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Showing 51 through 75 of 12,162 results

On a Darkling Plain (Routledge Revivals)

by Harvey Curtis Webster

Originally published in 1947 and presenting the famed poet-novelist against the background of contemporary thought and society, Harvey Curtis Webster shows that Hardy's later works give consistent evidence of hope; that pervasive pessimism was by no means the keynote of Hardy's thought. On a Darkling Plain traces the evolution of Hardy's thought, from faith, through disillusionment, to a cautious belief in the ultimate progress of man.

The Photographer's Story: The Art of Visual Narrative

by Michael Freeman

Having already taught you how to compose and interpret great photos, Michael Freeman now continues his best-selling series by exploring the most successful methods for presenting photography meaningfully and in an engaging format. This is the critical "next step" that separates adequate image galleries from captivating collections - and disinterested viewers from enthralled audiences.Tapping into his decades of experience shooting for such publications as Smithsonian, GEO, and Condé Nast Traveller (among many others), Michael Freeman studies the photo-essay phenomenon that took the world by storm and gave storytellers a completely new set of tools to construct their narratives. Having established how rhythm, pacing, and careful organisation build tension and cultivate interest, Freeman goes on to explain what this means for presenting your own photos, particularly in the new digital formats of online galleries, slideshows, and tablets.The Photographer's Story will enliven your images, refresh your perspective, and elevate your understanding of how photographs work together to tell a story. Your audiences will thank you for it.

Writing Politics: An Anthology

by David Bromwich

Explore the tradition of the political essay with this brilliant anthology.David Bromwich is one of the most well-informed, cogent, and morally uncompromising political writers on the left today. He is also one of our finest intellectual historians and literary critics. In Writing Politics, Bromwich presents twenty-seven essays by different writers from the beginning of the modern political world in the seventeenth century until recent times, essays that grapple with issues that continue to shape history—revolution and war, racism, women&’s rights, the status of the worker, the nature of citizenship, imperialism, violence and nonviolence, among them—and essays that have also been chosen as superlative examples of the power of written English to reshape our thoughts and the world. Jonathan Swift, Edmund Burke, Henry David Thoreau, Harriet Taylor, Abraham Lincoln, George Eliot, W. E. B. Du Bois, Mohandas Gandhi, Virginia Woolf, Martin Luther King, and Hannah Arendt are here, among others, along with a wide-ranging introduction.

The Child Who Never Grew: A Memoir

by Pearl S. Buck

<P>Pearl S. Buck's groundbreaking memoir, hailed by James Michener as "spiritually moving," about raising a child with a rare developmental disorder The Child Who Never Grew is Buck's candid memoir of her relationship with her oldest daughter, who was born with a rare type of mental retardation. <P>A forerunner of its kind, the memoir was published in 1950 and helped demolish the cruel taboos surrounding learning disabilities. Buck describes life with her daughter, Carol, whose special needs led Buck to send her to one of the best schools for disabled children in the United States--which she paid for in part by writing The Good Earth, her multimillion-selling classic novel. <P>Brave and touching, The Child Who Never Grew is a heartrending memoir of parenting. As Buck writes, "I learned respect and reverence for every human mind. It was my child who taught me to understand so clearly that all people are equal in their humanity and that all have the same human rights." <P> This ebook features an illustrated biography of Pearl S. Buck including rare images from the author's estate.

Crónicas: 1944-1953

by Albert Camus

Un testimonio de primera línea sobre un periodo convulso de la historia moderna, con la firma inconfundible del Premio Nobel de 1957 Publicados en la prensa francesa entre 1944 y 1953, los escritos periodísticos recopilados por Albert Camus en este volumen constituyen un testimonio de primera línea sobre un periodo convulso de la historia moderna. En buena parte provienen de los editoriales de la revista Combat, que el autor dirigió entre 1944 y 1947, aunque no faltan las piezas más personales, como las que responden a la polémica suscitada por El hombre rebelde. El conjunto nos muestra a un escritor incisivo y siempre abierto al diálogo al considerar los hechos más relevantes de su tiempo. Sobre la obra:«La modernidad de Albert Camus debe probablemente mucho al periodismo.»María Santos Sáinz, autora de Albert Camus, periodista: De reportero en Argel a editorialista en París «Camus elaboró una verdadera filosofía de un periodismo crítico, cuyos ejemplos se han vuelto escasos hoy en día.»Robert Kopp «Sus tomas de posición eran audaces, tanto sobre la cuestión de la independencia de Argelia como sobre sus relaciones con el Partido Comunista Francés.»France Inter

