic Narratives #6)

by H.L. Goodall Jr

Responding to the rapid growth of personal narrative as a method of inquiry among qualitative scholars, Bud Goodall offers a concise volume of practical advice for scholars and students seeking to work in this tradition. He provides writing tips and strategies from a well-published, successful author of creative nonfiction and concrete guidance on finding appropriate outlets for your work. For readers, he offers a set of criteria to assess the quality of creative nonfiction writing. Goodall suggests paths to success within the academy—still rife with political sinkholes for the narrative ethnographer—and ways of building a career as a public scholar. Goodall’s work serves as both a writing manual and career guide for those in qualitative inquiry.

Writing Strategies for the Education Dissertation

by Diane Bennett Durkin

Writing Strategies for the Education Dissertation offers a unique take on doctoral writing. It uses composition and rhetoric strategies to identify key activities for generating thought to keep students writing. It de-mythologizes the view of writing as a mere skill and promotes the view of writing as thinking. It uses writing to help students invent, think through, write, rethink, and rewrite as they develop and present their innovations. The book opens with this mindset and with the purposes of the task (adding to knowledge); it helps define a "researchable topic," and provides advice on invention ("brainstorming"). It then addresses each of the key sections of the dissertation, from Problem Statement, through Literature Review and Methods, to Findings and Conclusions, while underscoring the iterative nature of this writing. For each chapter, the book provides advice on invention, argument, and arrangement ("organization") – rhetorical elements that are seldom fully addressed in textbooks. Each chapter also looks at possible missteps, offers examples of student writing and revisions, and suggests alternatives, not rules. The text concludes with an inventive approach of its own, addressing style (clarity, economy, and coherence) as persuasion. This book is suitable for all doctoral students of education and others looking for tips and advice on the best dissertation writing.

Writing Successful Grant Proposals from the Top Down and Bottom Up

by Dr Robert J. Sternberg

This text provides comprehensive advice on how to build a successful grant proposal, from the top down and from the bottom up. Editor Robert J. Sternberg gathers editorial expertise from distinguished members of associations in the Federation of Associations of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, which includes some of the most successful grant applicants and grant givers in the field of brain and behavioral sciences. The chapter authors offer readers practical advice on planning, executing, submitting, and revising grant proposals in order to maximize their chances of success. Exploring both grant writers' and grant providers' perspectives, Writing Successful Grant Proposals from the Top Down and Bottom Up provides valuable insight into general strategies on how to write and submit proposals, as well as detailed information on the various types of proposals needed to reach particular research and teaching goals.

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