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Flight into Freedom and Beyond

by Eileen Caddy

An autobiographical tale of forgiveness, jealousy, hatred, and doubt involved in the break-up of a marriage.

Flight: My Life in Mission Control

by Chris Kraft

Flight is the stirring account of the U.S. space program from its infancy to its greatest triumphs - written by the one man who was there for it all, Christopher Columbus Kraft, Jr., the first NASA flight director.

The Flight of Jesse Leroy Brown

by Theodore Taylor

This volume tells the story of Jesse Leroy Brown, who became the Navy's first black pilot. Taylor consulted Brown's training and flight records and logs and includes quotes from them, in addition to letters. He describes Brown's training, experiences in combat, personal life, and other details. Annotation ©2007 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

The Flight of the Romanovs: A Family Saga

by Constantine Pleshakov John Curtis Perry

A saga of love and lust, personal tensions and rivalries, antagonisms and hatreds, The Flight of the Romanovs describes the last century of the Russian imperial dynasty-a century that saw the greatest social and political upheavals in all of recorded history. Drawing upon a wealth of untapped resources from Russian, British, and American archives, including unpublished diaries of many of the principal characters and never-before-published photographs, Perry and Pleshakov render an indelible portrait of a family and their time, from the youth of Alexander III in the 1860s to the death, one hundred years later, of his daughter Olga Alexandrovna, the last Grand Duchess. Set against the backdrop of this most cataclysmic century, The Flight of the Romanovs is a must-read for anyone interested in this fascinating dynasty, Russian history, and the history of European royalty.

Flight to Arras

by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

A recollection of the shattering days during World War II when, though the fall of France was imminent, a handful of French pilots continued to fight on against the Germans. Translated by Lewis Galantière.

Flight to Arras

by Antoine De Saint-Exupéry Lewis Galantière

A memoir by French author Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. Written in 1942, Flight to Arras recounts the author's role in the French Air Force as a pilot during the Battle of France in 1940.

Flights of Fantasy: The Unauthorized but True Story of Radio & TV's Adventures of Superman

by Michael J. Hayde

Superman isn't going away anytime soon. The Man of Steel thrives, outlasting flagging comic magazine sales, mediocre box office returns, dwindling Nielsen ratings and repeated attempts to give him a makeover. His owners kill him off, and he refuses to stay dead. He's still the consummate superhero; the most recognizable comic book character of all time and one of American literature's most famous creations. How did that happen? This book will answer that question.

Flim-Flam Man: A True Family History

by Jennifer Vogel

One frosty winter morning, Jennifer Vogel opened the newspaper and read that her father had gone on the run. John Vogel, fifty-two, had been arrested for single-handedly counter-feiting nearly $20 million in U.S. currency -- the fourth-largest sum ever seized by federal agents -- and then released pending trial. Though Jennifer hadn't spoken to her father in more than four years, the police suspected he might turn up at her Minneapolis apartment. She examined the shadows outside her building, thought she spotted him at the grocery store and the bus stop. He had simply vanished. Framed around the six months her father eluded authorities, Jennifer's memoir documents the police chase -- stakeouts, lie detector tests, even a segment on Unsolved Mysteries -- and vividly chronicles her tumultuous childhood while examining her father's legacy. A lifelong criminal who robbed banks, burned down buildings, scammed investors, and even plotted murder, John Vogel was also a hapless dreamer who wrote a novel, baked lemon meringue pies, and took his ten-year-old daughter to see Rocky in an empty theater on Christmas Eve. When it came time to pass his counterfeit bills, he spent them at Wal-Mart for political reasons. Culling from memories, photo albums, public documents, and interviews with the handful of people who knew the real John Vogel, Jennifer has created an intensely moving psychological portrait of a charismatic, larger-than-life figure -- a father who loved her and whom, in spite of everything, she loved back.

