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Selected to Live

by Johanna-Ruth Dobschiner

Memoir of a woman's holocaust experience.

Self Abuse: Love, Loss and Fatherhood

by Jonathan Self

From the age of three Jonathan Self had only one ambition: not to be like his father. Despite his determination to be a better man -- and a better parent than his own had been -- Jonathan was a twice-divorced father of three and, at age thirty-five, spiraling. Self Abuseis the story of Jonathan's efforts to break free from the cycle of despair and dysfunction that characterized his youth. A brilliantly rendered, unapologetic memoir about the pain and joy of parenthood, Jonathan's story is as heartbreak...

Self-Consciousness: Memoirs

by John Updike

John Updike's memoirs consist of six Emersonian essays that together trace the inner shape of the life, up to the age of fifty-five, of a relatively fortunate American male. The author has attempted, his Foreword states, "to treat this life, this massive datum which happens to be mine, as a specimen life, representative in its odd uniqueness of all the oddly unique lives in this world." In the service of this metaphysical effort, he has been hair-raisingly honest, matchlessly precise, and self-effacingly humorous. He takes the reader beyond self-consciousness, and beyond self-importance, into sheer wonder at the miracle of existence.

Self Healing: My Life and Vision

by Meir Schneider

Autobiography of Meir Schneider who was born blind, but years later, through eye exercises and movement therapy, was able to read without glasses.

Seminary Boy

by John Cornwell

One of the most extraordinary memoirs of recent years, the acclaimed writer John Cornwell has finally written his own story, and the story of a choice he had to make between the Church and a life lived outside its confines. John Cornwell decided to become a priest at the age of thirteen, a strange choice perhaps for a boy who'd been sent to a 'convalescent home' for having whacked a nun about the head. Growing up in a chaotic household, sharing two rooms with his brothers and sisters, his hot-headed mother and - when he was around - absconding father, John spent his time roaming the war-torn streets of London looking for trouble. One day, at his mother's suggestion, he responded to a call from his local parish priest for altar servers. The 'dance of the rituals', the murmur of Latin and the candlelit dawn took hold of his imagination and provided him with a new and unexpected comfort. He left post-war London for Cotton, a seminary in the West Midlands. In this hidden, all-male world, with its rhythms of devotion and prayer, John grew up caught between his religious feelings and the rough and tumble of his life back in London; between seeking the face of God in the wild countryside around him and experiencing his first kiss; between monitoring his soul and watching a girl from a moving train whose face he will never forget. Cornwell tells us of a world now vanished: of the colourful community of priests in charge; of the boys and their intense and sometimes passionate friendships; of the hovering threat of abuse in this cloistered environment. And he tells us of his struggle to come to terms with a shameful secret from his London childhood - a vicious sexual attack which haunts his time at Cotton. A book of tremendous warmth and humour, 'Seminary Boy' is about an adolescent's search for a father and for a home.

The Senator and the Sharecropper: The Freedom Struggles of James O. Eastland and Fannie Lou Hamer

by Chris Myers Asch

In this fascinating study of race, politics, and economics in Mississippi, Chris Myers Asch tells the story of two extraordinary personalities--Fannie Lou Hamer and James O. Eastland--who represented deeply opposed sides of the civil rights movement. Both were from Sunflower County: Eastland was a wealthy white planter and one of the most powerful segregationists in the U. S. Senate, while Hamer, a sharecropper who grew up desperately poor just a few miles from the Eastland plantation, rose to become the spiritual leader of the Mississippi freedom struggle. Asch uses Hamer's and Eastland's entwined histories, set against the backdrop of Sunflower County's rise and fall as a center of cotton agriculture, to explore the county's changing social landscape during the mid-twentieth century and its persistence today as a land separate and unequal. Asch, who spent nearly a decade in Mississippi as an educator, offers a fresh look at the South's troubled ties to the cotton industry, the long struggle for civil rights, and unrelenting social and economic injustice through the eyes of two of the era's most important and intriguing figures.

