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Trans and Autistic: Stories from Life at the Intersection

by Noah Adams Bridget Liang

This ground-breaking book foregrounds the voices of autistic trans people as they speak candidly about how their autism and gender identity intersects and the impact this has on their life.Drawing upon a wealth of interviews with transgender people on the autism spectrum, the book explores experiences of coming out, with self-discovery, healthcare, family, work, religion and community support, to help dispel common misunderstandings around gender identity and autism, whilst allowing autistic trans people to see their own neurodiverse experiences reflected in these interviews.An incisive introduction clearly sets out up-to-date research and thinking, before each chapter draws together key findings from the interviews, along with advice and support for those providing support to autistic trans individuals. Both accessible and authoritative, Trans and Autistic is an essential publication for autistic trans people, their families, and professionals wanting to understand and support their clients better.

Under Shifting Stars

by Alexandra Latos

This heartfelt novel for fans of Jandy Nelson and Adam Silvera follows twins Audrey and Clare as they grapple with their brother's death and their changing relationships-with each other and themselves. Audrey&’s best friend was always her twin, Clare. But as they got older, they grew apart, and when their brother Adam died, Clare blamed Audrey for the accident. Now, Audrey&’s attending an alternative school where she feels more isolated than ever. Tired of being seen as different from her neurotypical peers, Audrey&’s determined to switch to the public high school, rebuild her friendship with Clare, and atone for Adam&’s death . . . but she&’ll need to convince her parents, and her therapist, first. Clare knows her sister thinks she&’s the perfect twin, but Audrey doesn&’t realize that Clare&’s &“popular&” status is crumbling—she&’s begun to question old friendships, dress in Adam&’s clothes, and wonder what feelings for a nonbinary classmate, Taylor, might mean. As she grapples with not only grief but also her gender fluidity, Clare wonders where she&’ll belong if she sheds her carefully constructed image and embraces her true self. Will first crushes, new family dynamics, and questions of identity prove that Audrey and Clare have grown too different to understand each other-or that they've needed each other all along?

Unraveling: Remaking Personhood in a Neurodiverse Age

by Matthew J. Wolf-Meyer

Developing a cybernetic model of subjectivity and personhood that honors disability experiences to reconceptualize the category of the human Twentieth-century neuroscience fixed the brain as the basis of consciousness, the self, identity, individuality, even life itself, obscuring the fundamental relationships between bodies and the worlds that they inhabit. In Unraveling, Matthew J. Wolf-Meyer draws on narratives of family and individual experiences with neurological disorders, paired with texts by neuroscientists and psychiatrists, to decenter the brain and expose the ableist biases in the dominant thinking about personhood. Unraveling articulates a novel cybernetic theory of subjectivity in which the nervous system is connected to the world it inhabits rather than being walled off inside the body, moving beyond neuroscientific, symbolic, and materialist approaches to the self to focus instead on such concepts as animation, modularity, and facilitation. It does so through close readings of memoirs by individuals who lost their hearing or developed trauma-induced aphasia, as well as family members of people diagnosed as autistic—texts that rethink modes of subjectivity through experiences with communication, caregiving, and the demands of everyday life. Arguing for a radical antinormative bioethics, Unraveling shifts the discourse on neurological disorders from such value-laden concepts as &“quality of life&” to develop an inclusive model of personhood that honors disability experiences and reconceptualizes the category of the human in all of its social, technological, and environmental contexts.

We Could Be Heroes

by Margaret Finnegan

Shiloh meets Raymie Nightingale in this funny and heartwarming debut novel about a ten-year-old that finds himself in a whole mess of trouble when his new friend Maisie recruits him to save the dog next door.Hank Hudson is in a bit of trouble. After an incident involving the boy&’s bathroom and a terribly sad book his teacher is forcing them to read, Hank is left with a week&’s suspension and a slightly charred hardcover—and, it turns out, the attention of new girl Maisie Huang. Maisie has been on the lookout for a kid with the meatballs to help her with a very important mission: Saving her neighbor&’s dog, Booler. Booler has seizures, and his owner, Mr. Jorgensen, keeps him tied to a tree all day and night because of them. It&’s enough to make Hank even sadder than that book does—he has autism, and he knows what it&’s like to be treated poorly because of something that makes you different. But different is not less. And Hank is willing to get into even more trouble to prove it. Soon he and Maisie are lying, brown-nosing, baking, and cow milking all in the name of saving Booler—but not everything is as it seems. Booler might not be the only one who needs saving. And being a hero can look a lot like being a friend.

