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What The Bellhop Saw

by Jane Milmore Billy Van Zandt

Farce / 8m, 4f / Interior / A nice fellow checks into an expensive suite in New York City's finest hotel, precipitating a fantastic nightmare involving a Salman Rushdie type author, an Iranian terrorist, a shrew like woman, a conniving bellboy, an incompetent F.B.I. agent, a nubile celebrity mad maid, a dimwitted secretary and a little pig tailed girl. Gag lines are popping as events transpire at a whirlwind velocity. Topical humor blends with the traditional antics of farce: doors slamming, characters careening and confusion reigning supreme.

What Blest Genius?: The Jubilee That Made Shakespeare

by Andrew McConnell Stott

The remarkable, ridiculous, rain-soaked story of Shakespeare’s Jubilee: the event that established William Shakespeare as the greatest writer of all time. The remarkable, ridiculous, rain-soaked story of Shakespeare’s Jubilee: the event that established William Shakespeare as the greatest writer of all time. In September 1769, three thousand people descended on Stratford-upon-Avon to celebrate the artistic legacy of the town’s most famous son, William Shakespeare. Attendees included the rich and powerful, the fashionable and the curious, eligible ladies and fortune hunters, and a horde of journalists and profiteers. For three days, they paraded through garlanded streets, listened to songs and oratorios, and enjoyed masked balls. It was a unique cultural moment—a coronation elevating Shakespeare to the throne of genius. Except it was a disaster. The poorly planned Jubilee imposed an army of Londoners on a backwater hamlet peopled by hostile and superstitious locals, unable and unwilling to meet their demands. Even nature refused to behave. Rain fell in sheets, flooding tents and dampening fireworks, and threatening to wash the whole town away. Told from the dual perspectives of David Garrick, who masterminded the Jubilee, and James Boswell, who attended it, What Blest Genius? is rich with humor, gossip, and theatrical intrigue. Recounting the absurd and chaotic glory of those three days in September, Andrew McConnell Stott illuminates the circumstances in which William Shakespeare became a transcendent global icon.

What I Meant Was

by Craig Lucas

A major new collection by the author of Reckless and A Prelude to a Kiss, this collection includes his most ambitious work God's Heart, which premiered at Lincoln Center Theatre in 1997, and his newest play The Dying Gaul, which premieres this spring in New York. Also included ar 13 one-act plays written over the past five years.

What If? Six Short Comedies

by Jay D. Hanagan

Contents: Extra Curricular Activity / Fancy Meeting You Here / Last Laugh / She With A Capital Ess / Ships / Young Love.

What is Scenography?

by Pamela Howard

"Pamela Howard's ground-breaking What is Scenography? was the first book to set out the bold new approaches to designing and directing for theatre which had dazzled audiences in Europe during the previous decades. It did us all a service by enriching the scope of how we understand the aesthetics of the stage. The lavish new materials (drawings, colour photos, new production analysis) included in this second edition make it even more essential for anyone interested in new developments in theatre." - David Bradby "To write, design, organize, manage, sculpt, educate, paint, research and above all, to passionately live the life of the performance is what Pamela has done throughout her whole career and, in one way or another, it is reflected here in this book: the universality of stage design, its elements and its soul." - Ramon Ivars "Gives an excellent sense of scenography and a window on a life in the theatre - which is fascinating. ...A superb book." - Professor Arnold Aronson, Columbia University, USA "Pamela Howard is the precise definition of what a scenographer of today should be: a multiple artist. Her vast experience with space, her rare and acute power of reflection, her workshops worldwide, her masterful control of drawing and painting and her ability to interconnect scenography with other artistic expressions qualify her to discuss with great authority what "space for staging" should be in the coming decades of this millennium." - Jose Carlos SerroniPamela Howard's What is Scenography? has become a classic text in contemporary theatre design and performance practice. In this second edition, the author expands on her holistic analysis of scenography as comprising space, text, research, art, performers, directors and spectators, to examine the changing nature of scenography in the twenty-first century. The book includes: case studies and anecdotes from Howard's own celebrated career illustrations of her own recent work, in full colour throughout an updated 'world view' of scenography, with definitions from the world's most famous and influential scenographers A direct and personal response to the question of how to define scenography by one of the world's leading practitioners, What is Scenography? continues to shape the work of visual theatremakers throughout the world.

