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The Game of My Life

by Daniel Paisner Jason J-Mac McElwain

Now in paperback: ?An impressive achievement. . . Not likely to be forgotten anytime soon. ?(Washington Times) Here is the riveting true story of Jason McElwain? better known as ?J-Mac??the autistic student who made headlines when he scored twenty points, including a school record six three-pointers, for his high school basketball team in 2006. Including the revealing perspectives of J-Mac?s family and coach, this is McElwain?s inspiring account of the challenges of growing up autistic?not only for himself, but for his family. It?s also the tale of his unlikely star turn, the difference it made in his journey through life?and all the heartbreaking and heart-lifting stops along the way. .

Game Over: The Rise and Transformation of a Harlem Hustler

by Azie Faison Agyei Tyehimba

A cautionary tale about the life of former kingpin Azie Faison, who has become the fabric of street legend Faison was a ninth grade dropout who earned more than $100,000 a week selling cocaine in Harlem, New York, during the peak of America's "War on Drugs" between 1983 and 1990. Faison, along with two partners, was an urban prince with cars, jewels, and people -- in awe of this million-dollar phenomenon -- at his feet. His legacy has been praised by hip-hop's top names in their lyrics, and his life was the basis for the urban cult classic film Paid in Full starring Mekhi Phifer, Wood Harris, and rapper Cam'ron and produced by Jay-Z's Roc-A-Fella Films. In Game Over, Azie brings forth a powerful memoir of New York's perilous drug underworld and music industry, with an intellect and wisdom to empower and challenge the street culture he knows so very well.

The Game: Penetrating the Secret Society of Pickup Artists

by Neil Strauss

The author, a writer for Rolling Stone magazine, spent 2 years learning about and perfecting his 'game' - picking up women.

Game, Set, and Match

by Herbert Warren Wind

The leading players and outstanding matches of two thrilling decades in tennis history From Rod Laver's amateur Grand Slam in 1962 to the first US Open held at the National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadows, legendary sportswriter Herbert Warren Wind captures the grace and drama of modern tennis in this brilliant collection drawn from the pages of the New Yorker. The era's biggest names, including Margaret Court, Chris Evert, John Newcombe, Arthur Ashe, and Pancho Gonzales, thrill the crowds of Roland Garros, Wimbledon, and Forest Hills, and America's Davis Cup team battles patriotic linesmen and frenzied fans in an epic showdown against the Romanians in Bucharest. In "Mrs. King versus Mr. Riggs," Wind paints a witty and evocative portrait of Billy Jean King's historic beatdown of Bobby Riggs, and in "Forest Hills and the Final Between Connors and Borg," he vividly recounts one of the wildest and woolliest tournaments in the sport's history. Rendered with the same authority and eloquence that led the New York Times to declare Wind the dean of American golf writers, these dispatches from center court testify to the celebrated journalist's passion and versatility.

Game, Set, Match: Billie Jean King and the Revolution in Women's Sports

by Susan Ware

When Billie Jean King trounced Bobby Riggs in tennis's "Battle of the Sexes" in 1973, she placed sports squarely at the center of a national debate about gender equity. In this winning combination of biography and history, Susan Ware argues that King's challenge to sexism, the supportive climate of second-wave feminism, and the legislative clout of Title IX sparked a women's sports revolution in the 1970s that fundamentally reshaped American society. While King did not single-handedly cause the revolution in women's sports, she quickly became one of its most enduring symbols, as did Title IX, a federal law that was initially passed in 1972 to attack sex discrimination in educational institutions but had its greatest impact by opening opportunities for women in sports. King's place in tennis history is secure, and now, withGame, Set, Match, she can take her rightful place as a key player in the history of feminism as well. By linking the stories of King and Title IX, Ware explains why women's sports took off in the 1970s and demonstrates how giving women a sporting chance has permanently changed American life on and off the playing field.

