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The Good, the Bad, and Me

by Eli Wallach

The sparkling memoir of a movie icon's life in the footlights and on camera, The Good, the Bad, and Me tells the extraordinary story of Eli Wallach's many years dedicated to his craft. Beginning with his early days in Brooklyn and his college years in Texas, where he dreamed of becoming an actor, this book follows his career as one of the earliest members of the famed Actors Studio and as a Tony Award winner for his work on Broadway. Wallach has worked with such stars as Marlon Brando, Paul Newman, Marilyn Monroe, Gregory Peck, and Henry Fonda, and his many movies include The Magnificent Seven, How the West Was Won, and the iconic The Good, the Bad and the Ugly. For more than fifty years Eli Wallach held a special place in film and theater, and in a tale rich with anecdotes, wit, and remarkable insight he recounts his magical life in a world unlike any other.

The Good, the Bad, and the Grace of God

by Susy Flory Jep And Robertson

A Moving Story of Redemption and Second Chances Jep Robertson, the youngest son of Duck Commander Phil Robertson, and his wife, Jessica, open up about their personal trials, their early years together, and the challenges that might have destroyed them both had the grace of God not intervened. Jep describes being molested as a child and his reluctance to tell anyone until only a few years ago, his downward spiral into drug and alcohol abuse, and the eventual intervention of his family. Jessica shares about the difficult failure of her first marriage while still a teenager and the hurt that came along with it, much of it from the church. Her insecurities spun out of control as she wondered whether she would ever be good enough or pretty enough. This book is their love story but, more importantly, their love story for God."We are desperate to let people know that no matter what you've done; no matter what you've lived through, you can come out of it. You can be washed clean. You are redeemed."

Good Tidings and Great Joy

by Sarah Palin

Wish me a Merry Christmas. At a time when Christian values are challenged--when the greeting "Merry Christmas" has been replaced by the supposedly less offensive "Happy Holidays"--Governor Sarah Palin makes the case for bringing back the freedom to express the religious spirit of the season. In her bestselling books, Going Rogue and America by Heart, Palin has revealed how her strong Christian faith has guided her life and family. Now, in Good Tidings and Great Joy, she discusses one of Christianity's most sacred celebrations, and how the holiday has been robbed of its meaning and true tradition by the pressures of political correctness. Palin defends the importance of preserving Jesus Christ in Christmas--whether in public displays, school concerts, and pageants, or in our hearts--and delivers a sharp rebuke to today's society for the homogenization of the holiday season. Sharing personal memories from Palin Christmases past, she illustrates why she holds the celebration of Jesus Christ's Nativity so dear. Good Tidings and Great Joy revisits our traditional roots and the true meaning of Christmas. It is a call to action to readers to defend and openly celebrate the joys of their Christianity, and to say to one another, "Merry Christmas!"

Good Times, Bad Times

by Sir Harold Evans

In Harold Evans's classic memoir, he tells the inside story of Rupert Murdoch's takeover of the Times of London and his rise to become a global media powerIn 1981, Harold Evans was the editor of one of Britain's most prestigious publications, the Sunday Times, which had thrived under his watch. When Australian publishing baron Rupert Murdoch bought the daily Times of London, he persuaded Evans to become its editor with guarantees of editorial independence. But after a year of broken promises and conflict over the paper's direction, Evans departed amid an international media firestorm. Evans's story is a gripping, behind-the-scenes look at Murdoch's ascension to global media magnate. It is Murdoch laid bare, an intimate account of a man using the power of his media empire for his own ends. Riveting, provocative, and insightful, Good Times, Bad Times is as relevant today as when it was first written. This ebook features a new preface by the author, in which he discusses the Rupert Murdoch phone-hacking scandal.

