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Abraham Lincoln: The Great Emancipator (Childhood of Famous Americans Series)

by Augusta Stevenson

Using simple language that beginning readers can understand, this lively, inspiring, believable and fictionalized biography looks at the childhood of America's sixteenth president.

Abraham Lincoln (In Their Own Words)

by George Sullivan

Presents a biography, including excerpts from his speeches, letters, and other writings, of the man who was president during the Civil War.

Abraham Lincoln: The Man Behind the Myths

by Stephen B. Oates

Stephen B. Oates discerns the historical truth from the mythical legend that surrounds Lincoln in this original and fascinating portrait of America's 16th president.

Abraham Lincoln: The Prairie Years and the War Years (Volume II, The War Years 1861-1864)

by Carl Sandburg

He was a natural to write a biography of the prairie president. Sandburg has his roots there as well, and understood the plain speech, the wry humor, and the hard work. His portrayal of Lincoln had a quiet dignity about it and kept to the point, which was to describe how Lincoln grew up, read the law, took his ethics into the city, ran for office, waged war, and died just before he got to the promised land. Later biographies have emphasized Lincoln's psychology, or the rigors of his personal life, but Sandburg's portrait comes from two people of the prairie, himself and Lincoln.

Abraham Lincoln: The Prairie Years and the War Years (Volume III, The War Years 1864-1865)

by Carl Sandburg

The War years, 1864-1865, examines the bitter election of 1864, the conclusion of the War, the evolution of Lincoln's reconstruction policy, and finally the terrible assassination. Concluding volume of the 3-volume set.

Abraham Lincoln Quotes, Quips, and Speeches

by Abraham Lincoln Gordon Leidner

More than 140 years since his death, the enduring legacy of a great president, an American success story, and the celebrated leader of the Civil War continues. Abraham Lincoln: Quotes, Quips, and Speechescaptures the essence of the sixteenth president. In addition to Lincoln's own words, Gordon Leidner includes insights into the man by those who knew him best, from his wife, Mary Todd Lincoln, to his greatest political opponent, Stephen A. Douglas. Numerous photographs add to the charm and usefulness of the book.

Abraham Lincoln: Redeemer President

by Allen C. Guelzo

This major biography of Abraham Lincoln has won the prestigious Lincoln Prize, the annual award given to the best book in the Civil War field. Guelzo's superb work breaks new ground in exploring the role of ideas in Lincoln's life, treating him for the first time as a serious thinker deeply involved in the struggles of nineteenth-century thought.

Abraham Lincoln: Sixteenth President Of The United States

by Rebecca Stefoff

Surveys the childhood, education, employment, and political career of the Civil War president.

Abraham Lincoln, the Writer: A Treasury of His Greatest Speeches and Letters

by Abraham Lincoln Harold Holzer

A collection of speeches and letters of Abraham Lincoln, with brief introductions that provide historical background.

The Abraham Lincoln You Never Knew

by James Lincoln Collier

A biography of Abraham Lincoln that focuses on dispelling common misconceptions and emphasizes how he lived his life with wisdom and compassion.

Absaraka, Home of the Crows: Being the Experience of an Officer's Wife on the Plains

by Margaret Irvin Carrington

"With acknowledgments to Lieutenant-General Sherman, whose suggestions at Fort Kearney, in the spring of 1866, were adopted, in preserving a daily record of the events of a peculiarly eventful journey, and whose vigorous policy is as promising of the final settlement of Indian troubles and the quick completion of the Union Pacific Railroad as his "March to the Sea' was signal in crushing the last hope of armed rebellion, this narrative is respectfully dedicated. MARGRET IRVIN CARRINGTON.

Abu Nidal: A Gun for Hire

by Patrick Seale

British journalist Seale, distinguished as a Middle East specialist, details the Arab terrorist's career, the sources of his vast personal fortune, the motives behind his acts of terrorism and his ties to various Middle East and European governments.

