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Stage Kiss

by Sarah Ruhl

"Wickedly clever . . . Ruhl's unique, breezily elegant dialogue is fully present, as is her pleasingly loopy logic."-Variety"In the smart, rollicking Stage Kiss . . . passion and fidelity engage in a kind of elegant pas de deux. . . . The play manages to be both wholly original and instantly recognizable . . . with its combination of hilarity and trenchancy."-The New YorkerAward-winning playwright Sarah Ruhl brings her unique mix of lyricism, sparkling humor, and fierce intelligence to her new romantic comedy, Stage Kiss. When estranged lovers He and She are thrown together as romantic leads in a long-forgotten 1930s melodrama, the line between off-stage and on-stage begins to blur. A "knockabout farce that channels Noël Coward and Michael Frayn" (Chicago Tribune), Stage Kiss is a thoughtful and clever examination of the difference between youthful lust and respectful love. Ruhl, one of America's most frequently produced playwrights, proves that a kiss is not just a kiss in this whirlwind romantic comedy, which will receive its New York premiere at Playwrights Horizons in winter 2014.Sarah Ruhl's other plays include the Pulitzer Prize finalists In the Next Room (or the vibrator play) and The Clean House, as well as Passion Play, Dead Man's Cell Phone, Demeter in the City, Eurydice, Melancholy Play, and Late: a cowboy song. She is the recipient of a Whiting Writers' Award, a PEN/Laura Pels Award, and a MacArthur Fellowship. Her plays have premiered on Broadway, Off-Broadway, and have been produced in many theaters around the world.

The Stage Life of Props

by Andrew Sofer

InThe Stage Life of Props,Andrew Sofer aims to restore to certain props the performance dimensions that literary critics are trained not to see, then to show that these props are not just accessories, but time machines of the theater. Using case studies that explore the Eucharistic wafer on the medieval stage, the bloody handkerchief on the Elizabethan stage, the skull on the Jacobean stage, the fan on the Restoration and early eighteenth-century stage, and the gun on the modern stage, Andrew Sofer reveals how stage props repeatedly thwart dramatic convention and reinvigorate theatrical practice. While the focus is on specific objects, Sofer also gives us a sweeping history of half a millennium of stage history as seen through the device of the prop, revealing that as material ghosts, stage props are a way for playwrights to animate stage action, question theatrical practice, and revitalize dramatic form. Andrew Sofer is Assistant Professor of English, Boston College. He was previously a stage director.

Stage Lighting: Fundamentals and Applications

by Richard E. Dunham

The book’s organization follows a layered approach that builds on basic principles: Light as a Medium (Part 1), Tools of a Lighting Designer (Part 2), Design Fundamentals (Part 3), and Lighting Applications (Part 4). This presents students with a practical and logical sequence when learning basic concepts. The full spectrum of the lighting design process is presented in detail, giving students an example of how one might develop a lighting design from script analysis through concept and plot development, and all the way to an opening. This detailed process with a step-by-step design approach gives students a plan to work from, which they can later modify as they mature and gain confidence as designers. The text contains a more comprehensive discussion of basic technology, light as a physical phenomena, and methodology of designs than is found in most introductory texts, bridging the gap between introductory and advanced lighting courses. The text will appeal to theatrical designers who want to venture into areas of lighting like architectural or virtual lighting design, while at the same time gaining a solid grounding in the fundmentals of lighting design. Lighting Design will also benefit illuminating engineers who want to move away from mere computational approaches in lighting and on to explore techniques along the design approaches of theatrical lighting design. The final 9 chapters cover many specialty areas of lighting design, highlighting the unique and shared qualities that exist between the different aspects of these elements. Discussions involve traditional entertainment areas like theatre, as well as lesser known facets of the industry including film/video, landscape lighting, retail/museum lighting, virtual lighting, concert, spectacle performances, and architectural lighting. Models of design tasks demonstrate the actual use and development of plots/sections, schedules, photometrics tables, and cut sheets, rather than simply talking about what they are. This hands-on approach provides students with a firm understanding of how to actually use these tools and processes.

