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Brouwer Degree: The Core of Nonlinear Analysis (Progress in Nonlinear Differential Equations and Their Applications #95)

by George Dinca Jean Mawhin

This monograph explores the concept of the Brouwer degree and its continuing impact on the development of important areas of nonlinear analysis. The authors define the degree using an analytical approach proposed by Heinz in 1959 and further developed by Mawhin in 2004, linking it to the Kronecker index and employing the language of differential forms. The chapters are organized so that they can be approached in various ways depending on the interests of the reader. Unifying this structure is the central role the Brouwer degree plays in nonlinear analysis, which is illustrated with existence, surjectivity, and fixed point theorems for nonlinear mappings. Special attention is paid to the computation of the degree, as well as to the wide array of applications, such as linking, differential and partial differential equations, difference equations, variational and hemivariational inequalities, game theory, and mechanics. Each chapter features bibliographic and historical notes, and the final chapter examines the full history. Brouwer Degree will serve as an authoritative reference on the topic and will be of interest to professional mathematicians, researchers, and graduate students.

Broward County: For More Than Ninety Years Broward County's City Of Choice (Postcard History Series)

by Seth H. Bramson Mayor Barbara Sharief

Broward County came into existence on October 1, 1915, when Dade and Palm Beach Counties were partitioned to form a new county. Named for early-20th-century Florida governor Napoleon Bonaparte Broward, the county has grown to become renowned for nationally acclaimed restaurants, residential areas, colleges, universities, and shopping along Las Olas Boulevard in Fort Lauderdale. A major American metropolitan area, Broward County today is home to a branch of Florida International University, as well as the campuses of Nova Southeastern University, Broward College, and Florida Atlantic University. As of 2016, the population of Broward County was approximately 1.8 million people, making it Florida�s second-most populous county and the 17th-most populous in the United States.

Broward County: The Photography of Gene Hyde

by Susan Gillis

In 1915, the South Florida communities of Fort Lauderdale, Dania, Pompano, Hallandale, Deerfield, and Davie joined together to form a county. They named it Broward, in honor of the governor whose Everglades drainage program had brought them such prosperity. Today, Broward is Florida's second largest county, with 1.6 million people. Photographer Aaron Eugene Hyde came to Fort Lauderdale in 1933, at the age of 16, to begin a 40-year career, serving as one of the county's few professional photographers and the photographer for the Broward edition of the Miami Herald. Gene recorded fascinating people, places, and times pivotal in the county's development. His photos evoke nostalgia for the not-that-distant past, a way of life Broward County residents will never see again.

Brown: The Last Discovery of America

by Richard Rodriguez

In his dazzling new memoir, Richard Rodriguez reflects on the color brown and the meaning of Hispanics to the life of America today. Rodriguez argues that America has been brown since its inception-since the moment the African and the European met within the Indian eye. But more than simply a book about race, Brown is about America in the broadest sense--a look at what our country is, full of surprising observations by a writer who is a marvelous stylist as well as a trenchant observer and thinker. .

Brown

by Reviva Schermbrucker Sue Kramer

Reader: Level – First Words

Brown Adipose Tissue: Methods and Protocols (Methods in Molecular Biology #2448)

by David A. Guertin Christian Wolfrum

This detailed volume explores techniques for researching brown adipose tissue (BAT) and the fascinating biology and therapeutic potential of thermogenic adipocytes. The content reflects the advancing technologies in genetics, imaging, and 'omics strategies that are allowing researchers to probe BAT biology at unprecedented depths and detail, yet it also presents classic physiology principles, which remain the core tenets of BAT biology. Written for the highly successful Methods in Molecular Biology series, chapters include introductions to their respective topics, lists of the necessary materials and reagents, step-by-step, readily reproducible laboratory protocols, and tips on troubleshooting and avoiding known pitfalls. Authoritative and practical, Brown Adipose Tissue: Methods and Protocols provides perspectives and detailed protocols for the benefit of both new BAT researchers looking for guidance as well as seasoned researchers who would like to expand their toolkits. Chapter 12 is available open access under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License via link.springer.com.

Brown Adipose Tissue (Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology #251)

by Alexander Pfeifer Martin Klingenspor Stephan Herzig

The main focus of this book is on brown adipose tissue and its metabolic function. The book provides a timely update on the latest research and shows where the field is heading. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) dissipates energy and has received considerable attention in the last few years, having been re-discovered in adult humans in 2007/9. Moreover, BAT might offer a target for novel therapies to address obesity, a health condition that has reached pandemic dimensions.