The Senator and the Socialite: The True Story of America's First Black Dynasty

by Lawrence Otis Graham

This is the true story of America's first black dynasty. The years after the Civil War represented an astonishing moment of opportunity for African-Americans. The rush to build a racially democratic society from the ruins of slavery is never more evident than in the personal history of Blanche Kelso Bruce and his heirs. Born a slave in 1841, Bruce became a local Mississippi sheriff, developed a growing Republican power base, amassed a real-estate fortune, and became the first black to serve a full Senate term. He married Josephine Willson, the daughter of a wealthy black Philadelphia doctor. Together they broke racial barriers as a socialite couple in 1880s Washington, D.C. By befriending President Ulysses S. Grant, abolitionist Frederick Douglass, and a cadre of liberal black and white Republicans, Bruce spent six years in the U.S. Senate, then gained appointments under four presidents (Garfield, Arthur, Harrison, and McKinley), culminating with a top Treasury post, which placed his name on all U.S. currency. During Reconstruction, the Bruce family entertained lavishly in their two Washington town houses and acquired an 800-acre plantation, homes in four states, and a fortune that allowed their son and grandchildren to attend Phillips Exeter Academy and Harvard University, beginning in 1896. The Senator's legacy would continue with his son, Roscoe, who became both a protÉgÉ of Booker T. Washington and a superintendent of Washington, D.C.'s segregated schools. When the family moved to New York in the 1920s and formed an alliance with John D. Rockefeller Jr., the Bruces became an enviable force in Harlem society. Their public battle to get their grandson admitted into Harvard University's segregated dormitories elicited the support of people like W. E. B. Du Bois and Franklin D. Roosevelt, and broke brave new ground for blacks of their day. But in the end, the Bruce dynasty's wealth and stature would disappear when the Senator's grandson landed in prison following a sensational trial and his Radcliffe-educated granddaughter married a black Hollywood actor who passed for white. By drawing on Senate records, historic documents, and the personal letters of Senator Bruce, Josephine, their colleagues, friends, children, and grandchildren, author Lawrence Otis Graham weaves a riveting social history that spans 120 years. From Mississippi to Washington, D.C., to New York, The Senator and the Socialite provides a fascinating look into the history of race and class in America.

Senator Mansfield: The Extraordinary Life of a Great Statesman and Diplomat

by Don Oberdorfer

A spellbinding biography of one of the most powerful and dignified men ever to come to DC-Senator Mike Mansfield. Mike Mansfield's career as the longest serving majority leader is finally given its due in this extraordinary biography. In many respects, Mansfield's dignity and decorum represent the high-water mark of the US Senate: he was respected as a leader who helped build consensus on tough issues and was renowned for his ability to work across the aisle and build strong coalitions. Amazingly, he would have breakfast every morning with a member of the opposing party. Mansfield was instrumental in pushing through some of the most influential legislation of the twentieth century. He was at the helm when the Senate passed landmark legislation such as the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, the creation of Medicare, and the nuclear test ban treaty. Mansfield played a crucial role in shaping America's foreign policy, corresponding with JFK about his opposition to the growing presence of the US in Southeast Asia. As ambassador to Japan, his conversations with Cambodia and China paved the way for Nixon's historic trip to China in 1972.

Senior Year: A Father, a Son, and High School Baseball

by Dan Shaughnessy

In Senior Year, Dan Shaughnessy focuses his acclaimed sportswriting talent on his son Sam's senior year of high school, a turning point in any young life and certainly in the relationship between father and son. Sam is a natural hitter who quickly ascended the ranks of youth baseball. Now nicknamed the 3-2 Kid for his astonishing ability to hover between success and failure in everything he does, Sam is finally a senior and it is all on the line: what college to attend; how to keep his grades up and his head down until graduation; and whether his final high school baseball season will end in disappointment or triumph. All along the way, Dad is there, chronicling that universal experience of putting your child out on the field--and into the world--and hoping for the best. With gleaming insight, wicked humor, and, at times, the searching soul of an unsure father, Shaughnessy illuminates how sports connect generations and how they help us grow up--and let go.

