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Already Doing It

by Michael Gill

Why is the sexuality of people with intellectual disabilities often deemed "risky" or "inappropriate" by teachers, parents, support staff, medical professionals, judges, and the media? Should sexual citizenship depend on IQ? Confronting such questions head-on, Already Doing It exposes the "sexual ableism" that denies the reality of individuals who, despite the restrictions they face, actively make decisions about their sexual lives.Tracing the history of efforts in the United States to limit the sexual freedoms of such persons using methods such as forced sterilization, invasive birth control, and gender-segregated living arrangements--Michael Gill demonstrates that these widespread practices stemmed from dominant views of disabled sexuality, not least the notion that intellectually disabled women are excessively sexual and fertile while their male counterparts are sexually predatory. Analyzing legal discourses, sex education materials, and news stories going back to the 1970s, he shows, for example, that the intense focus on "stranger danger" in sex education for intellectually disabled individuals disregards their ability to independently choose activities and sexual partners--including nonheterosexual ones, who are frequently treated with heightened suspicion. He also examines ethical issues surrounding masturbation training that aims to regulate individuals' sexual lives, challenges the perception that those whose sexuality is controlled (or rejected) should not reproduce, and proposes recognition of the right to become parents for adults with intellectual disabilities. A powerfully argued call for sexual and reproductive justice for people with intellectual disabilities, Already Doing It urges a shift away from the compulsion to manage "deviance" (better known today as harm reduction) because the right to pleasure and intellectual disability are not mutually exclusive. In so doing, it represents a vital new contribution to the ongoing debate over who, in the United States, should be allowed to have sex, reproduce, marry, and raise children.

The Alphabet War

by Gail Piazza Diane Burton Robb

When Adam started kindergarten, the teacher wanted him to learn about letters. But "p" looked like "q," and "b" looked like "d." Adam would rather color or mold clay. In first grade, his teacher wanted him to put the letters into words so he could read. That was the beginning of the Alphabet War. "Was" looked like "saw," and "there" looked like "then." Almost everyone else in his class was learning to read, but Adam was fighting a war against letters. In second grade, he had to learn to spell, which was also impossible. Now he was so frustrated he got into trouble and had to go to the principal's office. At last, in third grade, he got the right kind of help. Slowly he began to do better. During fourth grade, he learned that he could excel in other things. That gave him the confidence to take chances with reading. One day he found himself reading a book all by himself!

Alphabet Kids - From ADD to Zellweger Syndrome: A Guide to Developmental, Neurobiological and Psychological Disorders for Parents and Professionals

by Robbie Woliver

From ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) to ZS (Zellweger Syndrome)-there seems to be an alphabet disorder for almost every behavior, from those caused by serious, rare genetic diseases to more common learning disabilities that hinder children's academic and social progress. Alphabet Kids have disorders that are often concurrent, interconnected or mistaken for one another: for example, the frequent combination of ASD, OCD, SID and ADHD. If a doctor only diagnoses one condition, he or she may have missed others. As the rates of these disorders dramatically rise, Alphabet Kids explains it all. Robbie Woliver covers 70 childhood disorders, providing information on causes, cures, treatments and prognoses. Chapters include a comprehensive list of signs and symptoms, and the disorders are illustrated with often heartbreaking, but always inspirational true-life stories of a child with the particular disorder. This comprehensive, easy-to-read go-to guide will help parents to sort through all the interconnected childhood developmental, neurobiological and psychological disorders and serve as a roadmap to help start the families' journey for correct diagnoses, effective treatment and better understanding of their Alphabet Kids.