Brown Album: Essays on Exile and Identity

by Porochista Khakpour

*A Vintage Original*From the much-acclaimed novelist and essayist, a beautifully rendered, poignant collection of personal essays, chronicling immigrant and Iranian-American life in our contemporary moment.Novelist Porochista Khakpour's family moved to Los Angeles after fleeing the Iranian Revolution, giving up their successes only to be greeted by an alienating culture. Growing up as an immigrant in America means that one has to make one's way through a confusing tangle of conflicting cultures and expectations. And Porochista is pulled between the glitzy culture of Tehrangeles, an enclave of wealthy Iranians and Persians in LA, her own family's modest life and culture, and becoming an assimilated American. Porochista rebels--she bleaches her hair and flees to the East Coast, where she finds her community: other people writing and thinking at the fringes. But, 9/11 happens and with horror, Porochista watches from her apartment window as the towers fall. Extremism and fear of the Middle East rises in the aftermath and then again with the election of Donald Trump. Porochista is forced to finally grapple with what it means to be Middle-Eastern and Iranian, an immigrant, and a refugee in our country today. Brown Album is a stirring collection of essays, at times humorous and at times profound, drawn from more than a decade of Porochista's work and with new material included. Altogether, it reveals the tolls that immigrant life in this country can take on a person and the joys that life can give.

Brown and Coconut

by Paul M. Healy Yuan Zou

Case

Brown and Gay in LA: The Lives of Immigrant Sons (Asian American Sociology)

by Anthony Christian Ocampo

The stories of second-generation immigrant gay men coming of age in Los AngelesGrowing up in the shadow of Hollywood, the gay sons of immigrants featured in Brown and Gay in LA could not have felt further removed from a world where queerness was accepted and celebrated. Instead, the men profiled here maneuver through family and friendship circles where masculinity dominates, gay sexuality is unspoken, and heterosexuality is strictly enforced. For these men, the path to sexual freedom often involves chasing the dreams while resisting the expectations of their immigrant parents—and finding community in each other. Ocampo also details his own story of reconciling his queer Filipino American identity and those of men like him. He shows what it was like for these young men to grow up gay in an immigrant family, to be the one gay person in their school and ethnic community, and to be a person of color in predominantly White gay spaces. Brown and Gay in LA is an homage to second-generation gay men and their radical redefinition of what it means to be gay, to be a man, to be a person of color, and, ultimately, what it means to be an American.

Brown and Shannon/Going to the Source, Volume 1: The Bedford Reader In American History

by Victoria Brown Timothy Shannon

Many document readers offer lots of sources, but only Going to the Source combines a rich selection of primary sources with in-depth instructions for how to use each type of source. Mirroring the chronology of the U.S. history survey, each chapter familiarizes students with a single type of source while focusing on an intriguing historical episode such as the Cherokee Removal or the 1894 Pullman Strike. Students practice working with a diverse range of source types including photographs, diaries, oral histories, speeches, advertisements, political cartoons, and more. A capstone chapter in each volume prompts students to synthesize information on a single topic from a variety of source types. The wide range of topics and sources across 28 chapters provides students with all they need to become fully engaged with America’s history.

Brown and Shannon/Going to the Source, Volume 2: The Bedford Reader In American History

by Victoria Brown Timothy Shannon

Many document readers offer lots of sources, but only Going to the Source combines a rich selection of primary sources with in-depth instructions for how to use each type of source. Mirroring the chronology of the U.S. history survey, each chapter familiarizes students with a single type of source while focusing on an intriguing historical episode such as the Cherokee Removal or the 1894 Pullman Strike. Students practice working with a diverse range of source types including photographs, diaries, oral histories, speeches, advertisements, political cartoons, and more. A capstone chapter in each volume prompts students to synthesize information on a single topic from a variety of source types. The wide range of topics and sources across 28 chapters provides students with all they need to become fully engaged with America’s history.

Brown Baby Jesus: A Picture Book

by Dorena Williamson

Celebrate Christmas with this unique retelling of the Nativity story featuring Jesus as a melanated baby in a story that&’s rich with Scripture, historical accuracy, and a multicultural weaving of love—from the author of Crowned with Glory.Like Moses, brown baby Jesus would be a deliverer. Like Rahab, brown baby Jesus would save His people from destruction. Like David, brown baby Jesus would rule as a great king. Like the colorful threads that make up a beautiful cloth, Brown Baby Jesus brings together the characters and stories leading to Jesus—showing how God included many races and nations in the story we celebrate each year.With an unconventional Christmas setting of Egypt and written in sweet, lyrical prose, Brown Baby Jesus is sure to become a holiday classic embraced by families of all races and backgrounds.

