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The Best Travel Writing 2009

by Sean O'Reilly James O'Reilly Larry Habegger

The points of view and perspectives in The Best Travel Writing 2009 are global, and the themes encompass high adventure, spiritual growth, romance, hilarity, misadventure, service to humanity, and encounters with exotic cuisine. Reading these stories is like sitting in a cafe filled with fellow travelers swapping tales about past adventures and ideas on where to head next. This edition takes the reader on a harrowing raft ride off the coast of Panama, on a whirlwind tour from Florence to Santorini, into the wilds of Patagonia, and to a colorful village in Ghana.

The Best Travel Writing 2010

by William Dalrymple Sean O'Reilly James O'Reilly Larry Habegger

The Best Travel Writing 2010 is the seventh volume in the annual Travelers' Tales series launched in 2004 to celebrate the world's best travel writing - from Nobel Prize winners to emerging new writers. The points of view and perspectives are global, and themes encompass high adventure, spiritual growth, romance, hilarity and misadventure, service to humanity, and encounters with exotic cuisine. In The Best Travel Writing 2010 readers will explore the mysteries of superstition in Cameroon, discover the meaning of life with an Irish carpenter on a long flight, take adopted children to Korea on a Homeland Tour, delve deep into a sacred Japanese pilgrimage, travel solo in Panama's forbidding Darien jungle, comprehend the nuances of bargaining in Senegal...and much more.

The Best Travel Writing 2011

by Sean O'Reilly James O'Reilly Larry Habegger

The Best Travel Writing 2011 is the eighth volume in the annual Travelers' Tales series launched in 2004 to celebrate the world's best travel writing - from Nobel Prize winners to emerging new writers. The points of view and perspectives are global, and themes encompass high adventure, spiritual growth, romance, hilarity and misadventure, service to humanity, and encounters with exotic cuisine. Sweat, suffer, and fall in love in Guyana, meet a traveler who conducts his own detente in Russian baths, and encounter the light of a stranger in Burma. Further tales include methods on comprehending the nuances of bargaining in Senegal and an archaeologist who digs up her own past in Greece.

The Best Travel Writing, Volume 10

by Sean O'Reilly James O'Reilly Larry Habegger

The Best Travel Writing, Volume 10 is the latest in the annual Travelers' Tales series launched in 2004 to celebrate the world's best travel writing - from Nobel Prize winners to emerging new writers. The points of view and perspectives are global, and themes encompass high adventure, spiritual growth, romance, hilarity and misadventure, service to humanity, and encounters with exotic cuisines and cultures. Includes winners from the annual Solas Awards for Best Travel Writing.

Best Weekend Getaways from Vancouver

by Jack Christie

In this detailed guide, Jack Christie shares his favorite two- and three-day trips in the Vancouver area. It covers everything from rugged outdoor activities in the Gulf Islands to bicycle tours in Victoria, wine tours in the Okanagan, and backroad exploring in Whistler, ensuring that visitors can find as much (or as little) adventure as they like. There are getaways for every taste and budget, and none are more than a five-hour drive from Vancouver, including ferry travel where necessary. Each of the 28 entries includes complete driving directions with tips on sights to see along the way, as well as activities, attractions, accommodations, and dining options for the destination. In addition to photos, each chapter features sidebars and pull-out sections that offer specific tips for maximizing one's time. Indexes of the destinations and activities make planning the perfect weekend getaway a breeze.

The Best Women's Travel Writing 2006: True Stories from Around the World

by Lucy Mccauley

This collection contains 35 stories by women travel writers who tell about their experiences in countries from Mexico to Papa New Guinea, emphasizing themes of serendipity, spiritual growth, adventure, romance, exoticism, and others. McCauley writes travel essays and is editor of other Travelers' Tales Anthologies.

The Best Women's Travel Writing 2008

by Lucy Mccauley

Women have been writing about their travels for generations, putting a uniquely feminine slant on life on the road and the people and places they encounter along the way. The third entry in Travelers' Tales acclaimed annual series, The Best Women's Travel Writing 2008 presents exciting, uplifting, and unforgettable adventures from women who have traveled to the ends of the earth to discover new people, places, and facets of themselves. Combining lively storytelling and compelling narrative with a woman's perspective, the stories - most published here for the first time - make the reader laugh, cry, wish she were there, or be glad she wasn't. Eclectic themes including solo journeys, family travel, romance, spiritual growth, strange foods, and even stranger people, inspire women to plan their next great journeys.