We Walk: Life with Severe Autism (The Culture and Politics of Health Care Work)

by Amy S. Lutz

In this collection of beautiful and raw essays, Amy S. F. Lutz writes openly about her experience—the positive and the negative—as a mother of a now twenty-one-year-old son with severe autism. Lutz's human emotion drives through each page and challenges commonly held ideas that define autism either as a disease or as neurodiversity. We Walk is inspired by her own questions: What is the place of intellectually and developmentally disabled people in society? What responsibilities do we, as citizens and human beings, have to one another? Who should decide for those who cannot decide for themselves? What is the meaning of religion to someone with no abstract language? Exploring these questions, We Walk directly—and humanly—examines social issues such as inclusion, religion, therapeutics, and friendship through the lens of severe autism. In a world where public perception of autism is largely shaped by the "quirky geniuses" featured on television shows like The Big Bang Theory and The Good Doctor, We Walk demands that we center our debates about this disorder on those who are most affected by its impacts.

What Are the Paralympic Games? (What Was?)

by Gail Herman Who HQ

It's time to cheer for the inspiring athletes of the Paralympic Games! As the Opening Ceremony for the 1948 Summer Olympic Games commenced in London, a similar sporting competition was taking place a few miles away. But the men at Stoke Mandeville weren't your typical athletes. They were paralyzed World War II veterans. The games at Stoke Mandeville were so successful that they would eventually lead evolve into the Paralympics. Participants from all around the world vie for the gold medal in a variety of sports, including archery, basketball, swimming, speed skating, and ice hockey. Author Gail Herman highlights their achievements, describes how these athletes train--both mentally and physically--for the games, and gives the reader a better understanding of what makes the Paralympic Games one of the world's most viewed sporting events.

What Makes Us Stronger

by Freya Lewis

The Manchester Arena attack nearly destroyed her.Love and courage saved her.Freya Lewis was just three metres away from the terrorist who detonated the bomb at the Manchester arena on the night of 22nd May 2017. Her best friend Nell was tragically killed, but Freya - thrown forwards by the blast - somehow survived. She suffered 29 separate injuries, was in a coma for five days, and wheelchair-bound for three months.Yet just 12 months later, she was on her feet, running the Junior Great Manchester Run and raising £60,000 for the hospital that saved her. From her darkest moment, she found the determination to live life to the fullest, for herself, and for those who lost their lives.This is Freya's courageous story. But it is also the story of the amazing community that surrounded her, uplifted her, and ultimately saved her life.What Makes Us Stronger is a testament to the power of hope and positivity.

What Really Works in Special and Inclusive Education: Using Evidence-Based Teaching Strategies

by David Mitchell Dean Sutherland

This fully revised and updated third edition presents teachers with a range of up-to-date evidence-based strategies they can use to tackle the challenges of inclusive education. An essential resource for the busy educator, each of the twenty-nine strategies explored in this book has a substantial research base drawn from a range of countries, a strong theoretical rationale and clear guidelines on their implementation, as well as cautionary advice where necessary. Key features of the third edition include: An easy to follow structure divided into four categories: Behavioural approaches, Social approaches, Cognitive strategies and mixed strategies Eight new chapters, focusing on topical areas such as neuroscience, social and emotional education, visual learning and communication and the transition from school to post-school environments Updated chapters that consider the most diverse and up-to-date research in education, psychology, health and technology Whilst the focus of this book is on children with special educational needs, the strategies are universally applicable, making this essential reading for all classroom teachers, school leaders, teacher educators and students, educational psychologists, special needs coordinators and consultants and educational researchers.

