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The Waste Land and Other Poems

by T. S. Eliot

"For many successive generations now, 'The Waste Land,' 'The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock,' and 'Four Quartets' have continued to excited readers and to inspire young poets. Teenagers still discover his work with a thrill of wonder and recognition. Eliot's unique power, his understanding of interrelated beauty and squalor, freshness and despair, survives academic fashions, survives all interpretations, survives even his own dicta and formulations. He is one of the great poets." --Robert Pinsky, former Poet Laureate and author of Singing School "An exalted nightmare, one of the great poems of the 20th century." --Edward Hirsch, author of How to Read a Poem (and Fall in Love with Poetry) and A Poet's Glossary

Egyptian Tales and Romances: Pagan, Christian and Muslim (Routledge Revivals)

by E. A. Budge

Sir E. A. Wallis Budge (1857-1934) was Keeper of the British Museum’s department of oriental antiquities from 1894 until his retirement in 1924. Carrying out many missions to Egypt in search of ancient objects, Budge was hugely successful in collecting papyri, statues and other artefacts for the trustees of the British Museum: numbering into the thousands and of great cultural and historical significance. Budge published well over 100 monographs, which shaped the development of future scholarship and are still of great academic value today, dealing with subjects such as Egyptian religion, history and literature. First published in 1931, Egyptian Tales and Romances examines the historical and religious romances of the Egyptians from the early dynastic period to the twentieth century. Budge demonstrates Egypt’s transition from Paganism to Christianity, and finally to Islam, through tales and stories carefully transcribed and translated. Part I contains historical romances written on papyrus and stone, whilst parts II and III are derived largely from Coptic and Muslim manuscript sources. Including detailed illustrations and photographs, this fascinating classic work will be of interest to academics and students of Egyptian folklore, archaeology and history, as well as the general inquisitive reader.

No Lonesome Road: SELECTED PROSE AND POEMS

by Don West Jeff Biggers George Brosi

This is the first book to celebrate the life and writing of one of the most charismatic Southern leaders of the middle twentieth century, Don West (1906-1992). West was a poet, a pioneer advocate for civil rights, a preacher, a historian, a labor organizer, a folk-music revivalist, an essayist, and an organic farmer. He is perhaps best known as an educator, primarily as cofounder of the Highlander Folk School in Tennessee and founder of the Appalachian South Folklife Center in West Virginia. In his old age, West served as an elder statesman for his causes. No Lonesome Road allows Don West to speak for himself. It provides the most comprehensive collection of his poetry ever published, spanning five decades of his literary career. It also includes the first comprehensive and annotated collection of West's nonfiction essays, articles, letters, speeches, and stories, covering his role at the forefront of Southern and Appalachian history, and as a pioneer researcher and writer on the South's little-known legacy of radical activism. Drawing from both primary and secondary sources, including previously unknown documents, correspondence, interviews, FBI files, and newspaper clippings, the introduction by Jeff Biggers stands as the most thorough, insightful biographical sketch of Don West yet published in any form. The afterword by George Brosi is a stirring personal tribute to the contributions of West and also serves as a thoughtful reflection on the interactions between the radicals of the 1930s and the 1960s. The best possible introduction to his extraordinary life and work, this annotated selection of Don West's writings will be inspirational reading for anyone interested in Southern history, poetry, religion, or activism.

Revival: The Junius Manuscript (1931) (Routledge Revivals)

by George Philip Krapp

This book is the first volume in a collective edition, the plan of which includes all the surviving records of Anglo-Saxon poetry. The main body of Anglo-Saxon poetry as it has come down to us is contained in four important miscellany manuscripts, the Junius Manuscript, the Vercelli Book, the Exeter Book, and the Beowulf Manuscript, each of which will constitute a separate volume in this edition. The remaining minor and more or less scattered examples of Anglo-Saxon poetry will be grouped together, in a volume of volumes of their own.

The Collected Poems of Theodore Roethke

by Theodore Roethke

This paperback edition contains the complete text of Roethke's seven published volumes plus sixteen previously uncollected poems. Included are his Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award winners The Walking, Words for the Wind, and The Far Field.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Complete Poems

by William Maxwell Claude Mckay

Containing more than three hundred poems, including nearly a hundred previously unpublished works, this unique collection showcases the intellectual range of Claude McKay (1889-1948), the Jamaican-born poet and novelist whose life and work were marked by restless travel and steadfast social protest. McKay's first poems were composed in rural Jamaican creole and launched his lifelong commitment to representing everyday black culture from the bottom up. Migrating to New York, he reinvigorated the English sonnet and helped spark the Harlem Renaissance with poems such as "If We Must Die." After coming under scrutiny for his communism, he traveled throughout Europe and North Africa for twelve years and returned to Harlem in 1934, having denounced Stalin's Soviet Union. By then, McKay's pristine "violent sonnets" were giving way to confessional lyrics informed by his newfound Catholicism. McKay's verse eludes easy definition, yet this complete anthology, vividly introduced and carefully annotated by William J. Maxwell, acquaints readers with the full transnational evolution of a major voice in twentieth-century poetry.