What is Scenography? (Theatre Concepts Ser.)

by Pamela Howard

The third edition of Pamela Howard’s What is Scenography? expands on the author’s holistic analysis of scenography as comprising space, text, research, art, performers, directors and spectators, to examine the changing nature of scenography in the twenty-first century. The book includes new investigations of recent production projects from Howard’s celebrated career, including Carmen and Charlotte: A Tri-Coloured Play with Music, full-colour illustrations of her recent work and updated commentary from a wide spectrum of contemporary theatre makers. This book is suitable for students in Scenography and Theatre Design courses, along with professional theatrical designers.

What Is Susan's Secret?

by Michael Parker Susan Parker

Characters: 3-7 male, 3-7 femaleFarceInterior The Cider Mill Inn is an old, rustic and somewhat run down country inn owned and operated by an endearing elderly couple, Michael and Susan Edwards. At first they appear to be bordering on senility. We quickly learn however that they are very clever con artists, preying on their unsuspecting guests, by advertising huge discounts to various tradesmen. Using an elaborate check-in form with duplicate copies, guests are, in fact, signing a work contract, requiring them to perform various tasks and improvements at the inn. Over the course of three weekends, plumbers, tile layers, carpenters and electricians are recruited to do work they never expected.This unique play offers theatres the opportunity for the other twelve characters (Besides Susan and Michael) to be played by either two males and two females, or twelve different actors, or any number in between. The characters vary from the world's most boring man, (his wife says he's had charisma bypass surgery), to a young couple on their honeymoon. Audiences will fall in love with each of these distinctive characters, but especially the loving relationship between the two main characters, Michael and Susan, so touching that this play might be called a love story, if it wasn't first and foremost a farce.So, what is Susan's secret? On this subject the authors remain silent, preferring instead to let the audience decide on the truth, which of course, in a Parker play, is only revealed in the last few seconds of the show.

What is the Theatre?

by Christian Biet Christophe Triau

What is the Theatre? is one of the most coherent and systematic descriptions and analyses of the theatre yet compiled. Theatre is, above all, spectacle. It is a fleeting performance, delivered by actors and intended for spectators. It is a work of the body, an exercise of voice and gesture addressed to an audience, most often in a specific location and with a unique setting. This entertainment event rests on the delivery of a thing promised and expected – a particular and unique performance witnessed by spectators who have come to the site of the performance for this very reason. To witness theatre is to take into account the performance, but it is also to take into account the printed text as readable object and a written proposition. In this book, Christian Biet and Christophe Triau focus on the practical, theoretical and historical positions that the spectator and the reader have had in relation to the locations that they frequent and the texts that they handle. They adopt two approaches: analysing the spectacle in its theatrical and historical context in an attempt to seek out the principles and paradigms of approaching the theatre experience on one hand, and analysing the dramaturgy of a production in order to establish lines of interpretation and how to read, represent and stage a text, on the other. This approach allows us to better understand the ties that link those who participate in the theatre to the practitioners who create theatrical entertainment.

What Mama Said: An Epic Drama

by Osonye Onwueme

An explosive political drama projecting an African people's revolutionary struggle to confront government forces and foreign oil corporations that have ravaged their land and strangled the voices of their mothers and daughters.

What Playwrights Talk About When They Talk About Writing

by Jeffrey Sweet

The art and craft of playwriting as explored in candid conversations with some of the most important contemporary dramatists Edward Albee, Lanford Wilson, Lynn Nottage, A. R. Gurney, and a host of other major creative voices of the theater discuss the art of playwriting, from inspiration to production, in a volume that marks the tenth anniversary of the Yale Drama Series and the David Charles Horn Foundation Prize for emerging playwrights. Jeffrey Sweet, himself an award-winning dramatist, hosts a virtual roundtable of perspectives on how to tell stories onstage featuring extensive interviews with a gallery of gifted contemporary dramatists. In their own words, Arthur Kopit, Marsha Norman, Christopher Durang, David Hare, and many others offer insights into all aspects of the creative writing process as well as their personal views on the business, politics, and fraternity of professional theater. This essential work will give playwrights and playgoers alike a deeper and more profound appreciation of the art form they love.

What The Rabbi Saw

by Jane Milmore Billy Van Zandt

Farce / 7m, 4f / Interior / Adrienne Barbeau headed the cast of this crazy slapstick farce which takes pre wedding jitters to nightmare proportions. In a posh New York hotel just before Walter and Wendy are scheduled to say "I do", Walter's zipper becomes attached to his bride's sister's dress during a last minute act of infidelity. Meanwhile Wendy is having a fling with the best man. This finely tuned exercise in physical comedy zips from one hilarious situation as all try to hide their exploits and make it to the church on time.

