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Firegirl

by Tony Abbott

<P>"...there is..." Mrs. Tracy was saying quietly, "there is something we need to know about Jessica..." <P>From this moment on, life is never quite the same for Tom and his seventh-grade classmates. They learn that Jessica has been in a fire and was badly burned, and will be attending St. Catherine's while getting medical treatments. <P>Despite her horrifying appearance and the fear she evokes in him and most of the class, Tom slowly develops a tentative friendship with Jessica that changes his life. <P>Tony Abbott is the author of over 35 books for young readers, including the extremely popular The Secrets of Droon series. In Firegirl he has written a powerful book that will show readers that even the smallest of gestures can have a profound impact on someone's life.

Excel Best Practices for Business

by Loren Abdulezer

How to create, manage, and validate spreadsheets that will stand up to scrutiny and provide a clear and accurate picture of your enterprise.

Hearts of Wisdom: American Women Caring for Kin, 1850-1940

by Emily K. Abel

Drawing upon a wealth of diaries, letters, and case records from hospitals and social service agencies, the author examines the shifting roles of caregivers between 1850 and 1940. In addition to the diaries and letters of literate white woman, she turns to slave narratives from the antebellum south and records from health-care agencies serving American Indians during the first part of the 20th century. Abel shows that women in the 19th century gained self-esteem and status through their knowledge of home remedies and nursing techniques. The medical profession gained strength with the discovery of microbes and the development of medications to treat specific diseases. During the 20th century professionals discredited women who provided health care at home. One chapter discusses mothers of children with epilepsy or mental retardation, who were pressured to place their children in institutions and to sever emotional ties with them. Another chapter explores the shift from American sign language to oralism in the education of deaf children, and the impact this had upon mothers. Abel concludes by looking briefly at the current trend to return more and more caregiving to the home.

Inner Views from My Culture

by Audrey Abell

Authors Introduction: I wrote this book because my High School requires everyone to do a senior project to graduate. I decided to interview other teenagers and young people I know that have a disability because I have cerebral palsy and have had it my whole life. I'm hoping this book will help to raise awareness for those that are not disabled by helping them to understand what we go through day to day in the life of a young person with CP. I wanted it to be from the strong heart of my generation. I collected the information by email, in person and phone conversations that were recorded. For the interviews I asked everyone forty-one questions and they answered only the ones they wanted to. Each person has his or her own chapter. It ended up that the majority of everyone in this book has cerebral palsy of some kind. Some of the people I knew already and some I found by word of mouth and on the internet. The questions I asked my friends were inspired by my own life and what I deal with on a daily basis. The people who participated in this book chose to be anonymous because some of the questions are very personal and that way it could be private. Everyone who contributed to the book will get their own copy to share with whomever they want, in their lives and communities. Hopefully after people read the information it will give them more insight and they'll have more understanding. Like most people in the book I am the only one at my school in a power chair and that has cp. I've been the only one my whole life so I'm used to that. I think my being at school has made some people more aware. I think the problem is that people don't understand those with disabilities have the same feelings and think the same. When someone does "get it" they just treat me like a normal person, speak directly to me normally, without extra loudness or slowness or the other big one is they don't talk to me like I'm a baby. In the interview I talk about other important issues. I hope you enjoy this book and that it changes your perspective on us, our world, and our culture. I also hope that it helps all the young writers who participated, feel better to know about what each other is going through and that we share a lot of the same feelings and can learn and help each other. That goes for people with disabilities everywhere too.

Liblouis User's and Programmer's Manual

by Abilitiessoft

A guide for users and programmers on Liblouis, an open-source braille translator and back-translator.

Liblouisxml User's and Programmer's Manual

by Abilitiessoft Viewplus Technologies

A user's and programmer's guide for Liblouisxml, a software component for translating XML into braille.

Jewish Perspectives on Theology and the Human Experience of Disability

by Judith Z. Abrams William C. Gaventa

Few people are untouched by the issue of disability, whether personally or through a friend or relative. Jewish Perspectives on Theology and the Human Experience of Disability shares moving insights from around the world and across the broad spectrum of Judaism on how and why the Jewish community is incomplete without the presence and participation of the disabled. Authors representing each of the three main movements of Judaism--Orthodox, Conservative, and Reform--examine theology, scripture, ethics, practical theology, religious education, and personal experience to understand and apply the lessons and wisdom of the past to issues of the present.

Gender and Disability: Women's Experiences in the Middle East

by Lina Abu-Habib

Women with disabilities face a double discrimination, both in terms of gender and also of their particular disability. For many women their most punishing disability is the attitude taken to them by society. This book examines the situation of women with various types of disability in the Middle Eastern context, and describes the evolution of Oxfam's perspective on working with disabled women. It provides a general overview of the concept of disability and includes several case studies from the Lebanon, Yemen, and the Occupied Palestinian Territories. Each chapter looks at specific aspects of the issue, and personal histories from disabled women and members of organizations for disabled people provide gripping testimony.