Stage Lighting: Design Applications and More

by Richard E Dunham

Stage Lighting: Design Applications and More builds upon the information introduced in Stage Lighting: The Fundamentals to provide an in-depth reference to a number of specialty areas of lighting design, from traditional applications such as drama, dance, and designing for different venues, to more advanced applications such as concert, corporate, film and video, virtual, architectural/landscape, and other forms of entertainment lighting. Each chapter gives the essential background, design practices, and equipment details for each specialization, so readers can make informed decisions and ask informed questions when encountering each field. The book provides insight on the latest technology and includes profiles of prolific designers, such as James Moody, Jeff Ravitz, Alan Adelman, and Paul Gregory. Stage Lighting: Design Applications and More is intended to help lighting designers translate their theatrical skills to other areas of lighting design, and provides guidance on how to take those initial steps into new ventures in their lighting careers.

Stage Lighting Handbook (Stage And Costume Ser.)

by Francis Reid

The Stage Lighting Handbook is well established as the classic practical lighting guide. The book explains the process of designing lighting for all forms of stage production and describes the equipment used. This new edition includes up-to-date information on new equipment and discusses its impact on working methods.

Stage Lighting Second Edition: The Fundamentals

by Richard E. Dunham

Stage Lighting: The Fundamentals is written specifically for introductory stage lighting courses. The book begins with an examination of the nature of light, perception, and color, then leads into a conversation of stage lighting equipment and technicians. Lamps, luminaries, controls/dimming, and electricity form the basis of these chapters. The book also provides a detailed explanation and overview of the lighting design process for the theatre and several other traditional forms of entertainment. Finally, the book explores a variety of additional areas where lighting designers can find related future employment, such as concert and corporate lighting, themed design, architectural and landscape lighting, and computer animation. New for this edition: enlarged full-color illustrations, photographs, light plots and examples of lighting design;updated information on LED lighting and equipment;expanded discussion of the practical use of color as a designer;expanded discussion of psychological/perceptual effects of color;new discussion of color mixing through light sources that make use of additive mixing;expanded discussion of industry professions;expanded discussion and illustrations relating to photometrics; expanded discussion and examples of control protocols and new equipment; andupdated designer profiles along with the addition of still more designer profiles.

Stage Makeup

by Richard Corson James Glavan Beverly Gore Norcross

Widely referred to as the “bible of stage makeup,” the timely revision of this classic text addresses principles and techniques in the use of makeup for the contemporary performer. This extensive exploration of the application and use of stage makeup and makeup for a variety of performance venues covers all aspects in detail and contains over 400 photographs, drawings, and diagrams demonstrating step-by-step procedures. Thoroughly updated and revised, this classic text remains accurate and comprehensive, providing information from which all readers – whether students to the field or seasoned, professional makeup artists – will benefit. New to this edition: Updated photography throughout. Features the latest information on products and techniques throughout. New additions to chapters concerning hairpieces and wigs: making a pattern for a beard and mustache, making a pattern for a wig, fronting a wig, or sending accurate information for rentals, and the basic roller set for wigs. The source Appendix has been totally updated with new vendors and the latest website addresses. The materials Appendix has had the most current products added. There are new, blank makeup charts for class work and designing makeups. There is a color guide for a two-part silicone life cast. The new color section featuring Academy Award nominee, Christien Tinsley, steps for the Tinsley Transfers for cuts, bruises and prosthetics. (As seen in the movie The Passion Of The Christ.) A selection of makeup in color with complete instructions. Color photos of Academy Award winner, Matthew Mungle, special effects makeup for the CSI television show. Instructions for a new “creating a likeness” of Queen Elizabeth I. The Film and Television chapter now includes information about working with the latest HD digital technology. The color section now includes a series of photos illustrating the effects of gel colors on natural makeup.