What They Don't Teach You at Film School: 161 Strategies For Making Your Own Movie No Matter What

by Camille Landau Tiara White

<p>Two filmmakers who've beaten the system give the real dope on what it takes to get your movie made. <p>Do you have to go to film school to get your movies made? No, say two young entrepreneurs who survived the grind. Here they offer 140 strategies for making movies no matter what. Amateurs as well as seasoned veterans can pick up this entertaining and incredibly useful guide in any place--at any point of crisis--and find tactics that work. Whether it's raising money or cutting your budget; dealing with angry landlords or angry cops; or jump-starting the production or stalling it while you finish the script, these strategies are delivered with funny, illustrative anecdotes from the authors' experiences and from veteran filmmakers eager to share their stories. Irreverent, invaluable, and a lot cheaper than a year's tuition, this friendly guide is the smartest investment any future filmmaker could make. <p>Strategies from the book include: Love your friends for criticizing your work--especially at the script stage; Shyness won't get you the donuts; Duct tape miracles; Don't fall in love with cast or crew (but if you do...).

What They Don't Tell You About: William Shakespeare

by Anita Ganeri

Did you know that Shakespeare couldn't spell his own surname? Love him or hate him, everyone has heard of the world's most famous playwright. But did the Elizabethans think he was a genius or simply that he wrote great soap operas? Any book on Shakespeare will give you the boring facts THEY think you should know, but only this one will tell you what the bard and his mates were REALLY like ... Uncover a wealth of information about Shakespeare! Find out where he was born and look at his family tree, see a map of Shakespeare's Stratford and Shakespeare's London, find out what school was like in Shakespeare's time, what London life was like and what sort of people went to the theatre. See a cross-section illustration of the Globe and discover how special effects were created and what actors wore. Read biographies of famous actors of the era such as Edward Alleyn, Richard Burbage, Richard Tarlton and William Kempe as well as biographies of contemporary writers Ben Jonson, Thomas Kyd and Christopher Marlowe. Read famous quotes and sayings and whizz your eye over a timeline of Shakespeare's plays and of his life. This book will tell you what Shakespeare's longest or shortest play is, or even which is the most miserable or goriest? It includes plots and information about ten of Shakespeare's plays: Richard III; Romeo and Juliet; A Midsummer Night's Dream; The Merchant of Venice; Henry V; Twelfth Night; Hamlet; Othello; Macbeth and The Tempest. It highlights some of Shakespeare's funniest characters and some of those that were in love. It concludes looking at how Shakespeare died, and discusses whether Shakespeare was, in fact, Sir Francis Bacon, Edward De Vere, Roger Manners, William Stanley or Christopher Marlowe. Finally, test your knowledge of all you've read with a fun 20-question quiz.

What We Talk About When We Talk About Clone Club: Bioethics and Philosophy in Orphan Black

by Gregory E. Pence

What is the real-world history and science of human cloning, and does Orphan Black get it right? Can you "own" a person-even a cloned one? How can Sarah Manning be straight, Cosima gay, and Tony trans? Cult hit sci-fi show Orphan Black doesn't just entertain-it also raises fascinating questions about human cloning, its ethics, and its impact on personal identity.In What We Talk About When We Talk About Clone Club: Bioethics and Philosophy in Orphan Black, prominent bioethicist Gregory E. Pence violates Clone Club's first rule to take us deeper into the show and its connections to the real world, including:Widespread myths about human clones (and Orphan Black's rejection of them)Our ugly history of eugenicsThe ethics of human experimentation, by way of Projects Castor and LedaWhat we can learn about clones and identity from twin studies and tensions among Orphan Black's clone "sisters"Kendall Malone and other genetic anomaliesThe brave new world of genetic enhancement and clonal dynasties, and how Helena and Kira Manning fit inIn the process, What We Talk About When We Talk About Clone Club reveals why Orphan Black is some of today's most engaging and thought-provoking television.

What Would Barbra Do?

by Emma Brockes

Emma Brockes didn't always love musicals. In fact, she hated them. One of her earliest (and most painful) memories is of her mother singing "The Hills Are Alive" while young Emma crossed the street to go to her babysitting gig. According to her mother, the music would keep muggers at bay. According to Emma, it warded off friends, a social life, and any chance of being normal. As she grew older, however, these same songs continued to resonate in her head, first like a broken record and then as a fond reminder of her mother's love. Some people would slice off their arm with a plastic knife before they'd sit through Fiddler on the Roof or The Sound of Music. But musicals are everywhere, and it's about time someone asked why. From An American in Paris to Oklahoma!, Brockes explores the history, art, and politics of musicals, and how they have become an indelible part of our popular culture. Smartly written and incredibly witty, this is a book for people who understand that there are few situations in which the question "What would Barbra do?" doesn't have relevance, in a world much better lived to a soundtrack of show tunes. At the heart of What Would Barbra Do? is a touching story about a daughter, a mother, and how musicals kept them together. Part memoir, part musical history tour, it will keep you laughing and singing all at once.