Flip

by Kevin Cook

The rags-to-riches story of a groundbreaking, beloved entertainer When The Flip Wilson Show debuted in 1970, black faces were still rare on television, black hosts nonexistent. So how did Clerow "Flip" Wilson go from Jersey City grade-school dropout to national celebrity, heralded on the cover of Time as "TV's First Black Superstar"? Flip is a candid, entertaining biography of a consummate comedian who changed the face of American popular culture. Kevin Cook chronicles Flip's meteoric rise through the Chitlin' Circuit of segregated nightclubs to his breakthrough on Johnny Carson's Tonight Show to his hit variety show, on which he created such outrageous and hilarious characters as the sassy Geraldine and flock-fleecing Reverend Leroy. As one of the biggest stars of his time, he performed and partied with Richard Pryor, George Carlin, Michael Jackson, Elvis Presley, and other stars of the 1970s. Drawing on interviews with family, friends, and celebrities, Cook delivers the inspiring story of a complex man who broke the prime-time color barrier, blazing a trail for generations of African American performers who followed him. .

Flips and Tips: Fun Advice from Today’s Top Skaters and Gymnasts

by Pohla Smith

How to improve your athletic skills, with tips from famous skaters and gymnasts.

Flirting in Spanish: What Mexico Taught Me About Love, Living and Forgiveness

by Susan McKinney De Ortega

A woman of privilege falls in love with a much younger and uneducated man in Mexico. Together they discover that love has no boundaries. McKinney recounts the joys and struggles of crossing cultural borders and building a life she had never imagined.

Flirting with Danger

by Siobhan Darrow

Former star correspondent for CNN, Siobhan Darrow covered the world's hottest war zones over the last two decades, reporting from the front lines in Moscow, Chechnya, the Balkans, Albania, Israel, and Northern Ireland. Her fearless pursuit of stories placed her in countless life-threatening situations, prompting Darrow to wonder what about her character so attracted her to adrenaline, and so alienated her from the family life a part of her longed for. Darrow approaches this question with the same honesty-and seat-of-the-pants courage-that established her reputation as a premiere reporter, and the answers she arrives at form this riveting memoir of a woman assigned to cover history in the making, even as she chases down the most elusive "get" of all: her own happiness.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Flirting with Faith

by Joan Ball

As a thirty-seven-year-old, highly skeptical, deeply rational woman, Joan had it all: loving family, extravagant home, a high-profile career, even personal contentment. So Joan was more surprised than anyone when she was relieved in an instant from the luxury of spiritual doubt and compelled to realign her life around practices of faith--about which she was a novice. With an unexplainable desire to pursue whatever God had for her at whatever cost was called for, Joan left her high-salary profession, sold her home and all her furniture (with her husband's support), and started life from a blank slate. Finally realizing that she had been flirting with faith since she was a young teen, Joan fell in love with the God who had been pursuing her.Joan candidly shares the story of her radical life change as she moved from atheist, to agnostic in addiction recovery, to the unexpected moment when she was "struck" Christian. As Joan lets go of control and convention, her skepticism is gradually replaced with a realization that embracing her new faith with radical abandon led to a far more mysterious and countercultural lifestyle than she'd ever imagined.

Floating City

by Sudhir Venkatesh

After his insider's study of Chicago crack gangs electrified the academy, Columbia University sociologist Sudhir Venkatesh spent a decade immersed in New York's underbelly, observing the call girls, drug dealers, prostitutes and other strivers that make up this booming underground economy. Amidst the trust-funder cocktail parties, midtown strip clubs, and immigrant-run sex shops, he discovers a surprisingly fluid and dynamic social world - one that can be found in global cities everywhere - as traditional boundaries between class, race and neighbourhood dissolve. In Floating City, Venkatesh explores New York from high to low, tracing the invisible threads that bind a handful of ambitious urban hustlers, from a Harvard-educated socialite running a high-end escort service to a Harlem crack dealer adapting to changing demands by selling cocaine to hedge fund managers and downtown artists. In the process, and as he questions his own reasons for going deeper into this subterranean world, Venkatesh finds something truly unexpected - community. Floating City is Venkatesh's journey through the 'vast invisible continent' of New York's underground economy - a thriving yet largely unseen world that exists in parallel to our own, at the heart of every city.