What Science Tells Us about Autism Spectrum Disorder: Making the Right Choices for Your Child

by Geraldine Dawson Joel T. Nigg Raphael A. Bernier

What have scientists learned about the causes of autism spectrum disorder? Why do different kids have such different symptoms, and what are the best ways to deal with them? Will there ever be a cure? From leading autism researchers, this accessible guide helps you put the latest advances to work for your unique child. Separating fact from fiction about causes, treatments, and prevention, the book guides you to make lifestyle choices that support the developing brain. From the impact of sleep, exercise, diet, and technology, to which type of professional help might be the right fit, the authors cover it all with expertise and compassion. Learn about the choices you face--and the steps you can take--to build a happier, healthier life for your child and family.

What's the Buzz? for Primary Students: A Social and Emotional Enrichment Programme

by Mark Le Messurier Madhavi Nawana Parker

What’s the Buzz? is an internationally renowned series of programmes designed to help children and young people develop social and emotional awareness. Now available in a revised second edition, What’s the Buzz for Primary Students is a sixteen-lesson programme targeting everyday social challenges faced by primary aged children, such as peer pressure and bullying style behaviours; competition and handling disappointment; feelings and wellbeing and self-awareness. Each lesson is designed around the SAFE criteria (Sequenced; Active; Focused; Explicit) and includes: A new and beautifully illustrated ‘Archie’ story, in which the popular character faces a new and relatable social challenge A series of lively and exciting games and activity suggestions Role-plays and discussion points so that children can put their skills into practice in a supportive environment Having already proven to appeal to teachers and support staff, counsellors and psychologists worldwide, this resource is suitable for anybody looking to enrich the social lives of children. Resources and training modules to support this book can be found on the website www.whatsthebuzz.net.au.

Wheels of Courage: How Paralyzed Veterans from World War II Invented Wheelchair Sports, Fought for Disability Rights, and Inspired a Nation

by David Davis

Out of the carnage of World War II comes an unforgettable tale about defying the odds and finding hope in the most harrowing of circumstances. Wheels of Courage tells the stirring story of the soldiers, sailors, and marines who were paralyzed on the battlefield during World War II-at the Battle of the Bulge, on the island of Okinawa, inside Japanese POW camps-only to return to a world unused to dealing with their traumatic injuries. Doctors considered paraplegics to be "dead-enders" and "no-hopers," with the life expectancy of about a year. Societal stigma was so ingrained that playing sports was considered out-of-bounds for so-called "crippled bodies." But servicemen like Johnny Winterholler, a standout athlete from Wyoming before he was captured on Corregidor, and Stan Den Adel, shot in the back just days before the peace treaty ending the war was signed, refused to waste away in their hospital beds. Thanks to medical advances and the dedication of innovative physicians and rehabilitation coaches, they asserted their right to a life without limitations. The paralyzed veterans formed the first wheelchair basketball teams, and soon the Rolling Devils, the Flying Wheels, and the Gizz Kids were barnstorming the nation and filling arenas with cheering, incredulous fans. The wounded-warriors-turned-playmakers were joined by their British counterparts, led by the indomitable Dr. Ludwig Guttmann. Together, they triggered the birth of the Paralympic Games and opened the gymnasium doors to those with other disabilities, including survivors of the polio epidemic in the 1950s. Much as Jackie Robinson's breakthrough into the major leagues served as an opening salvo in the civil rights movement, these athletes helped jump-start a global movement about human adaptability. Their unlikely heroics on the court showed the world that it is ability, not disability, that matters most. Off the court, their push for equal rights led to dramatic changes in how civilized societies treat individuals with disabilities: from kneeling buses and curb cutouts to the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Their saga is yet another lasting legacy of the Greatest Generation, one that has been long overlooked. Drawing on the veterans' own words, stories, and memories about this pioneering era, David Davis has crafted a narrative of survival, resilience, and triumph for sports fans and athletes, history buffs and military veterans, and people with and without disabilities.