Brown Beauty: Color, Sex, And Race From The Harlem Renaissance To World War Ii

by Laila Haidarali

Examines how the media influenced ideas of race and beauty among African American women from the Harlem Renaissance to World War II. Between the Harlem Renaissance and the end of World War II, a complicated discourse emerged surrounding considerations of appearance of African American women and expressions of race, class, and status. Brown Beauty considers how the media created a beauty ideal for these women, emphasizing different representations and expressions of brown skin.Haidarali contends that the idea of brown as a “respectable shade” was carefully constructed through print and visual media in the interwar era. Throughout this period, brownness of skin came to be idealized as the real, representational, and respectable complexion of African American middle class women. Shades of brown became channels that facilitated discussions of race, class, and gender in a way that would develop lasting cultural effects for an ever-modernizing world. Building on an impressive range of visual and media sources—from newspapers, journals, magazines, and newsletters to commercial advertising—Haidarali locates a complex, and sometimes contradictory, set of cultural values at the core of representations of women, envisioned as “brown-skin.” She explores how brownness affected socially-mobile New Negro women in the urban environment during the interwar years, showing how the majority of messages on brownness were directed at an aspirant middle-class. By tracing brown’s changing meanings across this period, and showing how a visual language of brown grew into a dynamic racial shorthand used to denote modern African American womanhood, Brown Beauty demonstrates the myriad values and judgments, compromises and contradictions involved in the social evaluation of women. This book is an eye-opening account of the intense dynamics between racial identity and the influence mass media has on what, and who we consider beautiful.

The Brown Betty Cookbook: Modern Vintage Desserts and Stories from Philadelphia's Best Bakery

by Linda Hinton Brown Norrinda Brown Hayat

The first cookbook from Philadelphia's phenomenal Brown Betty Dessert BoutiqueWhen three generations of African-American women decided to open a bakery in Philadelphia, they had no idea how quickly the accolades would come. With high praise from Rachael Ray magazine and other corners of the culinary world, the Brown Betty Dessert Boutique has found fame with their amazing poundcakes, cheesecakes, pies, and cookies, among other delectable treats. This delicious cookbook features both the secret recipes that Brown Betty's fans can't wait to get their hands on, as well as the personal stories that explain the evocative names of such recipes as Alice's Two Step and Strawberry Letter. Features recipes that combine old-fashioned treats with thrilling contemporary flavors like sweet potato poundcake and dark cherry cheesecakeIncludes gorgeous and mouthwatering full-color photography throughoutFor home bakers who want to experience the best of Brown Betty in their own homes or dessert-lovers looking for something new, The Brown Betty Cookbook offers both inspiration and delectation.

Brown Bodies, White Babies: The Politics of Cross-Racial Surrogacy (Intersections #9)

by Laura Harrison

Brown Bodies, White Babies focuses on the practice of cross-racial gestational surrogacy, in which a woman - through in-vitro fertilization using the sperm and egg of intended parents or donors - carries a pregnancy for intended parents of a different race. Focusing on the racial differences between parents and surrogates, this book is interested in how reproductive technologies intersect with race, particularly when brown bodies produce white babies. While the potential of reproductive technologies is far from pre-determined, the ways in which these technologies are currently deployed often serve the interests of dominant groups, through the creation of white, middle-class, heteronormative families. Laura Harrison, providing an important understanding of the work of women of color as surrogates, connects this labor to the history of racialized reproduction in the United States. Cross-racial surrogacy is one end of a continuum in which dominant groups rely on the reproductive potential of nonwhite women, whose own reproductive desires have been historically thwarted and even demonized. Brown Bodies, White Babies provides am interdisciplinary analysis that includes legal cases of contested surrogacy, historical examples of surrogacy as a form of racialized reproductive labor, the role of genetics in the assisted reproduction industry, and the recent turn toward reproductive tourism. Joining the ongoing feminist debates surrounding reproduction, motherhood, race, and the body, Brown Bodies, White Babies ultimately critiques the new potentials for parenthood that put the very contours of kinship into question.

