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The Frankfurt School, Jewish Lives, and Antisemitism

by Jack Jacobs

The history of the Frankfurt School cannot be fully told without examining the relationships of Critical Theorists to their Jewish family backgrounds. Jewish matters had significant effects on key figures in the Frankfurt School, including Max Horkheimer, Theodor W. Adorno, Erich Fromm, Leo Lowenthal and Herbert Marcuse. At some points, their Jewish family backgrounds clarify their life paths; at others, these backgrounds help to explain why the leaders of the School stressed the significance of antisemitism. In the post-Second World War era, the differing relationships of Critical Theorists to their Jewish origins illuminate their distinctive stances toward Israel. This book investigates how the Jewish backgrounds of major Critical Theorists, and the ways in which they related to their origins, impacted upon their work, the history of the Frankfurt School, and differences that emerged among them over time.

Frankie Muniz Boy Genius

by Nancy Krulik

Meet Frankie Muniz! He's the star of Malcolm in the Middle, one of the hottest shows on TV today. Frankie's fifteen, funny, and now he's famous. Here, for every fan who can't get enough of Frankie, is everything you need to know about him: how he broke into show business, what his hobbies are, where to find Frankie fan clubs on the Web, and whether his zodiac sign is compatible with yours! Extra bonus: take the all-Frankie quiz inside!

Franklin

by James Srodes

In his lifetime, Benjamin Franklin was celebrated all over the Western world. And with good reason, says award-winning biographer James Srodes in his riveting, comprehensively researched portrait of a man he calls "the essential Founding Father."Having plumbed archives and other sources neglected by previous biographers, Srodes debunks numerous myths that have gathered about Franklin--many of them spun by other Founding Fathers. Where John Adams--and his biographer David McCullough--had Franklin as indolent and careless, Srodes uses recently discovered documents to show that Franklin was keeping his colleague at arm's length in order to conduct convert activities to help the American cause. Srodes also looks closely at Franklin's reputation as a philanderer and challenges many long-held assumptions.Franklin is a fascinating study of a man of ceaseless energies and remarkable accomplishments: an apprentice printer from Boston who made his name and fortune in colonial Philadelphia before having his greatest adventures in Europe's leading capitals, London and Paris. Here we find the complete Franklin--scientist, diplomat, tradesman, author, inventor, celebrated wit, spymaster, propagandist, military leader, quartermaster. Srodes offers extraordinary insight into this complex man, showing us how Franklin's ability to divide his life into discrete compartments enabled him to accomplish so much in so many different areas.Of the many roles Franklin, played, he is perhaps most familiar to us as the genius inventor and experimenter. After all, Franklin's electrical experiments earned him the Copley Medal, the eighteenth-century equivalent of the Nobel Prize, and many of his inventions (including bifocals, the lightning rod, and the Franklin stove) are still with us today. But as Srodes shows, Franklin's greatest invention was America, for "it is hard to see how we would be what we are today without the eighty-four-year progress of Benjamin Franklin."More than twenty years before the Declaration of Independence, Franklin was the first to put forward a plan to unite the colonies, and he took the lead in challenging King George's authority. One of only six men to sign both the Declaration and the Constitution, he secured the alliance with France that proved essential to America's success in the Revolution. Indeed, one could say that while George Washington won the battles, Benjamin Franklin won the war.

Franklin and Lucy: Franklin D. Roosevelt, Mrs. Rutherford, and the Other Remarkable Women in His Life

