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Will You Miss Me When I'm Gone?

by Mark Zwonitzer Charles Hirshberg

Will You Miss Me When I'm Gone? is the first major biography of the Carter Family, the musical pioneers who almost single-handedly established the sounds and traditions that grew into modern folk, country, and bluegrass music -- a style celebrated in O Brother, Where Art Thou?A.P. Carter was a restless man, seemingly in a constant state of motion. On one of his travels across the sparsely settled mountains and valleys that surrounded his home in southern Virginia, he met and married a young girl named Sara Dougherty. Orphaned as a child, Sara was remote by nature but seemed to find release in singing the typically melancholy ballads that were a part of her home tradition.For fun, A.P., Sara, and her cousin Maybelle (who married A.P.'s brother "Eck" Carter) would play and sing the hymns and ballads known in their Poor Valley community, occasionally adding songs A.P. had collected during his travels. Then, in 1927, they traveled to Bristol, Tennessee, to audition for a New York record executive who was hunting "hillbilly" talent and offering an amazing fifty dollars per song for any he recorded. These Bristol recording sessions would become generally accepted as the "Big Bang" of country music, producing two of its first stars: Jimmie Rodgers and the Carter Family.By the early 1930s, the Carter Family was the most bankable country music group in America, with total sales of more than a million records. By the late '30s, they were appearing regularly on high-power radio station XERA, which broadcast from coast to coast. A whole generation of country people could gather around the radio and hear the sound of music that came straight from their world. Johnny Cash in Arkansas, Waylon Jennings in Texas, Chet Atkins in Georgia, and Tom T. Hall in Kentucky all listened to the Carter Family. It was their formal schooling, Country Music 101.Inside the Carter Family, however, things were hardly perfect. Though nobody outside the family knew it, Sara had left her difficult and quixotic husband in 1933. In 1936 she won a divorce. Even throughout the long and painful breakup, the Carters kept performing together, singing an ever-widening range of new songs they wrote or old songs they remade: songs of love, of betrayal, and of the death of fondest hopes. And they kept at it even after Sara married A.P.'s cousin Coy Bays in 1939. After fulfilling a final radio contract in 1943, Sara and Coy moved to California to settle near his family. The original Carter Family never performed or recorded together again.With Sara gone, A.P. retreated home, opened a general store, and lived out the next two decades in obscurity, the odd man out in a new and reconfigured Carter musical clan. Meanwhile, Maybelle and her daughters (Helen, June, and Anita) went out and got themselves new radio contracts, working in Richmond, Virginia; Knoxville, Tennessee; and Springfield, Missouri, before ascending to country music's ultimate stage, Nashville's Grand Ole Opry. Nearly fifty years in the business won Maybelle the title "Mother of Country Music" and the adoration of generations of guitar players and just plain listeners.The story of the Carter Family is a bittersweet saga of love and fulfillment, sadness and loss. Will You Miss Me When I'm Gone? is more than just a biography of a family; it is also a journey into another time, almost another world. But their story resonates today and lives on in the timeless music they created.

The Statesman and the Storyteller: John Hay, Mark Twain, and the Rise of American Imperialism

by Mark Zwonitzer

In a dual biography covering the last ten years of the lives of friends and contemporaries, writer Samuel Clemens (aka Mark Twain) and statesman John Hay (who served as secretary of state under presidents William McKinley and Theodore Roosevelt), The Statesman and the Storyteller not only provides an intimate look into the daily lives of these men but also creates an elucidating portrait of the United States on the verge of emerging as a world power. And just as the narrative details the wisdom, and the occasional missteps, of two great men during a tumultuous time, it also penetrates the seat of power in Washington as the nation strove to make itself known internationally--and in the process committed acts antithetical to America’s professed ideals and promises. The country’s most significant move in this time was to go to war with Spain and to eventually wrest control of Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Philippines. In what has to be viewed as one of the most shameful periods in American political history, Filipinos who believed they had been promised independence were instead told they were incapable of self-government and then violently subdued in a war that featured torture and execution of native soldiers and civilians. The United States also used its growing military and political might to grab the entirety of the Hawaiian Islands and a large section of Panama. As secretary of state during this time, Hay, though a charitable man, was nonetheless complicit in these misdeeds. Clemens, a staunch critic of his country’s imperialistic actions, was forced by his own financial and family needs to temper his remarks. Nearing the end of their long and remarkable lives, both men found themselves struggling to maintain their personal integrity while remaining celebrated and esteemed public figures. Written with a keen eye--Mark Zwonitzer is also an award-winning documentary filmmaker--and informed by the author’s deep understanding of the patterns of history, The Statesman and the Storyteller has the compelling pace of a novel, the epic sweep of historical writing at its best, and, in capturing the essence of the lives of Hay and Twain, the humanity and nuance of masterful biography.

