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The Little Locksmith: A Memoir

by Katharine Butler Hathaway

First published in 1942 and reprinted here by the Feminist Press, this is the deeply honest memoir of Katharine Butler, who was disabled from childhood due to tuberculosis of the spine. Butler describes her bedridden childhood and her emergence as a teenager with a notably different-looking body. She writes openly of her longing for sexual love and her sense that it was forever denied to her because of her difference. Much of the book concerns the author's renovation of and hopes for a house in Castine on the coast of Maine, which she dreamed would become a house for children, artists, and lovers. Nancy Mairs' afterword provides fascinating information about the author's life.

Section 504 and the ADA: A Resource Guide for Educators

by Council of Administrators for Special Education

This book provides an overview of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 for educators.

Twice Burned

by Bruce Porterfield

Bruce Porterfield spent three terms in Bolivia with the New Tribes Mission. Much of his time there was spent with other missionaries in seeking to make a friendly contact with primitive tribes in remote areas of the country. The story of this work is told in his book, Commandos for Christ. In his second book, ["jungle Fire," which is also available in this library] Porterfield uses the novel as a means of revealing much truth about missionary work, the needs, problems and opportunities faced. In his latest book, Twice Burned, he again turns to the novel as a means of clarifying the issues between ecumenical and mass-meeting evangelism compared to the New Testament pattern of Gospel preaching and church planting.

The Blind Colt

by Glen Rounds

Moving story of a mustang colt who was born blind and eventually adopted and trained by a ten-year-old boy. Story based on author's own experience as a youth with a blind wild colt on the family's ranch.

Off the Grid

by Robert W. Kingett

Journalist Robert Kingett accepts a dare: one that at first seems simple... to adapt to his blindness without the Internet. This account is a cozy diary of battling with an FM radio, hooking up a landline phone and the journey of adapting to a brand new way of living from someone who has never disconnected from the World Wide Web.

All for Love

by Ved Mehta

Ved Mehta joined the staff of The New Yorker in the 1960s, blind since the age of four and already on his way to a career as a writer. In a series of four relationships he demanded that his lovers, like him, pretend he could see. With lyrical and stirring accuracy, Mehta revisits these love affairs today, tracing the links between his denial of his disability and the cruel transformations that each of his lovers underwent. “Poignant and occasionally hilarious.”-The New York Times Book Review. “This elegant volume remains a striking piece of insight into the nature of love.”-Publishers Weekly. “[An] excoriatingly truthful and heartbreaking account of the pursuit and loss of love. ...”-The Times of London. “A mesmerizing account ... the most arresting passages are Mehta’s mind-expanding descriptions of how he perceives the world. ”-Booklist.

Mended Wheels

by Ann Bell Judy Sagal

Christian romance set in Missouri in which one of the main characters is disabled.

The Last Express (Duncan Maclain Mystery #1)

by Baynard Kendrick

When a bomb exploded in a New York subway car, killing the assistant D. A., it left a pair of puzzling survivors on the rear seat: two caged white mice. Who had put them there and why? Maybe a blind man could figure it out--if he had the amazing sensory powers of a Duncan Maclain. Captain Duncan Maclain, a blind detective, has a mystery to solve hidden in the labyrinth of New York's subway system. This is the first book in the series that inspired the popular television show "Longstreet."

The Whistling Hangman (Duncan Maclain Mystery #2)

by Baynard Kendrick

When a wealthy man falls from the balcony of a luxury apartment hotel, blind detective Captain Duncan Maclain and his Seeing Eye dog Schnucke are on the case. Was it suicide or was it murder? This is the second book in the series that inspired the popular television show "Longstreet."

Odor of Violets (Duncan Maclain Mystery #3)

by Baynard Kendrick

A paragraph in a gossip column causes two violent deaths... and all sorts of odd clues lead Captain Duncan Maclain, the brilliant private detective who is totally blind, on his next a strange and spectacular case. The third mystery in the series that inspired the popular television show "Longstreet."

The Prison of My Mind

by Barbara Field Benziger

In this memoir of psychiatric illness, the author describes two hospitalizations and her eventual restoration to mental health. In the first hospital she receives indifferent and even abusive treatment. In the second she has the good fortune to be assigned to a wise and compassionate psychiatrist who helps her explore her inner conflicts and find peace. Benziger writes eloquently of the terror of severe panic attacks when the world seems to be collapsing around her.

Reservations for Death (Duncan Maclain Mystery #9)

by Baynard Kendrick

When Belden Clark, a major metal and dye exporter goes down in a plane, his daughter contacts his old Army buddy, Captain Duncan MacLain, to help her get to the bottom of the mystery of what happened. But the plot thickens, when the FBI is called in and several more people end up dead. Is Captain Duncan on the list next? Will this be the end for the blind detective? Or can he with the help of Cappo his chauffeur, and his two German Shepherd dogs, Driest, his police dog, and Schnuck his Seeing Eye Dog, triumph in the end?