The Bias of Communication

by Alexander John Watson Harold A. Innis

One of the most influential books ever published in Canada, Harold A. Innis's The Bias of Communication has played a major part in reshaping our understanding of history, communication, and media theory. First published in 1951, this masterful collection of essays explores the relationship between a society's communication media and that community's ability to maintain control over its development. Innis considers political and economic forces in the context of social change and the role of communication in the creation of both ancient and modern empires. In an essay for this new edition, Innis biographer Alexander John Watson examines the reasons why Innis, at the height of his success as an economic historian, embarked on new research areas of communications and empire, as well as the ways in which Marshall McLuhan's interpretations of Innis changed and de-politicized Innis's work. As important today as it was when first published, The Bias of Communication is essential reading for historians and scholars of communication and media studies.

King Football

by Michael Oriard

This landmark work explores the vibrant world of football from the 1920s through the 1950s, a period in which the game became deeply embedded in American life. Though millions experienced the thrills of college and professional football firsthand during these years, many more encountered the game through their daily newspapers or the weekly Saturday Evening Post, on radio broadcasts, and in the newsreels and feature films shown at their local movie theaters. Asking what football meant to these millions who followed it either casually or passionately, Michael Oriard reconstructs a media-created world of football and explores its deep entanglements with a modernizing American society.Football, claims Oriard, served as an agent of "Americanization" for immigrant groups but resisted attempts at true integration and racial equality, while anxieties over the domestication and affluence of middle-class American life helped pave the way for the sport's rise in popularity during the Cold War. Underlying these threads is the story of how the print and broadcast media, in ways specific to each medium, were powerful forces in constructing the football culture we know today."[Oriard] captures the self-aggrandizing illogic of the game's cultural role in his absorbing study of early 20th-century culture.--New York Times"This excellent book should be required reading on any American Studies course worth the name. . . . Oriard's detailed and well-written work shows us how the game has been constructed through notions of national, gendered and ethnic--and, as he insists, also class--identities.--Journal of American StudiesIn this landmark work exploring the vibrant world of football from the 1920s through the 1950s, Michael Oriard explores how the mass media shaped and were shaped by the exploding popularity of football. King Football is at once a sweeping cultural history of football, a provocative study of the power of print and broadcast media, and a compelling investigation of American attitudes about race, class, and gender and their relationship to sport.-->

Luz de agosto (Alfaguara Literatura Ser.)

by William Faulkner

Luz de agosto es una de las obras más representativas del premio Nobel de Literatura William Faulkner. En Luz de agosto aparecen retratados algunos de los personajes más memorables de Faulkner: la cándida e intrépida Lena Grove en busca del padre de su hijo; el reverendo Gal Hightower, atormentado por constante visiones de soldados de caballería confederados, y Joe Christmas, un misterioso vagabundo consumido por los orígenes raciales de sus antepasados. Faulkner, además de haber sido el innovador de una forma de narrar que ha influido poderosamente en las generaciones que le han continuado, fue el cronista de los más notables hechos, costumbres y personajes de su tierra. Luz de agosto es una de las obras más representativas de un hombre que, trabajando sobre la historia y haciendo campear la imaginación, logró convertirse en uno de los escritores más importantes de su siglo.

My Several Worlds: A Personal Record

by Pearl S. Buck

The extraordinary and eventful personal account of the life of Pearl S. Buck, the first American woman to win the Nobel Prize for LiteratureOften regarded as one of Pearl S. Buck's most significant works, My Several Worlds is the memoir of a major novelist and one of the key American chroniclers of China. Buck, who was born to missionary parents in 1892, spent much of the first portion of her life in China, experiencing the Boxer Rebellion first hand and becoming involved with the society with an intimacy available to few outside observers. The book is not only an important reflection on that nation's modern history, but also an account of her re-engagement with America and the intense activity that characterized her life there, from her prolific novel-writing to her loves and friendships to her work for abandoned children and other humanitarian causes. As alive with incident as it is illuminating in its philosophy, My Several Worlds is essential reading for travelers and readers alike. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Pearl S. Buck including rare images from the author's estate.