Good to Go!

by Harry Constance Randall Fuerst

In 1966 Harry Constance became a member of the newly formed U.S. Navy SEALS TEAM II. By 1970 he was a veteran of 300 combat missions in Vietnam, had captured almost two hundred enemy prisoners, and had received 32 citations, including three bronze stars and a purple heart. In Good To Go, Constance powerfully recounts his experience during three tours in Vietnam as a member of Seal Team II, Seventh Platoon. Known as fierce warriors with amazing stealth and skill in battle, the Seals are an elite force trained to fight on sea, air, and land with sophisticated special operation warfare tactics. Made famous by Richard Marcinko's Rogue Warrior Books, here is a behind-the-scenes look at what Seal combat was really like. From the flood plains of the Mecong Delta to the beaches of the south China Sea, Good To Go takes readers on Constance's harrowing missions, along trails crisscrossed by trip wires and through dense jungles booby-trapped with live grenades. Each "Special Op" is dramatic: the Seventh Platoon sets up ambushes, infiltrates Viet Cong territory, preforms daring nighttime attacks, targets the location of high-level VC Officials, and narrowly escapes enemy fire. Constance gives an extra ordinary account of the Tet offensive, which his platoon fought from a hotel Mi Tho. But in recounting the ferocious battle of Tet, Constance shows why Seal humor and bravado always won the day. After Constance leaves Vietnam, Good To Go follows him as he plays a key role in the expansion of the Seal program. His duty training recruits for undercover clandestine Ops and going on dangerous assignments around globe - in South America hot spots and onboard nuclear submarines - reflects his inspiring dedication to the Seals. Constance's unforgettable memoir reveals the loyalty, bravery, and honor behind the Seal mystique. Packed with astonishing descriptions of the Seals real-life adventure in the deadliest of war zones, Good To Go captures the heroism and profound courage that have made the Seals legendary.

The Good Women of China

by Xinran

An unprecedented, intimate account of the lives of modern Chinese women, told by the women themselves -- true stories of the political and personal upheavals they have endured in their chaotic and repressive society. For eight groundbreaking years, Xinran hosted a radio program in China during which she invited women to call in and talk about themselves. Broadcast every evening, Words on the Night Breeze became famous throughout the country for its unflinching portrayal of what it meant to be a woman in modern China. Centuries of obedience to their fathers, husbands and sons, followed by years of fear under Communism, had made women terrified of talking openly about their feelings. Xinran won their trust and, through her compassion and ability to listen, became the first woman to hear their true stories.This unforgettable book is the story of how Xinran negotiated the minefield of restrictions imposed on Chinese journalists to reach out to women across the country. Through the vivid intimacy of her writing, these women confide in the reader, sharing their deepest secrets. Whether they are the privileged wives of party leaders or peasants in a forgotten corner of the countryside, they tell of almost inconceivable suffering: forced marriages, sexual abuse, separation of parents from their children, extreme poverty. But they also talk about love -- about how, despite cruelty, despite politics, the urge to nurture and cherish remains. Their stories changed Xinran's understanding of China forever. Her book will reveal the lives of Chinese women to the West as never before.

The Good Women of China

by Xinran

When Deng Xiaoping's efforts to "open up" China took root in the late 1980s, Xinran recognized an invaluable opportunity. As an employee for the state radio system, she had long wanted to help improve the lives of Chinese women. But when she was given clearance to host a radio call-in show, she barely anticipated the enthusiasm it would quickly generate. Operating within the constraints imposed by government censors, "Words on the Night Breeze" sparked a tremendous outpouring, and the hours of tape on her answering machines were soon filled every night. Whether angry or muted, posing questions or simply relating experiences, these anonymous women bore witness to decades of civil strife, and of halting attempts at self-understanding in a painfully restrictive society. In this collection, by turns heartrending and inspiring, Xinran brings us the stories that affected her most, and offers a graphically detailed, altogether unprecedented work of oral history.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Goodbye, Antoura: A Memoir of the Armenian Genocide