Stage Makeup: Special Edition

by Richard Corson James Glavan Beverly Gore Norcross

Widely referred to as the "bible of stage makeup," the timely revision of this classic text addresses principles and techniques in the use of makeup for the contemporary performer. This extensive exploration of the application and use of stage makeup and makeup for a variety of performance venues covers all aspects in detail and contains over 1000 photographs, drawings, and diagrams demonstrating step-by-step procedures. Thoroughly updated and revised, this classic text remains accurate and comprehensive, providing information from which all readers – whether students new to the field or seasoned, professional makeup artists – will benefit. New to this edition: Updated full-color photography throughout Expanded information on makeup design and application 48 new step-by-step instructions in color Expanded chapter on modeling with highlights and shadows New chapter on cross-gender makeup New instruction on making dentures, noses, and face casting New instructions for creating zombies, animals, aging effects, and trauma Expanded information on makeup for television and film Up-to-date information on Special Effects makeup Up-to-date information on prosthetic makeup Updated chapters on facial hair and wigs Updated resources for products, advanced training, and health and safety

Stage Makeup: The Actor's Complete Step-by-Step Guide to Today's Techniques and Materials

by Laura Thudium

This up-to-date, full-color makeup manual is designed to lie open on the makeup table as a guide for student, amateur, or professional performers.

Stage Management

by Alice R. O'Grady Lawrence Stern

Revered as the authoritative resource for stage management, this text offers students a practical manual on how to stage manage in all theater environments. Rich with practical resources -- checklists, diagrams, examples, forms and step-by-step directions -- Stage Management eschews excessive discussion of philosophy and gets right to the essential materials and processes of putting on a production. In addition to sharing his own expertise, Stern has gathered practical advice from working stage managers of Broadway, off-Broadway, touring companies, regional, community, and 99-seat Equity waiver theaters.

Stage Management

by Lawrence Stern Jill Gold

Stage Management offers readers a practical manual on how to stage manage in all theatre environments. Revered as the authoritative resource for stage management, this text is rich with practical resources, including checklists, diagrams, examples, forms and step-by-step directions. In addition to sharing his own expertise, Stern has gathered practical advice from working stage managers of Broadway, off-Broadway, touring companies, regional, community, and 99-seat Equity waiver theaters. In its 11th edition, the book is now fully in color and updated to include new information on Equity contracts, social media applications in stage management, and working with high school productions.

Stage Management Basics: A Primer for Performing Arts Stage Managers

by Emily Roth Jonathan Allender-Zivic Katy McGlaughlin

Without assuming any intrinsic prior knowledge of the theatrical field and its associated, specialized terminology, Stage Management Basics covers every aspect of the stage management, from reading a script, meeting with a director and theatre staff, and auditioning, to constructing green digital scripts, communication best practices, and opening night protocol. Additionally, this book features multiple appendices containing stage management form templates, blank version of which are available on its companion website. This book touches on basic principles for stage management for theatre, dance, and opera productions.

The Stage Management Handbook

by Daniel A. Ionazzi

A complete examination of the stage manager's job, explaining the manager's involvement with all aspects of theater work including interfacing with the playwright, director, producer and designer.

The Stage Management Handbook

by Daniel A. Ionazzi

The stage manager is the renaissance man of the theater. He or she must have a working knowledge of how the various technical aspects of the theater work (scenery, props, costumes, lights and sound), be part director, part playwright, part designer and part producer, and be prepared to act as confidant, counselor and confessor to everyone else in the company. This book addresses all of these considerations in detail and offers the reader–professional or amateur, veteran or beginner–helpful guidance and practical advice, supported by many forms and examples to illustrate the points covered in the text. The three phrases of mounting and performing a show are covered. Part I takes the reader through the pre-production phase–research, the script, planning and organization, and auditions. Part II covers the rehearsal process–rehearsal rules, blocking, cues, prompting, information distribution, technical and dress rehearsals. Part III discusses the performance phase–calling the show, maintaining the director's work, working with understudies and replacements, and more. Part IV provides insights into the organizational structure or some theaters and aspects of human behavior in those organizations. Many stage managers of long-running commercial productions believe that–once the show is up and running–only ten percent of their work is related to everything covered in Parts I, II and III. The other ninety percent is associated with issues in Part IV; i.e. "managing" human behavior and maintaining working relationships.