A History of the Book in America

by Michael Schudson Joan Shelley Rubin David Paul Nord

The fifth volume of A History of the Book in America addresses the economic, social, and cultural shifts affecting print culture from World War II to the present. During this period factors such as the expansion of government, the growth of higher education, the climate of the Cold War, globalization, and the development of multimedia and digital technologies influenced the patterns of consolidation and diversification established earlier.The thirty-three contributors to the volume explore the evolution of the publishing industry and the business of bookselling. The histories of government publishing, law and policy, the periodical press, literary criticism, and reading--in settings such as schools, libraries, book clubs, self-help programs, and collectors' societies--receive imaginative scrutiny as well. The Enduring Book demonstrates that the corporate consolidations of the last half-century have left space for the independent publisher, that multiplicity continues to define American print culture, and that even in the digital age, the book endures.Contributors:David Abrahamson, Northwestern UniversityJames L. Baughman, University of Wisconsin-MadisonKenneth Cmiel (d. 2006)James Danky, University of Wisconsin-MadisonRobert DeMaria Jr., Vassar CollegeDonald A. Downs, University of Wisconsin-MadisonRobert W. Frase (d. 2003)Paul C. Gutjahr, Indiana UniversityDavid D. Hall, Harvard Divinity SchoolJohn B. Hench, American Antiquarian SocietyPatrick Henry, New York City College of TechnologyDan Lacy (d. 2001)Marshall Leaffer, Indiana UniversityBruce Lewenstein, Cornell UniversityElizabeth Long, Rice UniversityBeth Luey, Arizona State UniversityTom McCarthy, Beirut, LebanonLaura J. Miller, Brandeis UniversityPriscilla Coit Murphy, Chapel Hill, N.C.David Paul Nord, Indiana UniversityCarol Polsgrove, Indiana UniversityDavid Reinking, Clemson UniversityJane Rhodes, Macalester CollegeJohn V. Richardson Jr., University of California, Los AngelesJoan Shelley Rubin, University of RochesterMichael Schudson, University of California, San Diego, and Columbia UniversityLinda Scott, University of OxfordDan Simon, Seven Stories PressIlan Stavans, Amherst CollegeHarvey M. Teres, Syracuse UniversityJohn B. Thompson, University of CambridgeTrysh Travis, University of FloridaJonathan Zimmerman, New York University

Mary McCarthy's Collected Memoirs: Memories of a Catholic Girlhood, How I Grew, and Intellectual Memoirs

by Mary Mccarthy

A special edition bringing together three powerful memoirs by bestselling author Mary McCarthyIn Memories of a Catholic Girlhood, Mary McCarthy begins with her recollections of a happy childhood cut tragically short by the death of her parents during the influenza epidemic of 1918. Tempering memory with invention, McCarthy describes how, orphaned at six, she spent much of her childhood shuttled between two sets of grandparents and three religions--Catholic, Protestant, and Jewish. Early on, McCarthy lets the reader in on her secret: The chapter you just read may not be wholly reliable--facts have been distilled through the hazy lens of time and distance.How I Grew is McCarthy's intensely personal autobiography of her life from age thirteen to twenty-one. With detail driven by an almost astonishing memory recall, the author gives us a masterful account of these formative years. From her wild adolescence--including losing her virginity at fourteen--through her eventual escape to Vassar, the bestselling novelist, essayist, and critic chronicles her relationships with family, friends, lovers, and the teachers who would influence her writing career.And Intellectual Memoirs opens with McCarthy as a married twenty-four-year-old Communist and critic. She's disciplined, dedicated, and sexually experimental: At one point she realizes that in twenty-four hours she "had slept with three different men." Over the course of three years, she will have had two husbands, the second being the esteemed, much older critic Edmund Wilson. It is Wilson who becomes McCarthy's mentor and muse, urging her to try her hand at fiction. Intellectual Memoirs is a vivid snapshot of a distinctive place and time--New York in the late 1930s--and the forces that shaped Mary McCarthy's life as a woman and a writer.

