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A Whole New Mind

by Daniel H. Pink

The future belongs to a different kind of person with a different kind of mind: artists, inventors, storytellers-creative and holistic "right-brain" thinkers whose abilities mark the fault line between who gets ahead and who doesn't.Drawing on research from around the world, Pink (author of To Sell Is Human: The Surprising Truth About Motivating Others) outlines the six fundamentally human abilities that are absolute essentials for professional success and personal fulfillment--and reveals how to master them. A Whole New Mind takes readers to a daring new place, and a provocative and necessary new way of thinking about a future that's already here.

A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule The Future

by Daniel H. Pink

Lawyers. Accountants. Radiologists. Software engineers. That's what our parents encouraged us to become when we grew up. But Mom and Dad were wrong. The future belongs to a very different kind of person with a very different kind of mind. The era of "left brain" dominance, and the Information Age that it engendered, are giving way to a new world in which "right brain" qualities-inventiveness, empathy, meaning-predominate. That's the argument at the center of this provocative and original book, which uses the two sides of our brains as a metaphor for understanding the contours of our times. In the tradition of Emotional Intelligence and Now, Discover Your Strengths, Daniel H. Pink offers a fresh look at what it takes to excel. A Whole New Mind reveals the six essential aptitudes on which professional success and personal fulfillment now depend, and includes a series of hands-on exercises culled from experts around the world to help readers sharpen the necessary abilities. This book will change not only how we see the world but how we experience it as well.

Whole School Health Through Psychosocial Emotional Learning

by Jared Scherz

15 strategies to jumpstart student and educator health With rapid technological advancements and changes to how schools must respond to learning and mental health needs, the educational landscape looks considerably different from how it did 20 years ago. How do educators contend with this everchanging future? Jared Scherz answers this question and more by outlining the 15 critical steps to educators’ and students’ health through psychosocial emotional learning. Designed for everyone involved in the educational system—including district administrators, teachers, students, parents, and the business community—this book provides a practical plan with steps to harmonize whole-school health, including sustainable growth in student character development, improvement of organizational health, and reduction of violence and other threats to education. A blueprint of applicable resources is provided, including: • 15 easy-to-follow guidelines for successfully implementing social-emotional learning practices • A spotlight on issues such as empathy, identity formation, self-control, and conflict resolution • Dozens of real-world stories from educators • Anecdotal and data-driven results from successful implementation Educators today must navigate a newer and more dynamic terrain than previous generations. This book provides a practical framework for improving the satisfaction of educators, all through the lens of whole-school health.

Whole School Health Through Psychosocial Emotional Learning

by Jared Scherz

15 strategies to jumpstart student and educator health With rapid technological advancements and changes to how schools must respond to learning and mental health needs, the educational landscape looks considerably different from how it did 20 years ago. How do educators contend with this everchanging future? Jared Scherz answers this question and more by outlining the 15 critical steps to educators’ and students’ health through psychosocial emotional learning. Designed for everyone involved in the educational system—including district administrators, teachers, students, parents, and the business community—this book provides a practical plan with steps to harmonize whole-school health, including sustainable growth in student character development, improvement of organizational health, and reduction of violence and other threats to education. A blueprint of applicable resources is provided, including: • 15 easy-to-follow guidelines for successfully implementing social-emotional learning practices • A spotlight on issues such as empathy, identity formation, self-control, and conflict resolution • Dozens of real-world stories from educators • Anecdotal and data-driven results from successful implementation Educators today must navigate a newer and more dynamic terrain than previous generations. This book provides a practical framework for improving the satisfaction of educators, all through the lens of whole-school health.

Whole Therapist, Whole Patient: Integrating Reich, Masterson, and Jung in Modern Psychotherapy

by Patricia R. Frisch

Integrating the work of Reich, Masterson, and Jung, Whole Therapist, Whole Patient is a step-by-step guidebook for professionals to learn about the psychology of their patients and conduct treatment in a dynamic way. This text combines Reich’s character analyses, Masterson’s work on personality disorders, and Jung’s dream analyses to create a clear typology of character types that therapists can use to understand themselves and their patients. Also included are case management techniques and guidance for working with difficult patients. In addition, readers can turn to the book’s online resources to access a downloadable patient package, case presentation guide, and psychological history form.

Wholeheartedness: Busyness, Exhaustion, and Healing the Divided Self

by Chuck DeGroat

I&’m being pulled in a thousand different directions. As a therapist, Chuck DeGroat hears that line all the time. &“I hear it from students and software developers,&” he says. &“I hear it from spiritual leaders and coffee baristas. And I hear it from my own inner self.&” We all feel that nasty pull to and fro, the frantic busyness that exhausts us and threatens to undo us. And we all think we know the solution — more downtime, more relaxation, more rest. And we&’re all wrong. As DeGroat himself has discovered, the real solution to what pulls us apart is wholeheartedness, a way of living and being that can transform us from the inside out. And that&’s what readers of this book will discover too.

