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The Shakespeare Name Dictionary

by J. Madison Davis Daniel A. Frankforter

First published in 2004. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Shakespeare / Not Shakespeare

by Christy Desmet Natalie Loper Jim Casey

This essay collection addresses the paradox that something may at once "be" and "not be" Shakespeare. This phenomenon can be a matter of perception rather than authorial intention: audiences may detect Shakespeare where the author disclaims him or have difficulty finding him where he is named. Douglas Lanier's "Shakespearean rhizome," which co-opts Deleuze and Guattari's concept of artistic relations as rhizomes (a spreading, growing network that sprawls horizontally to defy hierarchies of origin and influence) is fundamental to this exploration. Essays discuss the fine line between "Shakespeare" and "not Shakespeare" through a number of critical lenses--networks and pastiches, memes and echoes, texts and paratexts, celebrities and afterlives, accidents and intertexts--and include a wide range of examples: canonical plays by Shakespeare, historical figures, celebrities, television performances and adaptations, comics, anime appropriations, science fiction novels, blockbuster films, gangster films, Shakesploitation and teen films, foreign language films, and non-Shakespearean classic films.

Shakespeare, Objects and Phenomenology: Daggers of the Mind (Palgrave Shakespeare Studies)

by Susan Sachon

This book explores ways in which Shakespeare’s writing strategies shape our embodied perception of objects – both real and imaginary – in four of his plays. Taking the reader on a series of perceptual journeys, it engages in an exciting dialogue between the disciplines of phenomenology, cognitive studies, historicist research and modern acting techniques, in order to probe our sentient and intuitive responses to Shakespeare’s language. What happens when we encounter objects on page and stage; and how we can imagine that impact in performance? What influences might have shaped the language that created them; and what do they reveal about our response to what we see and hear? By placing objects under the phenomenological lens, and scrutinising them as vital conduits between lived experience and language, this book illuminates Shakespeare’s writing as a rich source for investigation into the way we think, feel and communicate as embodied beings.

Shakespeare on Screen

by Sarah Hatchuel Vienne-Guerrin Nathalie

The first volume in the re-launched series Shakespeare on Screen is devoted to Othello, offering up-to-date coverage of recent screen versions as well as new critical essays on older, canonical films. An international cast of authors explores not only productions from the USA and UK, but also translations, adaptations and appropriations in Qu#65533;bec, Italy, India, Brazil and Mexico. The volume takes part in the ceaseless cultural investigation of what Othello says about Shakespeare, the past and our present time, supported by an invaluable film-bibliography. Accompanying free online resources include a fuller version of the bibliography and an additional contribution on YouTube versions of Othello. This book will be a valuable resource for students, scholars and teachers of film studies and Shakespeare studies.

Shakespeare on Screen Othello

by Hatchuel, Sarah and Vienne-Guerrin, Nathalie Sarah Hatchuel Nathalie Vienne-Guerrin

"The first volume in the re-launched series Shakespeare on Screen is devoted to Othello, offering up-to-date coverage of recent screen versions as well as new critical essays on older, canonical films. An international cast of authors explores not only productions from the USA and UK, but also translations, adaptations and appropriations in Québec, Italy, India, Brazil and Mexico. The volume takes part in the ceaseless cultural investigation of what Othello says about Shakespeare, the past and our present time, supported by an invaluable film-bibliography. Accompanying free online resources include a fuller version of the bibliography and an additional contribution on YouTube versions of Othello. This book will be a valuable resource for students, scholars and teachers of film studies and Shakespeare studies"--

