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Sitting Bull (War Chiefs #5)

by Bill Dugan

When the gold-struck Northwest was opened up to settlement, westward expansion progressed from a trickle to a flood, devastating everything--and everyone--in its path. The Sioux and the Cheyenne knew that the hordes of settlers had to be stopped. But nothing--not even their peace-making attempts--could quell the greedy desires of the white man for land. Dependent upon buffalo for their livelihood, the Sioux found the great herds divided by the new railroad tracks and threatened on all sides by blue-uniformed soldiers. Soon, this proud people would find themselves drawn into a long, bloody battle against these soldiers, many hardened veterans of the Civil War. Only Sitting Bull had the courage to fight back, defying the inevitable consequences. In the aftermath of the disastrous battle of the Little Big Horn, Sitting Bull was ready to lead his people in one last try at self-determination--and survival. Impeccably researched, rich with real-life characters and period detail, this powerful historical novel vividly recounts the fall of the Sioux Nation and its inimitable leader, Sitting Bull, who heroically attempted to preserve his people's way of life in the face of overwhelming odds.

The Sitting Bull You Never Knew

by James Lincoln Collier

Explores the childhood, character, and influential events that shaped the life of Sitting Bull, the Sioux chief. Includes bibliographical references and index.

Six Men

by Alistair Cooke

Cooke looks at Charlie Chaplin, H. L. Mencken, Humphrey Bogart, Adlai Stevenson, Bertrand Russell, and Edward VIII.

Six Presidents from the Empire State

by Harry J. Sievers

Essays about Presidents Fillmore, Roosevelt, Arthur, Van Buren, Cleveland, and FDR.

Six Silent Men

by Reynel Martinez

"No way in hell you could survive 'out there' with six men. You couldn't live thirty minutes 'out there' with only six men." [pg. 13] In 1965 nearly four hundred men were interviewed and only thirty-two selected for the infant LRRP Detachment of the 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. Old-timers called it the suicide unit. Whether conducting prisoner snatches, search and destroy missions, or hunting for the enemy's secret base camps, LRRPs depended on one another 110 percent. One false step, one small mistake by one man could mean sudden death for all. Author Reynel Martinez, himself a 101st LRRP Detachment veteran, takes us into the lives and battles of the extraordinary men for whom the brotherhood of war was and is an ever-present reality: the courage, the sacrifice, the sense of loss when one of your own dies. In the hills, valleys, and triple-canopy jungles, the ambushes, firefights, and copter crashes, LRRPs were among the best and bravest to fight in Vietnam.

Six String Rocketeer: Holding Life Together When Your Parents Split Apart

by Jesse Butterworth

The painful, scary, but sometimes hilarious true story of how one guy survived his parents' divorce. And lived to sing about it. The teenage years are tough as it is, but throw in the fact that your parents are divorcing and it's like fuel on the fire. It started with the poorly muffled fights in his parents' bedroom. They just seemed to get worse, and it seemed that the inevitable would happen. Finally, it did and the family meeting was called. Jesse Butterworth had a hunch his folks were going to announce they were separating-but the two youngest boys were certain they'd be told they were going to Disneyland. No such luck. What happens when your world falls apart? How do you handle it when the two people you trusted most totally disappoint you...and seemingly destroy your already shaky life? That's what happened to Jesse Butterworth, and he tells his story with humor, honesty, and heart. He also shows how he figured out what to do with the emotions that come with divorce: anger, hurt, frustration, and loss. Picking up a beat up guitar, Jesse discovered that he could turn his misery into music and his pain into passion-becoming theSix String Rocketeer. In the process Jesse realized that the wounds that hurt you can become the wounds that heal you.

The Six Wives of Henry VIII

by Alison Weir

A collective biography of the six wives of Henry VIII.

Sixteen Years In Sixteen Seconds

by Paula Yoo

Biography of Sammy Lee who won olympic gold metals for diving.