by Joseph E. Persico

Franklin Delano Roosevelt was arguably the greatest figure of the twentieth century. While FDR's official circle was predominantly male, it was his relationships with women--particularly with Lucy Mercer Rutherfurd--that most vividly bring to light the human being beneath this towering statesman. It is no coincidence that Rutherfurd was with Roosevelt the day he died in Warm Springs, Georgia, along with two other close women companions. In Franklin and Lucy, acclaimed author and historian Joseph E. Persico explores FDR's romance with Lucy Rutherfurd, which was far deeper and lasted much longer than was previously acknowledged. Persico's provocative conclusions about their relationship are informed by a revealing range of sources, including never-before-published letters and documents from Lucy Rutherfurd's estate that attest to the intensity and scope of the affair.FDR's connection with Lucy also creates an opportunity for Persico to take a more penetrating look at the other women in FDR's life. We come to see more clearly how FDR's infidelity as a husband contributed to Eleanor's eventual transformation from a repressed Victorian to perhaps the greatest American woman of her century; how the shaping hand of FDR's strong-willed mother helped to imbue him with the resolve to overcome personal and public adversity throughout his life; and how other women around FDR, including his "surrogate spouse," Missy LeHand, and his close confidante, the obscure Margaret "Daisy" Suckley, completed the world that he inhabited. Franklin and Lucy is an extraordinary look at the private life of a leader who continues to fascinate scholars and the general public alike. In focusing on Lucy Rutherfurd and the myriad women who mattered to Roosevelt, Persico paints a more intimate portrait than we have heretofore had of this enigmatic giant of American history.

Franklin and Winston: A Portrait of a Friendship

by Jon Meacham

In this affectionate, intimate portrait, Jon Meacham refreshes our memories and offers new insights into a most remarkable personal friendship and political partnership

Franklin Chang-Diaz: In Space (Leveled Readers 4.1.2)

by Patricia West

Brief biography of Franklin Chang-Diaz, an astronaut.

Franklin D. Roosevelt

by Laura Hamilton Waxman

Franklin Delano Roosevelt was one of the greatest presidents of the United States. When he was President, the united States had many problems, but he showed Americans that nothing is impossible.

Franklin D Roosevelt and the New Deal 1932 -1940

by William E. Leuchtenburg

When the stability of American life was threatened by the Great Depression, the decisive and visionary policy contained in FDR's New Deal offered America a way forward. In this groundbreaking work, William E. Leuchtenburg traces the evolution of what was both the most controversial and effective socioeconomic initiative ever undertaken in the United States -- "and explains how the social fabric of American life was forever altered. It offers illuminating lessons on the challenges of economic transformation -- "for our time and for all time.

Franklin D. Roosevelt: A Leader in Troubled Times

by Jeremy Caplan

This Time for Kids book vividly portrays the life of Franklin D. Roosevelt focusing on how he rescued the nation out of troubled waters.

Franklin D. Roosevelt: The People's President (Great Lives Series)

by John W. Selfridge

The People's President depicts the life and times of one of America's best-loved presidents. Listen to his radio addresses--the famed "fireside chats"--and see how he showed the American people just how much a president can do.

Franklin D. Roosevelt: A Rendezvous with Destiny

by Frank Freidel

Freidel (history emeritus, Harvard U., U. of Washington), whose four- volume biography of the young FDR concluded with the launching of the New Deal, now offers a one-volume complete biography. Although he details Roosevelt's life before his presidency, the focus is on the Depression and wartime periods. This will probably become the standard one-volume biography. Annotation(c) 2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Franklin D. Roosevelt: Thirty-second President Of The United States

by Miriam Greenblatt

Follows the life of the thirty-second president from birth to death, examining his childhood, education, employment, and political career.

Franklin Delano Roosevelt

by Conrad Black

Franklin Delano Roosevelt stands astride American history like a colossus, having pulled the nation out of the Great Depression and led it to victory in the Second World War. Elected to four terms as president, he transformed an inward-looking country into the greatest superpower the world had ever known. Only Abraham Lincoln did more to save America from destruction. But FDR is such a large figure that historians tend to take him as part of the landscape, focusing on smaller aspects of his achievements or carping about where he ought to have done things differently. Few have tried to assess the totality of FDR's life and career. Conrad Black rises to the challenge. In this magisterial biography, Black makes the case that FDR was the most important person of the twentieth century, transforming his nation and the world through his unparalleled skill as a domestic politician, war leader, strategist, and global visionary--all of which he accomplished despite a physical infirmity that could easily have ended his public life at age thirty-nine. Black also takes on the great critics of FDR, especially those who accuse him of betraying the West at Yalta. Black opens a new chapter in our understanding of this great man, whose example is even more inspiring as a new generation embarks on its own rendezvous with destiny.