Flowers of a Moment (Lannan Translations Selection Series)

by Ko Un

&“Bodhisattva of Korean poetry, exuberant, demotic, abundant, obsessed with poetic creation . . . Ko Un is a magnificent poet, combination of Buddhist cognoscente, passionate political libertarian, and naturalist historian.&”—Allen Ginsberg"Korea's greatest living Zen poet."—Lawrence Ferlinghetti Flowers of a Moment is a treasure trove of more than 180 brief poems by a major world poet at the apex of his career. A four-time Nobel Prize nominee,Ko Un grew up in Korea during the Japanese occupation. During the Korean War, he was conscripted by the People's Army. In 1952, he became a Buddhist and lived a monastic life for ten years. For his activism confronting South Korea's dictatorial military government, he was imprisoned and tortured. He has published more than one hundred volumes of poetry, essays, fiction, drama, and translations of Chinese poetry. At sunset a wish to become a wolf beneath a fat full moon

Goblin Market: The Prince's Progress, And Other Poems (Dover Fine Art, History of Art #No. 53)

by Christina Rossetti Arthur Rackham

This lovely gift edition of Christina Rossetti's most famous poem will enchant readers of all ages. For children, the story offers a captivating adventure into a land of fantasy. For adults, it's a lyric and sensual allegory of temptation, sacrifice, and salvation. Arthur Rackham, a peerless illustrator of fairy tales and supernatural creatures, portrays the poem's otherworldly attractions in 4 color and 20 black-and-white images plus a reproduction of a rare watercolor.

Routledge Revivals: English Poetry in the Later Nineteenth Century (Routledge Revivals)

by B. Ifor Evans

First published in 1933, this study, which underwent revision in the 1960s, is a comprehensive survey of the verse of English nineteenth-century poets whose work appeared after 1860. A special feature is the full and critical treatment of minor writers. In no other book is their work so carefully evaluated. There is a full account of the minor Pre-Raphaelites, of James Thomson, the poet of The City of Dreadful Night, of Henley, Stevenson and George MacDonald. John Davidson is the subject of a long and revealing study. Evans suggests that poetry from the late nineteenth century is neglected in scholarly study, and that Victorian Romanticism deserves more attention than it has recently received.

Letters to a Young Poet

by Rainer Maria Rilke M. D. Norton

Rilke's timeless letters about poetry, sensitive observation, and the complicated workings of the human heart. Born in 1875, the great German lyric poet Rainer Maria Rilke published his first collection of poems in 1898 and went on to become renowned for his delicate depiction of the workings of the human heart. Drawn by some sympathetic note in his poems, young people often wrote to Rilke with their problems and hopes. From 1903 to 1908 Rilke wrote a series of remarkable responses to a young, would-be poet on poetry and on surviving as a sensitive observer in a harsh world. Those letters, still a fresh source of inspiration and insight, are accompanied here by a chronicle of Rilke's life that shows what he was experiencing in his own relationship to life and work when he wrote them.

The Collected Works of W.B. Yeats Vol. III: Autobiogra

by William Butler Yeats Douglas Archibald William O'Donnell

Autobiographies consists of six autobiographical works that William Butler Yeats published together in the mid-1930s to form a single, extraordinary memoir of the first fifty-eight years of his life, from his earliest memories of childhood to winning the Nobel Prize for Literature. This volume provides a vivid series of personal accounts of a wide range of figures, and it describes Yeats's work as poet and playwright, as a founder of Dublin's famed Abbey Theatre, his involvement with Irish nationalism, and his fascination with occultism and visions. This book is most compelling as Yeats's own account of the growth of his poetic imagination. Yeats thought that a poet leads a life of allegory, and that his works are comments upon it. Autobiographies enacts his ruling belief in the connections and coherence between the life that he led and the works that he wrote. It is a vision of personal history as art, and so it is the one truly essential companion to his poems and plays.Edited by William H. O'Donnell and Douglas N. Archibald, this volume is available for the first time with invaluable explanatory notes and includes previously unpublished passages from candidly explicit first drafts.

