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Cast of Characters: Wolcott Gibbs, E. B. White, James Thurber, and the Golden Age of The New Yorker

by Thomas Vinciguerra

The professional and personal lives of the pioneers of an enduring magazine. From its birth in 1925 to the early days of the Cold War, The New Yorker slowly but surely took hold as the country's most prestigious, entertaining, and informative general-interest periodical. In Cast of Characters, Thomas Vinciguerra paints a portrait of the magazine's cadre of charming, wisecracking, driven, troubled, brilliant writers and editors. He introduces us to Wolcott Gibbs, theater critic, all-around wit, and author of an infamous 1936 parody of Time magazine. We meet the demanding and eccentric founding editor Harold Ross, who would routinely tell his underlings, "I'm firing you because you are not a genius," and who once mailed a pair of his underwear to Walter Winchell, who had accused him of preferring to go bare-bottomed under his slacks. Joining the cast are the mercurial, blind James Thurber, a brilliant cartoonist and wildly inventive fabulist, and the enigmatic E. B. White--an incomparable prose stylist and Ross's favorite son--who married The New Yorker's formidable fiction editor, Katharine Angell. Then there is the dashing St. Clair McKelway, who was married five times and claimed to have no fewer than twelve personalities, but was nonetheless a superb reporter and managing editor alike. Many of these characters became legends in their own right, but Vinciguerra also shows how, as a group, The New Yorker's inner circle brought forth a profound transformation in how life was perceived, interpreted, written about, and published in America. Cast of Characters may be the most revealing--and entertaining--book yet about the unique personalities who built what Ross called not a magazine but a "movement."

Due to Circumstances Beyond Our Control . . .

by Fred W. Friendly

This discourse on the importance of television in society presents Friendly's uncannily prescient views on the corrosive effect of money on the news business, the sensationalization of news reporting, and the viewing public's appetite for quality broadcasting. With Edward R. Murrow, Fred Friendly practically invented television journalism. Through telling anecdotes and penetrating analysis, he recalls his collaborations with Murrow, from their stinging documentary on Senator Joseph McCarthy to CBS's pioneering coverage of the burgeoning civil rights and anti-Vietnam War movements. Friendly also recounts his resignation as president of CBS News in 1966, when the network ran reruns of I Love Lucy instead of Senate hearings on the war in Vietnam. Following that controversial decision, he began writing this memorable book.

Engineering Information Security

by Stuart Jacobs

Information security is the act of protecting information from unauthorized access, use, disclosure, disruption, modification, or destruction. This book discusses why information security is needed and how security problems can have widespread impacts. It covers the complete security lifecycle of products and services, starting with requirements and policy development and progressing through development, deployment, and operations, and concluding with decommissioning. Professionals in the sciences, engineering, and communications fields will turn to this resource to understand the many legal, technical, competitive, criminal and consumer forces and influences that are rapidly changing our information dependent society.If you're a professor and would like a copy of the solutions manual, please contact ieeepress@ieee.org.The material previously found on the CD can now be found on www.booksupport.wiley.com.

FireSigns: A Semiotic Theory for Graphic Design

by Steven Skaggs

Graphic design has been an academic discipline since the post-World War II era, but it has yet to develop a coherent theoretical foundation. Instead, it proceeds through styles, genres, and imitation, drawing on sources that range from the Bauhaus to deconstructionism. In FireSigns, Steven Skaggs offers the foundation for a semiotic theory of graphic design, exploring semiotic concepts from design and studio art perspectives and offering useful conceptual tools for practicing designers.Semiotics is the study of signs and significations; graphic design creates visual signs meant to create a certain effect in the mind (a "FireSign"). Skaggs provides a network of explicit concepts and terminology for a practice that has made implicit use of semiotics without knowing it. He offers an overview of the metaphysics of visual perception and the notion of visual entities, and, drawing on the pragmatic semiotics of the philosopher Charles Sanders Peirce, looks at visual experience as a product of the action of signs. He introduces three conceptual tools for analyzing works of graphic design -- semantic profiles, the functional matrix, and the visual gamut -- that allow visual "personality types" to emerge and enable a greater understanding of the range of possibilities for visual elements. Finally, he applies these tools to specific analyses of typography.