Brown Boy: A Memoir

by Omer Aziz

Brown Boy is an uncompromising interrogation of identity, family, religion, race, and class, told through Omer Aziz&’s incisive and luminous prose.In a tough neighborhood on the outskirts of Toronto, miles away from wealthy white downtown, Omer Aziz struggles to find his place as a first-generation Pakistani Muslim boy. He fears the violence and despair of the world around him, and sees a dangerous path ahead, succumbing to aimlessness, apathy, and rage. In his senior year of high school, Omer quickly begins to realize that education can open up the wider world. But as he falls in love with books, and makes his way to Queen&’s University in Ontario, Sciences Po in Paris, Cambridge University in England, and finally Yale Law School, he continually confronts his own feelings of doubt and insecurity at being an outsider, a brown-skinned boy in an elite white world. He is searching for community and identity, asking questions of himself and those he encounters, and soon finds himself in difficult situations—whether in the suburbs of Paris or at the Temple Mount in Jerusalem. Yet the more books Omer reads and the more he moves through elite worlds, his feelings of shame and powerlessness only grow stronger, and clear answers recede further away. Weaving together his powerful personal narrative with the books and friendships that move him, Aziz wrestles with the contradiction of feeling like an Other and his desire to belong to a Western world that never quite accepts him. He poses the questions he couldn&’t have asked in his youth: Was assimilation ever really an option? Could one transcend the perils of race and class? And could we—the collective West—ever honestly confront the darker secrets that, as Aziz discovers, still linger from the past? In Brown Boy, Omer Aziz has written a book that eloquently describes the complex process of creating an identity that fuses where he&’s from, what people see in him, and who he knows himself to be.

Brown Boy: A Memoir

by Omer Aziz

Aziz's story is a story that is common to many but one that is rarely told. It is the story of growing up the child of immigrants and trying to progress in a society where the realities of racism and xenophobia are all too obvious. It gives voice to the experience of finding oneself caught between worlds and the concomitant feelings of shame, insecurity and powerlessness that this can engender. As he describes it, he found himself &‘a hyphenated man&’ struggling to create an identity that fused East and West.Brown Boy is a hugely important and desperately needed book, which asks the most important questions and answers them in a way that is sometimes uncomfortable but always incredibly stimulating. Like Richard Wright's Black Boy, from which it draws inspiration, Brown Boy will be read for years to come. It is an enormously significant contribution to the contemporary debate around race and identity, and a work of deep literary sensitivity that will stand the test of time.

Brown Boys and Rice Queens: Spellbinding Performance in the Asias (Sexual Cultures #42)

by Eng-Beng Lim

Honorable Mention for the 2015 Cultural Studies Best Book presented by the Association of Asian American StudiesWinner of the 2013 CLAGS Fellowship Award for Best First Book Project in LGBT StudiesA transnational study of Asian performance shaped by the homoerotics of orientalism, Brown Boys and Rice Queens focuses on the relationship between the white man and the native boy. Eng-Beng Lim unpacks this as the central trope for understanding colonial and cultural encounters in 20th and 21st century Asia and its diaspora. Using the native boy as a critical guide, Lim formulates alternative readings of a traditional Balinese ritual, postcolonial Anglophone theatre in Singapore, and performance art in Asian America.Tracing the transnational formation of the native boy as racial fetish object across the last century, Lim follows this figure as he is passed from the hands of the colonial empire to the postcolonial nation-state to neoliberal globalization. Read through such figurations, the traffic in native boys among white men serves as an allegory of an infantilized and emasculated Asia, subordinate before colonial whiteness and modernity. Pushing further, Lim addresses the critical paradox of this entrenched relationship that resides even within queer theory itself by formulating critical interventions around “Asian performance.”

The Brown Bullet: Rajo Jack's Drive to Integrate Auto Racing

by Bill Poehler

The powers-that-be in 1920s auto racing, namely the American Automobile Association's Contest Board, barred everyone who wasn't a white male from the sport. But Dewey Gatson, a black man who went by the name Rajo Jack, drove into the center of "outlaw" auto racing in California, refusing to let the pervasive racism of his day stop him from competing against entire fields of white drivers. In The Brown Bullet, journalist Bill Poehler uncovers the life of a long-forgotten trailblazer and the great lengths he took to even get on the track, showing ultimately how Rajo Jack proved to a generation that a black man could compete with some of the greatest white drivers of his era, winning some of the biggest races of the day.

Brown Capital Management

by Emily R. McComb Luis M. Viceira Sarah Mehta

Set in July 2021, this case looks at several growth strategies under consideration at Brown Capital, the second-oldest Black-owned asset management firm in the U.S. Since its 1983 founding, Baltimore-based Brown Capital has specialized in small company growth equity-investing in small, publicly traded companies with outsized growth potential. But with its successful, domestic small company fund closed to new investors since 2013, and its international small company fund on a similar trajectory, Brown Capital's pathway to sustained growth is unclear. Should it (1) reconsider closing its Morningstar 5-star rated international small company fund; (2) focus on its newer mid company fund, which has more capacity for growth and a recent uptick in performance; or (3) introduce new strategies and asset classes?