The Accidental Billionaires: The Founding of Facebook: A Tale of Sex, Money, Genius and Betrayal

by Ben Mezrich

The high-energy tale of how two socially awkward Ivy Leaguers, trying to increase their chances with the opposite sex, ended up creating Facebook. Eduardo Saverin and Mark Zuckerberg were Harvard undergraduates and best friends-outsiders at a school filled with polished prep-school grads and long-time legacies. They shared both academic brilliance in math and a geeky awkwardness with women. Eduardo figured their ticket to social acceptance-and sexual success-was getting invited to join one of the university's Final Clubs, a constellation of elite societies that had groomed generations of the most powerful men in the world and ranked on top of the inflexible hierarchy at Harvard. Mark, with less of an interest in what the campus alpha males thought of him, happened to be a computer genius of the first order. Which he used to find a more direct route to social stardom: one lonely night, Mark hacked into the university's computer system, creating a ratable database of all the female students on campus-and subsequently crashing the university's servers and nearly getting himself kicked out of school. In that moment, in his Harvard dorm room, the framework for Facebook was born. What followed-a real-life adventure filled with slick venture capitalists, stunning women, and six-foot-five-inch identical-twin Olympic rowers-makes for one of the most entertaining and compelling books of the year. Before long, Eduardo's and Mark's different ideas about Facebook created in their relationship faint cracks, which soon spiraled into out-and-out warfare. The collegiate exuberance that marked their collaboration fell prey to the adult world of lawyers and money. The great irony is that while Facebook succeeded by bringing people together, its very success tore two best friends apart. The Accidental Billionairesis a compulsively readable story of innocence lost-and of the unusual creation of a company that has revolutionized the way hundreds of millions of people relate to one another. Ben Mezrich, a Harvard graduate, has published ten books, including theNew York TimesbestsellerBringing Down the House. He is a columnist forBoston Commonand a contributor forFlushmagazine. Ben lives in Boston with his wife, Tonya. From the Hardcover edition.

The Accidental Explorer: Wayfinding in Alaska

by Sherry Simpson

Alaska is a place of great adventure and exploration. After having lived in the Great Land for nearly all of her life, Sherry Simpson realized that she had not scaled mountains, trekked across wild tundra, or blazed trails through virgin forests. Did that fact make her less of an Alaskan? In the series of essays that comprise The Accidental Explorer, Sherry Simpson recounts the experiences of an ordinary woman confronting the great expanses of water and untracked land in Alaska, as she makes her best efforts to map her sense of place and her sense of self in a land that seems to require exploration of its inhabitants. While undertaking arduous treks into the backcountry, she falls into a glacial river and nearly drowns. On an archetypal epic solo hike, she ruminates constantly on when and whether she should abandon that folly. She writes with both humor and humility, harnessing great powers of observation of the natural world. In a downright scary encounter with a mildly aggressive bear, Simpson shrinks from any supposed Alaskan larger-than-life persona to assume her place on the food chain: an urbanized human who is appropriately afraid of big bears. Simpson also offers up the (less reverent) Alaskan view of Chris McCandles, the wanderer who perished in an abandoned bus near Denali, subject of Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer. Can an ordinary, not especially heroic, person be an adventurer? If she sets out, in a wild place like Alaska, what will she find out there, and what will she learn about the place back home? Throughout this compelling and probing book, Sherry Simpson illuminates the act of exploration as both a feat of extraordinary effort and as an everyday experience.

The Accidental Teacher: Life Lessons from My Silent Son

by Annie Lubliner Lehmann

A mother's honest, unvarnished, and touching memoir about the life lessons she learned from a son with autism

The Accompanist: An Autobiography of Andre Benoist

by Andre Benoist John Anthony Maltese

Benoist moved from France to the US and became the accompanist of musicians such as Jascha Heifetz and Albert Spalding, with many tours, recordings, concerts and broadcasts over decades.

The Account of Fray Juan Pobre's Residence in the Maríanas 1602

by Marjorie G. Driver

It was not whim or impulse that prompted the Franciscan Fray Juan Pobre de Zamora to jump ship in the Ladrones, or Maríana Islands, in 1602. Though not yet colonized, the islands had been known to the western world from the time of Ferdinand Magellan's visit in 1521, and they had been claimed for Spain by Miguel Lopez de Legaspi during his stopover at Guam while en route to the Philippines in 1565.