Wholeheartedness: Busyness, Exhaustion, and Healing the Divided Self

by Chuck DeGroat

I’m being pulled in a thousand different directions. As a therapist, Chuck DeGroat hears that line all the time. “I hear it from students and software developers,” he says. “I hear it from spiritual leaders and coffee baristas. And I hear it from my own inner self.” We all feel that nasty pull to and fro, the frantic busyness that exhausts us and threatens to undo us. And we all think we know the solution — more downtime, more relaxation, more rest. And we’re all wrong. As DeGroat himself has discovered, the real solution to what pulls us apart is wholeheartedness, a way of living and being that can transform us from the inside out. And that’s what readers of this book will discover too.

A Whore's Manifesto: An Anthology of Writing and Artwork by Sex Workers

by Kay Kassirer

Sex work was once thought to be anathema to women's liberation. Now, to some, we represent the tenacity of women's struggles under patriarchy and capitalism—that is, at least, the white, straight, cis, able-bodied sex workers who don't engage in actual sex with clients. These are the workers who get the glossy media profiles and get touted as feminist icons. But the red umbrella is wide and covers so many: escorts, sugar babies, strippers, session wrestlers, cam performers, fetish models, DIY queer porn stars, and the full range of gender, race, and ability. Our work and our identities are as vast and variable as the spectrum of sexuality itself. We do the work. In the streets, in the clubs, in hotel rooms, and in play party dungeons. We make dreams come true so we can afford a place to sleep. We do business in a marketplace that politicians and police are constantly burning down for our "own safety and dignity." We have high heels and higher anxiety. This isn't a collection of sob stories of heartbroken whores. This is a testament of life at ground zero of sexual discourse, the songs of canaries in the coal mines of sex, gender, class, race, and disability. We may dance on the table, but we still demand our seat at it. Sex workers of the world unite. This is A Whore's Manifesto.

Who's Afraid of John Maynard Keynes?: Challenging Economic Governance in an Age of Growing Inequality

by Paul Davidson

This is a book with many benefits. Davidson explains the importance of the market economy, and unveils how and why global financial crises occur when the liquidity of financial assets traded in the market, suddenly collapse. 70 years after Keynes' death, in another era of financial crisis and economic slump, Keynes' ideas have made a comeback within economic circles. Yet these ideas are not represented in contemporary government policy decisions. This book explains why Keynes' ideas need to be used by political parties in order to restore global prosperity and close the gap between income and wealth inequality. This book will is essential reading for researchers, practitioners, students and the wider public interested in an economic understanding of today's global economic problems.

Who's Afraid of Snakes, and Why?

by Judy Walker

Are we born afraid of snakes, or is it something we learn from other people?

Who's Asking?: Native Science, Western Science, and Science Education (The\mit Press Ser.)

by Douglas L. Medin Megan Bang

Analysis and case studies show that including different orientations toward the natural world makes for more effective scientific practice and science education.The answers to scientific questions depend on who's asking, because the questions asked and the answers sought reflect the cultural values and orientations of the questioner. These values and orientations are most often those of Western science. In Who's Asking?, Douglas Medin and Megan Bang argue that despite the widely held view that science is objective, value-neutral, and acultural, scientists do not shed their cultures at the laboratory or classroom door; their practices reflect their values, belief systems, and worldviews. Medin and Bang argue further that scientist diversity—the participation of researchers and educators with different cultural orientations—provides new perspectives and leads to more effective science and better science education.Medin and Bang compare Native American and European American orientations toward the natural world and apply these findings to science education. The European American model, they find, sees humans as separated from nature; the Native American model sees humans as part of a natural ecosystem. Medin and Bang then report on the development of ecologically oriented and community-based science education programs on the Menominee reservation in Wisconsin and at the American Indian Center of Chicago. Medin and Bang's novel argument for scientist diversity also has important implications for questions of minority underrepresentation in science.

Who's Asking?

by Douglas L. Medin Megan Bang

The answers to scientific questions depend on who's asking, because the questions asked and the answers sought reflect the cultural values and orientations of the questioner. These values and orientations are most often those of Western science. In Who's Asking?, Douglas Medin and Megan Bang argue that despite the widely held view that science is objective, value-neutral, and acultural, scientists do not shed their cultures at the laboratory or classroom door; their practices reflect their values, belief systems, and worldviews. Medin and Bang argue further that scientist diversity -- the participation of researchers and educators with different cultural orientations -- provides new perspectives and leads to more effective science and better science education. Medin and Bang compare Native American and European American orientations toward the natural world and apply these findings to science education. The European American model, they find, sees humans as separated from nature; the Native American model sees humans as part of a natural ecosystem. Medin and Bang then report on the development of ecologically oriented and community-based science education programs on the Menominee reservation in Wisconsin and at the American Indian Center of Chicago. Medin and Bang's novel argument for scientist diversity also has important implications for questions of minority underrepresentation in science.

