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Smashed: Story of a Drunken Girlhood

by Koren Zailckas

The summer Koren turns 14, she is initiated into the world of drinking with a stiff sip of Southern Comfort. Eye-opening, wise, and gripping.

Smells like Dead Elephants: Dispatches from a Rotting Empire

by Matt Taibbi

Matt Taibbi is notorious as a journalistic agitator, a stone thrower, a "natural provocateur" (Salon. com). His scathing, vibrant prose shines an unflinching spotlight on the corruption, dishonesty, and sheer laziness of our leaders. Smells Like Dead Elephants brings together Taibbi's most incisive, intense, and hilarious work from his "Road Work" column in Rolling Stone. Written over the last two years, a period in our history with no shortage of outrages to compel Taibbi's pen, these pieces paint a shocking portrait of our government at work--or, as Taibbi points out in "The Worst Congress Ever," rarely working. "In the Sixties and Seventies, Congress met an average of 162 days a year. The 109th Congress set the all-time record for fewest days worked by a U.S. Congress: 93. Figuring for half-days, in fact, the 109th Congress probably worked almost two months less than the notorious 'Do-Nothing' Congress of 1948". Taibbi has plenty to say about George W. Bush, Jack Abramoff, Tom DeLay, and all the rest, but he doesn't just hit inside the Beltway. He gets involved in the action, infiltrating Senator Conrad Burns's birthday party under disguise as a lobbyist for a fictional oil firm that wants to drill in the Grand Canyon. He floats into apocalyptic post-Katrina New Orleans in a dinghy with Sean Penn. He goes to Iraq as an embedded reporter, where he witnesses the mind-boggling dysfunction of our occupation and spends three nights in Abu Ghraib prison. And he reports from two of the most bizarre and telling trials in recent memory: California v. Michael Jackson and the evolution-vs.-intelligent-design trial in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. A brilliant collection from one of the most entertaining political writers of today, Smells Like Dead Elephants is a stylish record of the offenses of the Bush years.

Smith Wigglesworth: Apostle of Faith

by Stanley Howard Frodsham

SMITH WIGGLESWORTH constantly acknowledged how much he owed under God to a wonderful wife, but he was also equally grateful for a remarkable daughter. We first visited his home in 1909 when Alice Wigglesworth was spending her first term in Africa. The constant theme of his conversation from morning until night was "our Alice." After the home-going of Mrs. Wigglesworth in 1913, Alice Wigglesworth--who was later married to James Salter--in large manner took the place of her mother, traveling constantly with her father in his many journeys to different countries. Especially was this so during the last years of his life. Mrs. Salter herself had an inspiring ministry like her mother's, and Mr. Wigglesworth encouraged her constantly to stir up the saints with her fiery message before he himself gave forth the Word.

Smoke Gets in Your Eyes: And Other Lessons from the Crematory

by Caitlin Doughty

Most people want to avoid thinking about death, but Caitlin Doughty--a twenty-something with a degree in medieval history and a flair for the macabre--took a job at a crematory, turning morbid curiosity into her life's work. Thrown into a profession of gallows humor and vivid characters (both living and very dead), Caitlin learned to navigate the secretive culture of those who care for the deceased. Smoke Gets in Your Eyes tells an unusual coming-of-age story full of bizarre encounters and unforgettable scenes. Caring for dead bodies of every color, shape, and affliction, Caitlin soon becomes an intrepid explorer in the world of the dead. She describes how she swept ashes from the machines (and sometimes onto her clothes) and reveals the strange history of cremation and undertaking, marveling at bizarre and wonderful funeral practices from different cultures. Her eye-opening, candid, and often hilarious story is like going on a journey with your bravest friend to the cemetery at midnight. She demystifies death, leading us behind the black curtain of her unique profession. And she answers questions you didn't know you had: Can you catch a disease from a corpse? How many dead bodies can you fit in a Dodge van? What exactly does a flaming skull look like?Honest and heartfelt, self-deprecating and ironic, Caitlin's engaging style makes this otherwise taboo topic both approachable and engrossing. Now a licensed mortician with an alternative funeral practice, Caitlin argues that our fear of dying warps our culture and society, and she calls for better ways of dealing with death (and our dead).