by Karnig Panian translated by Simon Beugekian edited by Aram Goudsouzian

When World War I began, Karnig Panian was only five years old, living among his fellow Armenians in the Anatolian village of Gurin. Four years later, American aid workers found him at an orphanage in Antoura, Lebanon. He was among nearly 1,000 Armenian and 400 Kurdish children who had been abandoned by the Turkish administrators, left to survive at the orphanage without adult care. This memoir offers the extraordinary story of what he endured in those years-as his people were deported from their Armenian community, as his family died in a refugee camp in the deserts of Syria, as he survived hunger and mistreatment in the orphanage. The Antoura orphanage was another project of the Armenian genocide: its administrators, some benign and some cruel, sought to transform the children into Turks by changing their Armenian names, forcing them to speak Turkish, and erasing their history. Panian's memoir is a full-throated story of loss, resistance, and survival, but told without bitterness or sentimentality. His story shows us how even young children recognize injustice and can organize against it, how they can form a sense of identity that they will fight to maintain. He paints a painfully rich and detailed picture of the lives and agency of Armenian orphans during the darkest days of World War I. Ultimately, Karnig Panian survived the Armenian genocide and the deprivations that followed. Goodbye, Antoura assures us of how humanity, once denied, can be again reclaimed.

Goodbye, Darkness: A Memoir of the Pacific War

by William R. Manchester

In this intensely powerful memoir, America's preeminent biographer-historian, who has written so brilliantly about World War II in his acclaimed lives of General Douglas MacArthur (American Caesar) and Winston Churchill (The Last Lion), looks back at his own early life and offers an unrivaled firsthand account of World War II in the Pacific, of what it looked like, sounded like, smelled like, and, most of all, what it felt like to one who underwent all but the ultimate of its experiences.

Goodbye, Little Rock And Roller

by Marshall Chapman

Goodbye, Little Rock and Roller is an inventive and original book from Nashville singer/songwriter Chapman, who uses twelve of her most resonant songs as entry points to many of her life's adventures. Not a memoir, but a map of the places Chapman's been and what went through her mind as she was traveling there, this book is funny and tender, warm and exuberant. Raised a debutante in Spartanburg, South Carolina, the daughter of a mill owner and firmly part of proper society, Chapman became a rocker at a time when women weren't yet picking up electric guitars. She is "a living example," as one reviewer wrote, "of the triumph of rock and roll over good breeding." From New Year's Eve in 1978 when Jerry Lee Lewis gave Chapman advice on how to live life ("I mean it's one thing when your mother says 'Honey don't you think you'd better slow down?' But when The Killer voices his concern....") to the time her black maid Cora Jeter took the seven-year-old to see Elvis, Goodbye, Little Rock and Roller goes to the moments when the influences on Chapman's songwriting and psyche were cemented. And it winningly reveals how the creative process comes from life: one of Chapman's favorite songs was written after waking up facedown in her underpants in her front-yard vegetable garden. Revealing intimate rock and roll moments and memories of a South Carolina childhood, Marshall Chapman is a fresh voice firmly in the Southern tradition.

Goodbye Mr. Socialism

by Antonio Negri Raf Valvola Scelsi

Goodbye Mr. Socialism offers a gripping encounter with one of today's leading leftists, presenting his most up-to-date analysis of global events and insight into the prospects for the Left in an age of neoliberalism. In his most accessible work yet, philosopher Antonio Negri discusses the state of the global Left since the end of the Cold War and suggests a new politics in a series of rousing conversations with Raf Valvola Scelsi. Scelsi prompts Negri to critique the episodes in the post-Cold War period that have afforded the Left opportunities to rethink its strategies and objectives. Addressing the twilight of social democracy, Negri offers a compelling defense of the prospects for social transformation.

Goodbye Natalie, Goodbye Splendour

by Dennis Davern Marti Rulli

REVISED EDITION with new updates and additional information not included in the original hardcover release!GOODBYE NATALIE, GOODBYE SPLENDOUR is the long-awaited, detailed account of events that led to the mysterious death of Hollywood legend Natalie Wood off the coast of Catalina Island on November 28, 1981. It is a story told by a haunted witness to that fateful evening: Dennis Davern, the young captain of Splendour, the yacht belonging to Wood and husband Robert Wagner. Davern initially backed up Wagner's version of that evening's events through a signed statement prepared by attorneys. But Davern's guilt over failing Natalie tormented him.Davern reached out to his old friend Marti Rulli, and little by little, at his own emotional pace, he revealed the details of his years in Wood's employ, of the fateful weekend that Natalie died, and of the events following her death that prevented him from telling the whole story--until now.

