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Awake In The Heartland: The Ecstasy of What is

by Joan Tollifson

This is a book about waking up. It's not about techniques, dogmas, traditions, exotic states or future attainments. Rather, it points to the simplicity and wonder of what is, as it is. This is a book about discovering perfection in imperfection, and the extraordinary in the ordinary. It's about enlightenment, not a future attainment, but here and now. It celebrates life as it is, from the beautiful to the horrific, inviting the reader to see that everything is spiritual, and that nothing is a mistake. If there seems to be a gap between what the enlightenment books describe and what you find in your own life, if you still think enlightenment is something that will happen to you in the future (or not at all), if you're still chasing experiences or self-improvement, then this book may be just what you need to see that what you seek is already here. There is a vibrant energy that emanates from the pages of this book that cannot help but resonate with and stir the same essence in the reader and awaken them to the ecstasy of what is-their own true nature. Because the personal story is so beautifully interwoven, the book answers the question so often asked by seekers: "Yes, I under stand BUT...How do I live my life?" Joan is constantly showing the reader, by personal example, that life lives itself as IS no matter WHAT appears. I recommend it. - Sailor Bob Adamson

Awake: Discover the Power of Your Story

by Joel Sheldon Clark

Joel Clark’s heart-pounding, tear-jerking, laugh-out-loud stories didn’t happen by accident. His life of adventure ignited when he embraced the journey God had planned for him—the story God wants to tell through each one of us. With interactive film clips and personal interviews embedded in this Zondervan ebook, Joel invites you into the story Jesus is telling in the middle of the orphan crisis in Africa, the heart-rending tragedy that followed the Haiti earthquake, as well as his own quirky and very real love story. As you meet the characters who have shaped Joel’s journey, you’ll see Jesus through the tears of a young slave in Africa and witness intimate conversations with child soldiers in Haiti and youth group kids in South Africa. And you’ll be challenged to enter a God-adventure of your own. Because, according to Clark, another person’s experiences are never enough. Your unique passions, gifts and circumstances are calling you to live big and say yes. What part of the unfolding story is Jesus longing to tell through you? It’s time to do it … for the story.

Awaiting The Dawn

by Dorcas Hoover

This is the true story of the Troyer family, American Mennonite missionaries to Guatemala. The story is about the martyrdom of John Troyer in 1981 and how the family coped.

Avondale and Chicago's Polish Village

by Rob Reid Elisa Addlesperger Jacob Kaplan Dan Pogorzelski Dominic Pacyga

Home to Chicago's Polish Village, impressive examples of sacred and industrial architecture, and the legendary Olson Waterfall, Avondale is often tagged as "the neighborhood that built Chicago." Images of America: Avondale and Chicago's Polish Village sheds light on the little known history of the community, including its fascinating industrial past. From its beginnings as a sleepy subdivision started by a Michigan senator, it became a cultural mecca for Chicago's Polish community, playing a crucial role in Poland's struggles for independence. Other people also called Avondale home, such as Scottish proprietors, African American freedmen, Irish activists, Swedish shopkeepers, German tradesmen, Jewish merchants, Filipino laborers, and Italian entrepreneurs; a diversity further enriched as many from the former Soviet Bloc and Latin America settled here. As in other Chicago neighborhoods, change is the one constant, as the arts have brought a renaissance to this working-class corner of the city.

Avoiding Prison and Other Noble Vacation Goals: Adventures in Love and Danger

by Wendy Dale

From salsa dancing in a rum-induced haze and struggling to exercise in Colombia ("the guerrillas were using the track again today"), to crossing international borders unconventionally and dodging bombs in Lebanon ("the good news was that they were 'small bombs'"), Wendy somehow manages to find herself in the midst of hysterical, adventurous, and often illegal situations. Case in point--every time she heads to Costa Rica, she is forced to visit another prison. Although a jail may not be everyone's idea of a place to find a date, Wendy soon falls in love with a man, a country, and its people and risks everything she has to clear his name. Avoiding Prison and Other Noble Vacation Goals is a bumpy and hilarious ride in which Wendy discovers that a successful vacation--much like that elusive thing, happiness--can be found in some of the most unlikely places imaginable.