Young Children's Play: Development, Disabilities, and Diversity

by Jeffrey Trawick-Smith

Young Children’s Play: Development, Disabilities, and Diversity is an accessible, comprehensive introduction to play and development from birth to age 8 years that introduces readers to various play types and strategies and helps them determine when intervention might be needed. Skillfully addressing both typically developing children and those with special needs in a single volume, this book covers dramatic play, blocks, games, motor play, artistic play, and non-traditional play forms, such as humor, rough and tumble play, and more. Designed to support contemporary classrooms, this text deliberately interweaves practical strategies for understanding and supporting the play of children with specific disabilities (e.g. autism, Down syndrome, or physically challenging conditions) and those of diverse cultural backgrounds into every chapter. In sections divided by age group, Trawick-Smith explores strategies for engaging children with specific special needs, multicultural backgrounds, and incorporating adult–child play and play intervention. Emphasizing diversity in play behaviors, each chapter includes vignettes featuring children’s play and teacher interactions in classrooms to illustrate core concepts in action. Filled with research-based applications for professional practice, this text is an essential resource for students of early childhood and special education, as well as teachers and coaches supporting early grades or inclusive classrooms.

12 Principles for Raising a Child with ADHD

by Russell A. Barkley

Over decades of research and work with thousands of families, Russell A. Barkley has become a leading authority on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in kids and teens. He has learned what a huge difference parents can make in supporting their children's success--as well as how overwhelming it can be. This concise guide presents 12 key parenting principles for dealing with common behavioral, emotional, and school challenges. By cultivating a mindset of acceptance and compassion--together with an understanding of the executive function deficits of ADHD--you can strengthen your loving connection with your child and help your whole family thrive. Filled with practical suggestions and quick-reference lists and tips, this is the perfect book to read cover to cover or pick up any time you need extra support.

Affirmative Action and the Law: Efficacy of National and International Approaches

by Erica Howard Elvira Dominguez-Redondo Narciso Leandro Xavier Baez

Affirmative Action and the Law analyses the practical application of affirmative action measures and their efficacy in achieving substantive equality through the lenses of the United Nations human rights machinery and the legal regime and policies implemented in China, India, Central and South America, South Africa and the United Kingdom. The product of a joint research project involving academics from the Brazil, Chile, Mexico, India, Spain and the United Kingdom, the findings identify and reflect on trends emerging from State practice across the world in eradicating structural inequality through special measures for certain designated groups. The book seeks to provide a coherent and systematic approach to the analysis of special measures in the targeted countries. It also comprises two case-studies with in-depth insights on gender diversity on the boards of public listed companies in the UK and the European Union and the access of persons with disabilities to higher education in Brazil. The book will be a valuable resource for students and academics in the field of human rights, law, sociology and politics. It will also provide a source of good practice for states and policy makers in the framing of responses to increased inequality at national and international level; and for civil society actors seeking to explore meaningful interaction with a highly controversial topic in society.

Aging Veterans with Disabilities: A Cross-National Study of Policies and Challenges

by Arie Rimmerman

The number of older war veterans receiving disability benefits is steadily growing and is predicted to rise in the next decade. This book provides comprehensive knowledge about health and psychosocial concerns of veterans aging with disabilities and unmet needs and compares policy in three countries that have been involved in massive warfare in the 20th century––the United Kingdom (UK), the United States (US), and Israel. Using a cross-national comparative study of the policies, legislation and services provided by these three countries, which have significant numbers of aging disabled military veterans, this book provides evidence-based knowledge on the trajectories and attendant mental-health and psychosocial problems this sub-group faces when aging with a disability. It sheds light on the paradox in which most veterans with disabilities in the UK, USA and Israel are older, while the current legislation and budget target younger veterans with disabilities. The book reflects the current debate regarding the desired policy toward older veterans with disabilities in these countries and whether to provide them with proactive health services prior to retirement to prevent "accelerated aging". It also evaluates the dilemma of whether to serve aging veterans separately as a unique population or to provide them with the same services used by the general population. This book will be of interest to all academics and students working in disability studies, rehabilitation studies, gerontology, psychology, sociology, social work, social policy, and law more broadly.