Alone Together: Making an Asperger Marriage Work

by Tony Attwood Katrin Bentley

Communication is one of the biggest challenges faced by people with Asperger's Syndrome (AS), yet an Asperger marriage requires communication more than any other relationship. Thousands of people live in Asperger marriages without knowing the answers to important questions such as `What behaviours indicate that my spouse has AS?' `Is it worthwhile to get a diagnosis?' `Is there hope for improvement?' Katrin Bentley has been married for 18 years. Since receiving her husband's diagnosis of AS, their marriage has improved substantially. They learnt to accept each other's different approaches to life and found ways to overcome problems and misunderstandings. Today they are happily married and able to communicate effectively. Alone Together shares the struggle of one couple to rescue their marriage. It is uplifting and humorous, and includes plenty of tips to making an Asperger marriage succeed. This book offers couples hope, encouragement and strategies for their own marriages.

Aloha Crossing

by Pamela Bauer Mueller

From the book jacket: A year has passed since puppy raiser Diego handed Aloha's harness over to her blind partner Kimberly Louise. Now Diego is traveling to Georgia to visit his beloved friend again! This heartwarming story follows the exciting cross-country adventures and moving scenarios of a diverse group of family and friends. Although Aloha is a central figure in this intriguing story, she shares the stage with human actors who make this more than a tale about a blind woman and her guide dog. Learning from the devoted Aloha's example, they discover they are capable of weathering any storm and triumphing over every setback. From the opening chapter where Aloha rescues Kimberly Louise from the wheels of an unseen car, through the consequences of a horrific storm and finally to the riveting last chapter, we identified with the unfolding relationship forged between a blind person and canine partner. We thrilled as teenager Diego evolved from Aloha's puppy raiser to Miss Kimberly Louise's friend and eventually to hero. sequel to Hello, Goodbye, I Love You:

Almost Like A Song

by Ronnie Milsap Tom Carter

Ronnie Milsap, a legend in country music, shares the story of his life including the obstacles and opportunities created by his blindness. He describes his childhood in the rural south and gives an insider's view of life at a school for the blind. He chronicles his entry into country music and shares stories about his travels.

Ally's Busy Day: The Story of a Service Dog

by Maureen Pranghofer

Ally's Busy Day is the story about a typical day of a service dog named Ally. She helps her owner, who is blind and a quadriplegic, throughout her day. From odd jobs around the house and into the community, Ally serves with pride. When Ally works she wears a special vest so people know she is on the job.

Allies and Obstacles: Disability Activism and Parents of Children with Disabilities

by Allison C. Carey Pamela Block Richard Scotch

Parents of children with disabilities often situate their activism as a means of improving the world for their child. However, some disabled activists perceive parental activism as working against the independence and dignity of people with disabilities. This thorny relationship is at the heart of the groundbreaking Allies and Obstacles. The authors chronicle parents’ path-breaking advocacy in arenas such as the right to education and to liberty via deinstitutionalization as well as how they engaged in legal and political advocacy. Allies and Obstacles provides a macro analysis of parent activism using a social movement perspective to reveal and analyze the complex—and often tense—relationship of parents to disability rights organizations and activism. The authors look at organizational and individual narratives using four case studies that focus on intellectual disability, psychiatric diagnoses, autism, and a broad range of physical disabilities including cerebral palsy and muscular dystrophy. These cases explore the specific ways in which activism developed among parents and people with disabilities, as well as the points of alliance and the key points of contestation. Ultimately, Allies and Obstacles develops new insights into disability activism, policy, and the family.

All Secure: A Special Operations Soldier's Fight to Survive on the Battlefield and the Homefront