Avoid Boring People: Lessons from a Life in Science

by James D. Watson

From a living legend--James D. Watson, who shared the Nobel Prize for having revealed the structure of DNA--a personal account of the making of a scientist. In Avoid Boring People, the man who discovered "the secret of life" shares the less revolutionary secrets he has found to getting along and getting ahead in a competitive world. Recounting the years of his own formation--from his father's birding lessons to the political cat's cradle of professorship at Harvard--Watson illuminates the progress of an exemplary scientific life, both his own pursuit of knowledge and how he learns to nurture fledgling scientists. Each phase of his experience yields a wealth of age-specific practical advice. For instance, when young, never be the brightest person in the room or bring more than one date on a ski trip; later in life, always accept with grace when your request for funding is denied, and--for goodness' sake--don't dye your hair. There are precepts that few others would find occasion to heed (expect to gain weight after you win your Nobel Prize, as everyone will invite you to dinner) and many more with broader application (do not succumb to the seductions of golf if you intend to stay young professionally). And whatever the season or the occasion: avoid boring people. A true believer in the intellectual promise of youth, Watson offers specific pointers to beginning scientists about choosing the projects that will shape their careers, the supreme importance of collegiality, and dealing with competitors within the same institution, even one who is a former mentor. Finally he addresses himself to the role and needs of science at large universities in the context of discussing the unceremonious departure of Harvard's president Larry Summers and the search for his successor. Scorning political correctness, this irreverent romp through Watson's life and learning is an indispensable guide to anyone plotting a career in science (or most anything else), a primer addressed both to the next generation and those who are entrusted with their minds.

The Avocado Drive Zoo: At Home with My Family and the Creatures We've Loved

by Earl Hamner

The Avocado Drive Zoo is a warm and personal, yet humorous, recounting of how Earl Hamner, his wife, Jane, and their two children have lived with and loved the animals in their lives. From the beginning, Hamner and his wife shared an uncommon love and respect for animals, and as their family grew, so did the number of their pets. By the time they moved to Hollywood and settled into a lovely residence on Avocado Drive, their home was much like a "zoo." Among the colorful cast of animals who have lived with the Harmers have been Jane's possessive cocker spaniel pup, Clementine, who bit Earl as he proposed marriage; twelve box turtles from Virginia; bantam hens and roosters and a baby chick named 'Mackie; and Talmadge the mouse whose gluttony ended an unusual relationship with the family. And then there was Gus the horny dog whose amorous inclinations brought on his early demise; Willie the family rat; Yarrow the white labrador; a family of coyotes; Surprise the cat who nearly decimated their family of pet rats; Raymond the rabbit and George the guinea pig who were soul and crate mates; the alligator who lived in their bathtub; and a host of other unnamed pets and critters. The Avocado Drive Zoo is filled with the warmth, love, and respect the Hammers have for the animals they have known. By the last page of this wonderful, charming book it is obvious that not only have animals enriched the Hammers' lives, but they are a resource for all families, providing parents and children with opportunities to grow in love, understanding, and respect for one another--and for the creatures who share our world.

Avidly Reads Theory

by Jordan Alexander Stein

Avidly Reads is a series of short books about how culture makes us feel. Founded in 2012 by Sarah Blackwood and Sarah Mesle, Avidly—an online magazine supported by the Los Angeles Review of Books—specializes in short-form critical essays devoted to thinking and feeling. Avidly Reads is an exciting new series featuring books that are part memoir, part cultural criticism, each bringing to life the author’s emotional relationship to a cultural artifact or experience. Avidly Reads invites us to explore the surprising pleasures and obstacles of everyday life. This is a story about the emotional lives of ideas. As an avowed “theory head,” Jordan Alexander Stein confronts a contradiction: that the abstract, and often frustrating rigors of theory also produced a sense of pride and identity for him and his friends: an idea of how to be and a way to live. Although Stein explains what theory is, this is not an introduction or a how-to. Organized around five ways that theory makes us feel—silly, stupid, sexy, seething and stuck—Stein travels back to the late nineties to tell a story of coming of age at a particular moment and to measure how that moment lives on now.