The Sixties: Diaries:1960-1969

by Christopher Isherwood

This second volume of Christopher Isherwood's remarkable diaries opens on his fifty-sixth birthday, as the fifties give way to the decade of social and sexual revolution. Isherwood takes the reader from the bohemian sunshine of Southern California to a London finally swinging free of post-war gloom, to the racy cosmopolitanism of New York and to the raw Australian outback. He charts his ongoing quest for spiritual certainty under the guidance of his Hindu guru, and he reveals in reckless detail the emotional drama of his love for the American painter Don Bachardy, thirty years his junior and struggling to establish his own artistic identity. The diaries are crammed with wicked gossip and probing psychological insights about the cultural icons of the time-Francis Bacon, Richard Burton, Leslie Caron, Marianne Faithfull, David Hockney, Mick Jagger, Hope Lange, W. Somerset Maugham, John Osborne, Vanessa Redgrave, Tony Richardson, David O. Selznick, Igor Stravinsky, Gore Vidal, and many others. But the diaries are most revealing about Isherwood himself-his fiction (including A Single Man and Down There on a Visit), his film writing, his college teaching, and his affairs of the heart. He moves easily from Beckett to Brando, from arthritis to aggression, from Tennessee Williams to foot powder, from the opening of Cabaret on Broadway (which he skipped) to a close analysis of Gide. In the background run references to the political and historical events of the period: the anxieties of the Cold War, Yuri Gagarin's spaceflight, de Gaulle and Algeria, the eruption of violence in America's inner cities, the Vietnam War, the Summer of Love, the moon landing, and the raising and lowering of hemlines. Isherwood is well known for his prophetic portraits of a morally bankrupt Europe on the eve of World War II; in this unparalleled chronicle, The Sixties, he turns his fearless eye on the decade that more than any other has shaped the way we live now.

The Sixties: The Last Journal, 1960-1972

by Lewis M. Dabney Edmund O. Wilson

Edited by Wilson's biographer, this volume poignantly -- and defiantly -- records the final years of one of our foremost critics and writers, taking its place alongside his major works, including "To the Finland Station", "Patriotic Gore", "The Shores of Light, and Letters on Literature and Politics", as an enduring contribution to American culture. In "The Sixties" Wilson also struggles with his aging, as intellectual and personal curiosity contend against weakening physical powers, and flirtations that afford a sense of biological revival strain his relationship with his wife, Elena. He watches his children establishing their own lives and is aware of unfulfilled relationships with them. Yet, as he plunges into the contemporary scene of art, thought, and public affairs, the pull of his personal and cultural past is strengthened by the sense of his approaching end. Witnessing his own foibles and the ironies of human nature, expressing feeling more deeply than he often had in his journal, he writes his account of this decade with a concentration undiluted by other large-scale projects. The extraordinary personal record begun in another pivotal period in American life, with "The Twenties", comes to a fitting culmination in "The Sixties".

Siyaramsharan Gupta

by Premshankar Tapati Chowdhurie

Life and works of the poet Siyaramsharan Gupta. Translated from the Hindi original by Tapati Chowdhurie.

Sizwe's Test: A Young Man's Journey Through Africa's AIDS Epidemic

by Jonny Steinberg

At the age of twenty-nine, Sizwe Magadla is among the most handsome, well-educated, and richest of the men in his poverty-stricken village. Dr. Hermann Reuter, a son of old South West African stock, wants to show the world that if you provide decent treatment, people will come and get it, no matter their circumstances. Sizwe and Hermann live at the epicenter of the greatest plague of our times, the African AIDS epidemic. In South Africa alone, nearly 6 million people in a population of 46 million are HIV-positive. Already, Sizwe has watched several neighbors grow ill and die, yet he himself has pushed AIDS to the margins of his life and associates it obliquely with other people's envy, with comeuppance, and with misfortune. When Hermann Reuter establishes an antiretroviral treatment program in Sizwe's district and Sizwe discovers that close family members have the virus, the antagonism between these two figures from very different worlds -- one afraid that people will turn their backs on medical care, the other fearful of the advent of a world in which respect for traditional ways has been lost and privacy has been obliterated -- mirrors a continent-wide battle against an epidemic that has corrupted souls as much as bodies. A heartbreaking tale of shame and pride, sex and death, and a continent's battle with its demons, Steinberg's searing account is a tour-de-force of literary journalism.

A Sketch: The Original 1905 Biography of Joshua L. Chamberlain

by Brian L. Higgins

Written in 1905 by the Chamberlain Association of America, Higgins felt this book should be reprinted in its original format.

Sketches from a Life

by George F. Kennan

Written originally as a series of entries in a travel diary and now considered one of the important memoirs of the time, national bestseller "Sketches from a Life" is Kennan's, impressionistic record of his experiences with 20th-century history.

The Skies Belong to Us: Love and Terror in the Golden Age of Hijacking

by Brendan I. Koerner

In an America torn apart by the Vietnam War and the demise of sixties idealism, airplane hijackings were astonishingly routine. Over a five-year period starting in 1968, the desperate and disillusioned seized commercial jets nearly once a week, using guns, bombs, and jars of acid. Some hijackers wished to escape to foreign lands, where they imagined being hailed as heroes; others aimed to swap hostages for sacks of cash. Their criminal exploits mesmerized the country, never more so than when the young lovers at the heart of Brendan I. Koerner's The Skies Belong to Us pulled off the longest-distance hijacking in American history. A shattered Army veteran and a mischievous party girl, Roger Holder and Cathy Kerkow commandeered Western Airlines Flight 701 as a vague protest against the war. Through a combination of savvy and dumb luck, the couple managed to flee across an ocean with a half-million dollars in ransom, a feat that made them notorious around the globe. Koerner spent four years chronicling this madcap tale, which involves a cast of characters ranging from exiled Black Panthers to African despots to French movie stars. He combed through over 4,000 declassified documents and interviewed scores of key figures in the drama--including one of the hijackers, whom Koerner discovered living in total obscurity. Yet The Skies Belong to Us is more than just an enthralling yarn about a spectacular heist and its bittersweet, decades-long aftermath. It is also a psychological portrait of America at its most turbulent, and a testament to the madness that can grip a nation when politics fail.