The Collected Works of W. B. Yeats Volume III: Autobiographies

by William Butler Yeats Douglas Archibald William O'Donnell

Autobiographies consists of six autobiographical works that William Butler Yeats published together in the mid-1930s to form a single, extraordinary memoir of the first fifty-eight years of his life, from his earliest memories of childhood to winning the Nobel Prize for Literature. This volume provides a vivid series of personal accounts of a wide range of figures, and it describes Yeats's work as poet and playwright, as a founder of Dublin's famed Abbey Theatre, his involvement with Irish nationalism, and his fascination with occultism and visions. This book is most compelling as Yeats's own account of the growth of his poetic imagination. Yeats thought that a poet leads a life of allegory, and that his works are comments upon it. Autobiographies enacts his ruling belief in the connections and coherence between the life that he led and the works that he wrote. It is a vision of personal history as art, and so it is the one truly essential companion to his poems and plays. Edited by William H. O'Donnell and Douglas N. Archibald, this volume is available for the first time with invaluable explanatory notes and includes previously unpublished passages from candidly explicit first drafts.

Complete Poems

by Johnson James Weldon

2000 marks the centenary of "Lift Every Voice and Sing," James Weldon Johnson's most famous lyric, which is now embraced as the Negro National Anthem. In celebration, this Penguin original collects all the poems from Johnson's published works-Fifty Years and Other Poems (1917), God's Trombones (1927), and Saint Peter Relates an Incident of the Resurrection Day (1935)-along with a number of previously unpublished poems. Sondra Kathryn Wilson, the foremost authority on Johnson and his work, provides an introduction that sheds light on Johnson's many achievements and his pioneering contributions to recording and celebrating the African American experience. .

Haba Khatoon

by S. L. Sadhu

A monograph of Habba Khatoon the greatest Kashmiri poetess of the sixteenth century.

Kamayani

by Jayshankar Prasad

Kamayani looks at the Chayawaadi school of Hindi poetry. It plays continuously with the human emotions and takes metaphors from mythologies. The chapters even are named after the emotions. The plot is based on the Vedic story where Manu, the man surviving after the deluge (Pralaya), is emotionless (Bhavanasunya). Anyone having interest in Hindi poetry must read it.

Literary Essays of Ezra Pound

by Ezra Pound

Edited and with an introduction by T. S. Eliot. The 33 essays contained in this collection are separated into three categories: The Art of Poetry, The Tradition, and contemporaries. These essays showcase the range of Pound's interests, with topics ranging from modernist poetry to Japanese iconography, troubadour songs, and much more.

No Thanks

by E. E. Cummings George James Firmage

Reissued in an edition newly offset from the authoritative Complete Poems 1904-1962, edited by George James Firmage. E. E. Cummings, along with Pound, Eliot, and Williams, helped bring about the twentieth-century revolution in literary expression. He is recognized as the author of some of the most beautiful lyric poems written in the English language and also as one of the most inventive American poets of his time. Fresh and candid, by turns earthy, tender, defiant, and romantic, Cummings's poems celebrate the uniqueness of each individual, the need to protest the dehumanizing force of organizations, and the exuberant power of love. No Thanks was first published in 1935; although Cummings was by then in mid-career, he had still not achieved recognition, and the title refers ironically to publishers' rejections. No Thanks contains some of Cummings's most daring literary experiments, and it represents most fully his view of life--romantic individualism. The poems celebrate an openly felt response to the beauties of the natural world, and they give first place to love, especially sexual love, in all its manifestations. The volume includes such favorites as "sonnet entitled how to run the world)," "may I feel said he," "Jehovah buried. Satan dead," "be of love (a little)," and the now-famous grasshopper poem.

The Best Loved Poems of the American People

by Hazel Felleman

Adolph S. Ochs, publisher of the new york times Throughout his life loved poetry. He was keenly interested in the number of inquiries regarding it that came to the editorial rooms of the new york times Book Review, and he started the Queries and Answers page to handle them. The selection of verses collected under the title "The Best Loved Poems of the American People" is based on the most frequently requested items that have cleared through these columns over a period of three decades. During a large part of this time, Hazel Felleman has been the editor of Queries and Answers. From every state in the Union, and even beyond its borders, have come countless letters asking for this poem or that, or for the complete poem whose theme is such-and-such, or the song whose refrain is thus-and-so. Miss Felleman has long had her finger on the poetry pulse of the nation. Its heartbeats are truly registered in this, her book. In a sense, this book has been edited by the American people who love poetry. Miss Felleman is the liaison officer who has coordinated the poetry preferences of the nation. She has assembled the results in orderly fashion and given them back in an enduring and friendly form. This book was published originally in 1936 and i know of no better or more diverse collection of poetry anywhere. The Editor writes, "In the compilation of this book I have drawn on my experience as editor of the Queries and Answers page of the new york times Book Review over a period of fifteen years. The majority of inquiries that I receive are for favorite poems, and since not a day passes that does not bring to my desk a large sheaf of letters from all parts of the country, it is only natural that I have learned something of the poetry preferences of the American people. I have used this knowledge rather than my own personal liking in the selection of these poems; but I feel free to say that there are few of the poems that I would not have included myself."