Avidly Reads Theory

by Jordan Alexander Stein

Avidly Reads is a series of short books about how culture makes us feel. Founded in 2012 by Sarah Blackwood and Sarah Mesle, Avidly—an online magazine supported by the Los Angeles Review of Books—specializes in short-form critical essays devoted to thinking and feeling. Avidly Reads is an exciting new series featuring books that are part memoir, part cultural criticism, each bringing to life the author’s emotional relationship to a cultural artifact or experience. Avidly Reads invites us to explore the surprising pleasures and obstacles of everyday life. This is a story about the emotional lives of ideas. As an avowed “theory head,” Jordan Alexander Stein confronts a contradiction: that the abstract, and often frustrating rigors of theory also produced a sense of pride and identity for him and his friends: an idea of how to be and a way to live. Although Stein explains what theory is, this is not an introduction or a how-to. Organized around five ways that theory makes us feel—silly, stupid, sexy, seething and stuck—Stein travels back to the late nineties to tell a story of coming of age at a particular moment and to measure how that moment lives on now.

Avidly Reads Making Out

by Kathryn Bond Stockton

Avidly Reads is a series of short books about how culture makes us feel. Founded in 2012 by Sarah Blackwood and Sarah Mesle, Avidly—an online magazine supported by the Los Angeles Review of Books—specializes in short-form critical essays devoted to thinking and feeling. Avidly Reads is an exciting new series featuring books that are part memoir, part cultural criticism, each bringing to life the author’s emotional relationship to a cultural artifact or experience. Avidly Reads invites us to explore the surprising pleasures and obstacles of everyday life.Mid-kiss, do you ever wonder who you are, who you’re kissing, where it’s leading? It can feel luscious, libidinal, friendly, but are we trying to make out something through our kissing? For Kathryn Bond Stockton, making out is a prism through which to look at the cultural and political forces of our world: race, economics, childhood, books, and movies. Making Out is Stockton’s memoir about a non-binary childhood before that idea existed in her world. We think about kissing as we accompany Stockton to the bedroom, to the closet, to the playground, to the movies, and to solitary moments with a book, the ultimate source of pleasure.

Avidly Reads Board Games

by Eric Thurm

Avidly Reads is a series of short books about how culture makes us feel. Founded in 2012 by Sarah Blackwood and Sarah Mesle, Avidly—an online magazine supported by the Los Angeles Review of Books—specializes in short-form critical essays devoted to thinking and feeling. Avidly Reads is an exciting new series featuring books that are part memoir, part cultural criticism, each bringing to life the author’s emotional relationship to a cultural artifact or experience. Avidly Reads invites us to explore the surprising pleasures and obstacles of everyday life. Writer and critic Eric Thurm digs deep into his own experience as a board game enthusiast to explore the emotional and social rules that games create and reveal, telling a series of stories about a pastime that is also about relationships. From the outdated gender roles in Life and Mystery Date to the cutthroat, capitalist priorities of Monopoly and its socialist counterpart, Class Struggle, Thurm thinks through his ongoing rivalries with his siblings and ponders the ways games both upset and enforce hierarchies and relationships—from the familial to the geopolitical. Like sitting down at the table for family game night, Board Games is an engaging book of twists and turns, trivia, and nostalgia.

Avidly Reads Board Games

by Eric Thurm

Avidly Reads is a series of short books about how culture makes us feel. Founded in 2012 by Sarah Blackwood and Sarah Mesle, Avidly—an online magazine supported by the Los Angeles Review of Books—specializes in short-form critical essays devoted to thinking and feeling. Avidly Reads is an exciting new series featuring books that are part memoir, part cultural criticism, each bringing to life the author’s emotional relationship to a cultural artifact or experience. Avidly Reads invites us to explore the surprising pleasures and obstacles of everyday life. Writer and critic Eric Thurm digs deep into his own experience as a board game enthusiast to explore the emotional and social rules that games create and reveal, telling a series of stories about a pastime that is also about relationships. From the outdated gender roles in Life and Mystery Date to the cutthroat, capitalist priorities of Monopoly and its socialist counterpart, Class Struggle, Thurm thinks through his ongoing rivalries with his siblings and ponders the ways games both upset and enforce hierarchies and relationships—from the familial to the geopolitical. Like sitting down at the table for family game night, Board Games is an engaging book of twists and turns, trivia, and nostalgia.