The World of Jimmy Breslin: World Without End, Amen; The Gang That Couldn't Shoot Straight; Table Money; And Forsaking All Others

by Jimmy Breslin

An invaluable collection of early columns by one of New York's sharpest mindsIn the 1960s, as the once-proud New York Herald Tribune spiraled into bankruptcy, the brightest light in its pages was an ebullient young columnist named Jimmy Breslin. While ordinary columnists wrote about politics, culture, or the economy, Breslin's chief topics were the city and Breslin himself. He was chummy with cops, arsonists, and thieves, and told their stories with grace, wit, and lightning-quick prose. Whether covering the five boroughs, Vietnam, or the death of John F. Kennedy, Breslin managed to find great characters wherever he went. This collection includes some of Breslin's most famous early writing. Here are the unforgettable New Yorkers Sam Silverware and Larry Lightfingers, the celebrated interview with President Kennedy's gravedigger, and the classic "People I'm Not Talking To Next Year." But the most important voice here is Breslin's--as vibrant as ever. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Jimmy Breslin including rare photos and never-before-seen documents from the author's personal collection.

The End of Obscenity: The Trials of Lady Chatterley, Tropic of Cancer & Fanny Hill by the Lawyer Who Defended Them

by Charles Rembar

Winner of the George Polk Award: Charles Rembar's illuminating account of overturning America's obscenity laws and protecting literature from censorship Up until the 1960s, depending on your state of residence, your copy of Henry Miller's Tropic of Cancer might be seized by the US Postal Service before reaching your mailbox. Selling copies of Cleland's Fanny Hill in your bookstore was considered illegal. Lady Chatterley's Lover by D. H. Lawrence was, according to the American legal system, pornography with no redeeming social value. Today, these novels are celebrated for their literary and historic worth. The End of Obscenity is Charles Rembar's account of successfully arguing the merits of such great works of literature in front of the Supreme Court. As the lead attorney on the case, he--with the support of a few brave publishers--changed the way Americans read and honor books, especially the controversial ones. Filled with insight from lawyers, justices, and the authors themselves, The End of Obscenity is a lively tour de force. Racy testimony and hilarious asides make Rembar's memoir not only a page-turner but also an enlightening look at the American legal system.

2009 Children's Writer's & Illustrator's Market®

by Alice Pope

If you long to see your stories or artwork in the hands of young readers--from toddlers to teens--this is the book you'll need. Our 2009 edition includes 700+ updated listings for book publishers, magazines, agents, art reps, and others who may be interested in your work. Also includes articles and interviews with National Book Award winner Sherman Alexie; best-selling authors Scott Westerfeld and Katherine Applegate, and many others including more than half a dozen new authors. Listings for organizations, conferences, workshops, contests, awards, grants and more of interest to children's writers and illustrators included. Get perspective and insight into the writing, revising, and submitting of your work, negotiating contracts, working with agents, and more. This could be the year your writing dreams comes true.

The Kingdom and the Power

by Gay Talese

The classic inside story of The New York Times, the most prestigious, and perhaps the most powerful, of all American newspapers. Bestselling author Talese lays bare the secret internal intrigues behind the tradition of front page exposes in a story as gripping as a work of fiction and as immediate as today's headlines.From the Trade Paperback edition.

84 Charing Cross Road

by Helene Hanff

This is a touching correspondence between Helene Hanff and the employees at a book shop on Charing Cross Road in London. It spans many years. Short but satisfying, this little book will warm your heart.

