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Remembering Mrs. Rossi

by Amy Hest

Although she loves her father, their home in New York City, and her third-grade teacher Miss Meadows, Annie misses her mother who died recently.

Remembering Mr. Maugham

by Garson Kanin

MemoirCharacters: 2 maleRemembering Mr. Maugham is an intimate glimpse into the life of W. Somerset Maugham - one of the most brilliant, prolific and secretive writers of the 20th century. This graceful two-character, one-act play adapted by Garson Kanin from his memoir is a treasure trove of private conversations, amusing anecdotes and candid recollections of his beloved friend and confidant. Through decades of friendship, Kanin and Maugham poignantly reminisce about life, art and the unconquerable human spirit.

Remembering Maya: Extraordinary Love Story Of An Ordinary Man

by Jitendra Rathod

Jayesh Satvahana, a lawyer, is a loser and a winner--rolled into one. A successful and progressing career makes him a winner, but as far as relationships go--he's a loser. A chance meeting with the beautiful Maya Choudhary shakes Jay and he questions the very foundations of his life. Maya comes for help to save her non profit organization from greedy commercialists. Before Jay realizes, he is madly in love with Maya. He fights her case with audacity and determination. He struggles to win the case and wants to win Maya--and spend the rest of his life in peace and happiness. But fate is not without a cruel sense of irony.

Remembering Jake

by Cheryl Biggs

ONE AND THE SAME MANSomeone had betrayed him. Someone had wanted him dead. Now Jake Blagette was back to find out who, and his prime suspect was the woman he'd once loved more than anything in his life. Tina Peychaud had meant the world to him, until the day his life was changed forever. The day he had to become Mitch Ryan-a man with a face he had yet to get used to. Could he risk the chance that seeing Tina again would cause her to remember Jake and put his life-as well as his heart-in danger once more?

Remembering Iris Murdoch: Letters and Interviews

by Jeffrey Meyers

This annotated edition of the unpublished letters that Iris Murdoch wrote to Jeffrey Meyers includes her discussion of writers from Conrad to Updike; her quarrel with Rebecca West; and her difficulty with Alzheimer's. With both scholarly insight and personal reflection, this volume will deepen our understanding of Murdoch's complex life and work.

Remembering Generations

by Ashraf H. Rushdy

Slavery is America's family secret, a partially hidden phantom that continues to haunt our national imagination. Remembering Generations explores how three contemporary African American writers artistically represent this notion in novels about the enduring effects of slavery on the descendants of slaves in the post-civil rights era. Focusing on Gayl Jones's Corregidora (1975), David Bradley's The Chaneysville Incident (1981), and Octavia Butler's Kindred (1979), Ashraf Rushdy situates these works in their cultural moment of production, highlighting the ways in which they respond to contemporary debates about race and family. Tracing the evolution of this literary form, he considers such works as Edward Ball's Slaves in the Family (1998), in which descendants of slaveholders expose the family secrets of their ancestors.Remembering Generations examines how cultural works contribute to social debates, how a particular representational form emerges out of a specific historical epoch, and how some contemporary intellectuals meditate on the issue of historical responsibility--of recognizing that the slave past continues to exert an influence on contemporary American society.

Remembering French Algeria: Pieds-Noirs, Identity, and Exile

by Amy L. Hubbell

Colonized by the French in 1830, Algeria was an important French settler colony that, unlike its neighbors, endured a lengthy and brutal war for independence from 1954 to 1962. The nearly one million Pieds-Noirs (literally “black-feet”) were former French citizens of Algeria who suffered a traumatic departure from their homes and discrimination upon arrival in France. In response, the once heterogeneous group unified as a community as it struggled to maintain an identity and keep the memory of colonial Algeria alive. Remembering French Algeria examines the written and visual re-creation of Algeria by the former French citizens of Algeria from 1962 to the present. By detailing the preservation and transmission of memory prompted by this traumatic experience, Amy L. Hubbell demonstrates how colonial identity is encountered, reworked, and sustained in Pied-Noir literature and film, with the device of repetition functioning in these literary and visual texts to create a unified and nostalgic version of the past. At the same time, however, the Pieds-Noirs’ compulsion to return compromises these efforts. Taking Albert Camus’s Le Mythe de Sisyphe and his subsequent essays on ruins as a metaphor for Pied-Noir identity, this book studies autobiographical accounts by Marie Cardinal, Jacques Derrida, Hélène Cixous, and Leïla Sebbar, as well as lesser-known Algerian-born French citizens, to analyze movement as a destabilizing and productive approach to the past.