Avid Reader: A Life

by Robert Gottlieb

A spirited and revealing memoir by the most celebrated editor of his timeAfter editing The Columbia Review, staging plays at Cambridge, and a stint in the greeting-card department of Macy's, Robert Gottlieb stumbled into a job at Simon and Schuster. By the time he left to run Alfred A. Knopf a dozen years later, he was the editor in chief, having discovered and edited Catch-22 and The American Way of Death, among other bestsellers. At Knopf, Gottlieb edited an astonishing list of authors, including Toni Morrison, John Cheever, Doris Lessing, John le Carré, Michael Crichton, Lauren Bacall, Katharine Graham, Robert Caro, Nora Ephron, and Bill Clinton--not to mention Bruno Bettelheim and Miss Piggy. In Avid Reader, Gottlieb writes with wit and candor about succeeding William Shawn as the editor of The New Yorker, and the challenges and satisfactions of running America's preeminent magazine. Sixty years after joining Simon and Schuster, Gottlieb is still at it--editing, anthologizing, and, to his surprise, writing.But this account of a life founded upon reading is about more than the arc of a singular career--one that also includes a lifelong involvement with the world of dance. It's about transcendent friendships and collaborations, "elective affinities" and family, psychoanalysis and Bakelite purses, the alchemical relationship between writer and editor, the glory days of publishing, and--always--the sheer exhilaration of work.Photograph of Bob Gottlieb © by Jill Krementz

Aviator Extraordinaire: My Story

by G. J. Paul

"At Cambridge, as an undergraduate of St. John's, I realized that, more than anything else, I wanted to fly.A lifelong fascination and love of flying and aircrafts is fuel for this engaging autobiography by G J Christopher Paul, CB, DFC; a man bitten by the aviation bug at an air display at the age of four, and thereafter a devotee. His remarkable RAF career was followed by an eventful civilian career in aviation, which saw him organize rallies at places such as Sywell, encouraging 'flying for fun'. Both halves of his flying life are detailed here in chronological order and in his own words. Minor additions have been made to offer technical descriptions to readers unfamiliar with Paul's aviation vocabulary.The fifty year span of his career covered an incredible period of aviation history; from gaining his license in the 1920s to his retirement in the 1970s, there was virtually no iconic or, for that matter, obscure aircraft that Christopher Paul did not fly. Included in the book is an extensive appendix in which Paul details, again in chronological order, every aircraft type he flew during his career. It is a veritable roll of honor of every conceivable aircraft, both British built and International, across arguably the most important period of aviation development.Interwoven with his own career progression and experiences are world events and situations. Coupled with this we can clearly see the development of aircraft over a period of over fifty years. Eloquently written, this is the autobiography of a man who described flying a Spitfire as having 'one's own wings'; the thrill of flight is translated here, and the effect is equally thrilling. A lively account of a life in the skies. "

Aviation Mysteries of the North: Disappearances in Alaska and Canada

by Gregory Liefer

Russia's most famous aviator disappears on a world record flight over the North Pole. A commercial airliner with thirty-eight people is never found. The wreckage of a strategic bomber is discovered years later and hundreds of miles from where it was lost, without its nuclear payload. Two United States Congressmen on a routine campaign tour vanish, spurring accusations of cover-up and conspiracy. These are but a few of the stories detailed in Aviation Mysteries of the North. Far distant from major media outlets and occurring over remote and unforgiving wilderness, many of the mysteries have been overlooked or forgotten, until now. Meticulously researched, the accounts are a compilation of historically significant mysteries and large capacity aircraft which have been lost over a span of four decades. From takeoff and in flight until the final moments, through searches and controversy, the factual events are presented with captivating insight. Historical perspectives and aircraft descriptions add an informative background to the text.

Aviation: Cool Women Who Fly

by Carmella Van Vleet Lena Chandhok

Have you ever looked up into the sky, seen an airplane, and wondered where it was going and who was flying it? Aviation is the study of the design, development and production, and operation of aircraft. In Aviation: Cool Women Who Fly, children ages 9 to 12 learn about this fascinating field and meet three successful women working in aviation. Meg Godlewski is a master certified flight instructor, Kristin Wolfe is a pilot in the Air Force, and Taylor McConnell is a production support engineer.Nomad Press books in the Girls in Science series supply a bridge between girls' interests and their potential futures by investigating science careers and introducing women who have succeeded in science. Compelling stories of real-life aviation experts provide readers with role models that they can look toward as examples of success.Aviation: Cool Women Who Fly uses engaging content, links to primary sources, and essential questions to whet kids' appetites for further exploration and study of aviation. This book explores the history of aviation, the women who helped pioneer flight, and the multitude of varied careers in this exciting and important field. Both boys and girls are encouraged to let their imaginations and dreams soar.