Shakespeare On Stage and Off

by Kenneth Graham Alysia Kolentsis

Today, debates about the cultural role of the humanities and the arts are roiling. Responding to renewed calls to reassess the prominence of canonical writers, Shakespeare On Stage and Off introduces new perspectives on why and how William Shakespeare still matters. <p><p>Lively and accessible, the book considers what it means to play, work, and live with Shakespeare in the twenty-first century. Contributors – including Antoni Cimolino, artistic director of the Stratford Festival – engage with contemporary stagings of the plays, from a Trump-like Julius Caesar in New York City to a black Iago in Stratford-upon-Avon and a female Hamlet on the Toronto stage, and explore the effect of performance practices on understandings of identity, death, love, race, gender, class, and culture. Providing an original approach to thinking about Shakespeare, some essays ask how the knowledge and skills associated with working lives can illuminate the playwright's works. Other essays look at ways of interacting with Shakespeare in the digital age, from Shakespearean resonances in Star Trek and Indian films to live broadcasts of theatre performances, social media, and online instructional tools. Together, the essays in this volume speak to how Shakespeare continues to enrich contemporary culture. <p><p>A timely guide to the ongoing importance of Shakespearean drama, Shakespeare On Stage and Off surveys recent developments in performance, adaptation, popular culture, and education. <p><p>Contributors include Russell J. Bodi (Owens State Community College), Christie Carson (Royal Holloway University of London), Brandon Christopher (University of Winnipeg), Antoni Cimolino (Stratford Festival), Jacob Claflin (College of Eastern Idaho), Lauren Eriks Cline (University of Michigan), David B. Goldstein (York University), Gina Hausknecht (Coe College), Peter Holland (University of Notre Dame), R.W. Jones (University of Texas), Christina Luckyj (Dalhousie University), Julia Reinhard Lupton (University of California, Irvine), Linda McJannet (Bentley University), Roderick H. McKeown (University of Toronto), Hayley O'Malley (University of Michigan), Amrita Sen (University of Calcutta), Eric Spencer (The College of Idaho), Lisa S. Starks (University of South Florida St Petersburg), and Jeffrey R. Wilson (Harvard University).

Shakespeare On Stage and Off

by Kenneth Graham and Alysia Kolentsis

Today, debates about the cultural role of the humanities and the arts are roiling. Responding to renewed calls to reassess the prominence of canonical writers, Shakespeare On Stage and Off introduces new perspectives on why and how William Shakespeare still matters. Lively and accessible, the book considers what it means to play, work, and live with Shakespeare in the twenty-first century. Contributors - including Antoni Cimolino, artistic director of the Stratford Festival - engage with contemporary stagings of the plays, from a Trump-like Julius Caesar in New York City to a black Iago in Stratford-upon-Avon and a female Hamlet on the Toronto stage, and explore the effect of performance practices on understandings of identity, death, love, race, gender, class, and culture. Providing an original approach to thinking about Shakespeare, some essays ask how the knowledge and skills associated with working lives can illuminate the playwright's works. Other essays look at ways of interacting with Shakespeare in the digital age, from Shakespearean resonances in Star Trek and Indian films to live broadcasts of theatre performances, social media, and online instructional tools. Together, the essays in this volume speak to how Shakespeare continues to enrich contemporary culture. A timely guide to the ongoing importance of Shakespearean drama, Shakespeare On Stage and Off surveys recent developments in performance, adaptation, popular culture, and education. Contributors include Russell J. Bodi (Owens State Community College), Christie Carson (Royal Holloway University of London), Brandon Christopher (University of Winnipeg), Antoni Cimolino (Stratford Festival), Jacob Claflin (College of Eastern Idaho), Lauren Eriks Cline (University of Michigan), David B. Goldstein (York University), Gina Hausknecht (Coe College), Peter Holland (University of Notre Dame), R.W. Jones (University of Texas), Christina Luckyj (Dalhousie University), Julia Reinhard Lupton (University of California, Irvine), Linda McJannet (Bentley University), Roderick H. McKeown (University of Toronto), Hayley O'Malley (University of Michigan), Amrita Sen (University of Calcutta), Eric Spencer (The College of Idaho), Lisa S. Starks (University of South Florida St Petersburg), and Jeffrey R. Wilson (Harvard University).