Directed by Desire

by June Jordan

"Directed by Desire . . . is a powerful addition to the entire canon of American poetry."--BooklistNow in paperback, Directed by Desire is the definitive overview of June Jordan's -poetry. Collecting the finest work from Jordan's ten volumes, as well as dozens of "last poems" that were never published in Jordan's lifetime, these more than six hundred pages overflow with intimate lyricism, elegance, fury, meditative solos, and dazzling vernacular riffs.As Adrienne Rich writes in her introduction, June Jordan "wanted her readers, listeners, students, to feel their own latent power--of the word, the deed, of their own beauty and intrinsic value." From "These Poems": These poems they are things that I do in the dark reaching for you whoever you are and are you ready?The cloth edition of Directed by Desire was selected as a Library Journal Poetry Book of the Year and received the Lambda Book Award for Lesbian Poetry. June Jordan taught at UC Berkeley for many years and founded Poetry for the People. Her twenty-eight books include poetry, essays, fiction, and children's books. She was a regular columnist for The Progressive and a prolific writer whose articles appeared in The Village Voice, The New York Times, Ms. Magazine, and The Nation. After her death in 2002, a school in the San Francisco School District was renamed in her honor.

The Collected Works of W. B. Yeats Vol. V: Later Essays

by William Butler Yeats

Compiling nineteen essays and introductions, a volume with explanatory notes includes Per Amica Silentia Lunae and On the Boiler as well as introductions on Shelley and Balzac and essays on Irish poetry and politics.

Encounter in April: Poems

by May Sarton

The debut work of a literary legend May Sarton's career spanned sixty years and included novels, poetry, memoirs, and even children's books, but it was poetry that provided the world's first look at her wondrous talent. Encounter in April is a fitting starting point for readers wishing to familiarize themselves with one of the twentieth century's most lyrical and eloquent authors. In this anthology, Sarton describes womanhood devastatingly and unforgettably, deftly matching serene imagery with powerful emotion. Her sonnets are to be savored. Encounter in April is a thesis statement for a lengthy and profound career, and Sarton's talent is readily evident from the beginning.

The Odyssey

by Homer Adam Nicolson W. H. Rouse Deborah Steiner

One of the supreme masterpieces of world literature, the Homeric saga of the shipwrecks, wanderings, and homecoming of the master tactician Odysseus encompasses a virtual inventory of the themes and attitudes that have shaped Western culture. The tale of Odysseus's encounters with such obstacles as Calypso, Circe, Scylla and Charybdis, the Sirens, and the lotus-eaters, and his dramatic return to Ithaca and his patient wife, Penelope, forms a prototype for all subsequent Western epics.Robert Fitzgerald's much-acclaimed translation, fully possessing as it does the body and spirit of the original, has helped to assure the continuing vitality of Europe's most influential work of poetry. This edition includes twenty-five new line drawings by Barnaby Fitzgerald.(Book Jacket Status: Jacketed)

Euripides IV: Rhesus, The Suppliant Women, Orestes, Iphigenia in Aulis (The Complete Greek Tragedies #6)

by David Grene Euripides Richmond Lattimore

Volume 4 of the Grene and Lattimore editions offers the most comprehensive selection of the Greek tragedies available in English comprising Rhesus, The Suppliant Women, Orestes, and Iphigenia in Aulis.

The Iliad

by Homer W. H. Rouse Seth L. Schein Adam Nicholson

This translation of The Iliad equals Fitzgerald's earlier Odyssey in power and imagination. It recreates the original action as conceived by Homer, using fresh and flexible blank verse that is both lyrical and dramatic.

The Mortal Storm

by Phyllis Bottome

Freya Roth has everything a young woman could want. Her father is a kind and brilliant professor, her mother loving and beautiful, and there are three fine brothers. She is studying to be a doctor, and her suitro is rich and handsome. Then Hitler comes into power. Her older half-brothers turn against their stepfather, who is Jewish, and both are members of the Nazi Party. At the same time, Freya meets a young Communist peasant with whom she falls in love. Personal and political differences destroy the family's once uncloded happiness, and danger grows for Freya. This book, written in 1938, foreshadowed the horrors of years to come. It was also a feminist statement, made in an entertaining way. A film of this story with James Steward and Margaret Sullivan radically changed the plot although some of the seeds that must have attracted the producers are still there. However, the book is much less conventional and more forthright. "The Mortal Storm" is a poignant, exciting and thought-provoking book.

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