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60 Hikes Within 60 Miles: Salt Lake City

by Greg Witt

60 Hikes Within 60 Miles: Salt Lake City is the only guidebook that pinpoints the most exceptional hikes in the area. It contains meticulous trail descriptions that range from comfortable strolls for families to difficult treks for those looking for a challenging workout. Extensive key-at-a-glance information makes it easier to choose a hike based on length, difficulty, or scenery. A helpful list of hikes in the front of the book highlights those with special interests - best hikes for children, scenic hikes, hikes good for wildlife viewing, best hikes for runners, and more. Each hike report includes commentary on trailside geology, flowers, and wildlife. Historical notes provide fascinating details about early miners, trailblazers, the Pony Express, and Mormon pioneers.Nestled in the western flank of the Rockies, Salt Lake City provides ready access to a stunning array of hiking options amid alpine lakes, snow-draped mountain peaks, fragrant evergreen forests, deep canyon waterfalls, granite towers, and flowered cirques. Within 60 miles of Salt Lake City there are thousands of square miles of national forest, National Wilderness Areas, state parks and designated recreation areas to explore.Now, with this updated edition of 60 Hikes within 60 Miles: Salt Lake City, whether lacing up boots, stepping into sneakers or strapping on snowshoes, Salt Lake City is even more accessible for hikers.

60 Hikes Within 60 Miles: San Antonio and Austin

by Johnny Molloy Tom Taylor

The San Antonio area is perhaps the most picturesque spot for hiking in the Lone Star State. With this new edition in the best-selling 60 Hikes Within 60 Miles series, all these visually stunning and ruggedly charming routes are at the traveler's fingertips. This handy guide helps San Antonio and Austin natives get back into nature without going out of town. Extensive at-a-glance information makes it easy to choose the perfect hike based on length, difficulty, scenery, or on a specific factor such as hikes good for families, runners, or birding. Each trail profile includes maps, directions, driving times, nearby attractions, and other pertinent details.

60 Hikes Within 60 Miles: San Diego

by Sheri Mcgregor

Bounded by San Diego Bay and the Pacific coastline to the west, the Santa Rosa Mountains to the east, Mexico to the south, and the lower reaches of the Los Angeles metro area to the north, the 60-mile radius beyond San Diego creates a dramatic wedge of extraordinary natural beauty. Author Sheri McGregor shows hikers, experienced or novice, how to make the most of the many possibilities here.

60 Hikes Within 60 Miles: San Francisco

by Jane Huber

Bay Area parks and preserves offer a dramatic variety of landscapes, from rugged redwood-forested canyons to breezy coastal bluffs, grassy rolling hills to sunny chaparral-coated hillsides. Well-known destinations such as Point Reyes National Seashore, Mount Diablo State Park, Mount Tamalpais State Park, and many other more obscure jewels of the Bay Area park system are just a short drive from the heart of San Francisco. Completely updated and including several new hikes and a complete new map set, 60 Hikes within 60 Miles: San Francisco guides readers to a splendid assortment of trails in the nine counties surrounding one of the world's most beautiful cities. Whether hikers crave a quick and easy get-out-of-town stroll or a challenging day-long trek through wilderness, this book is the perfect trailblazer, for city natives and first-time visitors alikeConsider yourself warned: Hiking in the Bay Area can be an intense and addictive experience. Sure, other areas of California are home to more esteemed landforms and parks-Yosemite is one of many world-class parks within a day's drive, and backpackers traverse the state as they trek one of the country's longest routes, the Pacific Crest Trail. Throughout the Bay Area there are many "destination" parks, where people from all over the world flock to walk among giant redwoods or whale-watch from a wildflower-dotted coastal bluff. But there are hundreds of smaller parks unknown to most tourists and even lifelong residents, and short drives (or in some cases bus trips, walks, or bike rides) lead to numerous parks and preserves with stunning views, bountiful wildlife, and quiet trails. These "backyard" preserves are especially beneficial to the residents of the Bay Area's most densely packed cities, San Jose, San Francisco, and Oakland. Local parks provide close-to-home outlets for exercise and nature exploration on a daily basis-thousands of people living in the foothills of Mount Tamalpais can literally walk from their front doors for miles, all the way to the top of the mountain if they like. Locals hike parks and open-space preserves bordering the towns of Berkeley, Mill Valley, and Woodside daily, and they take active roles in maintaining the trails. Getting to know your backyard means getting to love your backyard-and we fight for what we love. This dedication to open space has led many ordinary citizens in rallies to save some of our most cherished Bay Area spots.The campaign to preserve open space began in the era of John Muir, and the list of protected parklands is long and impressive. Battles continue, and development still threatens many special areas. As you make your way over trails throughout the Bay Area, think of what we could have lost and have already preserved: old growth redwoods in Muir Woods saved from logging, Point Reyes National Seashore and the Marin Headlands saved from huge housing complexes, various small parks including Edgewood saved from development as golf courses, as well as many other "common" plots of land preserved to make life a little better for the surrounding community.