Ace Of Aces: The Life Of Capt. Eddie Rickenbacker

by H. Paul Jeffers

In this important new biography, acclaimed historian H. Paul Jeffers brings to vivid life one of the most daring and dramatic figures of twentieth century America-Medal of Honor recipient Capt. Eddie Rickenbacker. Born to immigrant parents with humble means at the turn of the century, Edward Rickenbacker was destined to embody the ingenuity, innovation, and courage that would make the United States a world power. Rickenbacker burst onto the national scene as one of the nation's first star race car drivers. In an era when tracks were rough and safety precautions virtually unknown, Rickenbacker pushed the fastest machines at terrifying speeds. Later in life, he would own the Indianapolis Speedway and help establish the sport of modern race car driving as we know it. But Rickenbacker's lasting fame came as an "Ace of Aces" in World War I, a fearless fighter pilot who would chase the "Flying Circus" of the legendary Red Baron above the battlefields of France. With his "Hat-in-the-Ring" squadron, Eddie was among the first to understand that the new technology of aviation would forever change the face of warfare. Shooting down twenty-six enemy planes in just seven months, he captured the hearts of a nation back home involved in its first Great War. Even after the war, he remained a national figure as one of the founders of Eastern Airlines. Turning his wartime experience to peacetime industry, Rickenbacker again led American interests in reshaping the world. And in one of the most dramatic chapters of World War II, a plane on which Rickenbacker flew as a civilian crash-landed in the Pacific Ocean. He survived as a castaway for twenty-four days before a rescue that defied the odds. Ace of Aces is the unparalleled story of a hero and the dramatic events that shaped our country and our history.

Acheson: The Secretary of State Who Created the American World

by James Chace

Acheson is the first complete biography of the most important and controversial secretary of state of the twentieth century. More than any other of the renowned "Wise Men" who together proposed our vision of the world in the aftermath of World War II, Dean Acheson was the quintessential man of action. Drawing on Acheson family diaries and letters as well as recent revelations from Russian and Chinese archives, historian James Chace traces Acheson's remarkable life, from his days as a schoolboy at Groton and his carefree life at Yale to his work for President Franklin Roosevelt on international financial policy and his unique partnership with President Truman. Acheson was a housemate of Cole Porter's at Harvard Law School, a protégé of Supreme Court justice Felix Frankfurter's, a friend of poet Archibald MacLeish's, a key adviser to General George Marshall, and a confidant of Winston Churchill's. Serving as Truman's secretary of state from 1949 to 1953, he was indeed "present at the creation," as he entitled his memoirs. More than any other of Truman's powerful and glamorous advisers, Acheson conceived the shape of the postwar world and mastered the policies that ensured its birth and endurance. He was the driving force behind the Truman Doctrine to contain the Soviet Union's expansionist ambitions; the Marshall Plan to rebuild the shattered economies of Europe; and NATO, the military alliance that would bind Western Europe and the United States and keep the Soviet Union firmly behind the Iron Curtain until it collapsed. Chace corrects many misconceptions about Acheson's role in the Cold War. Acheson was not one of the original Cold Warriors. In 1945, willing to acknowledge Soviet concerns about its security, Acheson worked closely with Secretary of War Henry Stimson on a plan to share America's scientific information about atomic energy with Moscow in order to avert an arms race. It was only when Moscow made threatening demands on Turkey for bases in the Dardanelles that Acheson hardened his views toward the Soviet Union. Acheson's initial approach toward Communist China was similarly nonideological. He had little sympathy for Chiang Kai-shek's Nationalists on Taiwan and, until the outbreak of the Korean War, held out hope that the United States would soon recognize Mao Zedong's regime as the legitimate government of China. Acheson's early pragmatism toward Moscow and Beijing, and his refusal to denounce Alger Hiss, a State Department colleague accused of being a Communist, earned him the enmity of the McCarthyites, who accused Acheson of having "lost" China and of sabotaging General Douglas MacArthur in Korea. Later, Acheson encouraged President Kennedy to stand firm against the Soviets in the Berlin Wall and Cuban missile crises. He headed a group of elder statesmen who advised President Johnson on the Vietnam War. When Acheson turned against the war, Johnson realized that domestic support for his policy had crumbled. Acheson is a masterful biography of a great statesman whose policies won the Cold War. It is also an important and dramatic work of history chronicling the momentous decisions, events, and fascinating personalities of the most critical decades of the American Century.