Remembering Everly (Lost & Found #2)

by J. L. Berg

After two years in a coma, August Kinkaid has forgotten the darkness in his past. But his past hasn't forgotten him. His beautiful former fiancée, Everly, remembers every tumultuous moment of their stormy relationship. The sizzling passion. The web of lies. And the terrible secret Everly's been hiding since her last fateful night with August.Now the truth is out and August remembers everything. As his long-buried memories come flooding back, he begins to understand why Everly would want to move on with her life. Why she would give her heart to another man. And why August should try to forget her once and for all.But he can't give up on the only woman he's ever loved. Even if he has to reopen old wounds--and face the darkest demons of his past--August will do whatever it takes for a second chance with Everly. He let her slip away once. He's not about to spend the rest of his life remembering Everly when he could be holding her in his arms forever . . .

Remembering Dionysus: Revisioning psychology and literature in C.G. Jung and James Hillman

by Susan Rowland

Dionysus, god of dismemberment and sponsor of the lost or abandoned feminine, originates both Jungian psychology and literature in Remembering Dionysus. Characterized by spontaneity, fluid boundaries, sexuality, embodiment, wild nature, ecstasy and chaos, Dionysus is invoked in the writing of C. G. Jung and James Hillman as the dual necessity to adopt and dismiss literature for their archetypal vision of the psyche or soul. Susan Rowland describes an emerging paradigm for the twenty-first century enacting the myth of a god torn apart to be re-membered, and remembered as reborn in a great renewal of life. Rowland demonstrates how persons, forms of knowing and even eras that dismiss Dionysus are torn apart, and explores how Jung was Dionysian in providing his most dismembered text, The Red Book. Remembering Dionysus pursues the rough god into the Sublime in the destruction of meaning in Jung and Jacques Lacan, to a re-membering of sublime feminine creativity that offers zoe, or rebirth participating in an archetype of instinctual life. This god demands to be honoured inside our knowing and being, just as he (re)joins us to wild nature. This revealing book will be invigorating reading for Jungian analysts, psychotherapists, arts therapists and counsellors, as well as academics and students of analytical psychology, depth psychology, Jungian and post-Jungian studies, literary studies and ecological humanities.

Remembering Cosmopolitan Egypt: Literature, culture, and empire (Routledge Studies in Middle Eastern Literatures)

by Deborah Starr

Remembering Cosmopolitan Egypt examines the link between cosmopolitanism in Egypt, from the nineteenth century through to the mid-twentieth century, and colonialism. While it has been widely noted that such a relationship exists, the nature and impact of this dynamic is often overlooked. Taking a theoretical, literary and historical approach, the author argues that the notion of the cosmopolitan is inseparable from, and indebted to, its foundation in empire. Since the late 1970s a number of artistic works have appeared that represent the diversity of ethnic, national, and religious communities present in Egypt in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. During this period of direct and indirect European domination, the cosmopolitan society evident in these texts thrived. Through detailed analysis of these texts, which include contemporary novels written in Arabic and Hebrew as well as Egyptian films, the implications of the close relationship between colonialism and cosmopolitanism are explored. This comparative study of the contemporary literary and cultural revival of interest in Egypt’s cosmopolitan past will be of interest to students of Middle Eastern Studies, Literary and Cultural Studies and Jewish Studies.