Memories of a Catholic Girlhood: How I Grew, Intellectual Memoirs (Penguin Twentieth Century Classics)

by Mary Mccarthy

Tracing her moral struggles to the day she accidentally took a sip of water before her Communion--a mortal sin--Mary McCarthy gives us eight funny and heartrending essays about the illusive and redemptive nature of memory "During the course of writing this, I've often wished that I were writing fiction."Originally published in large part as standalone essays in the New Yorker and Harper's Bazaar, Mary McCarthy's acclaimed memoir begins with her recollections of a happy childhood cut tragically short by the death of her parents during the influenza epidemic of 1918.Tempering memory with invention, McCarthy describes how, orphaned at six, she spent much of her childhood shuttled between two sets of grandparents and three religions--Catholic, Protestant, and Jewish. One of four children, she suffered abuse at the hands of her great-aunt and uncle until she moved to Seattle to be raised by her maternal grandparents. Early on, McCarthy lets the reader in on her secret: The chapter you just read may not be wholly reliable--facts have been distilled through the hazy lens of time and distance.In Memories of a Catholic Girlhood, McCarthy pays homage to the past and creates hope for the future. Reminiscent of Nabokov's Speak, Memory, this is a funny, honest, and unsparing account blessed with the holy sacraments of forgiveness, love, and redemption.This ebook features an illustrated biography of Mary McCarthy including rare images from the author's estate.

Bitter Lemons of Cyprus: Life on a Mediterranean Island

by Lawrence Durrell

On a Mediterranean island divided, a man finds peace in a time of perilous unrest in this stunning memoirIn 1953, as the British Empire relaxes its grip upon the world, the island of Cyprus bucks for independence. Some cry for union with Athens, others for an arrangement that would split the island down the middle, giving half to the Greeks and the rest to the Turks. For centuries, the battle for the Mediterranean has been fought on this tiny spit of land, and now Cyprus threatens to rip itself in half. Into this escalating conflict steps Lawrence Durrell--poet, novelist, and a former British government official. After years serving the Crown in the Balkans, he yearns for a return to the island lifestyle of his youth. With humor, grace, and passable Greek, Durrell buys a house, secures a job, and settles in for quiet living, happy to put up his feet until the natives begin to consider wringing his neck. More than a travel memoir, this is an elegant picture of island life in a changing world.

Operation Massacre

by Michael Greenberg Ricardo Piglia Rodolfo Walsh Daniella Gitlin

1956. Argentina has just lost its charismatic president Juán Perón in a military coup, and terror reigns across the land. June 1956: eighteen people are reported dead in a failed Peronist uprising. December 1956: sometime journalist, crime fiction writer, studiedly unpoliticized chess aficionado Rodolfo Walsh learns by chance that one of the executed civilians from a separate, secret execution in June, is alive. He hears that there may be more than one survivor and believes this unbelievable story on the spot. And right there, the monumental classic Operation Massacre is born.Walsh made it his mission to find not only the survivors but widows, orphans, political refugees, fugitives, alleged informers, and anonymous heroes, in order to determine what happened that night, sending him on a journey that took over the rest of his life.Originally published in 1957, Operation Massacre thoroughly and breathlessly recounts the night of the execution and its fallout.From the Trade Paperback edition.nformers, and anonymous heroes, in order to determine what happened that night, sending him on a journey that took over the rest of his life.Originally published in 1957, Operation Massacre thoroughly and breathlessly recounts the night of the execution and its fallout.

The Way the World Works: Essays

by Nicholson Baker

Nicholson Baker, who "writes like no one else in America" (Newsweek), here assembles his best short pieces from the last fifteen years. The Way the World Works, Baker's second nonfiction collection, ranges over the map of life to examine what troubles us, what eases our pain, and what brings us joy. Baker moves from political controversy to the intimacy of his own life, from forgotten heroes of pacifism to airplane wings, telephones, paper mills, David Remnick, Joseph Pulitzer, the OED, and the manufacture of the Venetian gondola. He writes about kite string and about the moment he met his wife, and he surveys our fascination with video games while attempting to beat his teenage son at Modern Warfare 2. In a celebrated essay on Wikipedia, Baker describes his efforts to stem the tide of encyclopedic deletionism; in another, he charts the rise of e-readers; in a third he chronicles his Freedom of Information lawsuit against the San Francisco Public Library. Through all these pieces, many written for The New Yorker, Harper's, and The American Scholar, Baker shines the light of an inexpugnable curiosity. The Way the World Works is a keen-minded, generous-spirited compendium by a modern American master.