Shakespeare on the Double! Julius Caesar

by William Shakespeare Mary Ellen Snodgrass

"But, for my own part, it was Greek to me. " Now you can appreciate Julius Caesar in plain English. Political intrigue. Ambition. Envy. Conspiracy. Hypocrisy. Betrayal. Assassination. Pride. Suicide. The Ides of March. The tides of war. Julius Caesar makes today's political scene seem boring! If the original text seems Greek (or geek) to you, now you can read and enjoy it in a modern translation that's easy to understand. Special aids make following the action and grasping the meaning a snap: A brief synopsis of the plot and action A comprehensive character list that describes the characteristics, motivations, and actions of each major player A visual character map that shows the relationships of major characters A cycle-of-death graphic that pinpoints the sequence of deaths and includes who dies, how they die, and why Reflective questions that help you understand the themes of the play Shakespeare on the Double! Julius Caesar helps you appreciate this play and the sad, oft-quoted question, "Et tu, Brute?"

Shakespeare on the University Stage

by Andrew James Hartley

Featuring essays from seventeen international scholars, this exciting new collection is the first sustained study of Shakespeare on the university and college stage. Treating the subject both historically and globally, the essays describe theatrical conditions that fit neither the professional nor the amateur models and show how student performances provide valuable vehicles for artistic construction and intellectual analysis. The book redresses the neglect of this distinctive form of Shakespeare performance, opening up new ways of thinking about the nature and value of university production and its ability to draw unique audiences. Looking at productions across the world - from Asia to Europe and North America - it will interest scholars as well as upper-level students in areas such as Shakespeare studies, performance studies and theatre history.

Shakespeare Only

by Jeffrey Knapp

Three decades of controversy in Shakespeare studies can be summed up in a single question: Was Shakespeare one of a kind? On one side of the debate are the Shakespeare lovers, the bardolatrists, who insist on Shakespeare's timeless preeminence as an author. On the other side are the theater historians who view modern claims of Shakespeare's uniqueness as a distortion of his real professional life. In Shakespeare Only, Knapp draws on an extraordinary array of historical evidence to reconstruct Shakespeare's authorial identity as Shakespeare and his contemporaries actually understood it. He argues that Shakespeare tried to adapt his own singular talent and ambition to the collaborative enterprise of drama by imagining himself as uniquely embodying the diverse, fractious energies of the popular theater. Rewriting our current histories of authorship as well as Renaissance drama, Shakespeare Only recaptures a sense of the creative force that mass entertainment exerted on Shakespeare and that Shakespeare exerted on mass entertainment.

Shakespeare, Origins and Originality (Shakespeare Survey vol. #68)

by Peter Holland

1. Shakespeare's anecdotal character Margreta de Grazia 2. What is a source? Or, how Shakespeare read His Marlowe Laurie Maguire and Emma Smith 3. Imitation or collaboration? Marlowe and the early Shakespeare canon Gary Taylor and John V. Nance 4. 'O Jephthah, judge of Israel': from original to accreted meanings in Hamlet's allusion Péter Dávidházi 5. The elephants' graveyard revisited: Shakespeare at work in Antony and Cleopatra, Romeo and Juliet and All's Well That Ends Well Catherine Belsey 6. 'Every like is not the same': translating Shakespeare in Spanish today Alfredo Michel Modenessi 7. Reading originals by the light of translations Tom Cheesman 8. 'My name is Will': Shakespeare's sonnets and autobiography Stanley Wells 9. Tracings and data in The Tempest: author, world and representation Janet Clare 10. Shakespearean gesture: narrative and iconography Farah Karim-Cooper 11. The origin of the late Renaissance dramatic convention of self-addressed speech James Hirsh 12. Reading in their present: early readers and the origins of Shakespearian appropriation Jean-Christophe Mayer 13. Shakespeare out of time (or, Hugo takes dictation from the beyond) Ruth Morse 14. Betrayal, derail, or a thin veil: the myth of origin Bi-qi Beatrice Lei 15. Global Shakespeares, affective histories, cultural memories Jyotsna G. Singh and Abdulhamit Arvas 16. Spinach and tobacco: making Shakespearian unoriginals Peter Holland 17. Ren Fest Shakespeare: the cosplay Bard Andrew James Hartley 18. 'Dead as earth': contemporary topicality and myths of origin in King Lear and The Shadow King Kate Flaherty 19. Shakespeare and the idea of national theatres Michael Dobson 20. John Rice and the boys of the Jacobean King's Men David Kathman 21. Shakespeare's Irish lives: the politics of biography Andrew Murphy 22. Shakespeare in blockaded Berlin: the 1948 'Elizabethan Festival' Bettina Boecker 23. Connecting the Globe: actors, audience and entrainment Robert Shaughnessy 24. 'Freetown!': Shakespeare and social flourishing Ewan Fernie 25. We'll always have Paris: the third household and the 'bed of death' in Romeo and Juliet Nicholas Crawford 26. The 'serpent of old Nile': Cleopatra and the pragmatics of reported speech Jelena Marelj 27. 'This insubstantial pageant faded': the drama of semiotic anxiety in The Tempest Lynn Forest-Hill 28. Shakespeare performances in England 2014 Carol Chillington Rutter 29. Professional Shakespeare productions in the British Isles, January–December 2013 James Shaw The year's contribution to Shakespeare studies: 1. Critical studies Charlotte Scott 2. Shakespeare in performance Russell Jackson 3. Editions and textual studies Peter Kirwan.