The Flock

by Joan Frances Casey Lynn Wilson

When, as a twenty-six-year-old married graduate student, Joan Frances Casey awoke on the ledge of a building ready to jump, she did not know how she had gotten there. And it wasn't the first time she had blanked out. This time, she thought she would give therapy another try. After only a few sessions, Lynn Wilson, an experienced psychiatric social worker, was shocked to discover that Joan had MPD-Multiple Personality Disorder. And as she came to know Joans distinct selves, Lynn uncovered a nightmarish pattern of emotional and physical abuse, including rape and incest, that nearly succeeded in smothering the artistic and intellectual gifts of this amazing young woman. In an extraordinary move that challenged the medical establishment-many of whom believe MPD does not exist-Lynn embarked on a radical program of reparenting therapy to bring out and individually treat Joans twenty-four separate personalities: Missy, the five-year-old artist; Jo, the scholar, Rusty, the motherless boy, Renee, the people pleaser; Josie, the self-destructive toddler; Joan Frances, the perfect one; and all the other deeply scarred members of The Flock that had been helping Joan Frances Casey function, despite tremendous psychic pain, since she was a child.

The Floor of Heaven: A True Tale of the Last Frontier and the Yukon Gold Rush

by Howard Blum

It is the last decade of the 19th century. The Wild West has been tamed and its fierce, independent and often violent larger-than-life figures -- gun-toting wanderers, trappers, prospectors, Indian fighters, cowboys, and lawmen -- are now victims of their own success. They are heroes who've outlived their usefulness. But then gold is discovered in Alaska and the adjacent Canadian Klondike and a new frontier suddenly looms - an immense unexplored territory filled with frozen waterways, dark spruce forests, and towering mountains capped by glistening layers of snow and ice. "Klondicitis," a giddy mix of greed and lust for adventure, ignites a stampede. Fleeing the depths of a worldwide economic depression and driven by starry-eyed visions of vast wealth, tens of thousands rush northward. Joining this throng of greenhorns and grifters, whores and highwaymen, sourdoughs and seers are three unforgettable men. In a true-life tale that rivets from the first page, we meet Charlie Siringo, a top-hand sharp-shooting cowboy who, after futilely trying to settle down with his new bride, becomes one of the Pinkerton Detective Agency's shrewdest; George Carmack, a California-born American Marine who's adopted by an Indian tribe, raises a family with a Taglish squaw, makes the discovery that starts off the Yukon Gold Rush - and becomes fabulously rich; and Soapy Smith, a sly and inventive predator-conman who rules a vast criminal empire. As we follow this trio's lives, we're led inexorably into a perplexing mystery. A fortune in gold bars has somehow been stolen from the fortress-like Treadwell Mine in Juneau, Alaska, with no clues as to how the thieves made off with such an immensely heavy cargo. To many it appears that the crime will never be solved. But the Pinkerton Agency has a reputation for finding the answers that elude others. Charged with getting the job done is Charlie Siringo who discovers that, to run the thieves to ground, he must embark on a rugged cross-territory odyssey that will lead him across frigid waters and through a frozen wilderness. Ultimately, he'll have his quarry in his sights. But then an additional challenge will present itself. He must face down Soapy Smith and his gang of 300 cutthroats. Hanging in the balance: George Carmack's fortune in gold. At once a compelling true-life mystery and an unforgettable portrait of a time in America's history when thousands were fired with a vision of riches so unimaginable as to be worth any price, The Floor of Heaven is also an exhilarating tribute to the courage and undaunted spirit of the men and women who helped shape America.