Aves de paso

by Eduardo Peláez Vallejo

Aves de paso es el retrato familiar de dos de los hermanos mayores de los Pelaez Vallejo, cuyas historias reflejan el entramado sentimental que sostiene a las familias y gran parte de la vida de una generación en la Medellín de finales de los años sesenta. Aves de paso es el conmovedor retrato de los Peláez Vallejo narrado a partir de los recuerdos del autor. Sus hermanos mayores, Ricardo y Marta Luz, son el hilo conductor de esta historia que da cuenta del entramado sentimental que sostiene a las familias y que a su vez se presenta como el reflejo de una generación, en Medellín, a finales de los años sesenta. Con una prosa rica en detalles e imágenes, Eduardo Peláez consigue colar al lector en una serie de episodios íntimos de su pasado familiar, que unidos se convierten en un relato potente y emotivo sobre el amor fraternal. La crítica ha dicho "La de Peláez es una prosa fina, precisa, cálida y con una fuerza descriptiva poco común que dota al lector de vista y oído y le hace ver, oír y sentir los paisajes que retrata con precisión". Darío Jaramillo Agudelo

Averroes: His Life, Work and Influence

by Majid Fakhry

This book provides a comprehensive overview of the life, times, and achievements of Averroes, a twelfth-century Muslim philosopher whose ideas were so controversial that his books were burnt not once, but twice. A fascinating introduction that covers all the key issues and underlines the importance of Islamic philosophy as a vital ingredient in contemporary Western culture.

Aventures in the South, Volume 4: Back Again to Paris

by Jacques Casanova

It is the fourth book from the "Memoirs of Jacques Casanova de Seingalt" the "Adventures in the South"

Avenging Angels: Young Women Of The Soviet Union's Wwii Sniper Corps

by Lyuba Vinogradova

Beginning in 1942, with the Eastern Front having claimed the lives of several million Soviet soldiers, Stalin's Red Army began drafting tens of thousands of women, most of them in their teens or early twenties, to defend against the Nazi invasion. Some volunteered, but most were given no choice, in particular about whether to become a sniper or to fill some other combat role.After a few months of brutal training, the female snipers were issued with high-powered rifles and sent to the front. Almost without exception, their first kill came as a great shock, and changed them forever. But as the number of kills grew, many snipers became addicted to their new profession, some to the point of becoming depressed if a "hunt" proved fruitless.Accounts from the veterans of the female sniper corps include vivid descriptions of the close bonds they formed with their fellow soldiers, but also the many hardships and deprivations they faced: days and days in a trench without enough food, water, or rest, their lives constantly at risk from the enemy and from the cold; burying their friends, most of them yet to leave their teenage years; or the frequent sexual harassment by male officers.Although many of these young women were killed, often on their first day of combat, the majority returned from the front, only to face the usual constellation of trials with which every war veteran is familiar. Some continued their studies, but most were forced to work, even as they also started families or struggled to adjust to life as single parents. Nearly all of them were still in their early twenties, and despite the physical and mental scars left by the war, they had no time for complaints as the Soviet Union rebuilt following the war.Drawing on original interviews, diaries, and previously unpublished archival material, historian Lyuba Vinogradova has produced an unparalleled quilt of first-person narratives about these women's lives. This fascinating document brings the realities and hardships faced by the Red Army's female sniper corps to life, shedding light on a little-known aspect of the Soviet Union's struggles against Hitler's war machine.