What's The Story: Essays About Art, Theater And Storytelling

by Anne Bogart

Anne Bogart is an award-winning theatre maker, and a best-selling writer of books about theatre, art, and cultural politics. In this her latest collection of essays she explores the story-telling impulse, and asks how she, as a ‘product of postmodernism’, can reconnect to the primal act of making meaning and telling stories. She also asks how theatre practitioners can think of themselves not as stagers of plays but ‘orchestrators of social interactions’ and participants in an on-going dialogue about the future.

What's the Story: Essays about art, theater and storytelling

by Anne Bogart

Anne Bogart is an award-winning theatre maker, and a best-selling writer of books about theatre, art, and cultural politics. In this her latest collection of essays she explores the story-telling impulse, and asks how she, as a ‘product of postmodernism’, can reconnect to the primal act of making meaning and telling stories. She also asks how theatre practitioners can think of themselves not as stagers of plays but ‘orchestrators of social interactions’ and participants in an on-going dialogue about the future. We dream. And then occasionally we attempt to share our dreams with others. In recounting our dreams we try to construct a narrative... We also make stories out of our daytime existence. The human brain is a narrative creating machine that takes whatever happens and imposes chronology, meaning, cause and effect... We choose. We can choose to relate to our circumstances with bitterness or with openness. The stories that we tell determine nothing less than personal destiny. (From the introduction) This compelling new book is characteristically made up of chapters with one-word titles: Spaciousness, Narrative, Heat, Limits, Error, Politics, Arrest, Empathy, Opposition, Collaboration and Sustenance. In addition to dipping into neuroscience, performance theory and sociology, Bogart also recounts vivid stories from her own life. But as neuroscience indicates, the event of remembering what happened is in fact the creation of something new.

What’s the Worst Thing You Can Do to Shakespeare?

by Richard Burt

What's the worst thing you can do to Shakespeare? The answer is simple: don't read him. To that end, Richard Burt and Julian Yates embark on a project of un/reading the Bard, turning the conventional challenges into a roadmap for textual analysis and a thorough reconsideration of the plays in light of their absorption into global culture.

When Heroes Sing

by Sarah Nooter

This book examines the lyrical voice of Sophocles' heroes and argues that their identities are grounded in poetic identity and power. It begins by looking at how voice can be distinguished in Greek tragedy and by exploring ways that the language of tragedy was influenced by other kinds of poetry in late fifth-century Athens. In subsequent chapters, Professor Nooter undertakes close readings of Sophocles' plays to show how the voice of each hero is inflected by song and other markers of lyric poetry. She then argues that the heroes' lyrical voices set them apart from their communities and lend them the authority and abilities of poets. Close analysis of the Greek texts is supplemented by translations and discussions of poetic features more generally, such as apostrophe and address. This study offers new insight into the ways that Sophoclean tragedy inherits and refracts the traditions of other poetic genres.

When Is a Clock

by Matthew Freeman

Dramatic Comedy / 5m, 3f / Approximate running time: 1 hour and 45 minutes, no intermission. / Various settings, some real, some imaginary, in Pennsylvania / When Gordon's wife vanishes, the only clue to her whereabouts is a bookmark in dog-eared copy of Traveling to Montpelier. With little help to be found at work, from his son, or from the police, Gordon takes off to a rural bookstore to find some answers. His journey brings him to the town of Cornersville, in the wilds of Pennsylvania. Through a fractured narrative that is half-mystery and half-memory, we learn about Gordon’s marriage, his relationship with his son, his work-life and his wife’s bizarre entanglements with a mysterious stranger. We learn, too, about the nature of the landscape unique to the play: a magical universe with physics and laws that can both free the characters from their own stifling identities, and trap them as well. Synchronicity, dreams, and alchemy combine in this exploration of what it means to be able to – and unable to – change. At turns both scathingly funny and disturbingly compelling, When Is A Clock features Freeman's celebrated deconstruction of American culture - which has been called "nonviolent, though as savage as any slasher film" by the New York Times.