60 Hikes Within 60 Miles: Seattle

by Bryce Stevens Andrew Weber

In addition to the Cascade Range and Puget Sound, this authoritative guide also leads to lesser-known destinations, including high bluffs and tide pools along the Pacific, abandoned mines and railways, and stands of old-growth forest inside the city limits.

60 Hikes Within 60 Miles: St. Louis

by Steve Henry

Mention St. Louis and most people think of the famous arch. Residents and visitors-in-the-know appreciate the many outdoor recreational opportunities the Gateway to the West has to offer. With new hikes and updated text and maps, 60 Hikes Within 60 Miles: St. Louis points hikers to the best outdoor trails and rambles within easy reach of the city. Whether walking in the footsteps of Louis and Clark, exploring amazing rock formation in the Pickle Springs Natural Area, or trekking along a portion of the longest rails-to-trails paths in the U.S., hikers are sure to be amazed at the diversity of outdoor experiences awaiting them. The included hikes are located in Missouri as well as its neighbor, Illinois.

60 Hikes Within 60 Miles: Washington, D.C.

by Paul Elliott

From in-town urban hikes and walks to scenic suburban forays to world-class area wilderness hikes, Washington, D.C. offers great opportunities for nature-lovers. This book guides locals and visitors to the wealth of possibilities here for every season, including a ridgetop trek on Massanutten Mountain, a leisurely walk through Prince William Forest Park, and a breathtaking tour of the 7.5-mile U.S. National Arboretum with its dwarf conifer forests, dawn redwoods, and Fern Valley. Detailed profiles of each site help readers determine the best hike according to length, time needed, difficulty, and scenery. The book covers special interests too - hikes that are sure to please children, wildlife enthusiasts, history buffs, waterfall watchers, and much more.

The 8:55 to Baghdad

by Andrew Eames

In 1928, Agatha Christie, the world's most widely read author, was a thirty-something single mother. With her marriage to her first husband, Archie Christie, over, she decided to take a much needed holiday; the Caribbean had been her intended destination, but a conversation at a dinner party with a couple who had just returned from Iraq changed her mind. Five days later she was off on a completely different trajectory. Merging literary biography with travel adventure, and ancient history with contemporary world events, Andrew Eames tells a riveting tale and reveals fascinating and little-knowndetails en route in this exotic chapter in the life of Agatha Christie. His own trip from London to Baghdad--a journey much more difficult to make in 2002 with the political unrest in the Middle East and the war in Iraq, than it was in 1928--becomes ineluctably intertwined with Agatha's, and the people he meets could have stepped out of a mystery novel. Fans of Agatha Christie will delight in Eames' description of the places and events that appeared in andinfluenced her fiction--and armchair travelers will thrill in the exotica of the journey itself. .

8 Men and a Duck

by Nick Thorpe

Partly to confirm controversial theories and the 1947 voyage of Thor Heyerdahl, partly from a deficiency of more sensible hobbies, a group of men decided to sail a reed boat, the </Viracocha/>, from Chile 2,500 miles across the Pacific to Easter Island. Travel writer Thorpe heard about the plan, talked his way aboard, and lived to tell the tale. Annotation c. Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

81 Days Below Zero

by Brian Murphy

Shortly before Christmas in 1943, five Army aviators left Alaska’s Ladd Field on a test flight. Only one ever returned: Leon Crane, a city kid from Philadelphia with little more than a parachute on his back when he bailed from his B-24 Liberator before it crashed into the Arctic. Alone in subzero temperatures, Crane managed to stay alive in the dead of the Yukon winter for nearly twelve weeks and, amazingly, walked out of the ordeal intact. 81 Days Below Zero recounts, for the first time, the full story of Crane’s remarkable saga. In a drama of staggering resolve with moments of phenomenal luck, Crane learned to survive in the Yukon’s unforgiving landscape. His is a tale of the human capacity to endure extreme conditions and intense loneliness—and emerge stronger than before.

A. A. Gill Is Away

by A. A. Gill

A. A. Gill is one of the most feared writers in London, noted--according to the New York Times--for his "rapier wit. " Some even consider the mere assignment of a subject to Gill a hostile act. But when the notice "AA GILL IS AWAY" runs in the Sunday Times of London, the city can rest peacefully in the knowledge that the writer is off traveling. "My editor asked me what I wanted from journalism and I said the first thing that came into my head--I'd like to interview places. To treat a place as if it were a person, to go and listen to it, ask it questions, observe it the way you would interview a politician or a pop star," Gill writes. Upon his return, readers are treated to an account of his vacations to places like famine-stricken Sudan, the pornography studios of California's San Fernando Valley, the dying Aral Sea or the seedy parts of Kaliningrad. The result is one of the most fascinating, stylish and irreverent collections of travel writing.