The Games Do Count

by Brian Kilmeade

What do Henry Kissinger, Jack Welch, Condoleezza Rice, and Jon Bon Jovi have in common? They have all reached the top of their respective professions, and they all credit sports for teaching them the lessons that were fundamental to their success. In his years spent interviewing and profiling celebrities, politicians, and top businesspeople, popular sportscaster and Fox & Friends cohost Brian Kilmeade has discovered that nearly everyone shares a love of sports and has a story about how a game, a coach, or a single moment of competition changed his or her life. These vignettes have entertained, surprised, and inspired readers nationwide with their insight into America's most respected and well-known personalities. Kilmeade presents more than seventy stories straight from the men and women themselves and those who were closest to them. From competition to camaraderie, individual achievement to teamwork, failure to success, the world of sports encompasses it all and enriches our lives. The Games Do Count reveals this simple and compelling truth: America's best and brightest haven't just worked hard -- they've played hard -- and the results have been staggering!

Gandhi

by Jad Adams

"Provocative. Adams strips away Gandhi's saintly aura and explores the duality . . . of India's most famous leader." --Financial Times Jad Adams traces the course of Gandhi's multi-faceted life, and the development of his religious, political, and social thinking over seven tumultuous decades: from his comfortable upbringing in a princely state in Gujarat; his early civil rights campaigns; his leadership through civil disobedience in the 1920s and 1930s that made him a world icon; and finally to his assassination by a Hindu extremist in 1948, only months after the birth of independent India. An elegant and masterly account of one of the seminal figures of twentieth-century history, Adams presents for the first time the true story behind the man whose life may truly be said to have changed the world.

Gandhi

by Demi

M.k.Gandhi known by his followers as Mahatama--or great soul--was born in India in 1869 and grew up to become one of the most influential and well-respected political and social leaders the world has ever known. An adamant idealist and a courageous thinker, Gandhi identified himself with the struggles of the common people. He won independence for India and is called "Father of India". Nelson Mandela and Martin Luther King were followers of Gandhi's teachings.

Gandhi

by Kazuki Ebine

The life of a true twentieth-century hero told in a vibrant graphic novel format. Through his quietly powerful leadership and influential use of nonviolent resistance in India's struggle against the British Raj, Mahatma Gandhi became one of the most revered figures of the modern era. While history has recorded Gandhi's words and deeds, the man himself has been eclipsed by maxims of virtuosity that seem to have little resonance in our everyday lives. In Gandhi, the third volume in our exciting new manga biography series, created in conjunction with Emotional Content, Kazuki Ebine combines a gripping narrative with stunning illustrations to share Gandhi's inspiring and deeply human story with a whole new generation of readers. Developed in conjunction with Emotional Content. .

Gandhi

by Kathleen Kudlinski

The man we remember simply as Gandhi was born Mohandas Gandhi in India in 1869. From an early age he was made keenly aware of the rigid Hindu caste system of his country, and was heavily influenced by his mother's ability to fast as a way to control her urges. Mohandas was married at the age of thirteen and continued his education, though he struggled as a student. He also struggled to find himself and to keep his moral center intact. At college in London, and then later at work in South Africa and India, Gandhi was appalled at the abject poverty he discovered and by the widespread denial of civil liberties and political rights he encountered. He ultimately dedicated his life to the struggle for fundamental human rights for all Indians. Read all about the fascinating early years and eventual accomplishments of this inspiring leader.

Gandhi

by Amy Pastan

Biography of Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi.

Gandhi Before India

by Ramachandra Guha

The first volume of a magisterial biography: the definitive portrait of the life and work of one of the most abidingly influential--and controversial--men in modern history. Here is a revelatory work of biography that takes us from Gandhi's birth in 1869 through his upbringing in Gujarat, his 2 years as a student in London, and his 2 decades as a lawyer and community organizer in South Africa. Ramachandra Guha has uncovered a myriad of previously untapped documents, including: private papers of Gandhi's contemporaries and co-workers; contemporary newspapers and court documents; the writings of Gandhi's children; secret files kept by British Empire functionaries. Using this wealth of material in a brilliantly nuanced narrative, Guha describes the social, political and personal worlds in which Gandhi began his journey to become the modern era's most important and influential political actor. And Guha makes clear that Gandhi's work in South Africa--far from being a mere prelude to his accomplishments in India--was profoundly influential on his evolution as a political thinker, social reformer and beloved leader.