A Sense of the World: How a Blind Man Became History's Greatest Traveler

by Jason Roberts

A biography of James Holman (1786-1857). James Holman was a 19th-century British naval officer who became blind at 25, but nevertheless became the greatest traveler of his time. With little money, and long before motorized conveyances made travel easy or popular, James Holman independently traveled over a quarter of a million miles, visiting more than 200 distinct cultures. Be forewarned, this book also contains some rather graphic and disturbing descriptions of the treatment of the Blind in the 19th century.

Sensory Biographies: Lives and Deaths Among Nepal's Yolmo Buddhists

by Robert R. Desjarlais

Sensory Biographies details the life histories of two Yolmo elders, a women in her late eighties known as Kisang Omu, and a Buddhist priest in his mid eighties known as Ghang Lama.

Sequoyah's Gift: A Portrait of the Cherokee Leader

by Janet Klausner Duane King

A biography of the Cherokee Indian who created a method for his people to write and read their own language.

The Serpents of Paradise

by Edward Abbey

The selections gathered here are arranged chronologically by incident, not by date of publication, to offer Edward Abbey's life from the time he was the boy called Ned in Home, Pennsylvania, until his death in Tucson at age 62.

Servants of Allah: African Muslims Enslaved in the Americas

by Sylviane A. Diouf

Explores the stories of African Muslim slaves in the New World. The author argues that although Islam as brought by the Africans did not outlive the last slaves, "what they wrote on the sands of the plantations is a successful story of strength, resilience, courage, pride, and dignity. " She discusses Christian Europeans, African Muslims, the Atlantic slave trade, literacy, revolts, and the Muslim legacy. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR

The Service

by Reinhard Gehlen

The mmoirs of a Nazi General who cooperated with the Allies.

Service Included: Four-Star Secrets of an Eavesdropping Waiter

by Phoebe Damrosch

Kitchen Confidential meets Sex and the City in this delicious, behind-the-scenes memoir from the first female captain at one of New York City's most prestigious restaurants. While Phoebe Damrosch was figuring out what to do with her life, she supported herself by working as a waiter. Before long she was a captain at the New York City four-star restaurant Per Se, the culinary creation of master chef Thomas Keller. Service Included is the story of her experiences there: her obsession with food, her love affair with a sommelier, and her observations of the highly competitive and frenetic world of fine dining. She also provides the following dining tips: Please do not ask your waiter what else he or she does. Please do not steal your waiter's pen. Please do not say you're allergic when you don't like something. Please do not send something back after eating most of it. Please do not make faces or gagging noises when hearing the specials-someone else at the table might like to order one of them. After reading this book, diners will never sit down at a restaurant table the same way again.

Serving in Silence: The Story of Margarethe Cammermeyer

by Chris Fisher Margarethe Cammermeyer

In 1989, in a routine interview for top-secret security clearance - a requisite for admission to the Army War College - Colonel Margarethe Cammermeyer was asked about her sexual orientation. After pausing for a moment to take a breath, she said, "I am a lesbian." Thus began an ordeal that continues to this day. Intense media coverage of the former colonel's dismissal from the U.S. Army has stirred debate all the way to the presidency. Her Bronze Star for duty in Vietnam, her being named Nurse of the Year by the Veterans Administration, and her role as Chief Nurse of the Washington State National Guard marked a long and distinguished military career. Her goal to become Chief Nurse of the entire National Guard was abruptly ended in 1992 by her discharge based on sexual orientation. With the same calm, assured articulation that won her one leadership position after another, Cammermeyer writes of her decision to challenge official policy on homosexuality and of her recent victory in Federal District Court. But this is not only a book about what she described in Time as "sticking around to get beaten up." It is also about coming of age, being a mother, and finding one's center; about "coming out," the daily horrors of nursing in Vietnam, and a female soldier's life.

Set Your Compass True

by Signe Bergstrom

This remarkable collection of quotations by John, Robert, and Edward Kennedy offers a wealth of advice and wisdom on leading a meaningful life. Within the book, the brothers opine, advise, and muse on many of life's issues and questions, from taking risks to solitude. At once poignant, witty, and insightful, this small anthology--which includes twenty-four pages of beautiful photography of the Kennedys over the course of their lives--is a treasure for seekers of all ages.