Goodbye to a River

by John Graves

In the 1950s, a series of dams was proposed along the Brazos River in north-central Texas. For John Graves, this project meant that if the stream's regimen was thus changed, the beautiful and sometimes brutal surrounding countryside would also change, as would the lives of the people whose rugged ancestors had eked out an existence there. Graves therefore decided to visit that stretch of the river, which he had known intimately as a youth.Goodbye to a River is his account of that farewell canoe voyage. As he braves rapids and fatigue and the fickle autumn weather, he muses upon old blood feuds of the region and violent skirmishes with native tribes, and retells wild stories of courage and cowardice and deceit that shaped both the river's people and the land during frontier times and later. Nearly half a century after its initial publication, Goodbye to a River is a true American classic, a vivid narrative about an exciting journey and a powerful tribute to a vanishing way of life and its ever-changing natural environment.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Goodbye Vietnam

by William Broyles Jr.

In this gripping memoir, a former marine returns to Vietnam to try to make sense of the war. Previously published as Brothers in Arms, this edition includes a new preface by the author.When William Broyles Jr. was drafted, he was a twenty-four-year-old student at Oxford University in England, hoping to avoid military service. During his physical exam, however, he realized that he couldn't let social class or education give him special privileges. He joined the marines, and soon commanded an infantry platoon in the foothills near Da Nang. More than a decade later, Broyles found himself flooded with emotion during the dedication of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, DC. He decided to return to Vietnam and confront what he'd been through. Broyles was one of the very first combat veterans to return to the battlefields. No American before or since has gone so deeply into the other side of the war: the enemy side. Broyles interviews dozens of Vietnamese, from the generals who ran the war to the men and women who fought it. He moves from the corridors of power in Hanoi--so low-tech that the plumbing didn't work--to the jungles and rice paddies where he'd fought. He meets survivors of American B-52 strikes and My Lai, and grieves with a woman whose son was killed by his own platoon. Along the way, Broyles also explores the deep bonds he shared with his own comrades, and the mystery of why men love war even as they hate it. Amidst the landscape of death, his formerly faceless enemies come to life. They had once tried to kill each other, but they are all brothers now.

The Google Boys: Sergey Brin and Larry Page In Their Own Words

by George Beahm

If you want to find something on the World Wide Web, you "Google" it. With its 1 million servers located around the world, the company handles over a billion search requests daily. But when the Internet first came online, people struggled to organize a seemingly infinite amount of information. Enter two computer science graduate students from Stanford, Larry Page and Sergey Brin, and the $229 billion behemoth we now know as Google was born. For the first time, the most thought-provoking, revealing, and inspiring quotes from Google's founders have been compiled into a single book. The Google Boys: Sergey Brin and Larry Page In Their Own Words is a comprehensive guidebook to the inner workings of Google's founders. Hundreds of their best quotes, comprising thoughts on business, management, entrepreneurship, technology, innovation, and life lessons, provide an intimate and direct look into the minds of these modern business icons. They are now highly respected, established figures in the tech industry, but Page and Brin, unlike industry icons like Steve Jobs or Bill Gates, have spent as little time as possible in front of the media. As a result, when Larry Page and Sergey Brin give time to speak, people listen. Carefully.