Gandhi & Churchill: The Rivalry That Destroyed An Empire and Forged Our Age

by Arthur Herman

Mohandas Gandhi and Winston Churchill: India's moral leader and Great Britain's greatest Prime Minister. Born five years and seven thousand miles apart, they became embodiments of the nations they led. Both became living icons, idolized and admired around the world. Today, they remain enduring models of leadership in a democratic society. Yet the truth was Churchill and Gandhi were bitter enemies throughout their lives. This book reveals, for the first time, how that rivalry shaped the twentieth century and beyond. For more than forty years, from 1906 to 1948, Gandhi and Churchill were locked in a tense struggle for the hearts and minds of the British public, and of world opinion. Although they met only once, their titanic contest of wills would decide the fate of nations, continents, peoples, and ultimately an Empire. Here is a sweeping epic with a fascinating supporting cast, and a brilliant narrative parable of two men whose great successes were always haunted by personal failure - and whose final moments of triumph were overshadowed by the loss of what they held most dear.

Gandhi: 'Hind Swaraj' and Other Writings

by Anthony J. Parel

Hind Swaraj is Mahatma Gandhi's fundamental work. Not only is it key to understanding his life and thoughts, but also the politics of South Asia in the first half of the twentieth century. Celebrating 100 years since Hind Swaraj was first published in a newspaper, this centenary edition includes a new preface and editor's introduction, as well as a new chapter on 'Gandhi and the 'Canonical aims of life''. The volume presents a critical edition of the 1910 text of Hind Swaraj, fully annotated and including Gandhi's own Preface and Foreword (not found in other editions). Anthony J. Parel sets the work in its historical and political contexts and analyses the significance of Gandhi's experiences in England and South Africa. The second part of the volume contains some of Gandhi's other writings, including his correspondence with Tolstoy and Nehru.

Gandhi in the West

by Sean Scalmer

The non-violent protests of civil rights activists and anti-nuclear campaigners during the 1960s helped to redefine Western politics. But where did they come from? Sean Scalmer uncovers their history in an earlier generation's intense struggles to understand and emulate the activities of Mahatma Gandhi. He shows how Gandhi's non-violent protests were the subject of widespread discussion and debate in the USA and UK for several decades. Though at first misrepresented by Western newspapers, they were patiently described and clarified by a devoted group of cosmopolitan advocates. Small groups of Westerners experimented with Gandhian techniques in virtual anonymity and then, on the cusp of the 1960s, brought these methods to a wider audience. The swelling protests of later years increasingly abandoned the spirit of non-violence, and the central significance of Gandhi and his supporters has therefore been forgotten. This book recovers this tradition, charts its transformation, and ponders its abiding significance.

Gandhi: A Memoir

by William L. Shirer

Recalling his friendship and conversations with the late Indian leader, William Shirer presents a portrait of Gandhi that spotlights his frailties as well as his accomplishments. As a young foreign correspondent, William Shirer reported briefly on Gandhi--but the year was 1931, when India's struggle for independence peaked and Gandhi scored perhaps his greatest political success. The year before, he had led a 200-mile march to the sea to pick up a lump of salt--a violation of the British salt tax; and this symbolic act (like--he reminds Shirer--the Boston Tea Party) had propelled the Indian masses into nonviolent civil disobedience on a large scale. To check its spread, Gandhi had been arbitrarily imprisoned. Now he was out of prison and negotiating with the British viceroy: if Gandhi would call off the civil-disobedience campaign and attend an upcoming London conference, the British would make concessions too. These, however, were so limited and vague that many Indian nationalists regarded Gandhi's agreement as a sell-out; but Shirer underlines history's judgment of its wisdom with Gandhi's own words. More importantly, he notes, the British had finally been forced "to deal with an Indian leader as an equal." Along these lines, Shirer also witnessed British discomfiture at Gandhi's arrival--complete with loin cloth, spinning wheel, and goat's milk; he saw the sensation Gandhi caused in London--and heard him address Lancashire millhands thrown out of work by the Indian boycott of British cotton. And he saw him at home, subsisting on four-hours' sleep and "frenzied acclaim." This book is sure to press upon readers the worldwide force of Gandhi's example.

