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The Parents Guide to Coaching Physically Challenged Children

by Richard Zulewski

Handbooks in The Better Way Coaching Kids series serve as the perfect step-by-step introductory primers for parents and coaches. Written in an easy, conversational style, these books cover all the basic skill-building techniques, rules of the games, proper equipment and first aid. These guides focus on team spirit, the importance of fair play and overall fun. Special attention is paid to developing a child's confidence and self-esteem, -- all important keys to success.

Choosing Naia: A Family's Journey

by Mitchell Zuckoff

Choosing Naia is a powerful story, based on an award-winning series of articles about a modern family and their Down syndrome baby. A dramatic and carefully detailed account of one family's journey through the maze of genetic counseling, medical technology, and disability rights

In a Different Key

by Caren Zucker John Donvan

Nearly seventy-five years ago, Donald Triplett of Forest, Mississippi became the first child diagnosed with autism. Beginning with his family's odyssey, In a Different Key tells the extraordinary story of this often misunderstood condition, and of the civil rights battles waged by the families of those who have it. Unfolding over decades, it is a beautifully rendered history of ordinary people determined to secure a place in the world for those with autism--by liberating children from dank institutions, campaigning for their right to go to school, challenging expert opinion on what it means to have autism, and persuading society to accept those who are different. It is the story of women like Ruth Sullivan, who rebelled against a medical establishment that blamed cold and rejecting "refrigerator mothers" for causing autism; and of fathers who pushed scientists to dig harder for treatments. Many others played starring roles too: doctors like Leo Kanner, who pioneered our understanding of autism; lawyers like Tom Gilhool, who took the families' battle for education to the courtroom; scientists who sparred over how to treat autism; and those with autism, like Temple Grandin, Alex Plank, and Ari Ne'eman, who explained their inner worlds and championed the philosophy of neurodiversity. This is also a story of fierce controversies--from the question of whether there is truly an autism "epidemic," and whether vaccines played a part in it; to scandals involving "facilitated communication," one of many treatments that have proved to be blind alleys; to stark disagreements about whether scientists should pursue a cure for autism. There are dark turns too: we learn about experimenters feeding LSD to children with autism, or shocking them with electricity to change their behavior; and the authors reveal compelling evidence that Hans Asperger, discoverer of the syndrome named after him, participated in the Nazi program that consigned disabled children to death.By turns intimate and panoramic, In a Different Key takes us on a journey from an era when families were shamed and children were condemned to institutions to one in which a cadre of people with autism push not simply for inclusion, but for a new understanding of autism: as difference rather than disability.

In a Different Key: The Story of Autism

by Caren Zucker John Donvan

An extraordinary narrative history of autism: the riveting story of parents fighting for their children 's civil rights; of doctors struggling to define autism; of ingenuity, self-advocacy, and profound social changeNearly seventy-five years ago, Donald Triplett of Forest, Mississippi, became the first child diagnosed with autism. Beginning with his family's odyssey, In a Different Key tells the extraordinary story of this often misunderstood condition, and of the civil rights battles waged by the families of those who have it. Unfolding over decades, it is a beautifully rendered history of ordinary people determined to secure a place in the world for those with autism--by liberating children from dank institutions, campaigning for their right to go to school, challenging expert opinion on what it means to have autism, and persuading society to accept those who are different. It is the story of women like Ruth Sullivan, who rebelled against a medical establishment that blamed cold and rejecting "refrigerator mothers" for causing autism; and of fathers who pushed scientists to dig harder for treatments. Many others played starring roles too: doctors like Leo Kanner, who pioneered our understanding of autism; lawyers like Tom Gilhool, who took the families' battle for education to the courtroom; scientists who sparred over how to treat autism; and those with autism, like Temple Grandin, Alex Plank, and Ari Ne'eman, who explained their inner worlds and championed the philosophy of neurodiversity. This is also a story of fierce controversies--from the question of whether there is truly an autism "epidemic," and whether vaccines played a part in it; to scandals involving "facilitated communication," one of many treatments that have proved to be blind alleys; to stark disagreements about whether scientists should pursue a cure for autism. There are dark turns too: we learn about experimenters feeding LSD to children with autism, or shocking them with electricity to change their behavior; and the authors reveal compelling evidence that Hans Asperger, discoverer of the syndrome named after him, participated in the Nazi program that consigned disabled children to death.By turns intimate and panoramic, In a Different Key takes us on a journey from an era when families were shamed and children were condemned to institutions to one in which a cadre of people with autism push not simply for inclusion, but for a new understanding of autism: as difference rather than disability.From the Hardcover edition.