by Steve Jackson Tom Satterly

One of the most highly regarded Tier One Delta Force operators in American military history shares his war stories and personal battle with PTSD.As a senior non-commissioned officer of Delta Force, the most elite and secretive special operations unit in the U.S. military, Command Sergeant Major Tom Satterly fought some of this country's most fearsome enemies. Over the course of twenty years and thousands of missions, he's fought desperately for his life, rescued hostages, killed and captured terrorist leaders, and seen his friends maimed and killed around him. All Secure is in part Tom's journey into a world so dark and dangerous that most Americans can't contemplate its existence. It recounts what it is like to be on the front lines with one of America's most highly trained warriors. As action-packed as any fiction thriller, All Secure is an insider's view of "The Unit." Tom is a legend even among other Tier One special operators. Yet the enemy that cost him three marriages, and ruined his health physically and psychologically, existed in his brain. It nearly led him to kill himself in 2014; but for the lifeline thrown to him by an extraordinary woman it might have ended there. Instead, they took on Satterly's most important mission-saving the lives of his brothers and sisters in arms who are killing themselves at a rate of more than twenty a day. Told through Satterly's firsthand experiences, it also weaves in the reasons-the bloodshed, the deaths, the intense moments of sheer terror, the survivor's guilt, depression, and substance abuse-for his career-long battle against the most insidious enemy of all: Post Traumatic Stress. With the help of his wife, he learned that by admitting his weaknesses and faults he sets an example for other combat veterans struggling to come home.

All in Pieces

by Suzanne Young

From <i>New York Times</i> bestselling author Suzanne Young comes a heartrending new novel about a girl struggling to deal with anger issues while taking care of her younger brother with special needs. <p>"Anger-management issues." That's how they classified Savannah Sutton after she stuck a pencil in her ex-boyfriend's hand because he mocked her little brother, Evan, for being disabled. That's why they sent her to Brooks Academy--an alternative high school that's used as a temporary detention center. <p>The days at Brooks are miserable, but at home, life is far more bleak. Savvy's struggling to take care of her brother since her mom left years ago, and her alcoholic dad can't be bothered. Life with Evan is a constant challenge, but he's also the most important person in the world to Savvy. <p>Then there's Cameron, a new student at Brooks with issues of his own; a guy from a perfect family that Savvy thought only existed on TV. Cameron seems determined to break through every one of the walls Savvy's built around herself, except if she lets herself trust him, it could make everything she's worked so hard for fall apart in an instant. <p>And with her aunt seeking custody of her brother and her ex-boyfriend seeking revenge, Savvy's fighting to hold all the pieces together. But she's not sure how much tighter she can be pulled before she breaks completely.</p>

All I Can Handle: I'm No Mother Teresa

by Jenny Mccarthy Kim Stagliano

"Dr. Spock? Check. Penelope Ann Leach (remember her?)? Check. What to Expect When You're Expecting? Check. I had a seven hundred dollar Bellini crib for God's sake! I was perfect. And so was Mia when she was born . . ." ...and so begins Kim Stagliano's electrifying and hilarious memoir of her family's journey raising three daughters with autism. In these stories, Stagliano has joined the ranks of David Sedaris and Augusten Burroughs with her amazing ability to lay everything on the table--from family, friends, and enemies to basement floods to birthdays to (possible) heroin addictions--eviscerating and celebrating the absurd. From her love of Howard Stern to her increasing activism in the autism community and exhaustive search for treatments that will help her daughters, she covers it all. Always outspoken, often touching, and sometimes heartbreaking, Kim Stagliano is a powerful new voice in comedic writing--her "Kimoir" (as she calls it) will be a must-read within the autism community and the literary world at large.

All Better Now

by Emily Wing Smith

I ask myself: how am I living still? And how I ask it depends on the day. All her life, Emily has felt different from other kids. Between therapist visits, sudden uncontrollable bursts of anger, and unexplained episodes of dizziness and loss of coordination, things have always felt not right. For years, her only escape was through the stories she'd craft about herself and the world around her. But it isn't until a near-fatal accident when she's twelve years old that Emily and her family discover the truth: a grapefruit sized benign brain tumor at the base of her skull. In turns candid, angry, and beautiful, Emily Wing Smith's captivating memoir chronicles her struggles with both mental and physical disabilities during her childhood, the devastating accident that may have saved her life, and the means by which she coped with it all: writing.