A Home Called Your Own: A Journey Across Six Generations

by Steve Hanna Darlene Anderson

When Steve Hanna boards a plane for Madrid on what is supposed to be a normal study abroad trip, he has no idea where it is about to take him. From the first person he meets on the flight over to the last person he encounters in a small town pharmacy, a series of seemingly unconnected events begins to unfold. As Steve works his way across six countries to the heart of the Czech Republic, he ends up uncovering a larger narrative - a story six generations in the making. Long ago his ancestors paid a price and made a pact to set one person free. One hundred and twenty-five years later, their pact is about to be fulfilled.

The A303

by Tom Fort

Some roads take us from A to B. Others take us on a journey. Others tell a story. The A303 is a one of the essential routes of English motoring. It is a byword for traffic-jam misery; yet at the same time it holds out a promise: to take the traveller west, to a world of entrancement and escape. In the A303, Highway to the Sun, Tom Fort takes a journey back thousands of years across an ever-changing English landscape. He meditates on the road's ancient origins, when bluestones were conveyed along its route to build Stonehenge, and on the Roman roads and drovers' paths that lie beneath it. He explores the rich and diverse terrain around it, the wide spaces of Salisbury Plain, the steep valleys of Somerset, the streams it crosses, the ancient woods that look down on it. And he gives voice to the stories that the road has to tell: of solstice seekers and Stonehenge; of Queen Guinevere and Sir Launcelot; of army camps and Druid rites; stagecoaches and motorcars; transport visionaries and batty clergymen; truckers' tea stops, and ancient inns; battles, festivals, punch-ups; of churches, farms and burial mounds. Digging in dark corners, peering into dusty corners. exploring long-forgotten byways and poring over ancient maps, Tom Fort has created a story of exploration, and of social and cultural history, as alive to the England of 3000 BC as the England of 2012 AD. Tom Fort was educated at Eton and Balliol College, Oxford. In 1978 he joined the BBC in London where he worked in the BBC Radio newsroom for 22 years. He lives in South Oxfordshire with his wife and two of his children and has been travelling up and down the A303 for over five decades.

Aama in America: A Pilgrimage of the Heart

by Broughton Coburn

Vishnu Maya, called Aama (Mother) by everyone in her tiny Nepalese village, was living high in the Himalayas when she befriended American Peace Corps worker Broughton Coburn in 1974. In 1988, Aama came to visit him--on a trip prescribed by village priests as a way for the eighty-four-year-old, four-foot-eight woman to earn merit by making a difficult journey late in life. Aama in America is a vivid chronicle of what became a twenty-five-state, coast-to-coast adventure. Guided by the perpetual curiosity and deeply spiritual orientation of their ingenious, unpredictable travel companion, Coburn and his fiancée gradually began to view their country from an entirely new perspective. "Beneath the uniform, commercial, man-made epidermis of our country," Coburn writes, "Aama found a culture and landscape that was alive and sacred, and she steered us toward it."Aama in America is on one level an offbeat American travelogue. But on another it is a profound exploration of beliefs, values, and lost spirituality, a rediscovery of the spiritual that lies beneath the surface of America, and a singular account of the meeting of two widely divergent cultures.

Abbey's Road

by Edward Abbe

Abbey's explorations include the territory of the Rio Grande in Texas, Canyonlands National Park and Lake Powell in Utah. He takes readers to such varied places as Scotland, the interior of Australia, the Sierra Madre, and Isla de la Sombra in Mexico.

The Abernathy Boys

by L. J. Hunt

Meet Bud Abernathy, age nine, and his brother, Temp, age five: two cowboys determined to see the Old West. The boys are headed for the Goodnight Ranch, where their daddy once was known as "Catch'em Alive" Jack for his ability to catch live wolves with his bare hands. To get to Goodnight, the brothers and their horses, Sam and Geronimo, will have to cross the caprock, a vast desert that is the loneliest place on earth. They're determined to do it -- and to do it alone. Some would say that the story of the boys' journey is a mighty tall tale. But it's entirely true.

About This Life: Journeys on the Threshold of Memory

by Barry Lopez

A new collection of biographical essays by the esteemed writer ("Arctic Dreams, Of Wolves and Men", among other works). Seven of the 17 essays are personal memory pieces; the others touch on a wide range of travels, adventures, and observations of people and places.

Abroad: British Literary Traveling Between the Wars

by Paul Fussell

A book about the meaning of travel, about how important the topic has been for writers for two and a half centuries, and about how excellent the literature of travel happened to be in England and America in the 1920s and 30s.