Autism Through A Sensory Lens: Sensory Assessment and Strategies

by Joy Beaney

The fully revised second edition of this easy-to-use resource introduces the sensory differences autistic children may face, and explores how these differences can affect their ability to make sense of the world. It is invaluable in helping those adults working with autistic children to identify the possible triggers for the child’s behaviour and consider it through a sensory lens. Children have varying sensory needs so the book offers both a wealth of enjoyable activities for sensory exploration and play, whilst also providing suggestions for strategies and ideas that can be used at home or in school to create an autism-friendly environment. This book: Highlights the possible link between behaviours that challenge and sensory difficulties for autistic children. Provides practical and accessible resources, helping parents, carers and practitioners to gain a greater understanding of sensory differences. Includes an online assessment with accompanying aids to create a visual representation of the child’s sensory needs. With both downloadable and photocopiable resources, this practical guide will be an essential tool for parents, carers and practitioners working with children with autism, enabling them to to create a visual profile of areas of difficulty which can form the basis of personalised strategies and fun sensory activities to support the child.

Behavior Analysis for Effective Teaching

by Julie S. Vargas

Behavior Analysis for Effective Teaching is a clear, comprehensive book on the integration of non-aversive behavior analysis principles into classrooms and other school settings. Carefully revised and updated throughout, this third edition includes new content on precision teaching and a new chapter on how teachers can provide appropriate education for students with special disabilities who are included in their classrooms. Focused on merging behavior management with effective student instruction and illustrated with examples from real teachers’ experiences, the book is an ideal primary resource for undergraduate and graduate courses in teacher education, special education, school psychology, and school counseling, as well as for preparation toward the BACB Credentialing Exam.

The Co-Teacher’s Guide: Intensifying Instruction Beyond One Teach, One Support

by Jennifer L. Goeke

This pragmatic guide provides concrete, detailed strategies for co-teachers looking to expand their instructional methods and involvement beyond the One Teach, One Support model. Including step-by-step examples, practical scenarios, and visuals of successful implementations to help you quickly and effectively put these tools into practice, each chapter also highlights specific tensions that can arise in your co-teaching partnership and frames effective solutions to move beyond them efficiently and effectively. While designed for both teachers in a co-teaching pair, the book’s tools can easily be applied on your own, making this an ideal resource for co-teachers with limited common planning time.

Creating Change for Vulnerable Teens: Lessons from a Therapeutic Farm Making a Difference to the Lives of Young People

by Tish Feilden

Creating Change for Vulnerable Teens tells the story of Tish Feilden and Jamie's Farm - a network of therapeutic farms dedicated to transforming the lives of disadvantaged children.Documenting Tish's experiences of working with truly remarkable teens who have faced huge challenges in their lives, the book describes how the farms help young people to thrive academically, socially and emotionally. She shares the approaches they have pioneered, including the critical importance of trust, of looking behind the behaviour and of really connecting with the desires and hopes of young people. If you have an interest in supporting vulnerable children or young people, this book provides a wealth of inspiration and ideas you can use, whatever the setting.

Creative Ways to Help Children Manage Anxiety: Ideas and Activities for Working Therapeutically with Worried Children and Their Families

by Fiona Zandt Suzanne Barrett

This book sets out therapeutic activities to help children aged 4-12 years and their families to better understand and manage anxiety. It explains how to work with anxious children, providing a framework for assessment and therapy that draws on CBT, ACT and narrative therapy approaches. Lots of practical tips for therapists are included and important developmental considerations are discussed, including adapting therapy for children with developmental difficulties, and working with families and schools.Over 50 playful therapeutic activities are included, which have been developed through the authors' extensive work with children, giving children an arsenal of coping strategies. They focus on key areas such as understanding anxiety, managing anxious thoughts, and building resilience and use readily available, inexpensive materials and downloadable templates which are provided in the book. This is the perfect tool for therapists looking for playful and purposeful ways to work with children with anxiety.