Goose: The Outrageous Life and Times of a Football Guy

by Tony Siragusa

A hugely popular and beloved football commentator and former player with the Indianapolis Colts and the Baltimore Ravens, Tony Siragusa offers his uncensored insider's look at the NFL and his hilarious take on life off the gridiron. The New York Times called him a "modern-day John Madden." Tony Soprano called him "Frankie Cortese." His teammates called him "Goose." Whatever you call him, Tony Siragusa is larger than life in every possible sense, from his personality to his physique to his colorful career, hilarious stories, and bombastic take on life. Goose is the book that Siragusa's fans have been clamoring for, to hear more from the Super Bowl champ-turned-commentator-turned-actor, who has brought his unmistakable style and intense love for life to every endeavor. In a memoir that is guaranteed to make you laugh, cheer, shake your head, laugh some more, and then think seriously, Siragusa offers stories, life lessons, and perspective gained from his unbelievable collection of experiences. He also offers a no-holds-barred look at the NFL, with locker room stories and surprising glimpses at the way things are done when the cameras (or the refs) aren't looking. His narratives range from hilarious anecdotes about his New Jersey childhood and wild college days, to behind-the-scenes glimpses at some of the greatest players in football history, to Goose's opinions about the current state of the NFL. And he shares them all with his signature love for life and uncensored insight.

Gorbachev: On My Country and the World

by Mikhail Gorbachev George Shriver

Here is the whole sweep of the Soviet experiment, as told by its last steward. Drawing on his own experience, rich archival material, and a keen sense of history and politics, Mikhail Gorbachev offers his rare perspective on a range of subjects concerning Russia's past, present, and future place in the world including the October Revolution, the Cold War, and key figures such as Lenin, Stalin, and Yeltsin. This book traces the arc of the U. S. S. R. 's development from the Bolshevik Revolution in 1917 to its surprisingly swift and sudden collapse in the early 1990s. Gorbachev also constructs a blueprint for where Russia needs to go in the next century, suggesting ways to strengthen the federation and achieve meaningful economic and political reforms. Finally, he examines the "new thinking" in foreign policy that helped to end the Cold War and shows how such approaches could help resolve a range of current crises, including NATO expansion, the role of the UN, the fate of nuclear weapons, and environmental problems.

The Gorbachev Phenomenon: A Historical Interpretation

by Moshe Lewin

The expanded edition includes 2 new chapters that explain the dramatic changes from 1989 to 1991. Lewin describes the complex historical roots of the turmoil in the USSR before its breakup.

The Gordon File: A Screenwriter Recalls Twenty Years of FBI Surveillance

by Bernard Gordon

For twenty-six years, the FBI devoted countless hours of staff time and thousands of U. S. taxpayer dollars to the surveillance of an American citizen named Bernard Gordon. Given the lavish use of resources, one might assume this man was a threat to national security or perhaps a kingpin of organized crime-not a Hollywood screenwriter whose most subversive act was joining the Communist Party during the 1940s when we were allied with the USSR in a war against Germany. For this honest act of political dissent, Gordon came to be investigated by the House Committee on Un-American Activities in 1952, blacklisted by the Hollywood film industry, and tailed by the FBI for over two decades. In The Gordon File, Bernard Gordon tells the compelling, cautionary story of his life under Bureau surveillance. Drawing on his FBI file of over 300 pages, which he obtained under the Freedom of Information Act, he traces how the Bureau followed him from Hollywood to Mexico, Paris, London, Rome, and even aboard a Dutch freighter as he created an unusually successful, albeit uncredited, career as a screenwriter and producer during the blacklist years. Comparing his actual activities during that time to records in the file, he pointedly and often humorously underscores how often the FBI got it wrong, from the smallest details of his life to the main fact of his not being a threat to national security. Most important, Gordon links his personal experience to the headlines of today, when the FBI is again assuming broad powers to monitor political dissidents it deems a threat to the nation. "Is it possible," he asks, "that books like this will help to move our investigative agencies from the job of blackmailing those who are critical of our imperfect democracy to arresting those who are truly out to destroy us?"

Gore Vidal

by Fred Kaplan

Fred Kaplan's insightful biography of the inimitable and brilliant Gore VidalFew writers of recent memory have distinguished themselves in so many fields, and so consummately, as Gore Vidal. A prolific novelist, Vidal also wrote for film and theater, and became a classic essayist of his own time, delivering prescient analyses of American society, politics, and culture. Known for his rapier wit and intelligence, Vidal moved with ease among the cultural elite--his grandfather was a senator, he was intimate with the Kennedys, and one of his best friends was Tennessee Williams. For this definitive biography, Fred Kaplan was given access to Vidal's papers and letters. The result is an insightful and entertaining portrait of an exceptional and mercurial writer.