In a Different Key: The Story of Autism

by Caren Zucker John Donvan

An extraordinary narrative history of autism: the riveting story of parents fighting for their children ’s civil rights; of doctors struggling to define autism; of ingenuity, self-advocacy, and profound social changeNearly seventy-five years ago, Donald Triplett of Forest, Mississippi, became the first child diagnosed with autism. Beginning with his family’s odyssey, In a Different Key tells the extraordinary story of this often misunderstood condition, and of the civil rights battles waged by the families of those who have it. Unfolding over decades, it is a beautifully rendered history of ordinary people determined to secure a place in the world for those with autism—by liberating children from dank institutions, campaigning for their right to go to school, challenging expert opinion on what it means to have autism, and persuading society to accept those who are different. It is the story of women like Ruth Sullivan, who rebelled against a medical establishment that blamed cold and rejecting “refrigerator mothers” for causing autism; and of fathers who pushed scientists to dig harder for treatments. Many others played starring roles too: doctors like Leo Kanner, who pioneered our understanding of autism; lawyers like Tom Gilhool, who took the families’ battle for education to the courtroom; scientists who sparred over how to treat autism; and those with autism, like Temple Grandin, Alex Plank, and Ari Ne’eman, who explained their inner worlds and championed the philosophy of neurodiversity. This is also a story of fierce controversies—from the question of whether there is truly an autism “epidemic,” and whether vaccines played a part in it; to scandals involving “facilitated communication,” one of many treatments that have proved to be blind alleys; to stark disagreements about whether scientists should pursue a cure for autism. There are dark turns too: we learn about experimenters feeding LSD to children with autism, or shocking them with electricity to change their behavior; and the authors reveal compelling evidence that Hans Asperger, discoverer of the syndrome named after him, participated in the Nazi program that consigned disabled children to death.By turns intimate and panoramic, In a Different Key takes us on a journey from an era when families were shamed and children were condemned to institutions to one in which a cadre of people with autism push not simply for inclusion, but for a new understanding of autism: as difference rather than disability.— Washington Post, Notable Non-fiction Books in 2016— WBUR, Best Books of 2016— Wall Street Journal, Best Books of the Year

In a Different Key: The Story of Autism

by Caren Zucker John Donvan

An extraordinary narrative history of autism: the riveting story of parents fighting for their children ’s civil rights; of doctors struggling to define autism; of ingenuity, self-advocacy, and profound social changeNearly seventy-five years ago, Donald Triplett of Forest, Mississippi, became the first child diagnosed with autism. Beginning with his family’s odyssey, In a Different Key tells the extraordinary story of this often misunderstood condition, and of the civil rights battles waged by the families of those who have it. Unfolding over decades, it is a beautifully rendered history of ordinary people determined to secure a place in the world for those with autism—by liberating children from dank institutions, campaigning for their right to go to school, challenging expert opinion on what it means to have autism, and persuading society to accept those who are different. It is the story of women like Ruth Sullivan, who rebelled against a medical establishment that blamed cold and rejecting “refrigerator mothers” for causing autism; and of fathers who pushed scientists to dig harder for treatments. Many others played starring roles too: doctors like Leo Kanner, who pioneered our understanding of autism; lawyers like Tom Gilhool, who took the families’ battle for education to the courtroom; scientists who sparred over how to treat autism; and those with autism, like Temple Grandin, Alex Plank, and Ari Ne’eman, who explained their inner worlds and championed the philosophy of neurodiversity. This is also a story of fierce controversies—from the question of whether there is truly an autism “epidemic,” and whether vaccines played a part in it; to scandals involving “facilitated communication,” one of many treatments that have proved to be blind alleys; to stark disagreements about whether scientists should pursue a cure for autism. There are dark turns too: we learn about experimenters feeding LSD to children with autism, or shocking them with electricity to change their behavior; and the authors reveal compelling evidence that Hans Asperger, discoverer of the syndrome named after him, participated in the Nazi program that consigned disabled children to death.By turns intimate and panoramic, In a Different Key takes us on a journey from an era when families were shamed and children were condemned to institutions to one in which a cadre of people with autism push not simply for inclusion, but for a new understanding of autism: as difference rather than disability.