Sleep in Children with Neurodevelopmental Disabilities: An Evidence-Based Guide

by Jennifer A. Accardo

This practical guide presents approaches to working with children and adolescents with neurodevelopmental disabilities who have sleep problems. Divided into four sections, the book begins with the impact of sleep problems in children with disabilities and the evaluation of sleep complaints. The next two sections cover the major categories of sleep disorders as they apply in children with disabilities, and specific neurodevelopmental disabilities with their characteristic sleep manifestations. The last section details options for treatment, which include behavioral and environmental strategies, occupational therapy, exercise, and medications. Chapters feature case studies that introduce and reinforce diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Those engaged in the care of children with neurodevelopmental disabilities and sleep problems will find this text to be an invaluable guide when assessing and treating sleep disorders.

Happy, the Hearing Ear Dog

by Susan Yoder Ackerman

Tyler's grandma is deaf, so she gets Happy, a specially trained dog who hears for her.

Shyla, the Seeing Eye Puppy: Ours But Not Forever

by Susan Yoder Ackerman

Courtney, her brother Jed, and the whole family must chip in to take care of Shyla, the Labrador retriever puppy, before she is sent to The Seeing Eye to become a guide dog for the blind. Shyla is trained at every opportunity, but the year she stays with Courtney's family goes by fast!

Brittany: Child of Joy

by Anne Adams

This is the memoir of a mother's journey to come to terms with her daughter's severe spinal injury and developmental disability.

Camel Crazy: A Quest for Miracles in the Mysterious World of Camels

by Christina Adams

In this page-turning odyssey, a mother on a mission travels the globe — from Bedouin camps in the Middle East to Amish farms in Pennsylvania to camel-herder villages in India — to obtain camel milk, which dramatically helps her son’s autism symptoms. Chronicling bureaucratic roadblocks, adventure-filled detours, and Christina Adams’s love-fueled determination, Camel Crazy explores why camels are cherished as family members and hailed as healers. Adams’s work uncovers studies of camel milk for possible treatment of autism, allergies, diabetes, and immune dysfunction, as well as ancient traditions of healing. But the most fascinating aspect of Adams’s discoveries is the gentle-eyed, mischievous camels themselves. Huge and often unpredictable, they are amazingly intelligent and adaptable. This moving and rollicking ode to “camel people” and the creatures they adore reveals the ways camels touch lives around the world. Includes users’ and buyers’ guides to camel’s milk

The Chicken Who Saved Us: The Remarkable Story of Andrew and Frightful

by Kristin Jarvis Adams

The true story of an autistic boy with a body under siege by mysterious illness, and the chicken who saved his life."Heartbreakingly beautiful - the gift of the human animal bond.” - Temple Grandin, Author, researcher, consultant and world-renowned autism spokespersonEight-year-old Andrew was autistic and bilingual. He spoke English - and Chicken. But the day he told his pet chicken Frightful that his body was trying to kill him, Andrew’s family and an entire medical community were launched into a decade-long quest for answers. This honest memoir of fierce and faithful parenting takes readers on a heartfelt journey through chronic illness and Asperger’s syndrome to discover the healing bond between a boy and his chicken. Navigating the complex landscape of modern medicine and genetics, through a rare diagnosis of Trisomy 8 Mosaicism and an experimental bone marrow transplant, readers venture to places where chickens talk, superheroes come alive, and a boy on the brink of death finds the courage to survive.

Raising Henry

by Rachel Adams

Rachel Adamss life had always gone according to plan. She had an adoring husband, a beautiful two-year-old son, a sunny Manhattan apartment, and a position as a tenured professor at Columbia University. Everything changed with the birth of her second child, Henry. Just minutes after he was born, doctors told her that Henry had Down syndrome, and she knew that her life would never be the same. In this honest, self-critical, and surprisingly funny book, Adams chronicles the first three years of Henrys life and her own transformative experience of unexpectedly becoming the mother of a disabled child. A highly personal story of one familys encounter with disability, "Raising Henry" is also an insightful exploration of todays knotty terrain of social prejudice, disability policy, genetics, prenatal testing, medical training, and inclusive education. Adams untangles the contradictions of living in a society that is more enlightened and supportive of people with disabilities than ever before, yet is racing to perfect prenatal tests to prevent children like Henry from being born. Her book is gripping, beautifully written, and nearly impossible to put down. Once read, her familys story is impossible to forget.