Developing Teacher Leaders in Special Education: An Administrator’s Guide to Building Inclusive Schools

by Marie Tejero Hughes Daniel M. Maggin

Practical and forward-thinking, Developing Teacher Leaders in Special Education is the administrator's essential guide to growing special educator leadership in any school, district, or program. Special educators need to be flexible, proactive, and collaborative – qualities that make them uniquely suited to roles in school leadership – but these skills are often overlooked when choosing effective teacher leaders. Featuring helpful tips and detailed examples to demonstrate the concepts in action, this book breaks down the qualities that special educators can bring to your school leadership team and explores how you can leverage those skills to create a more inclusive and successful community.

Disability and Citizenship Studies (Interdisciplinary Disability Studies)

by Marie Sépulchre

Focusing on the case of disability, this book examines what happens when previously marginalised individuals obtain the legal recognition of their equal citizenship rights but cannot fully enjoy these rights because of structural inequality. Bringing together disability and citizenship studies, it explores an original conceptualisation of disability as a distinct social division and approaches citizenship as a developing institution. In addition to providing innovative theoretical perspectives on citizenship and disability, this book is grounded in the empirical analysis of the claims of disability activists in Sweden. Drawing on a wide range of blog posts and debate articles, it sheds light upon the inequality and domination faced by disabled people in Sweden and underlines the disability activists’ proactive ideas and solutions for constructing a more equal citizenship. This book will be of interest to scholars, activists and policymakers in the fields of disability, citizenship, social inequality, human rights, politics, activism, social welfare and sociology.

Identity Construction and Illness Narratives in Persons with Disabilities (Interdisciplinary Disability Studies)

by Chalotte Glintborg

This book investigates how being diagnosed with various disabilities impacts on identity. Once diagnosed with a disability, there is a risk that this label can become the primary status both for the person diagnosed as well as for their family. This reification of the diagnosis can be oppressive because it subjugates humanity in such a way that everything a person does can be interpreted as linked to their disability. Drawing on narrative approaches to identity in psychology and social sciences, the bio-psycho-social model and a holistic approach to disabilities, the chapters in this book understand disability as constructed in discourse, as negotiated among speaking subjects in social contexts, and as emergent. By doing so, they amplify voices that may have otherwise remained silent and use storytelling as a way of communicating the participants' realities to provide a more in-depth understanding of their point of view. This book will be of interest to all scholars and students of disability studies, sociology, medical humanities, disability research methods, narrative theory, and rehabilitation studies.

International Perspectives on Disability Exceptions in Copyright Law and the Visual Arts: Feeling Art

by Jani McCutcheon and Ana Ramalho

This book provides an overview of disability exceptions to copyright infringement and the international and human rights legal framework for disability rights and exceptions. The focus is on those exceptions as they apply to visual art, while the book presents a comprehensive study of copyright’s disability exceptions per se and the international and human rights law framework in which they are situated. 3D printing now allows people with a visual impairment to experience 3D reproductions of paintings, drawings and photographs through touch. At the same time, the uncertain application of existing disability exceptions to these reproductions may generate concerns about legal risk, hampering sensory art projects and reducing inclusivity and equity in cultural engagement by people with a visual impairment. The work adopts an interdisciplinary approach, with contributions from diverse stakeholders, including persons with disabilities, cultural institutions and the 3D printing industry. The book sketches the scene relating to sensory art projects. Experts in intellectual property, human rights, disability and art law then critically analyse the current legal landscape relating to disability access to works of visual art at both international and regional levels, as well as across a broad representative sample of national jurisdictions, and identify where legal reform is required. This comparative analysis of the laws aims to better inform stakeholders of the applicable legal landscape, the legal risks and opportunities associated with sensory art and the opportunities for reform and best practice guidelines, with the overarching goal of facilitating international harmonisation of the law and enhanced inclusivity.

Love, Learning Disabilities and Pockets of Brilliance: How Practitioners Can Make a Difference to the Lives of Children, Families and Adults

by Sara Ryan

Find some pockets of brilliance for your practice! Insights and inspiration from families of learning disabled people, who share their lives, challenges and wishes. Discover what sorts of help will really help the people you support.

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