In a Different Key: The Story of Autism

by Caren Zucker John Donvan

An extraordinary narrative history of autism: the riveting story of parents fighting for their children ’s civil rights; of doctors struggling to define autism; of ingenuity, self-advocacy, and profound social changeNearly seventy-five years ago, Donald Triplett of Forest, Mississippi, became the first child diagnosed with autism. Beginning with his family’s odyssey, In a Different Key tells the extraordinary story of this often misunderstood condition, and of the civil rights battles waged by the families of those who have it. Unfolding over decades, it is a beautifully rendered history of ordinary people determined to secure a place in the world for those with autism—by liberating children from dank institutions, campaigning for their right to go to school, challenging expert opinion on what it means to have autism, and persuading society to accept those who are different. It is the story of women like Ruth Sullivan, who rebelled against a medical establishment that blamed cold and rejecting “refrigerator mothers” for causing autism; and of fathers who pushed scientists to dig harder for treatments. Many others played starring roles too: doctors like Leo Kanner, who pioneered our understanding of autism; lawyers like Tom Gilhool, who took the families’ battle for education to the courtroom; scientists who sparred over how to treat autism; and those with autism, like Temple Grandin, Alex Plank, and Ari Ne’eman, who explained their inner worlds and championed the philosophy of neurodiversity. This is also a story of fierce controversies—from the question of whether there is truly an autism “epidemic,” and whether vaccines played a part in it; to scandals involving “facilitated communication,” one of many treatments that have proved to be blind alleys; to stark disagreements about whether scientists should pursue a cure for autism. There are dark turns too: we learn about experimenters feeding LSD to children with autism, or shocking them with electricity to change their behavior; and the authors reveal compelling evidence that Hans Asperger, discoverer of the syndrome named after him, participated in the Nazi program that consigned disabled children to death.By turns intimate and panoramic, In a Different Key takes us on a journey from an era when families were shamed and children were condemned to institutions to one in which a cadre of people with autism push not simply for inclusion, but for a new understanding of autism: as difference rather than disability.

Parenting Kids With OCD: A Guide to Understanding and Supporting Your Child With OCD

by Bonnie Zucker

Parenting Kids With OCD provides parents with a comprehensive understanding of obsessive-compulsive disorder, its symptoms, types, and presentation in children and teens. The treatment of OCD is explained, and guidelines on how to both find appropriate help and best support one's child is provided. Family accommodation is the rule, not the exception, when it comes to childhood OCD; yet, higher accommodating is associated with a worsening of the child's symptoms and greater levels of familial stress. Parents who have awareness of how they can positively or negatively impact their child's OCD can benefit their child's outcome. Case examples are included to illustrate the child's experience with OCD and what effective treatment looks like. OCD worsens when there is increased stress for the child; therefore, stress management is an essential component for improvement. Parents will learn how to manage stress in themselves and encourage effective stress management for their children.