Remembering Christmas

by Frank Anthony Polito Tom Mendicino Michael Salvatore

Christmastime brings back memories as surely as office parties bring recriminations. The childhood wishes fulfilled (or dashed), the magic of anticipation, fighting over the dinner table. . .these are the ghosts of every Christmas past and present. Remembering Christmas brings together three holiday stories in a sparkling anthology sprinkled with nostalgia.It's Christmas Eve in Tom Mendicino's Away in a Manger, and James is snowbound en route from New York City to his West Virginia hometown. While the sight of a familiar Motor Lodge sparks longing for a roadside America of yesteryear, his visions of peppermint stick ice cream are thwarted by a vending machine. But amid the revelry at the local diner, James finds something far more satisfying that will change his Christmases forever. . .1991, Michigan State University. Best friends Jack and Kirk are preparing for an end-of-semester party in Frank Anthony Polito's A Christmas to Remember. But there's something unspoken in the air--and it's not just the aroma of cinnamon-speckled eggnog. In Missed Connections by Michael Salvatore, two childhood friends reconnect in an airport lounge on Christmas Eve. And over cocktail-fueled reminiscences, they reconsider the paths they're on--and the roads never taken. . .Get what you really want this Christmas, with three captivating stories stuffed with warmth, wit, surprises--and the promise of sweet Christmases yet to come. . .

Remembering Boethius: Writing Aristocratic Identity in Late Medieval French and English Literatures

by Elizabeth Elliott

Remembering Boethius explores the rich intersection between the reception of Boethius and the literary construction of aristocratic identity, focusing on a body of late-medieval vernacular literature that draws on the Consolation of Philosophy to represent and reimagine contemporary experiences of exile and imprisonment. Elizabeth Elliott presents new interpretations of English, French, and Scottish texts, including Machaut's Confort d'ami, Remede de Fortune, and Fonteinne amoureuse, Jean Froissart's Prison amoureuse, Thomas Usk's Testament of Love, and The Kingis Quair, reading these texts as sources contributing to the development of the reader's moral character. These writers evoke Boethius in order to articulate and shape personal identities for public consumption, and Elliott's careful examination demonstrates that these texts often write not one life, but two, depicting the relationship between poet and aristocratic patron. These works associate the reception of wisdom with the cultivation of memory, and in turn, illuminate the contemporary reception of the Consolation as a text that itself focuses on memory and describes a visionary process of education that takes place within Boethius's own mind. In asking how and why writers remember Boethius in the Middle Ages, this book sheds new light on how medieval people imagined, and reimagined, themselves.

Remembering Blue

by Connie May Fowler

Emotionally neglected by her mother, abandoned by her father, Mattie O'Rourke spent her childhood starved for the one thing she thought she'd never find: love. When her mother dies and, at twenty-two, she finds herself completely without ties of any kind, Mattie takes a chance at ending her loneliness and moves to a tiny coastal Florida town. At the Suwannee Swifty convenience store, a sea change envelops her. Mattie O'Rourke sees Proteus Nicholas Blue and their fate is sealed after only a few shy, stolen glances. Nick walks into Mattie's life having fled his own. A lifelong fisherman from a remote island off the coast, Nick is haunted by the certain knowledge that the sea will be the death of him (as it has been for all the Blue men) and he has resolved to leave it behind. But as Nick and Mattie settle into an intimacy that both comforts and surprises them, Nick feels the inextricable pull of the waxing moon's tide and the siren's call of the dolphins that, Blue legend has it, are his brethren. And so it is that Mattie, who only months before felt that happiness would never find her, returns with Nick to the island home that nurtured him and finds herself embraced by a large and loving family and an alluring and sensual landscape. Life on Lethe is transforming for Mattie. But Nick always knew that the sea would claim him, and all of Mattie's love cannot prevent the tragedy that is their destiny. Moving and enchanting, Remembering Blue is a lush story of love, loss, and the mythic power of the ocean, told in an elegant and passionate voice that could only come from Connie May Fowler.

Remembering Babylon

by David Malouf

David Malouf's novel--shortlisted for the 1993 Booker Prize--is a masterpiece. In the mid-1840s, a thirteen year old boy is cast ashore in the far north of Australia and taken in by aborigines. Sixteen years later, when settlers reach the area, he moves back into the world of Europeans, men and women who are staking out their small patch of security in an alien, half-mythological land, hopeful yet terrified of what it might do to them.

Remembering Amma

by Thi Jaa Malati Mathur

An interesting story about a boy training to be a priest set in vedic traditions of South India.