All About Me: A Step-by-Step Guide to Telling Children and Young People on the Autism Spectrum about Their Diagnosis

by Andrew Miller

Based on direct work with over 250 individual children, Andrew Miller wrote this book in order to provide parents and professionals with information, tools and guidance to help introduce children to autism in the absence of specialist support. This in-depth guide describes the practicalities of disclosure, including when to tell, who should do it and what they need to know beforehand with strategies to tailor your approach as every child's experience will be different. Step-by-step instructions detail how to deliver the programme and produce with a child a personalised booklet containing information about their personal attributes and their autism. These booklets and follow-up material help make disclosure a positive and constructive experience for everyone. Accompanying material can be downloaded online including questionnaires, examples of children's booklets and flexible templates.

All About Braille: Reading By Touch (Transportation and Communication Series)

by Laura S. Jeffrey

For younger children. From the Book jacket: All About Braille: Reading By Touch will tell you about Braille and finger reading. For those who cannot see or are losing their sight, Braille lets them read and communicate with others. Using special tools such as Braille writers that work like typewriters and Braille displays that hook up to computers, people can write letters and send e-mail. Learn more about the history of Braille and how it has opened the doors of communication.

All About ADHD: A Family Resource for Helping Your Child Succeed with ADHD

by Thomas Phelan

By the author of the bestselling parent book 1-2-3 MagicFor the estimated 20 million Americans with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder comes the third edition of All About ADHD by Dr. Thomas W. Phelan, an internationally renowned expert and lecturer on child discipline and ADHD. Completely updated with the latest research and treatment information, All About ADHD is a comprehensive guide to ADHD's symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment in children and adults, including information such as:· The basic symptoms of ADHD and their effects on school, work, home, and personal relationships· The differences in ADHD between boys and girls· Counseling, school interventions, behavior management, and social skills trainingWritten in easy-to-understand language and with a positive, treatment-focused approach, All About ADHD is a must-have resource for parents, teachers, physicians, and mental health professionals.

Alive Day: A Story of Love and Loyalty

by Tom Sullivan Betty White

Psychiatrist Dr. Brenden McCarthy determines he'll do whatever it takes to rescue a young marine from despair. But ultimately it's McCarthy's big-hearted and courageous black Labrador, Nelson, who teaches both men the real meaning of life after near-death.

Aligning IEPs to Academic Standards: For Students with Moderate and Severe Disabilities

by Diane M. Browder Ginevra Courtade

With increased emphasis on students meeting state academic standards, instructors of students with moderate and severe disabilities have wondered about their role. Will they continue to integrate their students in the regular classroom and in the general curriculum? Or will their participation in alternate assessments aligned to alternate achievement standards leave them stranded in self-contained classrooms once again? According to authors Ginevra Courtade-Little and Diane Browder, the answer lies in aligning students' IEPs to state standards consistent with students' grade and ability levels. By following this book, your students with significant disabilities can participate in parallel activities directly related to the general curriculum. For example, when meeting a math state standard in measurement, have the student match coins to a linear jig to purchase an item. It's really quite simple: You write IEP goals on standard-based content areas that are appropriate for a student's grade level and ability. This valuable and unique book does just that: Shows you how to construct student IEPs with goals aligned to each state's academic content standards for each student's assigned grade and ability level.

Aliens and UFOs: 21 Famous UFO Sightings (Critical Reading Series)

by Henry Billings Melissa Billings John F. Warner Margaret B. Warner

Motivate students with our best-selling series of high-interest selections. This best-selling series motivates students with high-interest selections at a higher readability level. Emphasis is on reading nonfiction. Critical thinking questions prepare students for state and national tests. Critical Reading, a perennial favorite for middle school and high school students of all ability levels, fascinates with astounding and intriguing stories of real-life adventure. Comprehension questions reinforce literal understanding, while critical thinking questions encourage students to consider the author's purpose, make inferences, identify cause and effect, and make predictions. The entire series is designed to reinforce state reading standards. The selections in the Critical Reading series are at the highest level of readability in our triple-threat offering which also includes The Real Deal and The Wild Side. Reading Level 6-8, Interest Level 6-12.