Shakespeare, Our Contemporary

by Jan Kott

Shakespeare, Our Contemporary is a provocative, original study of the major plays of Shakespeare. More than that, it is one of the few critical works to have strongly influenced theatrical productions.Peter Brook and Charles Marowitz are among the many directors who have acknowledged their debt to Jan Kott, finding in his analogies between Shakespearean situations and those in modern life and drama the seeds of vital new stage conceptions. Shakespeare, Our Contemporary has been translated into nineteen languages since it appeared in 1961, and readers all over the world have similarly found their responses to Shakespeare broadened and enriched.

Shakespeare Performance Studies

by W. B. Worthen

Taking a 'performance studies' perspective on Shakespearean theatre, W. B. Worthen argues that the theatrical event represents less an inquiry into the presumed meanings of the text than an effort to frame performance as a vehicle of cultural critique. Using contemporary performances as test cases, Worthen explores the interfaces between the origins of Shakespeare's writing as literature and as theatre, the modes of engagement with Shakespeare's plays for readers and spectators, and the function of changing performance technologies on our knowledge of Shakespeare. This book not only provides the material for performance analysis, but places important contemporary Shakespeare productions in dialogue with three influential areas of critical discourse: texts and authorship, the function of character in cognitive theatre studies, and the representation of theatre and performing in the digital humanities. This book will be vital reading for scholars and advanced students of Shakespeare and of Performance Studies.

Shakespeare Reproduced: The text in history and ideology

by Jean E Howard Marion F O’Connor

First published in 1987. The essays in Shakespeare Reproduced offer a political critique of Shakespeare's writings and the uses to which those writings are put Some of the essays focus on Shakespeare in his own time and consider how his plays can be seen to reproduce or subvert the cultural orthodoxies and the power relations of the late Renaissance. Others examine the forces which have produced an overtly political criticism of Shakespeare and of his use in culture. Contributors include: Jean E Howard and Marion O'Connor, Walter Cohen, Don E Wayne, Thomas Cartelli, Peter Erickson, Karen Newman, Thomas Moisan, Michael D Bristol, Thomas Sorge, Jonathan Goldberg, Robert Weimann, Margaret Ferguson.

Shakespeare Retold

by E. Nesbit Antonio Javier Caparo

A beautifully illustrated collection of prose retellings of seven Shakespeare plays will bring the Bard to life for young readers. Not only is this a beautiful keepsake edition, full of gorgeous illustrations by Antonio Javier Caparo, but the prose retellings by beloved classic children's book author E. Nesbit are an excellent tool to introduce children to the complex language of Shakespeare.A foreword by John Lithgow touches on his own childhood as a Shakespearean actor and the importance of Shakespeare. The book contains extensive support materials, including a biography, a timeline of Shakespeare's life, and further recommended readings.In this volume, you will find:Romeo and JulietA Midsummer Night's DreamTwelfth NightHamletMacbethThe TempestMuch Ado About Nothing

Shakespeare, Revenge Tragedy and Early Modern Law: Vindictive Justice (Early Modern Literature in History)

by Derek Dunne

This book, the first to trace revenge tragedy's evolving dialogue with early modern law, draws on changing laws of evidence, food riots, piracy, and debates over royal prerogative. By taking the genre's legal potential seriously, it opens up the radical critique embedded in the revenge tragedies of Kyd, Shakespeare, Marston, Chettle and Middleton.