Senator James Eastland: Mississippi's Jim Crow Democrat (Making the Modern South)

by Maarten Zwiers

In the years following World War II, the national Democratic Party aligned its agenda more and more with the goals of the civil rights movement. By contrast, a majority of southern Democrats remained as committed as ever to a traditional, segregationist ideology. Through the career of Senator James Eastland, one of the mid-century's most prominent politicians, author Maarten Zwiers explores the uneasy, yet mutually beneficial relationship between conservative southerners and the increasingly liberal party to which they belonged. Mississippi Democrat James "Big Jim" Eastland began an influential four-decade career in the United States Senate in 1941, ultimately rising to become president pro tempore of the Senate, a position that placed him third in the line of presidential succession. His reputation for toughness developed from his unfailing and ruthless opposition to greater civil rights and his concern over the global spread of communism, as he believed participants in the two movements were working together to undermine the American way of life. Zwiers contends that despite Eastland's extreme positions, he still managed to maintain influence through productive relationships with his Senate colleagues-liberal as well as conservative. Though the progressive wing of the Democratic Party continued to push for stronger civil rights legislation, they valued compromise with southern senators like Eastland in order to ensure support from a region the Democrats could ill afford to lose. While Eastland's campaigning rhetoric was inflammatory, his ability to operate within the national political structure by leveraging moderate concessions contributed to his lengthy and effective career. Drawing on recently opened archival records, Maarten Zwiers offers a nuanced portrait of a man frequently portrayed as a southern zealot. Senator James Eastland provides a case study of the complicated relationship between party and party members that allowed Democrats to maintain power in the South for much of the twentieth century.

The Parisian Jazz Chronicles: An Improvisational Memoir

by Mike Zwerin

This book is built around a structure that treats such subjects of my music column in the International Herald Tribune as Dexter Gordon, Freddy Heineken, Miles Davis, Bob Dylan, Chet Baker, and Melvin Van Peebles as though they were the written notes in big band arrangements.

Montaigne (Pushkin Collection)

by Stefan Zweig Will Stone

Written during the Second World War, Zweig's typically passionate and readable biography of Michel de Montaigne, is also a heartfelt argument for the importance of intellectual freedom, tolerance and humanism. Zweig draws strong parallels between Montaigne's age, when Europe was torn in two by conflict between Catholicism and Protestantism, and his own, in which the twin fanaticisms of Fascism and Communism were on the verge of destroying the pan-continental liberal culture he was born into, and loved dearly. Just as Montaigne sought to remain aloof from the factionalism of his day, so Zweig tried to the last to defend his freedom of thought, and argue for peace and compromise. One of the final works Zweig wrote before his suicide, this is both a brilliantly impassioned portrait of a great mind, and a moving plea for tolerance in a world ruled by cruelty.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Departures

by Paul Zweig Adam Gopnik

Departures is Paul Zweig's celebration of life and love. Zweig thought of himself as a sojourner, a contemporary Wandering Jew, a man with "a loose wire in his genes." He led a number of distinct lives: as a Jewish child in Brooklyn and on a farm in the Catskills; as a literature student at Columbia; as a young exile who spent a decade in Paris transforming himself into a French intellectual, absorbing the language, sex, culture, and leftist politics; and as an American man-of-letters who produced a steady stream of poems, essays, and wide-ranging works of literary scholarship and criticism. In 1978, at the age of forty-three, he abruptly entered a new life--"the life of the dying"--which he inhabited for the next six years. His writing was guided by a steely determination to hold the more pressing and distorting sentiments-- self-pity, regret, anger, fear--at bay for the sake of his lucidity, which became his way through the world of cancer. This memoir stands as a testament to the passion and spirit with which Zweig lived and to the dignity that he brought to his final years.