The Snake in the Sandtrap

by Lee Trevino Sam Blair

Autobiography of one of the PGA Tour's most colorful characters, "The Merry Mex," Lee Trevino.

Snow Falling in Spring: Coming of Age in China During the Cultural Revolution

by Moying Li

Most people cannot remember when their childhood ended. I, on the other hand, have a crystal-clear memory of that moment. It happened at night in the summer of 1966, when my elementary school headmaster hanged himself. In 1966 Moying, a student at a prestigious language school in Beijing, seems destined for a promising future. Everything changes when student Red Guards begin to orchestrate brutal assaults, violent public humiliations, and forced confessions. After watching her teachers and headmasters beaten in public, Moying flees school for the safety of home, only to witness her beloved grandmother denounced, her home ransacked, her father's precious books flung onto the back of a truck, and Baba himself taken away. From labor camp, Baba entrusts a friend to deliver a reading list of banned books to Moying so that she can continue to learn. Now, with so much of her life at risk, she finds sanctuary in the world of imagination and learning.

The Snow Leopard

by Peter Matthiessen

The story of the author's journey to Nepal to study Himalayan blue sheep, which was also a pilgrimage to find the Lama of Shey at the ancient Buddhist shrine on Crystal Mountain. Winner of the National Book Award.

The Snowball: Warren Buffett and the Business of Life

by Alice Schroeder

Here is THE book recounting the life and times of one of the most respected men in the world, Warren Buffett. The legendary Omaha investor has never written a memoir, but now he has allowed one writer, Alice Schroeder, unprecedented access to explore directly with him and with those closest to him his work, opinions, struggles, triumphs, follies, and wisdom. The result is the personally revealing and complete biography of the man known everywhere as "The Oracle of Omaha."Although the media track him constantly, Buffett himself has never told his full life story. His reality is private, especially by celebrity standards. Indeed, while the homespun persona that the public sees is true as far as it goes, it goes only so far. Warren Buffett is an array of paradoxes. He set out to prove that nice guys can finish first. Over the years he treated his investors as partners, acted as their steward, and championed honesty as an investor, CEO, board member, essayist, and speaker. At the same time he became the world's richest man, all from the modest Omaha headquarters of his company Berkshire Hathaway. None of this fits the term "simple."When Alice Schroeder met Warren Buffett she was an insurance industry analyst and a gifted writer known for her keen perception and business acumen. Her writings on finance impressed him, and as she came to know him she realized that while much had been written on the subject of his investing style, no one had moved beyond that to explore his larger philosophy, which is bound up in a complex personality and the details of his life. Out of this came his decision to cooperate with her on the book about himself that he would never write.Never before has Buffett spent countless hours responding to a writer's questions, talking, giving complete access to his wife, children, friends, and business associates--opening his files, recalling his childhood. It was an act of courage, as The Snowball makes immensely clear. Being human, his own life, like most lives, has been a mix of strengths and frailties. Yet notable though his wealth may be, Buffett's legacy will not be his ranking on the scorecard of wealth; it will be his principles and ideas that have enriched people's lives. This book tells you why Warren Buffett is the most fascinating American success story of our time.From the Hardcover edition.

Snowbound

by Richard S. Wheeler

In this powerful biographical novel, Richard S. Wheeler--winner of the Owen Wister Award and six Spur Awards--tells the amazing tale of an American explorer and hero. John Fremont, a one-time presidential candidate, was called the Pathfinder for his indomitable courage. But sometimes courage is not enough. After a failed expedition to find a railway route to the West along the 38th parallel, Fremont finds himself trapped in the snowbound Colorado mountains. His choices are simple: die, freezing and starving, or fight his way out. Fremont chooses to battle the elements in a harrowing, frigid journey over the backbone of the continent. In this tale of urgent danger and fierce courage, Wheeler presents a survival saga par excellence. Snowbound is a struggle of man against man, man against nature, man against himself... and a novel you will never forget.