Shakespeare, Rhetoric and Cognition

by Raphael Lyne

Raphael Lyne addresses a crucial Shakespearean question: why do characters in the grip of emotional crises deliver such extraordinarily beautiful and ambitious speeches? How do they manage to be so inventive when they are perplexed? Their dense, complex, articulate speeches at intensely dramatic moments are often seen as psychological - they uncover and investigate inwardness, character and motivation - and as rhetorical - they involve heightened language, deploying recognisable techniques. Focusing on A Midsummer Night's Dream, Othello, Cymbeline and the Sonnets, Lyne explores both the psychological and rhetorical elements of Shakespeare's language. In the light of cognitive linguistics and cognitive literary theory he shows how Renaissance rhetoric could be considered a kind of cognitive science, an attempt to map out the patterns of thinking. His study reveals how Shakespeare's metaphors and similes work to think, interpret and resolve, and how their struggle to do so results in extraordinary poetry.

The Shakespeare Riots

by Nigel Cliff

One of the bloodiest incidents in New York’s history, the so-called Astor Place Riot of May 10, 1849, was ignited by a long-simmering grudge match between the two leading Shakespearean actors of the age. Despite its unlikely origins, though, there was nothing remotely quaint about this pivotal moment in history–the unprecedented shooting by American soldiers of dozens of their fellow citizens, leading directly to the arming of American police forces. The Shakespeare Riotsrecounts the story of this momentous night, its two larger-than-life protagonists, and the myriad political and cultural currents that fueled the violence. In an engrossing narrative that moves at a breakneck pace from the American frontier to the Mississippi River, to the posh theaters of London, to the hangouts of the most notorious street gangs of the day, Nigel Cliff weaves a spellbinding saga of soaring passions, huge egos, and venal corruption. Cliff charts the course of this tragedy from its beginnings as a somewhat comical contretemps between Englishman William Charles Macready, the haughty lion of the London stage, and Edwin Forrest, the first great American star and a popular hero to millions. Equally celebrated, and equally self-centered, the two were once friends, then adversaries. Exploiting this rivalry, “nativist” agitators organized mobs of bullyboys to flex their muscle by striking a blow against the foppish Macready and the Old World’s cultural hegemony that he represented. The moment Macready took the stage in New York, his adversaries sprang into action, first by throwing insults, then rotten eggs, then chairs. When he dared show his face again, an estimated twenty thousand packed the streets around the theater. As cobblestones from outside rained down on the audience, National Guard troops were called in to quell the riot. Finding themselves outmatched, the Guardsmen discharged their weapons at the crowd, with horrific results. When the smoke cleared, as many as thirty people lay dead, with scores more wounded. The Shakespeare Riotsis social and cultural history of the highest order. In this wondrous saga Nigel Cliff immerses readers in the bustle of mid-nineteenth-century New York, re-creating the celebrity demimonde of the day and capturing all the high drama of a violent night that robbed a nation of its innocence.

Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet, and Civic Life: The Boundaries of Civic Space (Routledge Studies in Shakespeare)

by Silvia Bigliazzi Lisanna Calvi

This volume introduces ‘civic Shakespeare’ as a new and complex category entailing the dynamic relation between the individual and the community on issues of authority, liberty, and cultural production. It investigates civic Shakespeare through Romeo and Juliet as a case study for an interrogation of the limits and possibilities of theatre and the idea of the civic. The play’s focus on civil strife, political challenge, and the rise of a new conception of the individual within society makes it an ideal site to examine how early modern civic topics were received and reconfigured on stage, and how the play has triggered ever new interpretations and civic performances over time. The essays focus on the way the play reflects civic life through the dramatization of issues of crisis and reconciliation when private and public spaces are brought to conflict, but also concentrate on the way the play has subsequently entered the public space of civic life. Set within the fertile context of performance studies and inspired by philosophical and sociological approaches, this book helps clarify the role of theatre within civic space while questioning the relation between citizens as spectators and the community. The wide-ranging chapters cover problems of civil interaction and their onstage representation, dealing with urban and household spaces; the boundaries of social relations and legal, economic, political, and religious regulation; and the public dimension of memory and celebration. This volume articulates civic Romeo and Juliet from the sources of genre to contemporary multicultural performances in political contact-zones and civic ‘Shakespaces,’ exploring the Bard and this play within the context of communal practices and their relations with institutions and civic interests.