Art Ross: The Hockey Legend Who Built the Bruins

by Eric Zweig Ron Maclean

The first authorized biography of Art Ross, Hockey Hall of Famer, NHL founding father, and long-time member of the Boston Bruins. Though he last played the game nearly one hundred years ago, Art Ross remains connected with the greatest stars in hockey. Gordie Howe, Bobby Orr, Wayne Gretzky, and Sidney Crosby have all won the award that bears his name, the trophy given annually to the NHL’s top scorer. Ross himself managed just one goal during his NHL career; however, in the dozen years leading up to the formation of the NHL in 1917, he was one of the biggest stars in the game. After his playing career ended, Ross became one of the founding fathers of the Boston Bruins, holding the positions of coach, general manager, and vice president. He was one of the men most responsible for making the NHL a success in the United States, and was integral to the modernization of hockey. All these accomplishments led to him being one of the first players inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame. Hockey historian Eric Zweig brings to life the early days of hockey. From the mining towns of Northern Ontario to the hallowed halls of Boston Garden, Art Ross was one of the biggest names in hockey over his six decades in the game.

El origen

by Mariana Zuvic

Historia íntima del nacimiento de Néstor y Cristina en Santa Cruz como políticos. Mariana Zuvic, en primera persona, relata cómo nació la matriz de corrupción kirchnerista. Mariana Zuvic es nacida y criada en Río Gallegos, Santa Cruz. Conoció a Néstor y Cristina desde muy pequeña porque eran amigos de sus padres. Todo comenzó a cambiar -así lo narra en este libro- cuando el matrimonio Kirchner dio un giro a los parámetros morales con los que se movían en esa pequeña ciudad patagónica. Santa Cruz fue el laboratorio del modus operandi de hacer política que luego trasladaron a la Nación. Nunca antes alguien había narrado en primera persona la intimidad del origen de esas "prácticas de destrucción institucional, descomposición social y corrupción que llevaron a los ciudadanos a transformarse en rehenes de la lógica amigo-enemigo", según cuenta Zuvic. Método que ejercieron como abogados, en la intendencia, en la gobernación de la provincia y del país. El origen cuenta esa parte oculta de la historia reciente, lo que sucedió cuando Néstor y Cristina eran dos desconocidos para la mayoría de los argentinos. La investigación incansable de Mariana Zuvic junto a Elisa Carrió -que prologa este libro- fue determinante para llevar a la justicia las denuncias por malversación de fondos públicos del gobierno kirchnerista. Su historia es clave para entender qué pasó -y pasa- en Santa Cruz y en la Argentina desde hace treinta años.

Miss Brenda and the Loveladies

by Irene Zutell Brenda Spahn

One woman's fight to provide hope for the hopeless... Seven ex-cons who changed her heart forever... For Brenda Spahn, entrepreneur and businesswoman, wealth was a lifestyle--until a brush with the law threatened to send her to prison. In those dark moments, Brenda made a promise to God. Spared incarceration, a renewed Brenda glimpsed into the lives of women serving time in one of the worst places in America--the Julia Tutwiler Prison for Women in Wetumpka, Alabama. What she saw prompted a God-inspired vision. With a heart to help and a will that couldn't be crushed, Brenda fought the system and overcame tremendous obstacles to take ex-cons into her own home and help them navigate the alien world of life on the outside. This is the story of Brenda's journey from rags to riches to redemption. It's the story of the first unlikely year of her "Whole Way House" and of the extraordinary lives of the first seven women who came to call her "Miss Brenda." It's a story that testifies to the power of faith and how God changes hearts every day.

Franz Boas: The Emergence of the Anthropologist (Critical Studies in the History of Anthropology)