Franklin Delano Roosevelt

by Conrad Black

Franklin Delano Roosevelt stands astride American history like a colossus, having pulled the nation out of the Great Depression and led it to victory in the Second World War. Elected to four terms as president, he transformed an inward-looking country into the greatest superpower the world had ever known. Only Abraham Lincoln did more to save America from destruction. But FDR is such a large figure that historians tend to take him as part of the landscape, focusing on smaller aspects of his achievements or carping about where he ought to have done things differently. Few have tried to assess the totality of FDR's life and career. Conrad Black rises to the challenge. In this magisterial biography, Black makes the case that FDR was the most important person of the twentieth century, transforming his nation and the world through his unparalleled skill as a domestic politician, war leader, strategist, and global visionary--all of which he accomplished despite a physical infirmity that could easily have ended his public life at age thirty-nine. Black also takes on the great critics of FDR, especially those who accuse him of betraying the West at Yalta. Black opens a new chapter in our understanding of this great man, whose example is even more inspiring as a new generation embarks on its own rendezvous with destiny.

Franklin Delano Roosevelt: Champion of Freedom (Childhood of Famous Americans Series)

by Kathleen V. Kudlinski

This childhood biography of the 32nd president of the United States explores the events that shaped the tenacious character of a young Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

Frank's Home

by Richard Nelson

"A thoroughly invigorating, tightly focused piece of Chekhovian drama, wherein chatter about work and art . . . fail to mask deep vulnerability."-Chicago TribuneA play about Frank Lloyd Wright set in the summer of 1923, when the great architect has recently left Chicago for California, hoping to mend his relationship with his adult children. Richard Nelson brings to life two great architectural demigods, Wright and Louis Sullivan, only to show their all-too-human frailties.Richard Nelson's plays include Rodney's Wife, Goodnight Children Everywhere, Some Americans Abroad, Franny's Way, New England, and James Joyce's The Dead (with Shaun Davey), winner of the Tony Award for Best Book of a Musical.

Frantz Fanon

by David Macey

Born in Martinique, Frantz Fanon (1925-61) trained as a psychiatrist in Lyon before taking up a post in colonial Algeria. He had already experienced racism as a volunteer in the Free French Army, in which he saw combat at the end of the Second World War. In Algeria, Fanon came into contact with the Front de Libération Nationale, whose ruthless struggle for independence was met with exceptional violence from the French forces. He identified closely with the liberation movement, and his political sympathies eventually forced him out the country, whereupon he became a propagandist and ambassador for the FLN, as well as a seminal anticolonial theorist.David Macey's eloquent life of Fanon provides a comprehensive account of a complex individual's personal, intellectual and political development. It is also a richly detailed depiction of postwar French culture. Fanon is revealed as a flawed and passionate humanist deeply committed to eradicating colonialism.Now updated with new historical material, Frantz Fanon remains the definitive biography of a truly revolutionary thinker.

Franz Kafka: The Poet of Shame and Guilt

by Saul Friedlander

Franz Kafka was the poet of his own disorder. Throughout his life he struggled with a pervasive sense of shame and guilt that left traces in his daily existenceâ "in his many letters, in his extensive diaries, and especially in his fiction. This stimulating book investigates some of the sources of Kafkaâ TMs personal anguish and its complex reflections in his imaginary world.In his query, Saul Friedländer probes major aspects of Kafkaâ TMs life (family, Judaism, love and sex, writing, illness, and despair) that until now have been skewed by posthumous censorship. Contrary to Kafkaâ TMs dying request that all his papers be burned, Max Brod, Kafkaâ TMs closest friend and literary executor, edited and published the authorâ TMs novels and other works soon after his death in 1924. Friedländer shows that, when reinserted in Kafkaâ TMs letters and diaries, deleted segments lift the mask of â œsainthoodâ ? frequently attached to the writer and thus restore previously hidden aspects of his individuality.

Franz Liszt, Volume 1

by Alan Walker

The first volume in Alan Walker's magisterial biography of Franz Liszt.

Franz Liszt, Volume 2

by Alan Walker

The second volume in Alan Walker's magisterial biography of Franz Liszt.