Alexandra Hopewell, Labor Coach

by Dori Hillestad Butler

After breaking her third egg in her fifth grade class's Family Life Unit, Mrs. Ryder won't trust Alexandra with an egg, so Alex must write a report about child development. That's when Alex announces that she is going to be her mom's labor coach. But she hasn't told her mom yet.

Alexander Graham Bell, Teacher of the Deaf

by Juna Loch

Alexander Graham Bell, Teacher of the Deaf by Juna Loch

Alex: The Life of a Child

by Frank Deford

Frank DeFord tells the heartbreaking, yet uplifting story of his daughter Alex's brief life. She died of cystic fibrosis at the age of eight.

Alandra's Lilacs: The Story of a Mother and Her Deaf Daughter

by Tressa Bowers

When, in 1968, 19-year-old Tressa Bowers took her baby daughter to an expert on deaf children, he pronounced that Alandra was "stone deaf," she most likely would never be able to talk, and she probably would not get much of an education because of her communication limitations. Tressa refused to accept this stark assessment of Alandra's prospects. Instead, she began the arduous process of starting her daughter's education. Economic need forced Tressa to move several times, and as a result, she and Alandra experienced a variety of learning environments: a pure oralist approach, which discouraged signing; Total Communication, in which the teachers spoke and signed simultaneously; a residential school for deaf children, where Signed English was employed; and a mainstream public school that relied upon interpreters. Changes at home added more demands, from Tressa's divorce to her remarriage, her long work hours, and the ongoing challenge of complete communication within their family. Through it all, Tressa and Alandra never lost sight of their love for each other, and their affection rippled through the entire family. Today, Tressa can triumphantly point to her confident, educated daughter and also speak with pride of her wonderful relationship with her deaf grandchildren. Alandra's Lilacs is a marvelous story about the resiliency and achievements of determined, loving people no matter what their circumstances might be.

Ain't No Makin' It

by Macleod

Author Jay MacLeod OCOs classic ethnographyOCoa defining work on the cycle of social reproduction and inequality as lived through the young men from the Clarendon Heights housing projectOConow includes a third section that continues the lives of the original Brothers and Hallway Hangers through new interviews and analysis.

Ain't No Makin' It: Aspirations and Attainment in a Low-income Neighborhood

by Jay Macleod

This classic text addresses one of the most important issues in modern social theory and policy: how social inequality is reproduced from one generation to the next.

Aided Augmentative Communication for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (Autism and Child Psychopathology Series)

by Jennifer B. Ganz

Just as autism is a continuum of disorders, it is associated with a broad range of neurodevelopmental, social, and communication deficits. For individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) has a major impact on their daily lives, often reducing the occurrence of challenging behaviors. Aided Augmentative Communication for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders is a practical guide to the field, offering readers a solid grounding in ASD, related complex communication needs (CCN), and AAC, especially visual and computer-based technologies. Widely used interventions and tools in AAC are reviewed--not just how they work, but why they work--to aid practitioners in choosing those most suited to individual clients or students. Issues in evaluation for aided AAC and debates concerning its usability round out the coverage. Readers come away with a deeper understanding of the centrality of communication for clients with ASD and the many possibilities for intervention Key areas of coverage include: AAC and assessment of people with ASD and CCN. Interdisciplinary issues and collaboration in assessment and treatment. AAC intervention mediated by natural communication partners. Functional communication training with AAC. The controversy surrounding facilitated communication. Sign language versus AAC. Aided Augmentative Communication for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders is an essential resource for clinicians/practitioners, researchers, and graduate students in such fields as child and school psychology, speech pathology, language education, developmental psychology, behavior therapy, and educational technology.

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