Gandhi: A Spiritual Biography

by Arvind Sharma

In his Autobiography, Gandhi wrote, "What I want to achieve--what I have been striving and pining to achieve these thirty years--is self-realization, to see God face to face. . . . All that I do by way of speaking and writing, and all my ventures in the political field, are directed to this same end." While hundreds of biographies and histories have been written about Gandhi (1869-1948), nearly all of them have focused on the political, social, or familial dimensions of his life. Very few, in recounting how Gandhi led his country to political freedom, have viewed his struggle primarily as a search for spiritual liberation.Shifting the focus to the understudied subject of Gandhi's spiritual life, Arvind Sharma retells the story of Gandhi's life through this lens. Illuminating unsuspected dimensions of Gandhi's inner world and uncovering their surprising connections with his outward actions, Sharma explores the eclectic religious atmosphere in which Gandhi was raised, his belief in reincarnation, his conviction that morality and religion are synonymous, his attitudes toward tyranny and freedom, and, perhaps most important, the mysterious source of his power to establish new norms of human conduct. This book enlarges our understanding of one of history's most profoundly influential figures, a man whose trust in the power of the soul helped liberate millions.

The Gandhi Story, In His Own Words

by Mahendra Meghani

M. Meghani: "For years it has been my earnest desire that these two books may be read widely all over the world, especially by the young generation. But their great length made it difficult... The lapse of copyright in Gandhi's writings (2008) made it possible for me to attempt a combined condensation of the two volumes. Both were written... in the 1920s in Gujarati and translated into English... Now the condensations too are available in both languages."<P>Born in Mumbai and educated in Bhavnagar, Mumbai and Ahmedabad, Mahendra Meghani left Columbia University and settled in India to live a lifestyle congruent with his values. Inspired by Gandhi to a life of voluntary simplicity and service, this son of the legendary Gujarati poet Shri Jhaverchand Meghani -- named by Gandhi as the national poet of India -- carried forth his father's legacy to bring world literature to Gujaratis, and Gujarati literature to the world.<P>To these ends Mahendra became a translator, editor, bookseller, and publisher, and shifted the cultural narrative of his community with Lokmilap -- his innovative publishing co-operative making quality reading accessible to the poorest.<P>An octogenarian in 2009, his and his father's dream of replicating their bookstore in every district of Gujarat hasn't yet materialised, though Bookshare may have helped advance it a few paces.

Gandhi the Man

by Eknath Easwaran

This is the moving story of a nonviolent hero, illustrated with more than 70 photographs, and told by a highly respected author who grew up in Gandhi's India.Gandhi's life continues to inspire and baffle readers today. How did an unsuccessful young lawyer become the Mahatma, the "great soul" who led 400 million Indians in their struggle for independence from the British Empire? What is nonviolence, and how does it work?Easwaran answers these questions and gives a vivid account of the turning points and choices in Gandhi's life that made him an icon of nonviolence. Easwaran witnessed at firsthand how Gandhi inspired ordinary people to turn fear into fearlessness, and anger into love. He visited Gandhi in his ashram to find out more about this human alchemy, and during the prayer meeting watched the Mahatma absorbed in meditation on the Bhagavad Gita, the scripture that was the wellspring of his spiritual power.Quotations highlight Gandhi's teachings in his own words, and sidebar notes and a chronology, new to this updated edition, provide historical context.This book conveys the spirit and soul of Gandhi - the only way he can be truly understood.

Gandhi: The Traditional Roots of Charisma

by Susanne Hoeber Rudolph Lloyd I. Rudolph

The Rudolphs' analysis reveals that Gandhi's charisma was deeply rooted in the aspects of Indian tradition that he interpreted for his time. They key to his political influence was his ability to realize in both his daily life and his public actions, cultural ideals that many Indians honored but could not enact themselves--ideals such as the traditional Hindu belief that a person's capacity for self-control enhances his capacity to control his environment. Appealing to shared expectations and recognitions, Gandhi was able to revitalize tradition while simultaneously breaking with some of its entrenched values, practices, and interests. One result was a self-critical, ethical, and inclusive nationalist movement that eventually led to independence.

Gandhi: The True Man Behind Modern India

by Jad Adams

"Provocative. Adams strips away Gandhi's saintly aura and explores the duality of India's most famous leader."--Financial Times Jad Adams traces the course of Gandhi's multi-faceted life and the development of his religious, political, and social thinking over seven tumultuous decades: from his comfortable upbringing in a princely state in Gujarat; his early civil rights campaigns; his leadership through civil disobedience in the 1920s and 1930s that made him a world icon; and finally to his assassination by a Hindu extremist in 1948, only months after the birth of an independent India. An elegant and masterly account of one of the seminal figures of twentieth-century history, Adams presents for the first time the true story behind the man whose life may truly be said to have changed the world.