Skin Game

by Caroline Kettlewell

"There was a very fine, an elegant pain, hardly a pain at all, like the swift and fleeting burn of a drop of hot candle wax . . . Then the blood welled up and began to distort the pure, stark edges of my delicately wrought wound. "The chaos in my head spun itself into a silk of silence. I had distilled myself to the immediacy of hand, blade, blood, flesh." There are an estimated two to three million "cutters" in America, but experts warn that, as with anorexia, this could be just the tip of the iceberg of those affected by this little-known disorder. Cutting has only just begun to enter public consciousness as a dangerous affliction that tends to take hold of adolescent girls and can last, hidden and untreated, well into adulthood. Caroline Kettlewell is an intelligent woman with a promising career and a family. She is also a former cutter, and the first person to tell her own story about living with and overcoming the disorder. She grew up on the campus of a boys' boarding school where her father taught. As she entered adolescence, the combination of a family where frank discussion was avoided and life in what seemed like a fishbowl, where she and her sister were practically the only girls the students ever saw, became unbearable for Caroline. She discovered that the only way to find relief from overpowering feelings of self-consciousness, discomfort, and alienation was to physically hurt herself. She began cutting her arms and legs in seventh grade, and continued into her twenties. Why would a rational person resort to such extreme measures? How did she recognize and overcome her problem? In a memoir startling for its honesty, humor, and poignancy, Caroline Kettlewell offers a clear-eyed account of her own struggle to survive this debilitating affliction.

Skin: Talking about Sex, Class, and Literature

by Dorothy Allison

A collection of critical essays from award-winning author Dorothy Allison about identity, gender politics, and queer theory, now with a new preface <P> Lambda Award and American Library Association's Stonewall Book Award-winning author Dorothy Allison is known for her bold and insightful writing on issues of class and sexuality. In Skin, she approaches these topics through twenty-three impassioned essays that explore her identity--from her childhood in a poor family in South Carolina to her adult life as a lesbian in the suburbs of New York--and her sexuality. In "Gun Crazy," Allison delves into what guns meant to the men and women around her when she was growing up. She gives insight into the importance of speaking professionally about sexuality in "Talking to Straight People," and articulates the danger women feel about revealing their personal desires, even within feminist communities, in "Public Silence, Private Terror." Allison is fearless in her discussion of many social and political taboos. Compelling and raw, Skin is an honest and intimate work--perfect for Dorothy Allison fans and new readers alike.

Sky Burial: An Epic Love Story of Tibet

by Xinran Xue

In 2002 Xinran's Good Women of China became an international bestseller, revealing startling new truths about Chinese life to the West. Now she returns with an epic story of love, friendship, courage and sacrifice set in Chinese-occupied Tibet. Based on a true story, Xinran's extraordinary second book takes the reader right to the hidden heart of one of the world's most mysterious and inaccessible countries. In March 1958, Shu Wen learns that her husband, an idealistic army doctor, has died while serving in Tibet. Determined to find out what happened to him, she courageously sets off to join his regiment. But to her horror, instead of finding a Tibetan people happily welcoming their Chinese "liberators" as she expected, she walks into a bloody conflict, with the Chinese subject to terrifying attacks from Tibetan guerrillas. It seems that her husband may have died as a result of this clash of cultures, this disastrous misunderstanding. But before she can know his fate, she is taken hostage and embarks on a life-changing journey through the Tibetan countryside -- a journey that will last twenty years and lead her to a deep appreciation of Tibet in all its beauty and brutality. Sadly, when she finally discovers the truth about her husband, she must carry her knowledge back to a China that, in her absence, has experienced the Cultural Revolution and changed beyond recognition.

Slackjaw

by Jim Knipfel

It wasn't until he was in his early twenties that doctors discovered that Jim Knipfel's nearsightedness was the result of an untreatable rare genetic eye disease known as retinitis pigmentosa, which, they said, would leave him blind within a few short years.