The Achievement of William Faulkner

by Michael Millgate

From the preface: "THE principal object of this study has been to offer a critical review of Faulkner's overall achievement, to develop independent analyses of each of his novels and short story volumes, and to view each book in the context of his career as a whole. In order to establish that context as firmly as possible, I have opened with an extended account of those aspects of Faulkner's life which seemed relevant to an understanding of his work, especially as that work changed and developed in the course of time. This account is not offered as a biography, nor even as a biographical sketch; it does not pretend to explore Faulkner's elusive and intensely private personality; its intention is rather to draw together published material, to supplement this with additional information, and thus to provide the present generation of Faulkner students with a straightforward, reasonably comprehensive, and adequately documented narrative of Faulkner's literary career."

Acquainted With Grief: Wang Mingdao's Stand for the Persecuted Church in China

by Thomas Alan Harvey

Story of Wang Mingdao and the House Church in China.

Acres of Hope: The Miraculous Story of One Family's Gift of Love to Children Without Hope

by Joe Musser Patty Anglin

Back Cover: Over the past several years, Patty and Harold Anglin have adopted eight children with special needs, adding to their already large family of seven biological children. Their adopted children range in age from six months to fifteen years. They come from all over the world, from as far away as Nigeria and India. They are children who would have had no hope in this world if Patty and Harold had not opened their hearts and given them a home bursting with love and acceptance. Many people have asked Patty and Harold why they have adopted so many children with special needs. Their answer is simple, "There is a need!" Years ago, God gave them the verse, "And whoever receives one little child like this in My name receives Me" (Matthew 18:5). God has brought each miracle child into the Anglin home in a special way. They simply responded to the call. Patty says, "Our wish is that every innocent child will come to know and feel the love and security of a family. We believe if you are faithful and obedient servants of God, He will supply all your needs. We know this to be true; He has never let us down!"

Across an Untried Sea: Discovering Lives Hidden in the Shadow of Convention and Time

by Julia Markus

From the much acclaimed author of Dared and Done: The Marriage of Elizabeth Barrett and Robert Browning, a new book that retrieves the lives of Victorian women--writers, actresses, poets, journalists, sculptors, and social reformers--celebrated in their day but forgotten in ours. Julia Markus focuses in particular on the American Charlotte Cushman, the most famous English-speaking actress of her day, and on the Scottish Jane Welsh Carlyle, a brilliant London hostess who gave up private ambition to become the wife of her friend Thomas Carlyle.Charlotte Cushman became an international star on the New York and London stage, and her Romeo and Hamlet were sensations. An independent woman with shrewd business sense who made her own fortune and supported her entire family, she dressed like a man from the waist up and had a succession of female lovers, each one of whom she planned to live with for life, each of whom she 'married.'Jane Welsh Carlyle, literary hostess, unparalleled letter writer and chronicler of her times--who, after a passionate youthful love affair, resolved to marry genius or not at all--became the wife of the revered and lionized philosopher Thomas Carlyle, a difficult, demanding man with whom she had a sexless marriage.Interweaving the worlds of Charlotte Cushman and Jane Carlyle--the worlds of expatriate Rome, literary London, New York, and St. Louis--Markus gathers together a number of interrelated and renowned women who were relegated in the public eye to the position of Virgin Queen (no matter how much married) or Old Maid, but who were, in fact, privately leading vibrant, independent, sexual lives. Among them: Matilda Hays, translator of George Sand; Harriet Hosmer, who resolved to become the world's first professional woman sculptor; and Emma Stebbins, whom Cushman 'married' and who created the Bethesda Fountain in New York's Central Park. Here, too, are the people who sought the friendship of Cushman and Carlyle, including Ralph Waldo Emerson, Horace Mann, Elizabeth Peabody, President Lincoln's Secretary of State William H. Seward, Geraldine Jewsbury, and Rosa Bonheur.Making use of letters, diaries, newspaper accounts, and journals of the day, many of them overlooked and unpublished, Julia Markus rediscovers lives forgotten in the shadows of convention and shows how these remarkable women--seemingly separated by nationality, class, and sexual inclination--met, formed alliances, and influenced one another, forging changes in themselves and in their time.