The Best Women's Travel Writing 2009

by Lucy Mccauley Faith Adiele

This best-selling, award-winning series presents the finest accounts of women who have traveled to the ends of the earth to discover new places, peoples - and themselves. The common threads connecting the stories are a woman's perspective and lively storytelling to make the reader laugh, cry, wish she were there, or be glad she wasn't. From breaking the gender barrier on a soccer field in Kenya to learning the art of French cooking in a damp cellar in the Loire Valley to hitchhiking through Mexico in the 1960s, the points of view and perspectives are global and the themes eclectic, including stories that encompass spiritual growth, hilarity and misadventure, high adventure, romance, solo journeys, stories of service to humanity, family travel, and encounters with exotic cuisine.

The Best Women's Travel Writing 2010

by Stephanie Elizondo Griest

Since publishing the original edition of A Woman's World in 1995, Travelers' Tales has been the recognized leader in women's travel literature. The Best Women's Travel Writing 2010 is the sixth book in an annual series that presents stimulating, inspiring, and uplifting adventures from women who have traveled to the ends of the earth to discover new places, peoples, and facets of themselves. The common threads connecting these stories are a woman's perspective and fresh, compelling storytelling to make the reader laugh, weep, wish she were there, or be glad she wasn't. In The Best Women's Travel Writing 2010 readers will discover the hidden magic of Flamenco in Spain, walk the night and its terrors in Benin, have an excellent last day in Costa Rica, poke their way into the psyche of a security agent in Kabul, learn something new about death and Mexico in San Miguel de Allende, travel the darker side of the Hawaiian fantasy, draw a map of Argentinian tango, meet the best people in the world in Zimbabwe...and much more.

The Best Women's Travel Writing 2011

by Lavinia Spalding

Since publishing A Woman's World in 1995, Travelers' Tales has been the recognized leader in women's travel literature, and with the launch of the annual series The Best Travel Writing in 2004, the obvious next step was an annual collection of the best women's travel writing of the year. This title is the seventh in an annual series-The Best Women's Travel Writing-that presents inspiring and uplifting adventures from women who have traveled to the ends of the earth to discover new places, peoples, and facets of themselves. The common threads are a woman's perspective and compelling storytelling to make the reader laugh, weep, wish she were there, or be glad she wasn't.In The Best Women's Travel Writing 2011, readersHave lunch with a mobster in Japan and drinks with an IRA member in IrelandLearn the secrets of flamenco in Spain and the magic of samba in BrazilDeliver a trophy for best testicles in a small town in rural SerbiaFall in love while riding a camel through the Syrian DesertSki a first descent of over 5,000 feet in Northern IndiaDiscover the joy of getting naked in South KoreaLeave it all behind to slop pigs on a farm in Ecuador...and much more.

The Best Women's Travel Writing, Volume 10

by Lavinia Spalding

Since publishing the original edition of A Woman's World in 1995, Travelers' Tales has been the recognized national leader in women's travel literature, and with the launch of the annual series The Best Travel Writing in 2004, the obvious next step was an annual collection of the best women's travel writing of the year. This title is the tenth in that series -- The Best Women's Travel Writing -- presenting stimulating, inspiring, and uplifting adventures from women who have traveled to the ends of the earth to discover new places, peoples, and facets of themselves. The common threads connecting these stories are a female perspective and fresh, compelling storytelling to make the reader laugh, weep, wish she were there, or be glad she wasn't. The points of view and perspectives are global, and the themes are as eclectic as in all of our books, including stories that encompass spiritual growth, hilarity and misadventure, high adventure, romance, solo journeys, stories of service to humanity, family travel, and encounters with exotic cuisine.

The Best Women's Travel Writing, Volume 8

by Lavinia Spalding

Since publishing the original edition of A Woman's World in 1995, Travelers' Tales has been the recognized leader in women's travel literature, and with the launch of the annual series The Best Travel Writing in 2004, the obvious next step was an annual collection of the best women's travel writing of the year. This title is the eighth in an annual series-The Best Women's Travel Writing-that presents stimulating, inspiring, and uplifting adventures from women who have traveled to the ends of the earth to discover new places, peoples, and facets of themselves. The common threads connecting these stories are a woman's perspective and fresh, compelling storytelling to make the reader laugh, weep, wish she were there, or be glad she wasn't. The points of view and perspectives are global, and themes are as eclectic as in all of our books, including stories that encompass spiritual growth, hilarity and misadventure, high adventure, romance, solo journeys, stories of service to humanity, family travel, and encounters with exotic cuisine.