Slander

by Ann Coulter

"The immutable fact of politics in America is this: liberals hate conservatives." Ann Coulter, whose examination of the Clinton impeachment was a major national bestseller and earned widespread praise, now takes on an even tougher issue. At a time when Democrats and Republicans should be overwhelmingly congenial, American political debate has become increasingly hostile, overly personal, and insufferably trivial. Whether conducted in Congress or on the political talk shows, played out at dinners or cocktail parties, politics is a nasty sport. At the risk of giving away the ending: It's all liberals' fault. Cultlike in their behavior, vicious in their attacks on Republicans, and in almost complete control of mainstream national media, the left has been merciless in portraying all conservatives as dumb, racist, power hungry, homophobic, and downright scary. This despite the many Republican accomplishments of the last few decades, as well as the Bush administration's expert handling of the country's affairs in the wake of the worst attacks on American soil and of the war that followed. With incisive reasoning and meticulous research, Ann Coulter examines the events and personalities that have shaped modern political discourse-- the bickering, backstabbing, and name-calling that have made cultural mountains out of partisan molehills. She demonstrates how the media, especially, are biased-- and usually wrongheaded-- and have done all in their power to obfuscate the issues and the people behind them, bending over backward to villainize and belittle the right, while rarely missing an opportunity to praise the left. Perhaps if conservatives had had total control over every major means of news dissemination for a quarter century, they would have forgotten how to debate, too, and would just call liberals stupid and mean. But that's an alternative universe. In this universe, the public square is wall-to-wall liberal propaganda. Refreshingly honest and unerringly timely, Slander continues where Bernard Goldberg's number one bestselling Bias left off.

A Slant of Sun: One Child's Courage

by Beth Kephart

For Beth Kephart's son, the diagnosis was "pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified" -- a broad spectrum of difficulties, including autistic features. As the author and her husband discover, all that label really means is that their son Jeremy is "different in a million wonderful ways, and also different in ways that need our help". With the help of passionate parental involvement and the kindness of a few open hearts, Jeremy slowly emerges from a world of obsessive play rituals, atypical language constructions, endless pacing, and lonely frustrations. Triumphantly, he begins to engage others, describe his thoughts and passions, and build essential friendships.

Slash: The Autobiography

by Anthony Bozza Slash

From one of the greatest rock guitarists of our era comes a memoir that redefines sex, drugs, and rock 'n' roll He was born in England but reared in L.A., surrounded by the leading artists of the day amidst the vibrant hotbed of music and culture that was the early seventies. Slash spent his adolescence on the streets of Hollywood, discovering drugs, drinking, rock music, and girls, all while achieving notable status as a BMX rider. But everything changed in his world the day he first held the beat-up one-string guitar his grandmother had discarded in a closet. The instrument became his voice and it triggered a lifelong passion that made everything else irrelevant. As soon as he could string chords and a solo together, Slash wanted to be in a band and sought out friends with similar interests. His closest friend, Steven Adler, proved to be a conspirator for the long haul. As hairmetal bands exploded onto the L.A. scene and topped the charts, Slash sought his niche and a band that suited his raw and gritty sensibility. He found salvation in the form of four young men of equal mind: Axl Rose, Izzy Stradlin, Steven Adler, and Duff McKagan. Together they became Guns N' Roses, one of the greatest rock 'n' roll bands of all time. Dirty, volatile, and as authentic as the streets that weaned them, they fought their way to the top with groundbreaking albums such as the iconic Appetite for Destruction and Use Your Illusion I and II. Here, for the first time ever, Slash tells the tale that has yet to be told from the inside: how the band came together, how they wrote the music that defined an era, how they survived insane, never-ending tours, how they survived themselves, and, ultimately, how it all fell apart. This is a window onto the world of the notoriously private guitarist and a seat on the roller-coaster ride that was one of history's greatest rock 'n' roll machines, always on the edge of self-destruction, even at the pinnacle of its success. This is a candid recollection and reflection of Slash's friendships past and present, from easygoing Izzy to ever-steady Duff to wild-child Steven and complicated Axl. It is also an intensely personal account of struggle and triumph: as Guns N' Roses journeyed to the top, Slash battled his demons, escaping the overwhelming reality with women, heroin, coke, crack, vodka, and whatever else came along. He survived it all: lawsuits, rehab, riots, notoriety, debauchery, and destruction, and ultimately found his creative evolution. From Slash's Snakepit to his current band, the massively successful Velvet Revolver, Slash found an even keel by sticking to his guns. Slash is everything the man, the myth, the legend, inspires: it's funny, honest, inspiring, jaw-dropping . . . and, in a word, excessive.

The Slate Diaries

by Judith Shulevitz Jodi Kantor Cyrus Krone

Each week the editors of Slate, one of the on-line literary magazines, ask a different person to keep a diary. The Slate Diaries is a selection of some of the best of those diaries. Contributors include distinguished writers.

Slave Hunter: One Man's Global Quest to Free Victims of Human Trafficking

by Aaron Cohen Christine Buckley

From living the rock star life to wading through the world's war zones, refugee camps, and brothels, Aaron Cohen left behind his closest friends, his dying father, and his partnership with a legendary musician to take on treacherous rescue missions in search of modern-day slaves.

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