Across Boundaries: The Journey Of A South African Woman Leader

by Johnnetta B. Cole Mamphela Ramphele

'Across Boundaries' is an autobiography that captures both a unique heart and a nation's history. Because Mamphela Ramphele began her life as a shy child born into the cage of apartheid - and gradually became an activist who helped set South Africa free -her personal story enlarges each reader's sense of possibilities. Because she was part of the Black Consciousness Movement that linked the personal to the political, she teaches us that race, sex, and class are linked, and that enemies can only be defeated ifwe refuse to imitate them. . . No matter where or how each of us lives, 'Across Boundaries' gives us a rare leader who teaches us to teach ourselves. -Gloria Steinem"Stunningly moving and inspiring. "- Marian Wright Edelman, president, Children's Defense Fund"Survival," writes Mamphela Ramphele, "is a stronger force than the fear of offending others. " Born black and female in apartheid-ruled South Africa, Ramphele went on to become one of the most distinguished women on the African continent - a prominent activist, medical doctor, anthropologist, teacher, university leader, as well as a mother to two sons. 'Across Boundaries' chronicles Ramphele's inspiring journey, and reveals the staggering personal losses that coexisted with her astonishing political and professional achievements. In addition to recounting the fascinating and often gripping events of her life, she describes the personal side of her experiences - her early struggles to maintain dignity and hope in a world that devalued both black people and women; her battles against despair, especially after the murder of her colleague and lover Steven Biko and the death of her third child in infancy; her mistakes and regrets as well as her triumphs.

Across the Dark Islands: At War in the Pacific

by Floyd W. Radike

Floyd W. Radike Brigadier General, U.S. Army (Ret.) "I remember sitting in a foxhole on Guadalcanal in the rain. The sergeant I shared the hole with shook his head and asked me: 'What in the hell are we doing on this godforsaken island? Why don't we let the Japs keep this stinking rock?' I didn't have an answer." The war in the Pacific has never been portrayed more honestly--or in prose more powerful--than in Across the Dark Islands. In this unflinching account, Brig. Gen. Floyd W. Radike remembers how he started his military career in the mud and mayhem of Guadalcanal, fighting a campaign as crucial to the war's outcome as it was chaotic and cruel. Here is no whitewashed view of that war or the men who waged it. Here instead is the sobering story of a junior officer in a National Guard unit suddenly shipped off to the front lines, disdained by "regular army" elitists who served beside him, and given second-class status so that others could earn headlines and promotions. While struggling to survive amid dirt and disease, routine and monotony, Radike endured harrowing missions incompetently, arrogantly, or just impatiently planned. As no book ever has, Across the Dark Islands reveals shocking details removed from myth and sentimentality: how American commanders were intimidated by the Japanese stereotype of fearlessness, night attacks, and cries of "banzai" ... how imitations of John Wayne heroics caused immediate death ... threats of court-martial quieted accusations of Army injustice ... and panic and flight destroyed a fight for the enemy's Munda Field airstrip, an event that "disappeared from the record and appears in no official history." Emerging from the hellish conditions and military miscalculations is a tribute to common sense, courage, and respect for proper procedure, attributes that would help the author and soldiers like him to save their lives, succeed in battle, and win the war. From Guadalcanal to the Philippines to a planned invasion of Japan ended by the atom bomb, General Radike's experience spanned the entire course of the pivotal Pacific theater conflict. Candid and cautionary, his memoir is an important work whose writing rivals that of classic novels like James Jones's The Thin Red Line and Norman Mailer's The Naked and the Dead. It should be read by anyone looking to join an army or wage a war.

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