Snowflake Bentley

by Jacqueline Briggs Martin

From the book Jacket: Snow in Vermont is as common as dirt. Why would anyone want to photograph it? But from the time he was a small boy, Wilson Bentley thinks of the icy crystals as small miracles, and he determines that one day his camera will capture for others their extraordinary beauty. Often misunderstood in his time, Wilson Bentley took pictures that even today reveal two important truths about snowflakes: first, that no two are alike, and second, that each one is startlingly beautiful. His story, gracefully told by Jacqueline Briggs Martin and brought to life in Mary Azarian's lovely woodcuts, gives children insight into a soul who had not only a scientist's vision and perseverance, but a clear passion for the wonders of nature.

Snowflakes in September: Stories about God's Mysterious Ways

by Corrie Ten Boom Ernest Borgnine Caterine Marsall

Corrie Ten Boom, Ernest Borgnine, and Elizabeth Sherrill are among the contributors to this unique collection. As they stir in the reader a sense of awe for the divine ways of God, the stories offer dramatic proof that God is an active part in the everyday lives of ordinary people.

The Snows of Yesteryear

by Gregor Von Rezzori H. F. Broch De Rothermann

Gregor von Rezzori was born in Czernowitz, a onetime provincial capital of the Austro-Hungarian Empire that was later to be absorbed successively into Romania, the USSR, and the Ukraine--a town that was everywhere and nowhere, with a population of astonishing diversity. Growing up after World War I and the collapse of the empire, Rezzori lived in a twilit world suspended between the formalities of the old nineteenth-century order which had shaped his aristocratic parents and the innovations, uncertainties, and raw terror of the new century. The haunted atmosphere of this dying world is beautifully rendered in the pages of The Snows of Yesteryear.The book is a series of portraits--amused, fond, sometimes appalling--of Rezzori's family: his hysterical and histrionic mother, disappointed by marriage, destructively obsessed with her children's health and breeding; his father, a flinty reactionary, whose only real love was hunting; his haughty older sister, fated to die before thirty; his earthy nursemaid, who introduced Rezzori to the power of storytelling and the inevitability of death; and a beloved governess, Bunchy. Telling their stories, Rezzori tells his own, holding his early life to the light like a crystal until it shines for us with a prismatic brilliance.

Snowshoe Thompson

by Nancy Smiler Levinson

Danny is lonesome for his pa. He has written a letter asking him to come home for Christmas, but the horse-drawn mail coach cannot make it over the dangerous Sierra Nevada in the winter. Danny fears that his pa will not know how much he misses him-until John Thompson volunteers to ski over the mountains to deliver the mail. Foolhardy! That's what townsfolk think. When John sets off on the ninety-mile journey, few expect to see him again, but Danny is sure the town is in for a great surprise! Nancy Smiler Levinson's enjoyable story about one of the pioneers of skiing in America will have beginning readers cheering. Some pictures are described.

So Far From the Bamboo Grove

by Yoko Kawashima Watkins

This part of Yoko's life covers about a span of seven months and truly brings to light the human desire to live. The trials endured by Yoko and her family make us appreciate the things we have.

So You Want to be President

by Judith St. George

From the Book Jacket Winner of the 2000 Caldecott Medal That's a big job, and getting bigger But why not? Presidents have come in just about every variety They've been generals like George Washington and actors like Ronald Reagan; big like William Howard Taft, and small like James Madison; handsome like Franklin Pierce and homely like Abraham Lincoln; They've been born in log cabins like Andrew Jackson and mansions like William Harrison. [This text is listed as an example that meets Common Core Standards in English language arts in grades 2-3 at http://www.corestandards.org.]

Soar Unafraid: Learning to Trust No Matter What

by Jo Franz

Just when life bloomed full of promise, multiple sclerosis attacked Jo's body. How would she cope with this erratic disease? How could she overcome her husband's betrayal? Unveiling her struggles to understand--not merely survive--MS and her painful unwanted divorce, transforming them into meaningful life experiences, author Jo Franz leads readers through her story of perseverance and continually growing faith. Not only learning who she is, but to whom she belongs, Jo finds love and triumphant victories despite abuse, abandonment and physical injury, showing the world how she can Soar Unafraid.