Floor Sample

by Julia Cameron

An unflinching memoir by the woman who has helped thousands of people uncover their creative inspiration. In Floor Sample, the author of the international bestseller The Artist's Wayweaves an honest and moving portrayal of her life. From her early career as a writer for Rolling Stone magazine and her marriage to Martin Scorsese, to her tortured experiences with alcohol and Hollywood, Julia Cameron reflects in this engaging memoir on the experiences in her life that have fueled her own art as well as her ability to help others realize their creative dreams. She also describes the fascinating circumstances that led her to emerge as a central figure in the creative recovery movement-a movement that she inaugurated and defined with the publication of her seminal work, The Artist's Way. Julia Cameron is a passionate and wry observer of the world, and her account of her life as a self-described "floor sample" for all she teaches in her brilliant books on creativity will surprise, entertain, and inspire all her many fans as well as anyone interested in an absorbing literary memoir.

Florence Harding: The First Lady, the Jazz Age and the Death of America's Most Scandalous President

by Carl Sferrazza Anthony

Tells the story of Florence Harding's rise from young unwed mother to First Lady and reveals her influence behind Harding's ascent to America's most scandal-ridden presidency and her role in his death. The drama of her life is set against the stage of the White House in the Jazz Age, and involves exciting elements such as mistresses, blackmail, poisoning, and opium addicts.

Florence Nightingale: God's Servant at the Battlefield

by David R. Collins

A biography of the well-to-do woman who defied social convention in order to establish nursing as a respectable career for women, and bring about reforms in hospital conditions and nursing care.

Florence: The True Story of a Country Schoolteacher in Minnesota and North Dakota (second ed.)

by Audrey K. Wendland

The year is 1912 when seventeen-year-old Florence Thompson takes on her first job as a teacher at District 34, the worst country school in Swift County. This is the story of her triumphs and tribulations, living among the Norwegian immigrants in Minnesota during the horse-and-buggy era. It will bring chuckles in the heart to former schoolteachers everywhere. Audrey Wendland, a daughter of Florence, is a freelance writer with credits in a variety of magazines such as Coed, Army Times and Viking, published by the Sons of Norway. Her hobby is genealogy and she draws upon this knowledge to create a picture of life as it was lived in Swift County, and later in Bowman County, North Dakota when Florence decides to cast her lot with the homesteaders. (From the book jacket.)

The Florist's Daughter

by Patricia Hampl

During the long farewell of her mother's dying, Patricia Hampl revisits her midwestern girlhood.Daughter of a debonair Czech father, whose floral work gave him entrée to St. Paul society, and a distrustful Irishwoman with an uncanny ability to tell a tale,Hampl remained, primarily and passionately, a daughter well into adulthood. She traces the arc of faithfulness and struggle that comes with that role-from the postwar years past the turbulent sixties. At the heart of The Florist's Daughter is the humble passion of people who struggled out of the Depression into a better chance, not only for themselves but for the common good.Widely recognized as one of our most masterly memoirists, Patricia Hampl has written an extraordinary memoir that is her most intimate, yet most universal, work to date.This transporting work will resonate with readers of Francine du Plessix Gray's Them: A Memoir of Parents and JeannetteWall's The Glass Castle.

Flory

by Flory Van Beek

In 1939, as the Nazi occupation grew from threat to reality, the Jewish population throughout Europe faced heart-wrenching decisions--to flee and lose their homes or to go into hiding, hoping against all odds to avoid the fate of being discovered. Holocaust survivor Flory A. Van Beek faced this terrible choice, and in this poignant testament of hope she takes us on her personal journey into one of history's darkest hours. Only a teenage girl when the Nazis invaded her neutral homeland of Holland, Flory watched the only life she had ever known disappear. Tearfully leaving her family, Flory tried to escape on the infamous SS Simon Bolivar passenger ship with Felix, the young Jewish man from Germany who would later become her husband. Their voyage brought not safety but more peril as their ship was blown up by Nazi planted mines, one of the first passenger ships destroyed by the Germans during World War II, sending nearly all of its passengers to a watery end. Miraculously, both Flory and Felix survived. After recovering from their injuries in England, they returned to their homeland, overjoyed to be reunited with their families yet shocked to discover their beloved Holland a much-changed place. As the Nazi grip tightened, they were forced into hiding. Sheltered by compassionate strangers in confined quarters, cut off from the outside world and their relatives, they faced hunger and the stress of daily life shadowed by the ever-present threat of certain death. Yet they also discovered, with the remarkable and brave families who sacrificed their own safety to help keep Flory and Felix alive, a set of friends that remain as close as family to this day. A tribute to family, faith, and the power of good in the face of disparate evil, this gripping account captures the terror of the Holocaust, the courage of those who risked their lives to protect their fellow compatriots, and the faith of those who, against all odds, managed to survive.