Vision, Perception, and Cognition: A Manual for the Evaluation and Treatment of the Adult with Acquired Brain Injury

by Barbara Zoltan

Vision Perception and Cognition, Fourth Edition is a concisely structured text that expertly addresses clinical reasoning and decision making for the entire evaluation and treatment process of the adult with acquired brain injury. Provided are theoretical information, guidelines for both static and dynamic assessment, information on specific standardized evaluations, guidelines for adaptive and restorative treatment based on described theoretical and evidence-based information, and information on environmental impact of client performance.

Independent Living for Physically Disabled People

by Irving Kenneth Zola Nancy M. Crewe

A text book for students in Rehabilitation Counseling classes.

Missing Pieces: A Chronicle of Living With a Disability

by Irving Kenneth Zola

he personal odyssey of a man with a disability, this passionate book tries to tell as well as analyze what it is like to have a disability in a world that values vigor and health. Zola writes, "Missing Pieces is an unraveling of a social problem in the manner of Black Like Me. Like its author, I, too, am a trained social observer, but for me 'passing' was not an issue. For I already have the stigmata of the disable - the braces, the limp, the cane - though I have spent much of my life denying their existence." The author started out in the role of a social scientist on a seven-day excursion to acquaint himself with an extraordinary experiment in living - Het Dorp, one of the few places in the world designed to promote "the optimum happiness" of those with severe physical disabilities. Neither a medial center nor a nursing home, Het Dorp is a village in the western-most part of the Netherlands. What began as a sociological attempt to describe this unusual setting became, through the author's growing awareness, what can only be called a socio-autobiography. Resuming his prior dependence on a wheelchair, the author experienced his own transformation from someone who is "normal" and "valid" to someone who is "invalid." The routine of Het Dorp became his: he lived in an architecturally modified home, visited the workshops, and shared meals, social events, conversation, and perceptions with the remarkably diverse residents. The author confronts some rarely discussed issues - the self-image of a person with a chronic disability, how one fills one's time, how one deals with authority and dependence, and love and sex. Missing Pieces offers striking insights into an aspect of the human condition shared by nearly 30 million Americans. It is must reading for the general reader, as well as for the rehabilitation counselor, social worker, or social scientist. Author note: Irving Kenneth Zola (1935-1994) was Professor of Sociology at Brandeis University and a founding member and counselor at the Boston Self-Help Center. Nancy Mairs is the author of seven books, including Waist-High in the World: A Life Among the Disabled, and most recently, A Troubled Guest: Life and Death Stories. She lives in Tucson with her husband, George.

Helping Children with Nonverbal Learning Disabilities to Flourish: A Guide for Parents and Professionals