by Rosemary Lévy Zumwalt

Rosemary Lévy Zumwalt tells the remarkable story of Franz Boas, one of the leading scholars and public intellectuals of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The first book in a two-part biography, Franz Boas begins with the anthropologist’s birth in Minden, Germany, in 1858 and ends with his resignation from the American Museum of Natural History in 1906, while also examining his role in training professional anthropologists from his berth at Columbia University in New York City. Zumwalt follows the stepping-stones that led Boas to his vision of anthropology as a four-field discipline, a journey demonstrating especially his tenacity to succeed, the passions that animated his life, and the toll that the professional struggle took on him. Zumwalt guides the reader through Boas’s childhood and university education, describes his joy at finding the great love of his life, Marie Krackowizer, traces his 1883 trip to Baffin Land, and recounts his efforts to find employment in the United States. A central interest in the book is Boas’s widely influential publications on cultural relativism and issues of race, particularly his book The Mind of Primitive Man (1911), which reshaped anthropology, the social sciences, and public debates about the problem of racism in American society.Franz Boas presents the remarkable life story of an American intellectual giant as told in his own words through his unpublished letters, diaries, and field notes. Zumwalt weaves together the strands of the personal and the professional to reveal Boas’s love for his family and for the discipline of anthropology as he shaped it.

Conexión de perdedores: Memorias de un hueón Z

by Sebastián Zumelzu

Una novela autobiográfica que describe las vicisitudes de un joven millenial de manera crítica e hilarante Recién egresado del colegio, Z duda si seguir una carrera tradicional u otra más creativa. Finalmente logra convencer a sus padres de seguir su vocación de realizador audiovisual y, ya inserto en el mundo universitario, rompe la burbuja social y abre los ojos ante el mundo y, sobre todo, ante el espejo. Dueño de un gran oído y léxico, Zumelzu construye con mucho vértigo, humor y calle una radiografía de una generación marcada por la falta de compromiso y conformidad. Un estupendo debut narrativo de un autor dotado de velocidad y frescura.

Barack Obama Man of Destiny

by Amelie Von Zumbusch

Barack Obama is an inspiration to many people. He is the first African American to become president of the United States. Obama's story proves that any child from any background can become the president.

10 True Tales: Crime Scene Investigators (Ten True Tales)

by Allan Zullo

Ten true stories of real-life crime scene investigators! A gold ring has been discovered at a murder scene, but police have little else to go on. Can State Patrol Investigator Richard Havel use that clue to track down the killers? A bomber is terrorizing a western community. What forensic clues can Investigator Jack Charles gather to stop and solve the bombings? Enter the secret world of crime scene investigators who use the latest forensic techniques to solve mysteries and bring criminals to justice. You will never forget these incredible true stories.

10 True Tales: World War II Heroes (Ten True Tales)

by Allan Zullo

Ten true stories of heroes of World War II!

10 True Tales: 9/11 Heroes (Ten True Tales)

by Allan Zullo

Ten true stories of real-life heroes during the attacks on 9/11! When Captain Jay Jonas of the Fire Department of New York hears an emergency radio message about the World Trade Center, he has no idea of the terrible conditions he and his team will face. Arriving at the burning building, the firefighters must summon all their courage. On the same morning, just outside Washington, D.C., a jetliner piloted by terrorists slams into the Pentagon. Can Colonel Philip McNair save lives inside the flaming building? From the World Trade Center and the Pentagon to a hijacked plane above Pennsylvania, these ten stories of true American heroes on the day that changed America -- September 11, 2001.

10 True Tales: Secret Agent (Ten True Tales)

by Allan Zullo

Ten true stories of real-life kid spies! Can you imagine crossing enemy lines to deliver a secret message? Or spying on your enemy from the attic of their hideout? Read the 10 True Tales from kids just like you who risked their lives to be spies!

The Rescuers: Ten True Tales

by Allan Zullo

In these stories of bravery and unselfishness from the "Ten True Tales" series, middle and high school kids show that they have the insight and determination to do the right thing to save lives.

War Heroes: Ten True Tales

by Allan Zullo

"Staff Sergeant Chad Malmberg must find a way to save his convoy ambushed by well-armed insurgents. He faces grim odds, because he and his small band of soldiers are outnumbered ten to one... and they're running out of ammo. Five times throughout a fierce firefight, Marine Scout Sniper Scott Montoya spots an injured comrade in the street. And five times Scott disregards his own safety and rushes out into the open, braving enemy fire to rescue each wounded Marine. These and other American heroes risked their lives serving their country in Iraq. You will never forget their incredible true stories." -Back Cover