The Americanization of Edward Bok: The Autobiography of a Dutch boy Fifty Years After

by Edward Bok

Edward William Bok (born Eduard Willem Gerard Cesar Hidde Bok) (October 9, 1863 – January 9, 1930) was a Dutch-born American editor and Pulitzer Prize-winning author. He was editor of the Ladies' Home Journal for 30 years (1889-1919). <P><P> Pulitzer Prize Winner

Athens and the War on Public Space: Tracing a City in Crisis (PDF)

by Klara Jaya Brekke Christos Filippidis Antonis Vradis

Sometimes, the maelstrom of a crisis can be captured in a single image. The image of the mundane, barely noticeable movement of an urban dweller as they go about their everyday life. Athens and the War on Public Space commences from images just like this one, collected over a two-year period of research (2012–2014) in the Greek capital city. These images, gathered by a team of artist-researchers working to trace and study crisis-ridden urban public spaces in Athens, Greece, create a visual timeline for navigating through all that happened over those two troubled years. The resulting catalog shows how images of shipwrecks and disaster were used to harden anti-migratory policies, and how these exact policies then helped to foster the hatred that spilled onto the streets of Athens, in the form of racist attacks. Athens and the War on Public Space further outlines the violence inherent in the images of silent commuters going about daily life despite the catastrophe, caught in the freeze-frame of inaction as the world around them changes beyond recognition. The carefully curated images show how the crisis was quite literally played out in the city of Athens, especially vis-a-vis its performative construction in the images of anti-migratory policies, state repression, and their material, grave consequences. Athens and the War on Public Space is ultimately a collective portrait of a city caught in the whirlwind of crisis. The book is a compilation of work done during the larger Crisis-Scape project. The team comprised Klara Jaya Brekke, Dimitris Dalakoglou, Ross Domoney, Christos Filippidis, and Antonis Vradis.

Body Language: The Essential Secrets Of Non-verbal Communication

by Julius Fast

Body Language helps you to understand the unconscious body movements and postures that provide intimate keys to what a person is really thinking and the secrets of their true inner selves. You will learn how to read the angle of shoulders, the tilt of a head, or the tap of a foot, in order to discern whether an individual is angry, frightened or cheerful. You will be able to use Body Language to discover the most - and least - important person in any group by the way others position themselves. The body is not able to lie, for it sends subtle signals to those who know how to read them. Body Language will even show you how to do it without others knowing you are observing them. Body Language was a huge best seller when first published and has remained in print ever since. It has been thoroughly updated and revised especially for this new E-Reads edition.

Body Language

by Julius Fast

A study of physical, non-verbal communication.

Critical and Historical Essays -- Volume 1

by Baron Thomas Babington Macaulay Macaulay

Critical and Historical Essays: Contributed to the Edinburgh Review (1843) is a collection of articles by Thomas Babington Macaulay, later Lord Macaulay. They have been acclaimed for their readability, but criticized for their inflexible attachment to the attitudes of the Whig school of history.

Cultural Sutures: Medicine and Media

by Lester D. Friedman

Medicine and the media exist in a unique symbiosis. Increasingly, health-care consumers turn to media sources--from news reports to Web sites to tv shows--for information about diseases, treatments, pharmacology, and important health issues. And just as the media scour the medical terrain for news stories and plot lines, those in the health-care industry use the media to publicize legitimate stories and advance particular agendas. The essays in Cultural Sutures delineate this deeply collaborative process by scrutinizing a broad range of interconnections between medicine and the media in print journalism, advertisements, fiction films, television shows, documentaries, and computer technology. In this volume, scholars of cinema studies, philosophy, English, sociology, health-care education, women's studies, bioethics, and other fields demonstrate how the world of medicine engages and permeates the media that surround us. Whether examining the press coverage of the Jack Kevorkian-euthanasia controversy; pondering questions about accessibility, accountability, and professionalism raised by such films as Awakenings, The Doctor, and Lorenzo's Oil; analyzing the depiction of doctors, patients, and medicine on E. R. and Chicago Hope; or considering the ways in which digital technologies have redefined the medical body, these essays are consistently illuminating and provocative. Contributors. Arthur Caplan, Tod Chambers, Stephanie Clark-Brown, Marc R. Cohen, Kelly A. Cole, Lucy Fischer, Lester D. Friedman, Joy V. Fuqua, Sander L. Gilman, Norbert Goldfield, Joel Howell, Therese Jones, Timothy Lenoir, Gregory Makoul, Marilyn Chandler McEntyre, Faith McLellan, Jonathan M. Metzl, Christie Milliken, Martin F. Norden, Kirsten Ostherr, Limor Peer, Audrey Shafer, Joseph Turow, Greg VandeKieft, Otto F. Wahl