Florynce “Flo” Kennedy

by Sherie M. Randolph

Often photographed in a cowboy hat with her middle finger held defiantly in the air, Florynce "Flo" Kennedy (1916-2000) left a vibrant legacy as a leader of the Black Power and feminist movements. In the first biography of Kennedy, Sherie M. Randolph traces the life and political influence of this strikingly bold and controversial radical activist. Rather than simply reacting to the predominantly white feminist movement, Kennedy brought the lessons of Black Power to white feminism and built bridges in the struggles against racism and sexism. Randolph narrates Kennedy's progressive upbringing, her pathbreaking graduation from Columbia Law School, and her long career as a media-savvy activist, showing how Kennedy rose to founding roles in organizations such as the National Black Feminist Organization and the National Organization for Women, allying herself with both white and black activists such as Adam Clayton Powell, H. Rap Brown, Betty Friedan, and Shirley Chisholm.Making use of an extensive and previously uncollected archive, Randolph demonstrates profound connections within the histories of the new left, civil rights, Black Power, and feminism, showing that black feminism was pivotal in shaping postwar U.S. liberation movements.

Flower Between the Cracks

by Helen Sage

It's every parent's nightmare. One ordinary evening, Helen's twenty-two-year-old daughter Jayne is involved in a catastrophic car accident. Lying in a coma, her young life in the balance, Helen begins penning tender letters to Jayne, trying to make sense of the tragedy. When Jayne finally wakes, she can't talk or walk. Her life, and the lives of her family, will never be the same again. A Flower Between the Cracks is an extraordinarily powerful account of a mother's love and a daughter's immeasurable courage. It is a story of hope and survival, laced with surprising humour. Never has a memoir spoken of the complexity of caring for a disabled loved one with such grace and candour. This is a book for all Australians - reminding us of the profound joys to be found in each day.

Floyd Patterson: The Fighting Life of Boxing's Invisible Champion

by W. K. Stratton

"A well-researched and overdue tribute. Like one of Patterson's reliable left hooks, Stratton sharply recounts the life of an important, but often forgotten, two-time world heavyweight champion." -- Gary Andrew Poole, author of PacMan: Behind the Scenes with Manny PacquiaoIn 1956, Floyd Patterson became, at age twenty-one, the youngest boxer to claim the title of world heavyweight champion. Later, he was the first ever to lose and regain that honor. Here, the acclaimed author W. K. Stratton chronicles the life of "the Gentle Gladiator" -- an athlete overshadowed by Ali's theatrics and Liston's fearsome reputation, and a civil rights activist overlooked in the Who's Who of race politics. From the Gramercy Gym and wildcard manager Cus D'Amato to the final rematch against Ali in 1972, Patterson's career spanned boxing's golden age. He won an Olympic gold medal, had bouts with Marciano and Johansson, and was interviewed by James Baldwin, Gay Talese, and Budd Schulberg. A complex, misunderstood figure -- he once kissed an opponent at the end of a match -- he was known for his peekaboo stance and soft-spoken nature. Floyd Patterson was boxing's invisible champion, but in this deeply researched and beautifully written biography he comes vividly to life and is finally given his due -- as one of the most artful boxers of his time and as one of our great sportsmen, a man who shaped the world in and out of the ring.

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