When She Danced (Plays Ser.)

by Martin Sherman

Drama \ 3m, 5f \ Interior \ New York's Playwrights Horizons had a success starring Elizabeth Ashley as the legendary Isadora Duncan. The acclaimed author of Bent brings us Paris 1923, and Duncan's desperate attempts to keep herself financially solvent to realize her dream of retirement : a school in Italy to teach young dancers her art while distracted by her mercurial husband, a poet who only speaks Russian, as well as various acolytes, through whose eyes we glimpse the greatness of Isadora "when she danced". \ "A fascinating play.... A comic portrait of a Bohemian salon in both joy and extremis, as the calling of high art meets the low farce of insistent creditors, ludicrous lovers and unexpected guests. The very inexplicability of Isadora's art becomes ... a stirring emblem of its mysterious power to endure."- The New York Times

When You Are Old: Early Poems, Plays, and Fairy Tales

by William Butler Yeats Rob Doggett

Recalling Yeats's 1890s fascination in aestheticism and the arts and crafts movement, selections will draw from the first published versions of poems from works such as Crossways, The Rose, The Wind Among the Reeds, In the Seven Woods, The Green Helmet and Other Poems, Responsibilities, The Wild Swans at Coole, and Michael Robartes and the Dancer. A selection Irish myths and fairytales including "The Wanderings of Oisin," a Celtic fable and his first major poem, represent his fascination with mysticism, spiritualism and the rich and imaginative heritage of his native land.

Where Do We Live and Other Plays

by Christopher Shinn

This anthology marks the emergence of one of the finest and most innovative new artists writing for the theater today. "The secret of Shinn's success is in the way he exploits the dramatic gap between what is said and that which is left unsaid . . . writing like this is rare," said the London Independent. Where Do We Live, the title play, was written shortly after 9/11 and though never referenced, it still haunts this chronicle of the struggles of several aspiring and gifted young New Yorkers on the Lower East Side. Like all his work, it is a deeply affecting story of how we define our lives and our place in the world.The Coming World "Shinn certainly looks like a shining prospect for the future."--Daily TelegraphFour "Nothing is simple emotionally. The play keeps delivering small shocks and aches that end in a standoff, or maybe in that pause between despair, resignation and a twinge of hope. Haunting."--Margo Jefferson, The New York TimesOther People "Shinn writes with graceful compassion about people trapped inside their own skins unable to make sense of their lives."--The GuardianWhat Didn't Happen ". . . is about the distance between people, and the ways in which even friends, spouses and lovers are ultimately unknowable to one another . . . a playwright to cherish."--The New York TimesChristopher Shinn's plays have been produced at Playwrights Horizons, Manhattan Theatre Club, the Vineyard Theatre in New York and often at London's Royal Court Theatre. Where Do We Live received a 2003 Olivier Award nomination for most promising playwright. His next play, On the Mountain, premieres in New York City early in 2005.

Where Is Broadway? (Where Is?)

by Francesco Sedita Douglas Yacka Who HQ

Take your seats, because Where Is Broadway? is ready to take center stage!In a lively and engaging style, authors Douglas Yacka and Francesco Sedita cover the development of the first theaters and the birth of the American musical, as well as the shows and stars that have become Broadway legends. Readers will get the inside story on their favorite shows and may even discover some new ones.

Where the Blood Mixes

by Kevin Loring

Where the Blood Mixes is meant to expose the shadows below the surface of the author's First Nations heritage, and to celebrate its survivors. Though torn down years ago, the memories of their Residential School still live deep inside the hearts of those who spent their childhoods there. For some, like Floyd, the legacy of that trauma has been passed down through families for generations. But what is the greater story, what lies untold beneath Floyd's alcoholism, under the pain and isolation of the play's main character?Loring's title was inspired by the mistranslation of the N'lakap'mux (Thompson) place name Kumsheen. For years, it was believed to mean "the place where the rivers meet"-the confluence of the muddy Fraser and the brilliant blue Thompson Rivers. A more accurate translation is: "the place inside the heart where the blood mixes." But Kumsheen also refers to a story: Coyote was disemboweled there, along a great cliff in an epic battle with a giant shape-shifting being that could transform the world with its powers-to this day his intestines can still be seen strewn along the granite walls. In his rage the transformer tore Coyote apart and scattered his body across the nation, his heart landing in the place where the rivers meet.Floyd is a man who has lost everyone he holds most dear. Now after more than two decades, his daughter Christine returns home to confront her father. Set during the salmon run, Where the Blood Mixes takes us to the bottom of the river, to the heart of a People.In 2009 Where the Blood Mixes won the Jessie Richardson Award for Outstanding Original Script; the Sydney J. Risk Prize for Outstanding Original Script by an Emerging Playwright; and most recently the Governor General's Literary Award for Drama.

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Showing 5,901 through 5,925 of 6,105 results