Shakespeare, Spenser, Donne: Renaissance Essays

by Frank Kermode

First published in 1971. This collection of essays discusses some of the central works and areas of literature in the Renaissance period of cultural history. Contents include: Spenser and the Allegorists; The Faerie Queene, I and V; The Cave of Mammon; The Banquet of Sense; John Donne; The Patience of Shakespeare; Survival fo the Classic; Shakespeare's Learning; The Mature Comedies; The Final Plays.

The Shakespeare Stealer

by Gary Blackwood

Widge is an orphan with a rare talent for shorthand. His fearsome master has just one demand: steal Shakespeare's play "Hamlet"--or else. Widge has no choice but to follow orders, so he works his way into the heart of the Globe Theatre, where Shakespeare's players perform. As full of twists and turns as a London alleyway, this entertaining novel is rich in period details, colorful characters, villainy, and drama."A fast-moving historical novel that introduces an important era with casual familiarity." --School Library Journal, starred review

The Shakespeare Stealer

by Gary Blackwood

Fourteen year-old Widge has very little going for him, no family, no real name, but he can write shorthand and that is a very valuable asset to the man who wants to steal William Shakespeare's play Hamlet. In those days there was only one copy of the play script, and that was jealously guarded at the Globe Theatre, London by Shakespeare's company of players. Widge sets off for London, accompanied by Falconer, a cruel and fearsome cutthroat whose job is to make sure that the mission is accomplished, no matter what the cost. But Widge gets so caught up in the play that soon all that matters to him is whether Hamlet will take action to avenge his father, and he forgets his task. Then his notebook is stolen. Under threat from Falconer, he manages to work his way into the troupe of actors, who befriend him and, for the first time, make him feel part of a family. How can he betray them now?

The Shakespeare Stealer

by Gary L. Blackwood

Widge is an orphan with a rare talent for shorthand. His fearsome master has just one demand: steal Shakespeare's play "Hamlet"--or else. Widge has no choice but to follow orders, so he works his way into the heart of the Globe Theatre, where Shakespeare's players perform. As full of twists and turns as a London alleyway, this entertaining novel is rich in period details, colorful characters, villainy, and drama.

Shakespeare Studies Today

by Edward Pechter

The Romantics invented Shakespeare studies, and in losing contact with our origins, we have not been able to develop an adequate alternative foundation on which to build our work. This book asserts that among Shakespeareans at present, the level of conviction required to sustain a healthy critical practice is problematically if not dangerously low, and the qualities which the Romantics valued in an engagement with Shakespeare are either ignored these days or fundamentally misunderstood.

Shakespeare Survey: Volume 62, Close Encounters with Shakespeare's Text

by Peter Holland

Shakespeare Survey is a yearbook of Shakespeare studies and production. Since 1948 Survey has published the best international scholarship in English and many of its essays have become classics of Shakespeare criticism. Each volume is devoted to a theme, or play, or group of plays; each also contains a section of reviews of the previous year's textual and critical studies and of major British performances. The books are illustrated with a variety of Shakespearean images and production photographs. The current editor of Survey is Peter Holland. The first eighteen volumes were edited by Allardyce Nicoll, numbers 19-33 by Kenneth Muir and numbers 34-52 by Stanley Wells. The virtues of accessible scholarship and a keen interest in performance, from Shakespeare's time to our own, have characterized the journal from the start. For the first time, numbers 1-50 are being reissued in paperback, available separately and as a set.<P> The theme for volume 62 is 'Close Encounters with Shakespeare's Text'. The complete set of Survey volumes is also available online at http://www.cambridge.org/online/shakespearesurvey. This fully-searchable resource enables users to browse by author, essay and volume, search by play, theme and topic, and save and bookmark their results.

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