Keywords for Disability Studies

by Rachel Adams David Serlin Benjamin Reiss

Keywords for Disability Studies aims to broaden and define the conceptual framework of disability studies for readers and practitioners in the field and beyond. The volume engages some of the most pressing debates of our time, such as prenatal testing, euthanasia, accessibility in public transportation and the workplace, post-traumatic stress, and questions about the beginning and end of life. Each of the 60 essays in Keywords for Disability Studies focuses on a distinct critical concept, including "ethics," "medicalization," "performance," "reproduction," "identity," and "stigma," among others. Although the essays recognize that "disability" is often used as an umbrella term, the contributors to the volume avoid treating individual disabilities as keywords, and instead interrogate concepts that encompass different components of the social and bodily experience of disability. The essays approach disability as an embodied condition, a mutable historical phenomenon, and a social, political, and cultural identity. An invaluable resource for students and scholars alike, Keywords for Disability Studies brings the debates that have often remained internal to disability studies into a wider field of critical discourse, providing opportunities for fresh theoretical considerations of the field's core presuppositions through a variety of disciplinary perspectives. Visit keywords.nyupress.org for online essays, teaching resources, and more.

First Star I See

by Lynne Adamson Jaye Andras Caffrey

A lively, enchanting story that wonderfully captures the daily ups and downs of being a child with attention deficit disorder through the adventures of Paige, a bright young girl whose inability to stay focused threatens to spoil her best efforts to win a school contest.

Little Beauties

by Kim Addonizio

Diana McBride, a thirty-four-year-old former child pageant contender, now works in a baby store in Long Beach. Between dealing with a catastrophic haircut, the failure of her marriage, and phone calls from her alcoholic mother, Diana has gone off her OCD medication and is trying to cope via washing and cleaning rituals. When pregnant teenager Jamie Ramirez enters the store, Diana's already chaotic world is sent spinning. Jamie can't stand being pregnant. She can't wait to get on with her normal life and give the baby up for adoption. But her yet-to-be-born daughter, Stella, has a fierce will and a destiny to fulfill. And as the magical plot of Little Beauties unfolds, these three characters' lives become linked in ever more surprising ways.

Honey Out of Stone

by Gary Adelman

Gary Adelman has written intensely about a man's rediscovery of life within the affliction of unexpected blindness. Attacked by diabetes-induced blindness, Ben Storch abides the despair attendant upon the dissolution of his marriage and the spiritual terror of darkness. It is an "unblinding" through love--the love of a childhood sweetheart who leaves her own unhappy marriage to come to him--that gives his life an unhoped-for new meaning. Adelman tells Storch's story in a blend of prose and poetry which ranges from lyric and tender to violent and grotesque. He captures the heartbreak of loss and then the exhilaration of spiritual rebirth. But the essence of the book is his lyric, sexual, and wildly exuberant celebration of the romantic love, which has brought him new joy, new strength and vision.

A Man Called Norman

by Mike Adkins

This is the moving story of two men, an eccentric old man and a Christian musician, whose lives intertwine in a way that neither would have expected and only God could have planned.

Lost Eye: Coping with Monocular Vision After Enucleation or Eye Loss from Cancer, Accident, or Disease

by Jay D. Adkisson

Lost Eye is a collection of e-mails and message threads from Jay Adkisson's LostEye.com website, along with articles and other helpful information to help persons who have lost an eye to cope with the experience. The message is that life can continue as normal after the loss of an eye, and that there are many other people who are similarly situated and have successfully coped with the loss of an eye for many years.

A Picture Book of Helen Keller

by David A. Adler

A brief biography of the woman who overcame her handicaps of being both blind and deaf.

Forever Neverland

by Susan Adrian

What if Peter Pan wanted to take you to Neverland? Would you go? A contemporary sequel to J. M. Barrie's timeless classic Peter Pan, perfect for kids who loved THE LAND OF STORIES and dream of going to Neverland. <P><P>Clover and Fergus are the great-great-grandchildren of Wendy Darling (yes, that Wendy). And now Peter Pan wants to take them to Neverland for the adventure of their lives! But Clover is a little nervous--she's supposed to look after her brother. Fergus is autistic, and not everyone makes him feel welcome. What will happen to him in this magical world? <P><P>Fergus isn't nervous at all. To him, Neverland seems like a dream come true! He's tired of Clover's constant mothering and wants some independence, like Peter and the Lost Boys have. He wonders, Why can't the real world be more like Neverland? <P><P>Neverland is fun and free, but it's also dangerous and even scary at times. Unfamiliar creatures lurk in the shadows, and strange sounds come from the waters. And then the mermaids start to go missing. . . . <P><P>In an imaginative and thoughtful continuation of the story of Peter Pan, Susan Adrian explores Neverland with a fresh perspective and indelible warmth, offering a new adventure based on a beloved classic!

El Manual Sobre la Dislexia: Procedimientos Sobre la Dislexia y Trastornos Relacionados (2014)

by Agencia de Educación de Texas

Un manual para dislexia y otros trastornos relacionados. Modificado en 2014.

Manual sobre la Dislexia

by Agencias de educación en Texas

A manual for dyslexia.

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