by Marilyn Martin Zion

`Imagine getting lost in your own home, forgetting where the bathroom is at work, or being unable to operate a simple door knob. These are just some of the myriad challenges faced by individuals with a Nonverbal Learning Disability, or NLD...In Helping Children With Non-Verbal Learning Disabilities to Flourish, Marilyn Martin gives an overview of NLD and strategies for teaching individuals with this disability. Using examples of her struggles to help her daughter, who has NLD, as well as current research, she has written a book helpful for both parents and professionals. In addition to her experiences with her daughter, Martin is a Learning Specialist with more than fifteen years of experience working with students who have dyslexia, NLD, and other learning disorders... This book is a good introduction to NLD and interventions for treating it... As it gains recognition as a distinct learning disorder, interventions and informative books, like this one, will open doors, literally and figuratively, for families and individuals touched by NLD.' - Foreword, Autumn 2007 `Author Marilyn Martin's daughter Sara was diagnosed with Nonverbal Learning Disability (NLD). Marilyn offers a comprehensive developmental profile of children with NLD and explores the controversies surrounding the condition so parents and professionals can identify learners with NLD and ensure they receive early intervention. Offering practical advice on NLD at home and at school, the book describes step by step interventions for improving a range of skills from penmanship to social acumen.' -Autism Us, 2007 `Marilyn Martin's book Helping Children with Nonverbal Learning Disorder to Flourish is an exciting and essential new addition to the literature. ... Martin shines in her ability to match interventions to a broad range of problems and examples abound in every chapter. Clear, concise, and detailed explanations are given so that the interventions can be applied skillfully. ... Each intervention is presented in a terrifically useful and usable format that includes the problem, strengths available, proposed solution, how the solution can be generalized, the goal of the intervention, and a very up-to-date and helpful listing of relevant resources.' - from the Foreword by Michele Berg, Director, Center for Learning Disorders, Family Service and Guidance When you continuously cannot find the bathroom in your best friend's house, or you cannot print the letter `t' when all your friends are writing volumes, you notice, and you ask questions. So it was for Marilyn Martin's daughter, Sara, who was diagnosed with Nonverbal Learning Disability (NLD). This book skilfully combines a comprehensive guide to NLD with the inspiring story of how Sara transformed herself from that young girl whose existence seemed darkened by learning difficulties into the capable young woman she is today. In Helping Children with Nonverbal Learning Disabilities to Flourish, Marilyn Martin presents a comprehensive developmental profile of children with NLD. She explores the controversies surrounding the disorder so parents and professionals can identify learners with NLD and insure they receive early intervention. Offering practical advice on NLD at home and at school, she describes step-by-step interventions for improving a range of skills from penmanship to social acumen. This book is essential reading for parents and professionals working with children with NLD.

The A. D. D. Nutrition Solution: A Drug-Free Thirty-Day Plan

by Marcia Zimmerman

The first scientifically proven, effective, all-natural nutritional alternative to the much-prescribed drug Ritalin. Attention deficit disorder is a nutritional deficiency, not a psychological condition. This is the revolutionary discovery Marcia Zimmerman made during her ten years of research as a nutritional biochemist. That conclusion led her to develop a diet that addresses the specific needs of the 17 million adults and children suffering from ADD. Her easy-to-follow thirty-day plan has been proven just as effective as Ritalin in relieving the symptoms of ADD. Learn: - How women should boost their nutrition before conception to prevent ADD in their children. - Why boys are much likelier to be tagged as ADD than girls - How to get a reliable ADD diagnosis Reasons why parents prefer a diet plan to prescription drugs for ADD children - The effects of brain allergies on attention span - Foods to avoid that may exacerbate ADD - Fats and oils we all need to stay focused - Calming effects of carbohydrates - Concentration-enhancing protein - Why to stay away from simple sugars - The dangers of artificial food ingredients, and much more This important book will help us curb the epidemic growth of ADD in this country and change the way we treat those who have it now by addressing its source instead of merely treating its symptoms.

Reaching for Sun

by Tracie Vaughn Zimmer

Josie Wyatt knows what it means to be different. Her family's small farmhouse seems to shrink each time another mansion grows up behind it. She lives with her career-obsessed mom and opinionated Gran, but has never known her father. Then there's her cerebral palsy: even if Josie wants to forget that she was born with a disability, her mom can't seem to let it go. Yet when a strange new boy--Jordan--moves into one of the houses nearby, he seems oblivious to all the things that make Josie different. Before long, Josie finds herself reaching out for something she's never really known: a friend... and possibly more. Interlinked free verse poems tell the beautiful, heartfelt story of a girl, a family farm reduced to a garden, and a year of unforgettable growth.<P><P> Winner of the Schneider Family Book Award