Stage Management Theory as a Guide to Practice: Cultivating a Creative Approach

by Narda E. Alcorn Lisa Porter

Stage Management Theory as a Guide to Practice offers theory and methodology for developing a unique stage management style, preparing stage managers to develop an adaptive approach for the vast and varied scope of the production process, forge their own path, and respond to the present moment with care and creativity. This book provides tactile adaptive strategies, enabling stage managers to navigate diverse populations, venues, and projects. Experiential stories based on extensive experience with world-renowned artists exemplify the practices and provide frameworks for self-reflection, synthesis, and engagement with theory-guided practice. This book empowers stage managers to include the ‘How You’ with ‘How To’ by flexing collaborative muscles and engaging tools to guide any collaborative project to fruition with creativity, curiosity, and the drive to build connections. Exploring topics such as group dynamics, ethics, culture, conflict resolution, and strategic communication, Stage Management Theory as a Guide to Practice: Cultivating a Creative Approach is an essential tool for advanced stage management students, educators, and professionals.

Stage Manager: The Professional Experience—Refreshed

by Larry Fazio

Stage Manager: The Professional Experience–Refreshed takes the reader on a journey through all aspects of the craft of stage management in theatre, including the technological advancements that have come to theatre and the stage manger’s job. Chapters are laid out to reflect the order in which stage managers experience and perform their work: what makes a good stage manager, seeking the job, building a resume, interviewing for the job, and getting the job (or not getting the job). Included are chapters on the chain of command, working relationships, tool and supplies, creating charts, plots, plans and lists, the rehearsal period, creating the prompt book, calling cues, and the run of the show. These are just some of the many topics covered in this book. In addition, the author uses interviews with stage management professionals in various stages of production, providing another view of how the stage manager is perceived and what is expected form the work of the stage manager. Fifteen years after the original publication of Stage Manager: The Professional Experience, this new and refreshed edition is now in color to help clarify and illustrate points in the text. It is fully updated to reflect the the world of computerized technology: smart phones, thinly designed laptops, tablets, use of email and text messaging, storing and sharing files and information in cloud-based apps. Then there are the innovations of automation–electronically moving scenery, scenic projections–casting images and patterns on the stage; moving lights; LED luminaires; lasers; and greater use of fog and haze machines. In addition, the extensive glossary of more than 600 terms and phrases had been extend to well over 700, providing and excellent professional vocabulary for anyone hoping to be a theatre stage manager or already working in the field.

The Stage Manager's Toolkit

by Laurie Kincman

As a Stage Manager, you are responsible for organizing rehearsals, running performances, and keeping everyone and everything on track and in sync. To do the job well, you need to be a communication wizard--able to collect a wide range of details and share them as effectively as possible. The Stage Manger's Toolkit is more than another overview book which generalizes how to be a Stage Manager. It presents the day-to-day duties in detail--discussing not only what to do but also why. Focusing on communication best practices, the book explores objectives, paperwork, and the questions that need to be asked in order to ensure a smooth production whether on Broadway, at a university, or somewhere in between. Introduces strategies for sharing information both in person and in writing Explores how document design can enhance the accessibility and effectiveness of your reports, charts, and lists Contains principles for web-based information sharing as well as hard-copy paperwork Provides customizable paperwork templates on the accompanying website, allowing you to put the ideas to work on your own show Other features: Organized based on the chronology of a typical theatre production: pre-production work, rehearsals, the tech period, performances, and post-production duties. In each section, the book outlines the objectives for the stage manager and the communication techniques that will ensure success. Provides examples of paperwork a stage manager commonly works with, including variations for plays and musicals, shortcuts for shows on an abbreviated time table, and strategies for maintaining consistency and legibility. The book highlights differences the stage manager may encounter when working on professional and academic productions.