The Way the World Works

by Nicholson Baker

Nicholson Baker, who "writes like no one else in America" (Newsweek), here assembles his best short pieces from the last fifteen years. The Way the World Works, Baker's second nonfiction collection, ranges over the map of life to examine what troubles us, what eases our pain, and what brings us joy. Baker moves from political controversy to the intimacy of his own life, from forgotten heroes of pacifism to airplane wings, telephones, paper mills, David Remnick, Joseph Pulitzer, the OED, and the manufacture of the Venetian gondola. He writes about kite string and about the moment he met his wife, and he surveys our fascination with video games while attempting to beat his teenage son at Modern Warfare 2. In a celebrated essay on Wikipedia, Baker describes his efforts to stem the tide of encyclopedic deletionism; in another, he charts the rise of e-readers; in a third he chronicles his Freedom of Information lawsuit against the San Francisco Public Library. Through all these pieces, many written for The New Yorker, Harper's, and The American Scholar, Baker shines the light of an inexpugnable curiosity. The Way the World Works is a keen-minded, generous-spirited compendium by a modern American master.

Coronation Everest

by Jan Morris

May 29, 1953: Edward Hillary and Tenzing Norgay first reach the summit of Mount Everest, and nearly the Coronation Day for a new Queen, Elizabeth II. Breaking the story was James Morris, special correspondent for The Times, who met the victorious climbers at Camp IV at 20,000 feet. Morris known to millions of readers today as the travel essayist Jan Morris, wrote this account of the Hillary expedition with all the verve and sharp detail for which Jan Morris is famous.

Alone atop the Hill: The Autobiography of Alice Dunnigan, Pioneer of the National Black Press (A\sarah Mills Hodge Fund Publication)

by Alice Dunnigan

The memoir of &“the first African American female reporter to gain entry into the closed society of the White House and congressional news correspondents&” (Hank Klibanoff, coauthor of the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Race Beat). In 1942 Alice Allison Dunnigan, a sharecropper&’s daughter from Kentucky, made her way to the nation&’s capital and a career in journalism that eventually led her to the White House. With Alone Atop the Hill, Carol McCabe Booker has condensed Dunnigan&’s 1974 self-published autobiography to appeal to a general audience and has added scholarly annotations that provide historical context. Dunnigan&’s dynamic story reveals her importance to the fields of journalism, women&’s history, and the civil rights movement and creates a compelling portrait of a groundbreaking American. Dunnigan recounts her formative years in rural Kentucky as she struggled for a living, telling bluntly and simply what life was like in a Border State in the first half of the twentieth century. Later she takes readers to Washington, D.C., where we see her rise from a typist during World War II to a reporter. Ultimately she would become the first black female reporter accredited to the White House; authorized to travel with a U.S. president; credentialed by the House and Senate Press Galleries; accredited to the Department of State and the Supreme Court; voted into the White House Newswomen&’s Association and the Women&’s National Press Club; and recognized as a Washington sports reporter. In Alone Atop the Hill, &“Dunnigan&’s indelible self-portrait affirms that while the media landscape has changed, along with some social attitudes and practices, discrimination is far from vanquished, and we still need dedicated and brave journalists to serve as clarion investigators, witnesses, and voices of conscience (Booklist, starred review).

Communication Yearbook 33

by Christina S. Beck

The Communication Yearbook annuals publish diverse, state-of-the-discipline literature reviews across the field of communication. Sponsored by the International Communication Association, volumes offer insightful descriptions of research as well as reflections on the implications of those findings for other areas of the discipline. Editor Christina S. Beck presents a diverse, international selection of articles that highlight empirical and theoretical intersections in the communication discipline.

A Dictionary of Catch Phrases: British and American, from the Sixteenth Century to the Present Day

by Eric Partridge

A catch phrase is a well-known, frequently-used phrase or saying that has `caught on' or become popular over along period of time. It is often witty or philosophical and this Dictionary gathers together over 7,000 such phrases.