Who's Been Sleeping In Your Head

by Kahr

World-renowned psychotherapist and researcher reveals the astonishing truths behind secrecy, shame, and taboo

Who's Been Sleeping In Your Head

by Kahr

In the largest study ever undertaken on sexual fantasy, world-renowned psychotherapist and researcher Brett Kahr reveals the astonishing truths behind secrecy, shame, and taboo in this groundbreaking book based on surveys of 23,000 men and women from eighteen to ninety years of age. The definitive account of what our fantasies tell us about ourselves, Who’s Been Sleeping in Your Head? overturns conventional wisdom about sexuality today.

Who's Been Sleeping In Your Head

by Brett Kahr

In the largest study ever undertaken on sexual fantasy, world-renowned psychotherapist and researcher Brett Kahr reveals the astonishing truths behind secrecy, shame, and taboo in this groundbreaking book based on surveys of 23,000 men and women from eighteen to ninety years of age. The definitive account of what our fantasies tell us about ourselves, Who’s Been Sleeping in Your Head? overturns conventional wisdom about sexuality today.

Who's Been Sleeping in Your Head?: The Secret World of Sexual Fantasies

by Brett Kahr

In the largest study ever undertaken on sexual fantasy, pioneering psychotherapist and researcher Brett Kahr surveyed more than 23,000 men and women from eighteen to ninety years of age to find out who, exactly, has been sleeping in our heads-and how they got there. The results are a groundbreaking account of what our fantasies tell us about ourselves. Kahr's discoveries are both surprising and illuminating: Sexual fantasy has a profound influence not only on our sexual behavior, but on our personal and professional lives as well. Drawing on intimate and explicit personal narratives and his own interpretive analysis, Kahr reveals the astonishing truths behind secrecy, shame, and taboo.

Who's Behind the Couch?: The Heart and Mind of the Psychoanalyst

by Kerry L. Malawista Robert Winer

What is it like to be a working psychoanalyst? And what is it like to be held in the mind of one? These were the questions that led Winer and Malawista to interview seventeen notable analysts from around the world. Who's Behind the Couch?: The Heart and the Mind of the Psychoanalyst explores the analyst's mind at work, not so much from a theoretical perspective, but rather from the complexities and richness inherent in every moment-to-moment clinical encounter. As analysts we are all continually challenged to find what might work best with a particular patient. Yet we don't often hear senior analysts share their personal struggles, feelings, and sensibilities. To understand the internal experience of analysts the authors posed questions such as: What is it like for analysts to manage rough spots, to lose ground and try to recapture it? To feel appreciated and then to feel devalued? To feel betrayed? To feel responsibility for someone's life while working to maintain their own balance?

Who's That Girl? Who's That Boy?: Clinical Practice Meets Postmodern Gender Theory

by Lynne Layton

Hailed on publication as "an impressive integration of postmodernism and relational psychoanalysis" (James Hansel) and "an intelligent and stimulating account of where the issues of identity, gender, and difference are joined" (Jessica Benjamin), Lynne Layton's Who's That Girl? Who's That Boy? is a major contribution to the postmodern understanding of gender issues. This new edition, under the aegis of the Bending Psychoanalysis Book Series, includes a Foreword by Series Editor Jack Drescher and an Afterword in which Lynne Layton addresses the evolution of her thinking since the book's publication in 1998.

Who's Who of the Brain: A Guide to Its Inhabitants, Where They Live and What They Do

by Bryan Lask Tanya Hanstock Ken Nunn

Meet the inhabitants of the brain in this reader-friendly introduction to what it is and how it works. Residents include Frederick Foresight (the frontal cortex), Mayor of Cephalton-upon-Ridge, who is the `big picture' person responsible for planning and decision-making; Sage Seahorse (the hippocampus), who has an astonishing memory for times, names and places; Annie Almond (the amygdala), the community's alarm system who is always on the alert; and many other fellow citizens. Each character is introduced and their appearance, role and key functions in the brain explained. The authors also show what happens when things go wrong in the brain, and illustrate the work using examples of classic clinical cases. This book provides an immediate and entertaining way for anyone to gain a basic understanding or to refresh their knowledge of the inside workings of the brain.