The Best Women's Travel Writing, Volume 9

by Lavinia Spalding

Since publishing the original edition of A Woman's World in 1995, Travelers' Tales has been the recognized national leader in women's travel literature, and with the launch of the annual series The Best Travel Writing in 2004, the obvious next step was an annual collection of the best women's travel writing of the year. This title is the ninth in that series-The Best Women's Travel Writing-presenting stimulating, inspiring, and uplifting adventures from women who have traveled to the ends of the earth to discover new places, peoples, and facets of themselves. The common threads connecting these stories are a female perspective and fresh, compelling storytelling to make the reader laugh, weep, wish she were there, or be glad she wasn't. The points of view and perspectives are global, and themes are as eclectic as in all of our books, including stories that encompass spiritual growth, hilarity and misadventure, high adventure, romance, solo journeys, stories of service to humanity, family travel, and encounters with exotic cuisine.

Bethel

by Rita J. Sheehan

The town of Bethel is located in Sullivan County, 90 miles northwest of New York City. Bethel was established on March 27, 1809, and the first hotel in the county opened in the hamlet of White Lake in 1846. Hundreds of hotels were to follow, from the Arlington to the Woodlawn Villa. During the silver and golden ages, White Lake became fashionable, and many people flocked to the clean water of the lake, fresh mountain air, and grand hotels. The tanneries, gristmills, and sawmills were prosperous during the 1800s. In 1969, Bethel was the site of the Woodstock Music and Arts Fair that drew nearly 500,000 people to the town. Through vintage images, Bethel recalls this town's vibrant past.

Bethel Park

by Kristen R. Normile

Although once part of a much larger area of southwestern Pennsylvania, Bethel Park has carved its niche into the rolling hills of Allegheny County with its rich history, interesting stories, and fascinating people. Incorporated in 1886 as Bethel Township, Bethel Park has seen its landscape prosper and change from agricultural to industrial and finally into the largest populated suburb in Allegheny County's South Hills neighborhoods. Advances in transportation and industry transformed Bethel Park into an inviting community of family homes, distinguished schools, and well-established local businesses. Bethel Park was also one of the key sites in the famed Whiskey Rebellion; the location of the first documented armored car robbery; the burial site of famed pop artist Andy Warhol; and the home of well-known writer, producer, and narrator Rick Sebak.

Bethlehem

by Carol Ann Brown

Settled in 1734, Bethlehem is a typical Litchfield hill town and retains much of its rural charm. Around its green are an old post tavern at the Woodward House, two historic churches, and the Bellamy-Ferriday House and Garden. Rev. Joseph Bellamy came to Bethlehem in 1738 and stayed to establish the first theological school in the country, educating Aaron Burr, James Morris, and later John C. Calhoun. In 1938, postmaster Earl Johnson designed a rubber stamp to adorn cards sent from the post office attached to his family's general store. This first cachet became an annual project and established Bethlehem as "the Christmas town." In 1946, two Benedictine nuns came to stay with artist Lauren Ford while establishing the Abbey of Regina Laudis in a factory donated by local businessman Robert Leather. Every September for the last 85 years, the Bethlehem Fair has welcomed more than 60,000 people to apple pies and horse draws at its scenic fairgrounds.

Bethlehem

by Kathleen Stewart Bethlehem Area Public Library

Bethlehem, Pennslyvania, has a fascinating history that is steeped in tradition. The city was founded in 1741 by the Moravians, a Protestant group. They envisioned Bethlehem as an industrial center, a support center for missionaries, and as the headquaters for the Moravian Church in North America. Bethlehem became all of this and more. Moravian traditions are still strong in this town, from the preservation of the original stone buildings on Church Street to the sounds of the Trombone Choir on Easter morning. Yet with the arrival of industrialists and immigrants to the area, Bethlehem evolved into something more. Canals, railroads, steel mills, and silk mills all became part of the city' story. The little town grew into a city with a diverse population. In the process, Bethlehem eveolved into a graceful place, famous for its institutions of higher learning, for steel production, and for Bach. Bethlehem covers the period between 1845 through 1990. It is a reinterpretation of teh photograph exhibit that graced the windows of the Bethlehem Area Public Library during the city's 250th anniversary celebration. The original exhibit consisted of 350 photographs, selected from more than 600 submitted by area residents. This book includes a selection of 217 photographs from that exhibit.