Abundant Beauty

by Laura Ponsonby Marianne North

In 1871, Marianne North, a brilliant artist with a keen interest in botany, set-forth to travel the world on a quest to paint indigenous plants in their natural habitat. Encouraged by her friend Charles Darwin, North travelled by boat, train, mule, foot and palanquin to every continent except Antarctica. She circled the globe twice over fifteen years and accumulated an extensive and valuable collection of more than eight hundred paintings, which today comprise the esteemed Marianne North Gallery at the Royal Botanical Gardens at Kew, London.North - high-spirited, indefatigable, and brave - also kept detailed journals, which were posthumously published in three volumes in the late 1800s. Abundant Beauty collects the most engaging writings from those journals in one edition, including rich descriptions of botanica and delightful accounts of local people and customs from her sometimes dangerous travels. Abundant Beauty is a fascinating and informative read for botanists, gardeners, historians, and armchair travellers.

Academic Anthropology and the Museum

by Mary Bouquet

There is ample evidence that anthropologists are among those whose imaginations have been fired by the museum, over the past fifteen to twenty years.

Access to Mass Transit for Blind and Visually Impaired Travelers

by William R. Wiener Mark M. Uslan Alec F. Peck Arlene Stern

Access to Mass Transit addresses travel issues vital to independence for blind and visually impaired persons from several perspectives- those of blind and visually impaired persons who use mass transit, orientation and mobility instructors, and transportation professionals. Focusing on national and international issues, this information-filled manual covers approaches to making mass transit accessible in several cities in the United States and in Canada, the United Kingdom, and Japan. Arranged in a well-illustrated, easy-to-use format, tips, techniques, guidelines, and adaptive strategies are presented for safe and independent travel on subways, buses, and commuter rails.

The Accessible Museum Model Programs of Accessibility for Disabled and Older People

by American Association of Museums

A very interesting guide to museums of all kinds, which cater to accessibility for disabled and older people.

Accessible Tourism

by Dimitrios Buhalis Simon Darcy

Inclusion, disability, an ageing population and tourism are increasingly important areas of study due to their implications for both tourism demand and supply. This book therefore sets out to explore and document the current theoretical approaches, foundations and issues in the study of accessible tourism. In drawing together the contributions to this volume the editors have applied broader social constructionist approaches to understanding the accessible tourism phenomena. Accessible tourism, as with any area of academic study is an evolving field of academic research and industry practice. As with other areas of tourism, the field is multidisciplinary, and is influenced by various disciplines including geography, disability studies, economics, public policy, psychology and marketing.

The Accidental Explorer: Wayfinding in Alaska

by Sherry Simpson

Alaska is a place of great adventure and exploration. After having lived in the Great Land for nearly all of her life, Sherry Simpson realized that she had not scaled mountains, trekked across wild tundra, or blazed trails through virgin forests. Did that fact make her less of an Alaskan? In the series of essays that comprise The Accidental Explorer, Sherry Simpson recounts the experiences of an ordinary woman confronting the great expanses of water and untracked land in Alaska, as she makes her best efforts to map her sense of place and her sense of self in a land that seems to require exploration of its inhabitants. While undertaking arduous treks into the backcountry, she falls into a glacial river and nearly drowns. On an archetypal epic solo hike, she ruminates constantly on when and whether she should abandon that folly. She writes with both humor and humility, harnessing great powers of observation of the natural world. In a downright scary encounter with a mildly aggressive bear, Simpson shrinks from any supposed Alaskan larger-than-life persona to assume her place on the food chain: an urbanized human who is appropriately afraid of big bears. Simpson also offers up the (less reverent) Alaskan view of Chris McCandles, the wanderer who perished in an abandoned bus near Denali, subject of Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer. Can an ordinary, not especially heroic, person be an adventurer? If she sets out, in a wild place like Alaska, what will she find out there, and what will she learn about the place back home? Throughout this compelling and probing book, Sherry Simpson illuminates the act of exploration as both a feat of extraordinary effort and as an everyday experience.

The Accidental Office Lady

by Laura Kriska

A young woman with a new degree in Japanese studies and plenty of youthful idealism and can-do spirit accepts a job as the first American trainee at Honda's headquarters in Tokyo. Her image of Japanese corporate life is dramatically challenged on her first day at work when she is issued a blue polyester uniform--a uniform worn only by women!From menial beginnings serving tea to executives and cleaning the boss's desk, to a stint in public relations, to developing training classes for Japanese associates going to America, Laura Kriska recounts her struggle to adapt to--and ultimately thrive in--the culture of a traditional Japanese company. Shortly before her departure, she travels full circle by introducing a successful campaign to make women's uniforms optional.Now with a new foreword by the author, The Accidental Office Lady is a vivid and valuable firsthand account not only of corporate Japan and the gender inequality that persists within it, but of an outsider's successful attempt to work within cultural boundaries to affect organizational change.

Showing 76 through 100 of 5,230 results

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