Remembering 1942: And Other Chinese Stories

by Howard Goldblatt Sylvia Li-chun Lin Liu Zhenyun

Sweeping, humorous, and moving tales from one of contemporary China's greatest writers.The bestselling and award-winning author of novels satirizing contemporary China, Liu Zhenyun is also renowned for his short stories. Remembering 1942 showcases six of his best, featuring a diverse cast of ordinary people struggling against the obstacles-bureaucratic, economic, and personal-that life presents. The six exquisite stories that comprise this collection range from an exploration of office politics unmoored by an unexpected gift to the tale of a young soldier attempting to acclimate to his new life as a student and the story of a couple struggling to manage the demands of a young child. Another, about petty functionaries trying to solve a mystery of office intrigue, reads like a survival manual for Chinese bureaucracy. The masterful title story explores the legacy of the drought and famine that struck Henan Province in 1942, tracing its echoes in one man's personal journey through war and revolution and into the present.Each story is rich in wit, insight, and empathy, and together they bring into focus the realities of China's past and present, evoking clearly and mordantly the often Kafkaesque circumstances of contemporary life in the world's most populous nation.Skyhorse Publishing, as well as our Arcade, Yucca, and Good Books imprints, are proud to publish a broad range of books for readers interested in fiction-novels, novellas, political and medical thrillers, comedy, satire, historical fiction, romance, erotic and love stories, mystery, classic literature, folklore and mythology, literary classics including Shakespeare, Dumas, Wilde, Cather, and much more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.

Remembering

by Wendell Berry

"Remembering" takes place in a single day in 1976. Andy Catlett, at the bottom of a deep dark depression since losing his hand in a farming accident, is alone in San Francisco, and takes a long walk through the walking street of the city. By the end of the day, when he has flown home to Port William, Kentucky, Andy is on his way to becoming whole again.

Remembering: A Novel (Port William Ser.)

by Wendell Berry

Wendell Berry's continued fascination with the power of memory continues in this treasured novel set in 1976. Andy Catlett, a farmer whose hand was lost in an accident only eight months prior, wanders the streets of San Francisco. As his perspective filters through his anger over his loss and the harsh city that surrounds him, Andy begins to remember: the people and places that wait 2,000 miles away in his Kentucky home, the comfort he knew as a farmer, and his symbiotic relationship to the soil. Andy laments the modern shift away from the love of the land, even as he begins to accept his own changed relationship to the world.

The Remembering

by Steve Cash

THEIR ORIGINS ARE A MYSTERY. THEIR FUTURE IS AT HAND. For thousands of years the Meq have existed side by side with humanity--appearing as twelve-year-old children, unsusceptible to wounds and disease, dying only by extraordinary means. They have survived through the rise and fall of empires and emperors, through explorations, expansions, and war. Five sacred stones give a few of them mystical powers, but not the power to understand a long-destined event called the Remembering. In the aftermath of the nuclear bombing of Japan in 1945, Zianno Zezen finds himself alone, while the fate of the other Meq and his beloved Opari, carrier of the Stone of Blood, is unknown. But Z's archenemy, the Fleur-du-Mal, survives. In the next half century Z will reunite with far-flung friends both Meq and human, as American and Soviet spies vie to steal and harness the powers and mysteries of the timeless children. With the day of the Remembering rapidly approaching, Z must interpret the strange writing on an ancient etched stone sphere. In those markings, Z will discover messages within messages and begin a journey to the truth about his people and himself.Lyrical and mesmerizing, The Remembering spans the world and history, from the first humans to a secret that has never been told before. The Remembering is the moving saga of the Meq--their purpose, past, and future among us.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Remembering

by Joan Williams Lisa C. Hickman

Remembering: Joan Williams' Uncollected Pieces illustrates again that rediscovering an admired author--especially through his or her later works--is every bit as engaging as discovering a new literary voice. Joan Williams, an accomplished and prize-winning southern novelist, published a number of short stories and nonfiction pieces in the later years of her life; a life complicated early on by the influential men with whom she was involved, namely American author William Faulkner and independent publisher Seymour Lawrence. For years these literary gems were scattered and virtually unattainable to readers. Remembering: Joan Williams' Uncollected Pieces unites the formerly published but never collected material. The book's title piece, "Remembering," features a 1981 essay on Byronic Mississippi-born poet, Frank Stanford--known to Joan from his infancy until his tragic suicide--whose collected poems What About This (2015) appeared thirty-seven years posthumously. Skillful, nuanced, and altogether approachable, these mature efforts by a seasoned writer will surprise and reward. Remembering is a lovely testament to the craft of writing and Joan Williams' indelible style.