The Stage Manager's Toolkit: Templates and Communication Techniques to Guide Your Theatre Production from First Meeting to Final Performance (The Focal Press Toolkit Series)

by Laurie Kincman

The Stage Manager’s Toolkit provides a comprehensive account of the role of the stage manager for live theatre with a focus on both written and verbal communication best practices. The book outlines the duties of the stage manager and assistant stage manager throughout a production, discussing not only what to do but why. The book identifies communication objectives for each phase of production, paperwork to be created, and the necessary questions to be answered in order to ensure success.

Stage-Play and Screen-Play: The intermediality of theatre and cinema

by Michael Ingham

Dialogue between film and theatre studies is frequently hampered by the lack of a shared vocabulary. Stage-Play and Screen-Play sets out to remedy this, mapping out an intermedial space in which both film and theatre might be examined. Each chapter’s evaluation of the processes and products of stage-to-screen and screen-to-stage transfer is grounded in relevant, applied contexts. Michael Ingham draws upon the growing field of adaptation studies to present case studies ranging from Martin McDonagh’s The Cripple of Inishmaan and RSC Live’s simulcast of Richard II to F.W. Murnau’s silent Tartüff, Peter Bogdanovich’s film adaptation of Michael Frayn’s Noises Off, and Akiro Kurosawa’s Ran, highlighting the multiple interfaces between media. Offering a fresh insight into the ways in which film and theatre communicate dramatic performances, this volume is a must-read for students and scholars of stage and screen.

Stage Presence

by Jane Goodall

Focusing on examples of live performance in drama, dance, opera and light entertainment, Jane Goodall explores a characteristic as compelling and enigmatic as the performers who demonstrate it. The mysterious quality of ‘presence’ in a performer has strong resonances with the uncanny. It is associated with primal, animal qualities in human individuals, but also has connotations of divinity and the supernatural, relating to figures of evil as well as heroism. Stage Presence traces these themes through theatrical history. This fascinating study also explores the blend of science and spirituality that accompanies the appreciation of human power. Performers display a magnetism of their audiences; they electrify them, exhibit mesmeric command, and develop chemistry in their communication. Case studies include: Josephine Baker, Sarah Bernhardt, Thomas Betterton, David Bowie, Maria Callas, Bob Dylan, David Garrick, Barry Humphries, Henry Irving, Vaslav Nijinsky and Paul Robeson.

The Stage Producer's Business and Legal Guide

by Charles Grippo

The entire range of individuals involved in entertainment-performers, writers, and directors to box office managers, theater board members, and theater owners-will find comprehensive answers to questions on every aspect of theater business and law. Written by attorney, producer, and playwright, this book reveals hundreds of insider strategies for minimizing legal costs, negotiating contracts, and licensing and producing plays. It also features expert, practical advice on such topics as tax risks and liabilities, safety regulations, organizing the theater company, financing, box office management, not-for-profit management, and much more. Plus everything is explained clearly, written without a lot of legal jargon.

The Stage Producer's Business and Legal Guide (Second Edition)

by Charles Grippo

Expert, Practical Advice for Everyone in Show Business Now updated and expanded, this second edition of The Stage Producer’s Business and Legal Guide is the ultimate survival kit for anyone presenting live entertainment. The information contained in this handbook is essential for those working in Broadway, regional, stock, or university theater; concert halls; opera houses; and more. Attorney, producer, and playwright Charles Grippo provides comprehensive advice on every aspect of the theater business and the law, including: Crowdfunding Your ProductionNew Opportunities to Raise MoneySelf-ProductionLicensing and Producing PlaysDevised Theater and CollaborationsCreating Jukebox MusicalsOrganizing a Theater CompanyTheatrical InsuranceMaintaining a Harassment-Free EnvironmentNegotiating ContractsEssential Rules Every Board Member Must KnowManaging a Not-for-Profit Theater CompanyNavigating TaxesUsing Third-Party Intellectual PropertyAnd much, much more! The entire range of individuals involved in entertainment—producers, performers, writers, directors, managers, and theater owners—will find invaluable practical and legal advice in this handy guide.