From Harvard to Hell...and Back

by Kerry Zukus Sylvester Sviokla III

Dr. Sylvester "Skip" Sviokla lived life as a successful, driven, athletic, and brilliant graduate of Harvard Medical School, reveling in wealth and glamour as a "celebrity doctor" until addiction brought his life crashing down. This real-life "Dr. House" had it all (he thought) until addiction took everything. Miraculously, recovery gave him back his family, his self-respect, and much more.The media is filled with celebrity addiction stories, so people will be drawn to the author's experience as a "doctor to the stars." Having attended the most famous university and medical school in the world, Dr. Sviokla's story will also be relevant to a larger audience, including medical professionals and those seeking answers about addiction.Sylvester "Skip" Sviokla III, MD, is a 1967 graduate of Harvard College (where he was a two-year starter on the football team, culminating in his receiving one vote for the 1966 Heisman Trophy and an offer to try out for the Chicago Bears) and a 1972 graduate of Harvard Medical School. He was owner and medical director of Skip Sviokla Entertainment Medicine, Inc. and of Medical Weight Management, Inc., in Massachusetts.Kerry Zukus is an alumnus of Berklee College of Music in Boston, where he studied composition and arranging while appearing as an actor in theaters all over New England.

Riding High: How I Kissed SoulCycle Goodbye, Co-Founded Flywheel, and Built the Life I Always Wanted

by Ruth Zukerman

From the co-founder of Flywheel and SoulCycle comes a story of perseverance and success.“Ruth Zukerman is an inspiration. She somehow had a keen sense that indoor cycling was going to be a huge trend and she wasted no time turning it into a lucrative business. I'm among the legions of Flywheel fans who make Ruth's class part of our regular routine. Her energy, enthusiasm and great playlist keeps us spinning and coming back for more." —KATIE COURICRuth Zukerman is the Queen of Spinning: she put the Soul in SoulCycle and the Fly in Flywheel.Recounting the pivotal moments that helped launch Zukerman as the breakout star of the boutique fitness world, Riding High is a reminder that the greatest success stories often start in the unlikeliest of places.Ruth Zukerman used her heartache–at the death of her father, the end of her marriage, and the dissolution of her first business partnership with SoulCycle, as the inspiration to reinvent herself. At 51, she co-founded a new business, the highly successful Flywheel, and built the life she’d always dreamed of. And she did it all while navigating through single motherhood and a business world that is often unkind to women, especially those who wear their hearts on their sleeves. Riding High is a prescriptive, warts-and-all journey through Ruth’s evolution, offering fresh, unexpected business and life lessons to help readers recognize their own potential and channel their passion into success. Part confidante, part mentor, Ruth pulls no punches and holds nothing back.

Ben Roethlisberger

by Jeffrey Zuehlke

Quarterback Ben Roethlisberger set an amazing record in only his second year in the NFL. In late 2005, the twenty-four-year-old led the Pittsburgh Steelers on a wild ride to Super Bowl XL. With 11 wins, the Steelers just made a playoff spot. Next Ben and the team defeated three strong opponents on the road. Then in the big game, Ben became the youngest quarterback ever to achieve a Super Bowl victory. Having reached the top of his sport so early, many wondered what Big Ben would do next. A motorcycle accident and surgery almost took Ben out of play for 2006. He recovered, but his 2006 season had ups and downs. Still Pittsburgh fans are eager for more great play from this hugely talented young quarterback.

Dirk Nowitzki

by Jeffrey Zuehlke

At the towering height of 7' 0", forward Dirk Nowitzki is one of the tallest players in the NBA. But Dirk also has a light touch and is one of the best shooters in the league. Born in Germany where soccer is king, Dirk didn't begin playing basketball until he was almost a teenager. In his short time in the game, Dirk has proven himself to be one of the best players in the world. Learn more about this athlete's life and amazing career.

Michael Phelps (Revised Edition)

by Jeffrey Zuehlke

U.S. swimmer Michael Phelps more than met the world's expectations at the 2008 Olympic Games. He already had eight medals--two bronze and six gold--from the 2004 Olympics. He left Beijing with a history-making eight more golds--one for every race he entered. His fourteen golds are the record number for any Olympian--ever. In addition, he set seven world records at the Games. Follow this hard-working swimmer from his days as a talented seven-year-old through his amazing performance in Beijing.

Andrew Johnson: A Biographical Companion

by Richard Zuczek Glenna R. Schroeder-Lein

This A-Z encyclopedia provides carefully selected entries covering the people, events, and concepts relevant to Andrew Johnson's life.

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