Gore Vidal: Writer Against the Grain

by Jay Parini

A collection of critical essays from various literary critics.

Gorge

by Kara Richardson Whitely

Kara knew she could reach the summit of Mt. Kilimanjaro. She had done it once before. That's why, when she failed in a second attempt, it brought her so low. As she struggled with food addiction and looked for ways to cope with feelings of failure and shame, Kara's weight shot to more than 300 pounds. Deep in her personal gorge, Kara realized the only way out was up. She resolved to climb the mountain again-and this time, she would reach the summit without waiting for her plus-sized status to disappear.Gorge: My Journey Up Kilimanjaro at 300 Pounds is the raw story of Kara's ascent from the depths of self-doubt to the top of the world. Her difficult but inspiring trek speaks to every woman who has struggled with her self-image or felt that food was controlling her life. Honest and unforgettable, Kara's journey is one of intense passion, endurance, and self-acceptance. In Gorge, Kara shows that big women can do big things.

Gorgeous George

by John Capouya

This is the first-ever biography of the legendary wrestler Gorgeous George, filled with incredible never-before-told stories. George directly influenced the likes of Muhammad Ali, who took his bragging and boasting from George; James Brown, who began to wear sequined capes onstage after seeing George on TV; John Waters, whose films featured the outrageous drag queen Divine as an homage to George; and too many wrestlers to count. Amid these pop culture discoveries are firsthand accounts of the pro wrestling game from the 1930s to the 1960s. The ideal American male used to be stoic, quiet, and dignified. But for a young couple struggling to make ends meet, in the desperation born of the lingering Depression and wartime rationing, an idea was hatched that changed the face of American popular culture, an idea so bold, so over-the-top and absurd, that it was perfect. That idea transformed journeyman wrestler George Wagner from a dark-haired, clean-cut good guy to a peroxide-blond braggart who blatantly cheated every chance he got. Crowds were stunned-they had never seen anything like this before-and they came from miles around to witness it for themselves. Suddenly George-guided by Betty, his pistol of a wife-was a draw. With his golden tresses grown long and styled in a marcel, George went from handsome to . . . well . . . gorgeous overnight, the small, dank wrestling venues giving way to major arenas. As if the hair wasn't enough, his robes-unmanly things of silk, lace, and chiffon in pale pinks, sunny yellows, and rich mauves-were but a prelude to the act: the regal entrance, the tailcoat-clad valet spraying the mat with perfume, the haughty looks and sneers for the "peasants" who paid to watch this outrageously prissy hulk prance around the ring. How they loved to see his glorious mane mussed up by his manly opponents. And how they loved that alluringly alliterative name . . . Gorgeous George . . . the self-proclaimed Toast of the Coast, the Sensation of the Nation! All this was timed to the arrival of that new invention everyone was talking about-television. In its early days, professional wrestling and its larger-than-life characters dominated prime-time broadcasts-none more so than Gorgeous George, who sold as many sets as Uncle Miltie. Fans came in droves-to boo him, to stick him with hatpins, to ogle his gowns, and to rejoice in his comeuppance. He was the man they loved to hate, and his provocative, gender-bending act took him to the top of the entertainment world. America would never be the same again.

The Goshawk

by T. H. White

The Goshawk is a memoir by T. H. White, the author of The Once and Future King, chronicling multiple attempts, with various degrees of success, to acquire and train a Goshawk, a large bird of prey. White is a novice at the start of the book, and he brings the reader along with him as he slowly learns how to tame the fierce, fearless predators. Penguin Random House Canada is proud to bring you classic works of literature in e-book form, with the highest quality production values. Find more today and rediscover books you never knew you loved.

The Gospel According to Jesus Christ

by José Saramago Giovanni Pontiero

An extremely provocative and unconventional novelization of Christ's life by a Nobel-laureate.

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