The Remembered Gate: Memoirs by Alabama Writers

by Jay Lamar Jeanie Thompson

A collection of essays from 19 nationally known writers from Alabama, reflecting on artistic self-discovery and regional awareness.

Remembered Death

by Agatha Christie

From the book: ROSEMARY IS FOR REMEMBRANCE . .. The inquest turned up no evidence of foul play, but no one who knew Rosemary Barton really believed the vivacious beauty would take her own life at her own birthday party. And no one saw her do it. It was ironic, now that the word "murder" was in the air, that not one of her nearest and dearest was free from suspicion. Her husband had, perhaps, endured one romantic "incident" too many; his secretary wanted him at any cost. Rosemary's lover feared the exposure that could destroy his career; his wife would do anything to have her husband back again. And Rosemary's penniless sister had lived all her life in Rosemary's scandalous and flamboyant shadow. One thing was certain-an utterly ruthless killer was plotting once more, composing a ghastly and final reprise!

The Remembered Dead: Poetry, Memory and the First World War

by Andrew Palmer Sally Minogue

The Remembered Dead explores the ways poets of the First World War - and later poets writing in the memory of that war - address the difficult question of how to remember, and commemorate, those killed in conflict. It looks closely at the way poets struggled to meaningfully represent dying, death, and the trauma of witness, while responding to the pressing need for commemoration. The authors pay close attention to specific poems while maintaining a strong awareness of literary and philosophical contexts. The poems are discussed in relation to modernism and myth, other forms of commemoration (photographs, memorials), and theories of cultural memory. There is fresh analysis of canonical poets which, at the same time, challenges the confines of the canon by integrating discussion of lesser-known figures, including non-combatants and poets of later decades. The final chapter reaches beyond the war's centenary in a discussion of one remarkable commemoration of Wilfred Owen.

Remembered: Longlisted for the Women's Prize 2019

by Yvonne Battle-Felton

From the Women's Prize for Fiction longlist and the Northern Writer's Award Winner comes. . .REMEMBERED 'Compares with Toni Morrison's Beloved' Guardian 'Powerful, unapologetic, revealing' The Herald'This book feels vital for our time' Irish Times 'It's haunting and militant and very visceral and compassionate' Diana Evans'Some books both break your heart and set you free. Remembered will change you' Rachel EdwardsIt is 1910 and Philadelphia is burning . . . The last place Spring wants to be is in the rundown, coloured section of a hospital surrounded by the groans of sick people and the ghost of her dead sister. But as her son Edward lays dying, she has no other choice.There're whispers that Edward drove a streetcar into a shop window. Some people think it was an accident, others claim that it was his fault, the police are certain that he was part of a darker agenda. Is he guilty? Can they find the truth?All Spring knows is that time is running out. She has to tell him the story of how he came to be. With the help of her dead sister, newspaper clippings and reconstructed memories, she must find a way to get through to him. To shatter the silences that governed her life, she will do everything she can to lead him home.

Remember Your Lies

by Jill Jones

&“Voodoo, danger and romance all combine to construct an on the edge of your seat thriller!&” —RT BOOK REVIEWS Ex-cop Angela Donahue has traded a life of mystery and danger for one of tranquility when she ended her career with the Georgia Bureau of Investigation. But when she&’s arrested for the murder of a man she&’s never even heard of, she realizes that her old life isn&’t as far behind her as she&’d hoped. Upon receiving news of her arrest, undercover operative Dylan Montana returns from Angela&’s past, determined to clear the name of the woman he still loves. With staggering evidence against her and threats growing more deadly, Angela has no choice but to trust a man who has already betrayed her once before. But in a whirlwind of deceit, violence, and murder, if Dylan wants to reclaim her heart, he&’ll have to save her life first.

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