Bethlehem

by Elizabeth Anne Ward

One hundred years ago, the White Mountains were America's favorite resort. Presidents, writers, artists, industrialists, and prominent individuals of all types came to stay in the grand hotels and enjoy the recreation and scenery. Bethlehem, New Hampshire, was in the center of all this activity. With more than thirty hotels and lodging places, the town became synonymous with summer leisure and relaxation. Visitors enjoyed golf, tennis, riding, scenic drives, balls and gala events, and lots of rocking chair time on the wide verandahs. Fresh, pollen-free air gave relief to those suffering from asthma and hay fever. P.T. Barnum called the annual coaching parades "the second greatest show on earth." By the 1920s, the automobile and expanded travel opportunities to the West and to Europe were forcing the grand hotels into decline. Fortunately for Bethlehem, the New York Jewish community discovered the town. Bethlehem became an almost entirely Jewish resort and prospered as such until the 1970s. Even today, several hotels cater to a small Hassidic population, and the Bethlehem Hebrew congregation is a small but active year-round Jewish community. In recent years Bethlehem has undergone a rebirth of sorts, with the renovation of historical buildings, the formation of a heritage society, and the renewal of interest and pride in Bethlehem's rich and colorful history.

Bethlehem Revisited

by Karen M. Samuels William G. Weiner Jr.

Due in part to the Lehigh Canal and the Lehigh Valley Railroad, Bethlehem evolved from a tranquil town to a modern industrial city. Built in 1829, the Lehigh Canal passed by the center of Bethlehem. With it brought a steady stream of outsiders who shaped and changed the community. The Lehigh Valley Railroad was established in South Bethlehem in the 1850s, turning the city into a manufacturing center with such new industries as Lehigh Zinc and Bethlehem Steel as well as silk mills. Bethlehem Revisited captures a city in transition, at a time when its streets could barely accommodate the influx of horses, trolleys, automobiles, and pedestrians. Bursting at its seams with people, businesses, and residences, Bethlehem comes alive through this collection of extraordinary postcards.

Betsy and the Great World

by Maud Hart Lovelace

It's the trip of a lifetime. Betsey Ray, 21 years old, is heading off for a solo tour of Europe. From the moment she casts off, her journey is filled with adventure--whether she's waltzing at the captain's ball, bartering for beads in Madeira, or sipping coffee at a bohemian cafe in Munich. It's rich fodder for a budding young writer, and Betsy's determined to make the most of the experience. If only she could stop thinking about her ex-sweetheart, Joe Willard. Then a handsome, romantic Italian goes overboard for Betsy, and she has a big decision to make. Marco Regali is passionate, fascinating, and cultured. Could it be that Betsy's heart belongs in Europe instead of Minnesota? Betsy's childhood dream is finally coming true--she's off to Europe just like she and Tacy planned so long ago. Despite her travels and many adventures, Betsy's heart won't let her forget Joe Willard, her high school sweetheart.

Better

by John O'Brien

"John O'Brien was a stunningly talented writer who created poetry from the most squalid materials."--Jay McInerney, author of Bright Lights, Big CityWithin the walls of a foreboding mansion situated in the hills overlooking Los Angeles, the suave Double Felix plays host to an array of beautiful women as well as his unlikely sidekick William. The mysterious patriarch grants his live-in guests' every wish while asking nothing in return. Days begin with William and Double Felix discussing their conquests with the ladies over morning Vodka, a ritual that is nonetheless edged in homoerotic tension. From there the drinking continues, only to be interrupted by some miscellany--perhaps a rerun of The Love Boat or some casual sex.But the ongoing torpor has been upset by the house's newest arrival, a stunning young woman named Laurie, with whom both Double Felix and William become hopelessly smitten. Trash-talking Maggie and Zipper, the hooker who flew in on a trick and never left, smolder with envy while Laurie garners more and more attention from the men.As tensions spiral out of control, the house--an almost anthropomorphic entity in itself--ejects some of its denizens while further ensnaring others. Eventually, each faces the same ultimatum: leave or stay. The decision is fraught with consequence.Better delves deep into the psyche of its subjects through an intricate web of cultural icons, loyalty, covert communications, and sex. John O'Brien's characters loom in and out of a surreal world that seems to float high above the rest of us, but is in fact firmly tethered to the human condition.John O'Brien was born in 1960 and grew up in Cleveland, Ohio. He moved to Los Angeles in 1982 with his then-wife Lisa. During his lifetime, he was a busboy, file clerk, and coffee roaster, but writing was his true calling. He committed suicide in April 1994 at age thirty-three. His published fiction includes Leaving Las Vegas, The Assault on Tony's, and Stripper Lessons.