Eyes at My Feet

by Jessie Hickford

From the Book Jacket: In my work as a veterinary surgeon I regularly examine and treat guide dogs and I always find something humbling in the cheerfulness of the blind people and their pride in the wonderful animals which serve as their eyes. But not until now have I had the opportunity to read how one of these partnerships developed. With no trace of self pity Jessie Hickford takes us with her through the early difficult days of her training with her dog Prudence; and surely no writer has more movingly described the flowering of companionship and love between animal and mistress as they gradually adjust to each other. I like to write about animals and I enjoy reading about them too, so this is a book for me and for all the thousands who share my tastes. 'It is not a sad book, it is a happy one because it is a story of ultimate triumph ; and I do not know which character captivated me most the brave woman who wrote it or the beautiful dog she has never seen. JAMES HERRIOT Author of ALL CREATURES GREAT AND SMALL

The Snake Pit

by Mary Jane Ward

Based on the author's experiences as a psychiatric patient in the early 1940's, this novel tells the story of Virginia Cunningham as she wends her way through the frightening and mystifying world of a hospital called Juniper Hill. Her memory clouded by a series of electroshock treatments, Virginia struggles to make sense out of her situation, though the senseless rules and the perplexing behavior of the staff and patients around her are all the more unfathomable as her mind begins to clear. The Snake Pit is the basis for a classic movie of the late 1940's. The book and film helped to bring mental illness out of the closet. Apart from its social significance this is a compelling novel, told with wonderful ironic humor.

Karen

by Marie Killilea

As told by her mother, the inspirational story of Karen, who--despite a handicap--learns to talk, to walk, to read, to write. Winner of the Golden Book Award and two Christopher Awards. THERE WAS SOMETHING SPECIAL ABOUT MY CHILD... I knew it from the moment she was born... A minute morsel, she weighed under two pounds, and measured nine inches from the tip of her tiny head to her infinitesimal toes.... I lay back still, bathed in happiness. It was like a brittle shell, this happiness, and I felt that motion or sound might shatter it.... I could still feel the surge of unbelievable wonder and joy evoked by the baby's lusty yell. "What do you think of our child? Is she as pretty as Marie? Did you count her fingers and toes?"... He sat down at the foot of the bed and I waited for him to express his delight. "You must realize"--John spoke gently-- "she's not out of the woods yet." A gust of cold air entered my sun-drenched room and I shivered.... The sequel is available in this library.

With Love from Karen

by Marie Killilea

What happened to Karen, a little girl with cerebral palsy, in the years after her original story was published in the award-winning book "Karen."<P><P> This sequel, undoubtedly greeted with joy by all of us who loved "Karen," in one sense surpasses the first work. Karen, delightful and positive though she is, is depicted far more realistically than in the initial book, which tended to make her a bit of a picture book saint. Her struggles, decisions, and (in all honesty) unquestionable confusion with the expectations of her wonderful family are quite vividly portrayed. (As an example of the last - one wonders why Marie does not realise that much of Karen's dilemma over "walking vs wheelchair" undoubtedly stems from Marie's constant insistence on Karen's walking - she fought the idea of Karen's having a wheelchair at all earlier in the book.) The Killilea family clearly had an unusual and blessed balance - tough-minded, persistent, deeply religious, but hospitable and joyous to the point where their home seemed a favourite stopping place for all whom they knew. Yet many new questions remained unanswered. "Karen," though it did not include many extended family members at length, mentioned a large family - in "With Love from Karen," even the most special occasions include many "honorary" family members but no blood relatives.

I Know How It Feels to Fight for Your Life

by Jill Krementz

This book presents first-person accounts by fourteen children (ages seven to sixteen) who live with chronic illnesses and/or disabilities. The conditions include leukemia, spina bifida, juvenile diabetes, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and kidney failure. The stories are very positive and pubeat. Most of the children emphasize the importance of the support they have received from family and friends.

Access to Information: Materials, Technologies, and Services for Print Impaired readers

by Tom Mcnulty Dawn Suvino

This is a book about alternative media for people with print disabilities

Assistance Dog Providers in the United States: A Complete Guide to Finding a Guide, Hearing, or Service Dog

by Carla Stiverson Norm Pritchett

This book offers excellent information of guide, service and hearing alert dogs and schools and organizations that train them in the United States. offers information on obtaining a working dog, what the different tasks that the dog do, and gives a list of addresses and contacts.

Research in Secondary Special Education and Transitional Employment

by Frank R. Rusch

Although dated, the results reported in this book shed light on a still salient issue.

Wrightslaw: From Emotions to Advocacy - The Special Education Survival Guide

by Peter Wright Pamela Darr Wright

The Special Education Survivor Guide: A Must for Parents!

A Dog to Trust: The Saga of a Seeing-Eye Dog

by Joseph E. Chipperfield

Tells the story of Arno, an Alsatian dog also known as a German Shepherd Dog, who was trained as the eyes of Ralph, a painter who loses his sight, and in a twist of fate, Arno becomes blind and Ralph becomes his eyes.

Multiple Journeys to One: Spiritual Stories of Integrating from Dissociative Identity Disorder

by Judy Dragon Terry Popp

This book compiles the accounts of eight women who developed dissociative identity disorder or DID (also called multiple personality disorder, or MPD) as a means of surviving horrific child abuse. The narratives focus on the process of healing and becoming integrated. In addition to traditional psychotherapy, these women report receiving help from spiritual healers and hypnotherapists.

Leveling the Playing Field: Improving Technology Access and Design for People with Intellectual Disabilities

by Presidents Committee for People w/Intellectual Disabilities

The President's Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities is honored to advise the President and the Secretary of Health and Human Services about the role of technology in improving the quality of life for people with ID and ensuring their full citizenship rights. A new generation of technologies continues to redefine, at an accelerated pace, how we all live, grow, and excel. The same should be true for people with ID. Access to technology is critical for people with ID to fully engage in the everyday life of our society.

For Pete's Sake

by Linda Verville

Chelsea can't figure out what is wrong with Pete the new pup. He runs into things, can't tell the difference between night and day, can't understand he is getting in trouble. Eventuallly the family discovers that Pete is blind and deaf, and then they realize he is special in spite of his disabilites. For young kids and old too.

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