Whose Freud? The Place of Psychoanalysis in Contemporary Culture

by Alex Woloch Peter Brooks

Features contributors, Judith Butler, Frederick Crews, Leo Bersani, Juliet Mitchell, Robert Jay Lifton, Richard Wollheim and other theorists from such fields as literature, philosophy, film, history, cultural studies, neuroscience, psychotherapy. Under discussion in all these articles is whether Freud is still relevant, specifically whether psychoanalysis is still a valid theory of mind, if its therapeutic applications have been rendered obsolete by drugs, how psychoanalysis still figures in debates about sexual identity despite its rejection by many feminists, and how Freud's work still contributes to cultural analysis. The editor's conclusion is that Freud is not only still relevant but the "presiding genius of our culture and the author of its symptomatic illnesses. " Papers were delivered in a 1998 symposium at Yale, the locale from which Freud launched his original invasion of the US psyche nearly a century before.

Whose Game Is It, Anyway?

by Amy Baltzell Richard D. Ginsburg Stephen Durant

In an era when parents and kids are overwhelmed by a sports-crazed, win-at-all-costs culture, here is a comprehensive guide that helps parents ensure a positive sports experience for their children. In Whose Game Is It, Anyway? two of the country's leading youth sports psychologists team up with a former Olympic athlete and expert on performance enhancement to share what they have gleaned in more than forty years of combined experience.The result is a book unique in its message, format, and scope.Through moving case studies and thoughtful analyses, Ginsburg, Durant, and Baltzell advocate a preventive approach through a simple three-step program: know yourself, know your child, know the environment.They look at children in age groups, identifying the physical, psychological, and emotional issues unique to each group and clarifying what parents can expect from and desire for their kids at every stage.They also explore myriad relevant topics, including parental pressure, losing teams, steroid use, the overscheduled child, and much more.Illuminating, impassioned, and inspiring, Whose Game Is It, Anyway?is required reading for anyone raising-or educating-a child who participates in sports.

Why?: What Makes Us Curious

by Mario Livio

Astrophysicist and author Mario Livio investigates perhaps the most human of all our characteristics—curiosity—as he explores our innate desire to know why.Experiments demonstrate that people are more distracted when they overhear a phone conversation—where they can know only one side of the dialogue—than when they overhear two people talking and know both sides. Why does half a conversation make us more curious than a whole conversation? In the ever-fascinating Why? Mario Livio interviewed scientists in several fields to explore the nature of curiosity. He examined the lives of two of history’s most curious geniuses, Leonardo da Vinci and Richard Feynman. He also talked to people with boundless curiosity: a superstar rock guitarist who is also an astrophysicist; an astronaut with degrees in computer science, biology, literature, and medicine. What drives these people to be curious about so many subjects? Curiosity is at the heart of mystery and suspense novels. It is essential to other forms of art, from painting to sculpture to music. It is the principal driver of basic scientific research. Even so, there is still no definitive scientific consensus about why we humans are so curious, or about the mechanisms in our brain that are responsible for curiosity. Mario Livio—an astrophysicist who has written about mathematics, biology, and now psychology and neuroscience—explores this irresistible subject in a lucid, entertaining way that will captivate anyone who is curious about curiosity.

Why Am I Afraid to Tell You Who I am?

by John Powell

There are many reasons for being afraid to tell others who we really are. We're often taught to put on an act when around other people. This book shows you how you can overcome the fear of revealing your true self to others.

Why Am I Crying?: A Helpful & Honest Look at Depression

by Martha Maughon

An honest, helpful, I-have-been-there look at depression. Martha Maughon writes encouragingly of God's grace and human weakness.

Why Are Faggots So Afraid of Faggots?: Flaming Challenges to Masculinity, Objectification, and the Desire to Conform

by Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore

Gay culture has become a nightmare of consumerism, whether it's an endless quest for Absolut vodka, Diesel jeans, rainbow Hummers, pec implants, or Pottery Barn. Whatever happened to sexual flamboyance and gender liberation, an end to marriage, the military, and the nuclear family? As backrooms are shut down to make way for wedding vows, and gay sexual culture morphs into "straight-acting dudes hangin' out," what are the possibilities for a defiant faggotry that challenges the assimilationist norms of a corporate-cozy lifestyle? Why Are Faggots So Afraid of Faggots? challenges not just the violence of straight homophobia but the hypocrisy of mainstream gay norms that say the only way to stay safe is to act straight: get married, join the military, adopt kids! Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore reinvokes the anger, flamboyance, and subversion once thriving in gay subcultures in order to create something dangerous and lovely: an exploration of the perils of assimilation; a call for accountability; a vision for change. A sassy and splintering emergency intervention! Called "startlingly bold and provocative" by Howard Zinn, and described as "a cross between Tinkerbell and a honky Malcolm X with a queer agenda" by The Austin Chronicle, Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore is undoubtedly one of America's most outspoken queer critics. She is the author of two novels, including, most recently, So Many Ways to Sleep Badly, and is the editor of four nonfiction anthologies, including Nobody Passes: Rejecting the Rules of Gender and Conformity and That's Revolting! Queer Strategies for Resisting Assimilation.

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