Stage Writers Handbook

by Dana Singer

Dana Singer, Associate Director of America's foremost playwrights' association, the Dramatists Guild, gathers all the information and ideas stage writers need to conduct their careers in a businesslike manner, with all the protections the law provides. Includes chapters devoted to copyright, self-promotion, representation, production contracts, publishing and licensing agreements, underlying rights and collaboration.

Stagecraft Fundamentals

by Rita Kogler Carver

Stagecraft Fundamentals Second Edition tackles every aspect of theatre production with Emmy Award-winning author Rita Kogler Carver's signature witty and engaging voice. The history of stagecraft, safety precautions, lighting, costumes, scenery, career planning tips, and more are discussed, illustrated by beautiful color examples that display step-by-step procedures and the finished product. This second edition offers even more in-demand information on stage management, drawing and drafting (both by hand and CAD), lighting fixtures, and special effects. Also new to this edition are current articles from Lighting and Sound America, brand new diagrams that illustrate hard-to-grasp concepts, and a plethora of information on European conversions, standards, and practices, making the skills you learn applicable to stage jobs on either side of the ocean! The accompanying website, www.stagecraftfundamentals.com is bursting with additional material such as an instructor's manual, exercises and study questions that coincide with chapters from the book, CAD drawings, color theory, manufacturing information, and so much more to help you along the way as you learn all about the world of theatre production! Praise for the Book:Beautifully written! The author has succeeded in relaying technical theatre information without being too technical and putting the reader to sleep. I read three sentences and instantly knew this book was for me and the way I teach. When I think back on the insufferable intro to tech theatre books I had to read, I feel cheated I didn't have this one as a student. I will be using this text in my class! -- Rob Napoli, Designer and Technical Director at Penn State University, Berks Campus This text has temped me to return to teaching with a textbook for the first time in seven years. The language is both accessible and informal yet the text goes a long way in debunking some of the typical jargon that may alienate students just getting into the field, or trying it out for the first time. The illustrations (the text is full of them) coupled with the stories reinforce the fundamental information being conveyed. -- John Paul Devlin, Associate Professor of Theatre at Saint Michael's College What a great idea! Thank heavens someone is doing this for students at that impressionable age. That has been one of my mantras - education of teachers and students on the use of scenic materials. The teachers don't have enough time in college to learn and do everything they have to teach. Most get thrown into the theatre area by default and struggle with designing/building/painting the scenery. -- Jenny Knott, Rosco Stagecraft Fundamentals is beautifully illustrated throughout, and the pofusion of color on every page gives this textbook the appearance of a coffee table book. The writing is clear and personal, which should be very appealing to students. Rita Carver covers all aspects of theatre production from scenery, to lighting, to an actor's makeup. Her close ties to the New York theatre scene gives this book a special insight into the professional world, one that goes well beyond what is found in most college textbooks. -- John Holloway, Professor in the Theatre Department at the University of Kentucky and President of the International Association of Theatrical stage Employees (IATSE) Local 346. I can't thank you enough for Stagecraft Fundamentals. I have been teaching stagecraft since 1976 and you have saved me from the nightmare of writing a text to suit my class needs..After two semesters with your text, I have found that I had more time to develop the skills necessary within the classroom than before. The humor that you have infused in the book has enticed my students to read on. That alone makes this text invaluable.--Meta Lasch, Assistant Professor, West Liberty University

Stagecraft Fundamentals: A Guide and Reference for Theatrical Production

by Rita Kogler Carver

Stagecraft Fundamentals tackles every aspect of basic theatre production with Rita Kogler Carver’s signature wit and engaging voice. The history of stagecraft, safety precautions, lighting, costumes, scenery, career planning tips, and more are discussed, illustrated by beautiful color examples that both display step-by-step procedures and break with the traditionally boring black and white introductory theatre book. This third edition improves upon the last, featuring three new chapters on design for props, projection, and touring. Also included are new end-of-chapter questions and an expanded discussion on LED lighting, stage automation, digital technology, stage management, makeup, theatre management, and sound design. This is the must have introductory theatre production book.

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Showing 5,776 through 5,800 of 6,945 results