English as She Is Spoke: The Guide of the Conversation in Portuguese and English

by Mark Twain Pedro Carolino

The Guide of the Conversation in Portuguese and English

Fifty Years of the Texas Observer

by Molly Ivins Char Miller

For the past five decades the Texas Observer has been an essential voice in Texas culture and politics, championing honest government, civil rights, labor, and the environment, while providing a platform for many of the state's most passionate and progressive voices. Included are ninety-one selections from Roy Bedichek, Lou Dubose, Ronnie Dugger, Dagoberto Gilb, Jim Hightower, Molly Ivins, Larry McMurtry, Maury Maverick Jr., Willie Morris, Debbie Nathan, and others.To mark the Observer's fiftieth anniversary, Char Miller has selected a cross section of the best work to appear in its pages. Not only does the collection pay homage to an important alternative voice in Texas journalism, it also serves as a progressive chronicle of a half-century of life in the Lone Star State-a state that has spawned three presidents in the last forty years. If Texas is, as some say, a crucible for national politics, then Fifty Years of the Texas Observer can be read as a casebook for issues that concern citizens in all fifty states.Molly Ivins's foreword gives historical background for the Observer and sets the stage for the book.

Fifty Years of the Texas Observer

by Molly Ivins Char Miller

For the past five decades the Texas Observer has been an essential voice in Texas culture and politics, championing honest government, civil rights, labor, and the environment, while providing a platform for many of the state's most passionate and progressive voices. Included are ninety-one selections from Roy Bedichek, Lou Dubose, Ronnie Dugger, Dagoberto Gilb, Jim Hightower, Molly Ivins, Larry McMurtry, Maury Maverick Jr., Willie Morris, Debbie Nathan, and others.To mark the Observer's fiftieth anniversary, Char Miller has selected a cross section of the best work to appear in its pages. Not only does the collection pay homage to an important alternative voice in Texas journalism, it also serves as a progressive chronicle of a half-century of life in the Lone Star State-a state that has spawned three presidents in the last forty years. If Texas is, as some say, a crucible for national politics, then Fifty Years of the Texas Observer can be read as a casebook for issues that concern citizens in all fifty states.Molly Ivins's foreword gives historical background for the Observer and sets the stage for the book.

Into the Valley: Marines at Guadalcanal

by John Hersey

Hersey gives insightful details concerning the jungle environment, recounts conversations among the men before, during, and after the battle at Guadalcanal, and describes how the wounded were evacuated as well as other works of daily heroism.

Literary Blunders: A Chapter in the "History of Human Error"

by Henry B. Wheatley

Linguist Wheatley discusses typographical errors, "Irish bulls," deliberate and accidental misquotations, poor translations from other languages into English and vice versa, and errors of fact in student papers and examinations.

Literary Copyright

by Charles Dudley Warner

This is the first public meeting of the National Institute of Arts and Letters. The original members were selected by an invitation from the American Social Science Association, which acted under the power of its charter from the Congress of the United States. The members thus selected, who joined the Social Science Association, were given the alternative of organizing as an independent institute or as a branch of the Social Science Association.

Literature and Life (Complete)

by William Dean Howells

Known as “The Dean of American Letters”, William Dean Howells (1837-1920) was a realist author and literary critic best known for his tenure as one of the most influential editors of the Atlantic Monthly, which is still an important publication today. And though Howells is known mostly for his work as a literary critic, he was also a novelist who wrote works like The Rise of Silas Lapham, Christmas Every Day, and much more. Along the way, he was a literary critic of the works of some of his greatest contemporaries, like Emile Zola, and he knew many American writers, including Mark Twain, Henry James, and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.

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Showing 76 through 100 of 10,726 results