Gandhi: A Very Short Introduction

by Bhikhu Parekh

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (1869-1948) was one of the few men in history to fight simultaneously on moral, religious, political, social, economic, and cultural fronts. During his time as a lawyer in South Africa he developed his strategy of non-violence: the idea of opposing unjust laws by non-violent protest. He led the Indian National Congress party in three major campaigns against British rule, each culminating in his arrest. In Gandhi, a short introduction to Gandhi's life and thought, Bhikhu Parekh outlines both Gandhi's major philosophical insights and the limitations of his thought. Written with extensive access to Gandhi's writings in Indian languages to which most commentators have little or no access, Parekh looks at Gandhi's cosmocentric anthropology, his spiritual view of politics, and his theories of oppression, non-violent action, and active citizenship. He also considers how the success of Gandhi's principles were limited by his lack of coherent theories of evil, and of state and power. Gandhi's view of man as ascetic allows no room for expressions of the cultural, artistic, or intellectual. Furthermore, he was so hostile to modern civilization that he was unable to appreciate its complex dialectic or offer a meaningful narrative. Nevertheless, Gandhi's life and thought had an enormous impact on the Indian nation, and he continues to be widely revered--known before and after his assassination as Mahatma, the Great Soul.

Gandhi: Young Nation Builder (Childhood of Famous Americans Series)

by Kathleen V. Kudlinski

This book narrates the fascinating early years and eventual accomplishments of the inspiring leader, Mahatma Gandhi, who is known as the Father of the Nation of India.

The Gandhian Moment

by Ramin Jahanbegloo

Gandhi is revered as a historic leader, the father of Indian independence, and the inspiration for nonviolent protest around the world. But the importance of these practical achievements has obscured Gandhi's stature as an extraordinarily innovative political thinker. Ramin Jahanbegloo presents Gandhi the political theorist-the intellectual founder of a system predicated on the power of nonviolence to challenge state sovereignty and domination. A philosopher and an activist in his own right, Jahanbegloo guides us through Gandhi's core ideas, shows how they shaped political protest from 1960s America to the fall of the Berlin Wall and beyond, and calls for their use today by Muslims demanding change. Gandhi challenged mainstream political ideas most forcefully on sovereignty. He argued that state power is not legitimate simply when it commands general support or because it protects us from anarchy. Instead, legitimacy depends on the consent of dutiful citizens willing to challenge the state nonviolently when it acts immorally. The culmination of the inner struggle to recognize one's duty to act, Jahanbegloo says, is the ultimate "Gandhian moment. " Gandhi's ideas have motivated such famous figures as Martin Luther King, Nelson Mandela, and the Dalai Lama. As Jahanbegloo demonstrates, they also inspired the unheralded Muslim activists Abul Kalam Azad and Khan Abdul Ghaffar Khan, whose work for Indian independence answers those today who doubt the viability of nonviolent Islamic protest. The book is a powerful reminder of Gandhi's enduring political relevance and a pioneering account of his extraordinary intellectual achievements.

Gandhi's Passion: The Life and Legacy of Mahatma Gandhi

by Stanley Wolpert

Mahatma Gandhi, through his indomitable will and selfless determination, transformed himself into a model of courage and integrity for India's people to emulate in their nonviolent struggle for political power. More than half a century after his death, Gandhi continues to inspire millions throughout the world. Yet modern India seems to have abandoned much of his nonviolent vision, joining the nuclear arms race. Inspired by recent events in India, Stanley Wolpert offers this subtle and profound biography of India's "Great Soul". Wolpert compellingly chronicles the life of Mahatma Gandhi from his early days as a child of privilege to his humble rise to power and his assassination at the hands of a man of his own faith. This trajectory, like that of Christ, was the result of Gandhi's passion: his conscious courting of suffering as the means of reaching divine truth. From his early campaigns to end discrimination in South Africa to his leadership of a people's revolution to end the British imperial domination of India, Gandhi emerges as a man of inner conflicts conquered by his political genius and moral vision. The sweet reasonableness of his "Great Soul", combined with the steel of his unyielding opposition to intolerance and oppression, would inspire India like no leader since the Buddha -- creating a legacy that would encourage Martin Luther King, Jr., Nelson Mandela, and other global leaders to demand a better world through peaceful civil disobedience.

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