Better Made in Michigan: The Salty Story of Detroit’s Best Chip

by Karen Dybis

For many, Detroit is the crunch capital of the world. More than forty local chip companies once fed the Motor City's never-ending appetite for salty snacks, including New Era, Everkrisp, Krun-Chee, Mello Crisp, Wolverine and Vita-Boy. Only Better Made remains. From the start, the brand was known for light, crisp chips that were near to perfection. Discover how Better Made came to be, how its chips are made and how competition has shaped the industry into what it is today. Bite into the flavorful history of Michigan's most iconic chip as author Karen Dybis explores how Detroit "chipreneurs" rose from garage-based businesses to become snack food royalty.

Better Off Without 'Em

by Chuck Thompson

Let's talk about secession. Not exactly the most suitable cocktail party conversation starter anywhere in the country, but take that notion deep into the heart of Dixie and you might find yourself running from the possum-hunting conservatives, trailer-park lifers, and prayer warriors Chuck Thompson encountered during the two years he spent traveling the American South asking the question: Would we be better off without 'em? The result is a heavily researched, serious inquiry into national divides which is unabashedly controversial, often uproarious, and always thought-provoking. From a church service in Mobile, Alabama, where the gospel entertainer announces "Islam is upon us!" to a store selling Ku Klux Klan memorabilia on a quaint little street in South Carolina--Thompson lifts the green velvet drapes on a South that would seem to belong more to the time of Rhett and Scarlett than the dawn of the twenty-first century. By crunching numbers, interviewing experts, and roaming the not-so-former Confederacy, Thompson--an openly disgruntled liberal from the Northwest--makes a compelling case for southern secession. What would the new nations look like if Virginia governor Bob McDonnell was elected as the first President of the Confederate States of America? If a southern electorate was left to fend for itself while the North did damage control on an economy decimated by cut-rate southern workers who operate as a rival nation within its own borders? If the BCS championship football game were replaced by a North vs. South Coca Cola/ Starbucks Blood BowlTM? If Florida went to the South and Texas to the North in the most complex land-and-population grab in American history? Better Off Without 'Em is a deliberately provocative book whose insight, humor, fierce and fearless politics, and sheer nerve will spark a national debate that is perhaps long overdue.

Between Man and Beast

by Monte Reel

The unbelievably riveting adventure of an unlikely young explorer who emerged from the jungles of Africa with evidence of a mysterious, still mythical beast--the gorilla--only to stumble straight into the center of the biggest debate of the day: Darwin's theory of evolution In 1856 Paul Du Chaillu marched into the equatorial wilderness of West Africa determined to bag an animal that, according to legend, was nothing short of a monster. When he emerged three years later, the summation of his efforts only hinted at what he'd experienced in one of the most dangerous regions on earth. Armed with an astonishing collection of zoological specimens, Du Chaillu leapt from the physical challenges of the jungle straight into the center of the biggest issues of the time--the evolution debate, racial discourse, the growth of Christian fundamentalism--and helped push each to unprecedented intensities. He experienced instant celebrity, but with that fame came whispers--about his past, his credibility, and his very identity--which would haunt the young man. Grand in scope, immediate in detail, and propulsively readable, Between Man and Beast brilliantly combines Du Chaillu's personal journey with the epic tale of a world hovering on the sharp edge of transformation.

Between the Woods and the Water

by Jan Morris Patrick Leigh Fermor

Continuing the journey on foot across Europe begun in A Time of Gifts Between the Woods and the Water begins where its predecessor, A Time of Gifts, leaves off--in 1934, with the nineteen-year-old Patrick Leigh Fermor standing on a bridge crossing the Danube between Hungary and Slovakia. A trip downriver to Budapest follows, along with passage on horseback across the Great Hungarian Plain, and a crossing of the Romanian border into Transylvania. Remote castles, villages, monasteries, and mountains that are the haunts of bears, wolves, eagles, gypsies, and sundry religious sects are all savored in the approach to the Iron Gates, on the border of Yugoslavia and Romania. This ruggedly beautiful and historic stretch of the Danube has since been lost beneath the waters of an immense hydroelectric power plant--as indeed so much of the old Europe that Leigh Fermor's pages so vividly evoke was soon to be destroyed in World War II. Patrick Leigh Fermor is a writer of inexhaustible charm, learning, and verbal resource who possesses a breathtaking ability to sketch a landscape, limn a portrait, and bring the past to life. Between the Woods and the Water, part of an extraordinary work in progress that has already been acclaimed as a classic of English literature, is a triumph of his art. For this tale of youthful adventure is at the same time an exploration of the dream and reality of Europe, a book of wanderings that wends its way in and out of history and natural history, art and literature, with the tireless curiosity--and winning fecklessness--of its young protagonist, even as it opens haunting vistas into time and space.

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