Franz Liszt, Volume 3

by Alan Walker

The third volume in Alan Walker's magisterial biography of Franz Liszt.

Franz Schubert and His World

by Christopher H. Gibbs Morten Solvik

During his short lifetime, Franz Schubert (1797-1828) contributed to a wide variety of musical genres, from intimate songs and dances to ambitious chamber pieces, symphonies, and operas. The essays and translated documents in Franz Schubert and His World examine his compositions and ties to the Viennese cultural context, revealing surprising and overlooked aspects of his music.Contributors explore Schubert's youthful participation in the Nonsense Society, his circle of friends, and changing views about the composer during his life and in the century after his death. New insights are offered about the connections between Schubert's music and the popular theater of the day, his strategies for circumventing censorship, the musical and narrative relationships linking his song settings of poems by Gotthard Ludwig Kosegarten, and musical tributes he composed to commemorate the death of Beethoven just twenty months before his own. The book also includes translations of excerpts from a literary journal produced by Schubert's classmates and of Franz Liszt's essay on the opera Alfonso und Estrella. In addition to the editors, the contributors are Leon Botstein, Lisa Feurzeig, John Gingerich, Kristina Muxfeldt, and Rita Steblin.

Fraternity: A Journey in Search of Five Presidents

by Bob Greene

"What if you set off on a vacation trip in search of history--and your destination was the men who had been president?" Asking himself that tantalizing question, bestselling author and award-winning journalist Bob Greene embarked on a long journey across the breadth of the nation, hoping to spend time with Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, Jimmy Carter, George Bush and Ronald Reagan. The result of his odyssey is Fraternity. Rich with the sounds of the presidents' own voices, Fraternity is dramatic, surprising, funny, revealing, inspiring, tragic, touching and unforgettable: a story destined to be read and enjoyed not just now, but far into the future as Americans think about who we are as a people.Here is Nixon, in an unmarked office high above Manhattan, explaining the reason for his solitary walks through New York streets at 5:30 every morning. Here is Carter, riding in a Secret Service van, recalling the sting of his family's being mocked for their rural Southern heritage, even after he had won the White House. Here is Ford, beside a golf course fairway, laughing at his startled discovery that of all his presidential papers, the one worth the most on the open market was a letter from a woman who tried to kill him. Here is Bush, on the road with his son, remembering his despair and anger at encountering a swastika carved into the sand behind an elegant resort on American soil. And here is Nancy Reagan, in a Beverly Hills hotel, on the haunting first night she must stand in for her husband after the announcement of his illness.A travelogue of the national spirit that chronicles a quest stretching over fifteen years and starring the biggest names in the modern American saga, this is living history of the most human kind, and Bob Greene at his very best.

Fraud

by David Rakoff

A frequent contributor to theNew York Timesmagazine,Outside,Salon, andGQ, and a regular on Public Radio International's "This American Life,"David Rakoff's debut collection of essays is simultaneously laugh-out-loud funny and take-your-breath-away poignant. David Rakoff is a fish out of water. Whether he finds himself on assignment climbing Mount Monadnock in New Hampshire -- donning a pair of Timberlands for his trek, only to realize with horror that "the shoes I wouldn't be caught dead in might actually turn out to be the shoes I am caught dead in. " -- sitting quietly impersonating Sigmund Freud in a department store window. . . for a month, or musing on the unique predicament of being undetectably Canadian in New York City (". . . what's more spicy than being Canadian, I ask you?"), Rakoff has a gift for exposing life's humour and pathos. Fraud takes us places even we didn't know we wanted to go: expeditions as varied as a search for elves in Iceland, a foray into soap opera acting, or contemplating the gin-soaked olive at the bottom of a martini glass. With the sharpest of eyes, David Rakoff explores the odd and ordinary events of life, spotting what is unique, funny and absurd in the world around him. But for all its razor-sharp wit and snarky humor,Fraudis also, ultimately, an object lesson in not taking life, or oneself, too seriously. From the Hardcover edition.

Fraud: The Strategy Behind the Bush Lies and Why the Media Didn't Tell You

by Paul Waldman

Analysis of the man and his first administration.

Showing 7,826 through 7,850 of 25,708 results

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