Settin' the Woods on Fire: Confessions of Hank’s Steel Guitar Player

by Donald Hugh Helms Dale M. Vinicur

Biography of one of Hank Williams' fellow musicians, Don Helms

Setting Love in Order: Hope and Healing for the Homosexual

by Mario Bergner

Mario Bergner tells the story of his journey through life as a gay man in search of spiritual healing and acceptance from God. He shares the hope, questions, and truths he learned along the way. He shows how he came to know God and his understanding of the Bible. He believes that God loves everyone whether they are gay or straight and that God can restore and redeem anyone who seeks Him.

Setting Right: What Went Wrong?

by Kiran Bedi

Setting Right: What Went Wrong? is a collection of first-hand, volunteered accounts by individuals who had nothing to declare but their disturbed past-- each one an ocean of painful experiences. These persons-- men, women, adolescents, and even children-- had the courage to tell what went wrong in their lives; to what extent they themselves were responsible, and to what extent the external circumstances were beyond their control. Personally, all through my daily work, both in the police service and the community work, these innumerable accounts 'anger' me to seek remedies. I clearly see these lives exposing the apathy and callous neglect of those responsible for sufferings, which were seemingly inevitable, but certainly preventable. Wisdom is to learn from your own and others' mistakes. Being forewarned is being forearmed, and prevention is better than cure. These are very often repeated clichés but also highly steeped in reality.

Seven Brave Women

by Betsy Hearne Bethanne Andersen

Take a journey through time as a young girl recounts the exploits of her female ancestors, seven brave women who left their imprints on the past and on her. Beginning with the great-great-great-grandmother who came to America on a wooden sailboat, these women were devout and determined and tireless and beloved.

Seven Deadly Sins: My Pursuit of Lance Armstrong

by David Walsh

The story of Lance Armstrong - the cyclist who recovered from testicular cancer and went on to win the Tour de France a record seven times, the man who wrote a bestselling and inspirational account of his life, the charitable benefactor - seemed almost too good to be true. And it was. As early as Armstrong's first victory on the Tour in 1999, Sunday Times journalist David Walsh had reason to think that the incredible performances we were seeing from Armstrong were literally too good to be true. Based on insider information and dogged research, he began to unmask the truth. Cycling's biggest star used every weapon in his armoury to protect his name. But he could not keep everyone silent. In the autumn of 2012, the USADA published a damning report on Armstrong that resulted in the American being stripped of his seven Tour victories and left his reputation in shreds. Walsh's long fight to reveal the truth had been vindicated. This book tells the compelling story of one man's struggle to bring that truth to light against all the odds.

Seven Deadly Sins: Settling the Argument Between Born Bad and Damaged Good

by Corey Taylor

For the first time, Slipknot and Stone Sour frontman Corey Taylor speaks directly to his fans and shares his worldview about life as a sinner. And Taylor knows how to sin. As a small-town hero in the early '90s, he threw himself into a fierce-drinking, drug-abusing, hard-loving, live-for-the moment life. Soon Taylor's music exploded, and he found himself rich, wanted, and on the road. His new and ever-more extreme lifestyle had an unexpected effect, however; for the first time, he began to actively think about what it meant to sin and whether sinning could--or should--be recast in a different light. Seven Deadly Sins is Taylor's personal story, but it's also a larger discussion of what it means to be seen as either a "good" person or a "bad" one. Yes, Corey Taylor has broken the law and hurt people, but, if sin is what makes us human, how wrong can it be?

Seven Letters from Paris

by Samantha Vérant

Twenty years, seven letters, and one long-lost love of a lifetime At age 40, Samantha Verant's life is falling apart-she's jobless, in debt, and feeling stuck... until she stumbles upon seven old love letters from Jean-Luc, the sexy Frenchman she'd met in Paris when she was 19. With a quick Google search, she finds him, and both are quick to realize that the passion they felt 20 years prior hasn't faded with time and distance. Samantha knows that jetting off to France to reconnect with a man that she only knew for one sun-drenched, passion-filled day is crazy-but it's the kind of crazy she's been waiting for her whole life.

Showing 7,576 through 7,600 of 9,527 results

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