The Elements of Power: Lessons on Leadership and Influence

by Terry R. Bacon

What do a person's knowledge, expressiveness, history, character, and attraction have in common? Or his or her role, resources, information, network, and reputation? Each is a key to either personal or organizational power, and together they open the complex combination lock on the door of true leadership and irresistible influence. The Elements of Power combines the latest research on the nature of power all over the world with a handy self-assessment and invaluable insight into: How power works in organizations How people use and lose power The relationship between power and leadership What makes famous people powerful or what diminishes their power Sources of power and how to build each one Leading and influencing others more effectively Complete with "Portraits in Power" examining key business figures and world leaders alike, the full effect is an accessible and unprecedented pipeline to the many sources and types of internal and external power, including the most valuable of all: the power of will.

Missed Information: Better Information for Building a Wealthier, More Sustainable Future

by Jay Schulkin David Sarokin

Information is power. It drives commerce, protects nations, and forms the backbone of systems that range from health care to high finance. Yet despite the avalanche of data available in today's information age, neither institutions nor individuals get the information they truly need to make well-informed decisions. Faulty information and sub-optimal decision-making create an imbalance of power that is exaggerated as governments and corporations amass enormous databases on each of us. Who has more power: the government, in possession of uncounted terabytes of data (some of it obtained by cybersnooping), or the ordinary citizen, trying to get in touch with a government agency? In Missed Information, David Sarokin and Jay Schulkin explore information -- not information technology, but information itself -- as a central part of our lives and institutions. They show that providing better information and better access to it improves the quality of our decisions and makes for a more vibrant participatory society.Sarokin and Schulkin argue that freely flowing information helps systems run more efficiently and that incomplete information does just the opposite. It's easier to comparison shop for microwave ovens than for doctors or hospitals because of information gaps that hinder the entire health-care system. Better information about such social ills as child labor and pollution can help consumers support more sustainable products. The authors examine the opacity of corporate annual reports, the impenetrability of government secrets, and emerging techniques of "information foraging." The information imbalance of power can be reconfigured, they argue, with greater and more meaningful transparency from government and corporations.

The Troubles of Journalism: A Critical Look at What's Right and Wrong With the Press

by William A. Hachten

This book looks at criticisms of the journalism profession and evaluates many of the changes in journalism--both positive and negative. In addition, it suggests what the many changes mean for this nation and indeed for the world at large, as American journalism--its methods and standards--has markedly influenced the way many millions overseas receive news and view their world. Based on author William Hachten's 50-year involvement with newspapers and journalism education, The Troubles of Journalism serves as a realistic examination of the profession, and is appropriate for upper-level undergraduate courses in journalism and media criticism. Since the previous edition of The Troubles of Journalism, many significant challenges have occurred in the media: the events of September 11, the war on terrorism, mergers and consolidation of media ownership, new concerns about press credibility, the expanding and controversial role of cable news channels, the growing impact role of news and comment on the Internet, and continuing globalization and controversy over the role of American media in international communications. To do justice to these recent "troubles" of the news media, important additions and modifications have been made in every chapter of this Third Edition.

The Dog Who Came to Stay: A Memoir

by Hal Borland

During a fierce snowstorm, an abandoned and hungry animal howls at the back door of nature writer Hal Borland's farmhouse, announcing the beginning of a transformational friendship Hal Borland and his wife Barbara have recently moved onto a hundred-acre farm in northwest Connecticut, where both hope to write and live in harmony with nature. From his New England home, Borland travels the country searching for material for his New York Times "outdoor editorials"--but soon nature comes searching for him, in the form of a miserable, half-starved, deeply trusting, black-and-white foxhound mutt that wanders onto the farm during a blizzard. The dog, Pat, becomes a member of the family and teaches Borland that, often, our most immediate connection to the natural world is through the animals we live with.

Kinesics and Context

by Ray L. Birdwhistell

Ray L. Birdwhistell, in this study of human body motion (a study he terms kinesics), advances the theory that human communication needs and uses all the senses, that the information conveyed by human gestures and movements is coded and patterned differently in various cultures, and that these codes can be discovered by skilled scrutiny of particular movements within a social context.

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