Avedon: Something Personal

by Steven M. Aronson Norma Stevens

An intimate biography of Richard Avedon, the legendary fashion and portrait photographer who “helped define America’s image of style, beauty and culture” (The New York Times), by his longtime collaborator and business partner Norma Stevens and award-winning author Steven M. L. Aronson. Richard Avedon was arguably the world’s most famous photographer—as artistically influential as he was commercially successful. Over six richly productive decades, he created landmark advertising campaigns, iconic fashion photographs (as the star photographer for Harper’s Bazaar and then Vogue), groundbreaking books, and unforgettable portraits of everyone who was anyone. He also went on the road to find and photograph remarkable uncelebrated faces, with an eye toward constructing a grand composite picture of America. Avedon dazzled even his most dazzling subjects. He possessed a mystique so unique it was itself a kind of genius—everyone fell under his spell. But the Richard Avedon the world saw was perhaps his greatest creation: he relentlessly curated his reputation and controlled his image, managing to remain, for all his exposure, among the most private of celebrities. No one knew him better than did Norma Stevens, who for thirty years was his business partner and closest confidant. In Avedon: Something Personal—equal parts memoir, biography, and oral history, including an intimate portrait of the legendary Avedon studio—Stevens and co-author Steven M. L. Aronson masterfully trace Avedon’s life from his birth to his death, in 2004, at the age of eighty-one, while at work in Texas for The New Yorker (whose first-ever staff photographer he had become in 1992). The book contains startlingly candid reminiscences by Mike Nichols, Calvin Klein, Claude Picasso, Renata Adler, Brooke Shields, David Remnick, Naomi Campbell, Twyla Tharp, Jerry Hall, Mikhail Baryshnikov, Bruce Weber, Cindy Crawford, Donatella Versace, Jann Wenner, and Isabella Rossellini, among dozens of others. Avedon: Something Personal is the confiding, compelling full story of a man who for half a century was an enormous influence on both high and popular culture, on both fashion and art—to this day he remains the only artist to have had not one but two retrospectives at the Metropolitan Museum of Art during his lifetime. Not unlike Richard Avedon’s own defining portraits, the book delivers the person beneath the surface, with all his contradictions and complexities, and in all his touching humanity.

Ava's Man

by Rick Bragg

With the same emotional generosity and effortlessly compelling storytelling that made All Over But the Shoutin’ a national bestseller, Rick Bragg continues his personal history of the Deep South. This time he’s writing about his grandfather Charlie Bundrum, a man who died before Bragg was born but left an indelible imprint on the people who loved him. Drawing on their memories, Bragg reconstructs the life of an unlettered roofer who kept food on his family’s table through the worst of the Great Depression; a moonshiner who drank exactly one pint for every gallon he sold; an unregenerate brawler, who could sit for hours with a baby in the crook of his arm. In telling Charlie’s story, Bragg conjures up the backwoods hamlets of Georgia and Alabama in the years when the roads were still dirt and real men never cussed in front of ladies. A masterly family chronicle and a human portrait so vivid you can smell the cornbread and whiskey, Ava’s Man is unforgettable.From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Avant-garde And The Popular In Modern China: Tian Han And The Intersection Of Performance And Politics

by Liang Luo

The Avant-Garde and the Popular in Modern China explores how an important group of Chinese performing artists invested in politics and the pursuit of the avant-garde came to terms with different ways of being "popular" in modern times. In particular, playwright and activist Tian Han (1898-1968) exemplified the instability of conventional delineations between the avant-garde, popular culture, and political propaganda. Liang Luo traces Tian's trajectory through key moments in the evolution of twentieth-century Chinese national culture, from the Christian socialist cosmopolitanism of post-WWI Tokyo to the urban modernism of Shanghai in 1920s and 30s, then into the Chinese hinterland during the late 1930s and 40s, and finally to the Communist Beijing of the 1950s, revealing the dynamic interplay of art and politics throughout this period. Understanding Tian in his time sheds light upon a new generation of contemporary Chinese avant-gardists (Ai Wei Wei being the best known), who, half a century later, are similarly engaging national politics and popular culture.

Avalanche: A Love Story

by Julia Leigh

An intensely personal narrative of loss, hope, and longing for a child. In this brave and lucid account, Julia Leigh broaches a challenging life event often left undiscussed: how the struggle to have a child can take an agonizing toll. Leigh’s experience at the vanguard of medical science is acutely rendered, physically and emotionally, transmitting what it feels like to so desperately wish for a child while knowing that the odds are stacked against you. From the daily shots she puts herself through at home, to hopes raised and dashed, and finally to the decision to stop treatment, Avalanche bears witness to Leigh’s raw desire, suffering, strength, and, in the end, transformation—a shift to a different kind of love. The reader looks behind the scenes of a clinic and discovers how things really work: reality is a far cry from the slick marketing of the billion-dollar infertility industry. As for so many women, Leigh’s treatment failed, but her ghost child lingers in memory.

The Available Man: The Life behind the Masks of Warren Gamaliel Harding

by Andrew Sinclair

This is a full-length biography of President Warren G. Harding, who served from 1921 to 1923. While the author presents an unvarnished account of Harding's flaws and weaknesses, he also presents a sympathetic side and shows him as a weak man caught up by circumstances that swept beyond his control.

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