Soccer Men

by Simon Kuper

In his national bestseller, Soccernomics, Simon Kuper pioneered a new way of looking at soccer, the world's most popular game, through his witty and meticulous use of data. In Soccer Men, Kuper explores the heart and soul of the sport by getting up close and personal with soccer's greatest players and coaches. An inquiry into the genius and hubris of the modern game, Soccer Men details the lives of international stars such as Arsène Wenger, Jose Mourinho, Josep Guardiola, Lionel Messi, Wayne Rooney, and David Beckham, describing their upbringings, the soccer cultures they grew up in, the way they play or coach, and the baggage they bring to their relationships at work.In this updated edition, Kuper profiles Hope Solo, Raymond Domenech, Andrea Agnelli, Robin van Persie, Carlo Ancelotti, and more. He also provides a brilliant comparison of two tales of immigrant life: Philip Roth's Portnoy's Complaint and the autobiography of Swedish striker Zlatan Ibrahimovic.

The Social Question and the Democratic Revolution: Marx and the Legacy of 1848

by Douglas Moggach Paul Leduc Browne

The revolutionary movements of 1848 viewed the political cataclysm of continental Europe as an explosion of liberty, a new age of freedom and equality. This collection focuses on the relationship between democratic and socialist currents in 1848, seeking to reassess the relevance of these currents to the present era of global economic liberalism.

Socialism Is Great!

by Lijia Zhang

With a great charm and spirit, "Socialism Is Great!" recounts Lijia Zhang's rebellious journey from disillusioned factory worker to organizer in support of the Tiananmen Square demonstrators, to eventually become the writer and journalist she always determined to be. Her memoir is like a brilliant miniature illuminating the sweeping historical forces at work in China after the Cultural Revolution as the country moved from one of stark repression to a vibrant, capitalist economy.

Society's Child: My Autobiography

by Janis Ian

Grammy Award-winning singer and songwriter Janis Ian's memoir of her more than forty years in the music business. Janis Ian was catapulted into the spotlight in 1966 at the age of fifteen when her soul-wrenching song "Society's Child" became a national hit. An intimate portrait of an interracial relationship, "Society's Child" climbed the charts despite the fact that many radio stations across the country refused to play it because of its controversial subject matter. But this was only the beginning of a long and illustrious career. In this fascinating memoir of her life in the music business, Ian chronicles how she did drugs with Jimi Hendrix, went shopping for Grammy clothes with Janis Joplin, and sang with Mel Torm --all the while never ceasing to create unforgettable music. In Society's Child, Ian shares with readers what it felt like to move in and out of the public eye. In 1975 her legendary song "At Seventeen" earned two Grammy awards and five nominations. But during the 1980s she made a conscious decision to walk away from the often grueling music business to study ballet and acting. She also struggled through a difficult marriage that ended with her then husband's threat to kill her. The hiatus from music lasted for nearly a decade until, in 1993, Ian returned with the release of Breaking Silence. Rather than risk losing artistic control, she took out a second mortgage on her home to fund the record. It paid off as Breaking Silencegained Ian her ninth Grammy nomination. Now in her fifth decade, Ian continues to draw large audiences around the globe. Janis Ian has inspired generations of fans and in this moving book she shares the fascinating story of her life in music.

Socrates: A Very Short Introduction

by Christopher Taylor

Socrates has a unique position in the history of philosophy. On the one hand he is one of the most influential of all philosophers, and on the other one of the most elusive and least known. Further, his historical influence is not itself independent of his elusiveness.

Sojourner Truth

by Julia Denos Peter Merchant

Sojourner Truth had a tough childhood. She was born a slave, and many of the families she worked for treated her poorly. But when she was finally freed, Sojourner used her life to teach others about women's rights and the power of freedom.

Sojourner Truth

by Peter Roop Connie Roop

In the words of an American hero, this is the story of Sojourner Truth, a slave born in New York who went on to free herself and her children. As a free woman, she traveled across the country speaking against slavery and in favor of human rights.

Sojourner Truth

by Gwenyth Swain

Describes the life of Sojourner Truth, an abolitionist who was herself a former slave.

Sojourner Truth: Ain't I a Woman ?

by Patricia C. Mckissack Fredrick Mckissack

This 1993 Coretta Scott King Honor Book chronicles the life of African-American Sojourner Truth, a nineteenth-century preacher, abolitionist, and activist for the rights of African Americans and women.

Showing 7,751 through 7,775 of 9,476 results

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