Brown Church: Five Centuries of Latina/o Social Justice, Theology, and Identity

by Robert Chao Romero

Interest in and awareness of the demand for social justice as an outworking of the Christian faith is growing. But it is not new. For five hundred years, Latina/o culture and identity have been shaped by their challenges to the religious, socio-economic, and political status quo, whether in opposition to Spanish colonialism, Latin American dictatorships, US imperialism in Central America, the oppression of farmworkers, or the current exploitation of undocumented immigrants. Christianity has played a significant role in that movement at every stage. Robert Chao Romero, the son of a Mexican father and a Chinese immigrant mother, explores the history and theology of what he terms the "Brown Church." Romero considers how this movement has responded to these and other injustices throughout its history by appealing to the belief that God's vision for redemption includes not only heavenly promises but also the transformation of every aspect of our lives and the world. Walking through this history of activism and faith, readers will discover that Latina/o Christians have a heart after God's own.

Brown County

by Lisa Haitz Greg Haitz

The history of Brown County has been shaped largely by the Ohio River. It has allowed farmers and industries to transport their products and provided recreation, entertainment, and travel opportunities to the residents of the community. Even though flooding of the river brought destruction many times, it also enabled freedom for thousands of slaves. Under abolitionist leaders like John Rankin and John Parker, parts of Brown County became known as the "Grand Central Station" of the Underground Railroad. Interesting and notable Brown County natives include Ulysses S. Grant, who grew up to command one of the largest armies ever assembled and later became president of the United States; Col. Charles Young, the third African American to graduate from West Point and a military attache to Liberia; Rosie Riles, better known as "Aunt Jemima"; and Joe Smith, who inadvertently helped Louis Armstrong's career, also hailed from this great county.

Brown County Mornings

by Gary Moore

“I spent many days of my childhood in the woods of southern Indiana. Each [photograph] brings memories rushing back with a flush of nostalgia and pleasure.” —Tim FitzharrisRolling hills, rich forests, and beautiful vistas have made Brown County, Indiana, a favorite haunt of painters and ordinary tourists. In this gorgeous collection, landscape photographer Gary Moore reveals the spirit of the place in the morning hours as it awakens to the new day.Complementing Moore’s wonderful photographs is a text by James P. Eagleman, one of the area’s lifelong naturalists, which showcases the county’s unique flora and fauna. Included with more than one hundred color landscape photographs are Moore’s tips on composition, atmosphere, and lighting, encouraging readers to test their creativity with whatever equipment they possess. A book to treasure, Brown County Mornings beckons visitors to enjoy this magical place at any time of day or year.

Brown Eggs and Jam Jars: Family Recipes from the Kitchen of Simple Bites

by Aimee Wimbush-Bourque

Aimée's rural homesteader upbringing, years working as a professional chef, and everyday life as a busy mom led to the creation of the hugely popular blog Simple Bites. Raising three young children with husband Danny, Aimée traded her tongs and chef whites for a laptop and camera, married her two passions--mothering and cooking--and has since been creating recipes with an emphasis on whole foods for the family table, sharing stories, tips and inspiring readers to make the family-food connection on the Simple Bites blog. Brown Eggs and Jam Jars is Aimée's long-awaited cookbook inspired by her urban homesteading through the seasons and the joyous events they bring. It embraces year-round simple food with fresh flavours from celebrating spring with a stack of Buttermilk Buckwheat Pancakes and pure maple syrup, to a simple late-summer harvest dinner with Chili-Basil Corn on the Cob and Lemon Oregano Roast Chicken. Autumn favourites include Apple Cinnamon Layer Cake with Apple Butter Cream Cheese Frosting and Make-Ahead Currant Scones that are delicious topped with homemade Strawberry-Honey Jam with Orange Zest. Comfort meals include Chicken Leek Shepherd's Pie and Slow Cooker Cider Ham; homemade treats abound like Whole-What Chocolate Chunk Cookies with Orange Zest, Cinnamon Shortbread Bars with Dark Chocolate Ganache, Ice Cider Caramel Corn, and much more. Created for the family-minded home cook, Aimée shares over 100 recipes from melt-on-your-tongue maple butter tarts to tangy homemade yogurt that have a touch of nostalgia, feature natural ingredients, and boast plenty of love. Aimée's heart-warming stories capture everyday life in a busy family. In addition, she shares tips and advice on how to get the whole family involved in cooking from the ground up and enjoying homemade food. Brown Eggs and Jam Jars will inspire you to connect your family and food right where you are in life--from growing your own tomatoes to making a batch of homemade cookies. Enjoy your urban homestead!

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