Death Will Get You Sober

by Elizabeth Zelvin

On Christmas Day, Bruce Kohler wakes up in detox on the Bowery in New York City. He knows it's time to change his life, but how can he stay sober without dying of boredom? When homeless alcoholics start to die unexpectedly, Bruce is surprised to find he cares enough to want to find out why. Most of them had been down and out for many years, but Bruce's friend Guff was different: a cynical aristocrat with a trust fund and some secrets. Two old friends give Bruce a second chance and agree to help him with his investigation: his best friend, Jimmy, a computer genius and history buff who's been in AA for years, and Jimmy's girlfriend Barbara, a counselor who sometimes crosses the line between helping and codependency. Barbara works a night shift at the detox and confronts a counselor who might still be dealing drugs. Bruce gets a job temping for Guff's arrogant nephew. Between the three of them, suspects start piling up. The trail leads back to the detox. Or does it? In Death Will Get You Sober, Bruce discovers that the church basements of AA are a small world in the big city of New York.As he grapples with staying sober, he finds that not drinking is only the beginning of coming back to life--a life he finds he wants to keep when it's threatened by a killer. Debut author Elizabeth Zelvin has used her expertise as an addiction councilor to pen a riveting mystery filled with memorable, realistic characters who are as flawed as they are heroic.

Coping in Young Children: Early Intervention Practices to Enhance Adaptive Behavior and Resilience

by Shirley Zeitlin G. Gordon Williamson

A guide for early intervention professionals describing the ways to assist children with disabilities to integrate and apply their developmental skills for greater flexibility and independent problem solving. Covers application of a theoretical frame of reference, assessment of children's coping styles, and collaborating with parents to facilitate adaptive functioning. Includes case histories and sample forms. Annotation copyright by Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR

Handbook of Infant Mental Health

by Charles H. Zeanah

Widely regarded as the standard reference in the field, this state-of-the-art Handbook offers a comprehensive analysis of developmental, clinical, and social aspects of mental health from birth to the preschool years. Leading authorities explore models of development; biological, family, and sociocultural risk and protective factors; and frequently encountered disorders and disabilities. Evidence-based approaches to assessment and treatment are presented, with an emphasis on ways to support strong parent-child relationships. The volume reviews the well-documented benefits of early intervention and prevention and describes applications in mental health, primary care, childcare, and child welfare settings. The chapter on psychopharmacology has been updated for the paperback edition.

Reading Sounds

by Sean Zdenek

Imagine a common movie scene: a hero confronts a villain. Captioning such a moment would at first glance seem as basic as transcribing the dialogue. But consider the choices involved: How do you convey the sarcasm in a comeback? Do you include a henchman's muttering in the background? Does the villain emit a scream, a grunt, or a howl as he goes down? And how do you note a gunshot without spoiling the scene? These are the choices closed captioners face every day. Captioners must decide whether and how to describe background noises, accents, laughter, musical cues, and even silences. When captioners describe a sound--or choose to ignore it--they are applying their own subjective interpretations to otherwise objective noises, creating meaning that does not necessarily exist in the soundtrack or the script. Reading Sounds looks at closed-captioning as a potent source of meaning in rhetorical analysis. Through nine engrossing chapters, Sean Zdenek demonstrates how the choices captioners make affect the way deaf and hard of hearing viewers experience media. He draws on hundreds of real-life examples, as well as interviews with both professional captioners and regular viewers of closed captioning. Zdenek's analysis is an engrossing look at how we make the audible visible, one that proves that better standards for closed captioning create a better entertainment experience for all viewers.

Medical Aspects of Disability: A Handbook for the Rehabilitation Professional

by Herbert H. Zaretsky Myron G. Eisenberg Robert L. Glueckauf

A comprehensive guide to disabilities for rehabilitation professionals.

The Disability Rights Movement: From Charity to Confrontation, Updated Edition

by Frieda Zames Doris Zames Fleischer

A newly updated account of the struggle for disability rights in the U.S.

Manta's Gift

by Timothy Zahn

I am not a fan of science fiction, but I have to admit that this is a clever, creative and well-crafted novel. My favorite review: What if James Dean were a twin-tailed manta ray swimming in Jupiter's atmosphere? Bestselling Star Wars novelist Zahn (Angelmass) gives us a tale of teen coming-of-age angst set in the herd society of the Qanska, intelligent herbivores who inhabit the equatorial band of the gas giant. Suspecting them to be non-native life, Earth's corporate masters, the Five Hundred, send in a spy to find their hidden star drive. Facing their own disaster, the Qanska agree, hoping to gain a human perspective on the impending exhaustion of their ecology. What neither side can count on is how the person injected into the Qanskan world will react. Matt Raimey, a 22-year-old paralyzed by a skiing accident, agrees to have his brain transplanted into a Qanska fetus. Given a second chance to be mobile, he also unexpectedly gets another chance to mature. Zahn concentrates more on the psychological processes at work than on the technological. Solutions to problems arise from better emotional and intellectual integrity, not simply larger databases. While the author doesn't get as deep into his characters as they do into Jupiter's depths, his portrayal of Matt/Manta is direct and involving. Qanskan life, looking much like marine reef life on Earth, is intriguingly portrayed, even if the biology of the Qanskan problem is suspect. YA readers looking for more than the usual SF action-adventure should be well pleased. (Publisher's Weekly)

Zorg voor de verstandelijk gehandicapte: Basiswerken verpleging en verzorging

by Yvonne van de Ven

Behandelt de meest voorkomende onderwerpen en begrippen.<P><P> Koppelt de theorie aan de praktijk door middel van casussen.<P> Behandelt naast de beperkingen ook de mogelijkheden tot ondersteuning.<P> Gaat verder dan de basisprincipes.<P> Zorg voor de verstandelijke gehandicapte laat zien hoe veelzijdig begeleiding aan mensen met een verstandelijke beperking is. Alle onderwerpen en begrippen die regelmatig voorkomen in deze zorg, komen aan bod. Om de theorie dicht bij de praktijk te brengen, is deze gekoppeld aan een casus. Dat maakt het boek aansprekend en goed leesbaar. Ook onderwerpen als wetgeving en kwaliteit blijven op deze manier dicht bij het werk van de verzorgende. De ondersteuning aan mensen met een verstandelijke beperking vindt zo veel mogelijk in de maatschappij plaats. Dit vergt van de verzorgende een aanpassing in houding en begeleiding. Het boek behandelt, naast de beperkingen, de mogelijkheden tot ondersteuning. Mensen met een verstandelijke beperking ervaren vaak beperkingen op lichamelijk, psychisch en sociaal gebied. De combinatie hiervan maakt het noodzakelijk om vanuit een breed perspectief naar cliënten te kijken. Het boek maakt duidelijk dat de rol van de verzorgende centraal staat in de multidisciplinaire begeleiding. Om problemen op tijd te signaleren, is observatie op basis van voldoende basiskennis noodzakelijk. Deze kennis biedt dit boek.

Challenging Barriers to Change: Attitudes Towards the Disabled

by Harold E. Yuker J. Richard Block

This small book is a lecture given by professors Yuker and Block in 1979 on attitudinal barriers concerning people with disabilities.

All in Pieces

by Suzanne Young

From <i>New York Times</i> bestselling author Suzanne Young comes a heartrending new novel about a girl struggling to deal with anger issues while taking care of her younger brother with special needs. <p>"Anger-management issues." That's how they classified Savannah Sutton after she stuck a pencil in her ex-boyfriend's hand because he mocked her little brother, Evan, for being disabled. That's why they sent her to Brooks Academy--an alternative high school that's used as a temporary detention center. <p>The days at Brooks are miserable, but at home, life is far more bleak. Savvy's struggling to take care of her brother since her mom left years ago, and her alcoholic dad can't be bothered. Life with Evan is a constant challenge, but he's also the most important person in the world to Savvy. <p>Then there's Cameron, a new student at Brooks with issues of his own; a guy from a perfect family that Savvy thought only existed on TV. Cameron seems determined to break through every one of the walls Savvy's built around herself, except if she lets herself trust him, it could make everything she's worked so hard for fall apart in an instant. <p>And with her aunt seeking custody of her brother and her ex-boyfriend seeking revenge, Savvy's fighting to hold all the pieces together. But she's not sure how much tighter she can be pulled before she breaks completely.</p>

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