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Zvi

by Elwood Mcquaid

For more than half a century, Zvi has endured as the best selling book produced by the ministry of The Friends of Israel. Millions of people have been touched, inspired, and encouraged by this story of a World War II waif in Warsaw, Poland. As a 10-year-old Jewish boy, Zvi was separated from his parents and forced to face the trials of survival in Adolph Hitler's crazed world. How he triumphed against all odds and found his way to Israel and faith in the Messiah is one of the great stories of our time.

Zumwalt

by Larry Berman

Zumwalt is a compelling portrait of the controversial military man who is widely regarded as the founder of the modern U.S. Navy, Admiral Elmo Russell “Bud” Zumwalt. Chief of Naval Operations during the decades-long Cold War crisis, Zumwalt implemented major strategic innovations that endure to this day, especially in his campaign against racism and sexism throughout the fleet. Larry Berman, the author of Perfect Spy, offers a fascinating, detailed look at an extraordinary man—winner of the Presidential Medal of Freedom—an inspiring portrait of leadership that is essential in these troubled times.

Zoya's Story

by John Follain Rita Cristofari

Kabul was always more beautiful in the snow. Even the piles of rotting rubbish in my street, the only source of food for the scrawny chickens and goats that our neighbors kept outside their mud houses, looked beautiful to me after the snow had covered them in white during the long night. Though she is only twenty-three, Zoya has witnessed and endured more tragedy and terror than most people experience in a lifetime. Born in a land ravaged by war, she was robbed of her parents when they were murdered by Muslim fundamentalists. Devastated, she fled Kabul with her grandmother and started a new life in exile in Pakistan. She joined the Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan (RAWA), an organization that challenged the crushing edicts of the Taliban government, and she took destiny into her own hands, joining a dangerous, clandestine war to save her nation. Direct and unsentimental, Zoya vividly brings to life the realities of growing up in a Muslim culture, the terror of living in a perpetual war zone, the pain of losing those she has loved, the horrors of a woman's life under the Taliban, and the discovered healing and transformation that lead her on a path of resistance.

Zoya's Story: An Afghan Woman's Struggle for Freedom

by Zoya John Follain Rita Cristofari

Zoya's Story is a young woman's searing account of her clandestine war of resistance against the Taliban and religious fanaticism at the risk of her own life. An epic tale of fear and suffering, courage and hope, Zoya's Story is a powerful testament to the ongoing battle to claim human rights for the women of Afghanistan. Though she is only twenty-three, Zoya has witnessed and endured more tragedy and terror than most people do in a lifetime. Zoya grew up during the wars that ravaged Afghanistan and was robbed of her mother and father when they were murdered by Muslim fundamentalists. Devastated by so much death and destruction, she fled Kabul with her grandmother and started a new life in exile in Pakistan. She joined the Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan, which challenged the crushing edicts of the Taliban government, and she made dangerous journeys back to her homeland to help the women oppressed by a system that forced them to wear the stifling burqa, condoned public stoning or whipping if they ventured out without a male chaperon, and forbade them from working. Zoya is our guide, our witness to the horrors perpetrated by the Taliban and the Mujahideen "holy warriors" who had defeated the Russian occupiers. She helped to secretly film a public cutting of hands in a Kabul stadium and to organize covert literacy classes, as schooling-branded a "gateway to Hell" -- was forbidden to girls. At an Afghan refugee camp she heard tales of heartrending suffering and worked to provide a future for families who had lost everything. The spotlight focused on Afghanistan after the New York and Washington terrorist attacks highlights the conditions of repression and fear in which Afghan women live and makes Zoya's Story utterly compelling. This is a memoir that speaks louder than the images of devastation and outrage; it is a moving message of optimism as Zoya struggles to bring the plight of Afghan women to the world's attention.

Zora Neale Hurston's Final Decade

by Virginia Lynn Moylan

In 1948, false accusations of child molestation all but erased the reputation and career Zora Neale Hurston had worked for decades to build. Sensationalized in the profit-seeking press and relentlessly pursued by a prosecution more interested in a personal crusade than justice, the morals charge brought against her nearly drove her to suicide.But she lived on. She lived on past her accuser’s admission that he had fabricated his whole story. She lived on for another twelve years, during which time she participated in some of the most remarkable events, movements, and projects of the day.Since her death, scholars and the public have rediscovered Hurston’s work and conscientiously researched her biography. Nevertheless, the last decade of her life has remained relatively unexplored. Virginia Moylan fills in the details--investigating subjects as varied as Hurston’s reporting on the trial of Ruby McCollum (a black woman convicted of murdering her white lover), her participation in designing an "anthropologically correct" black baby doll to combat stereotypes, her impassioned and radical biography of King Herod, and her controversial objections to court-ordered desegregation.

Zora Neale Hurston on Florida Food: Recipes, Remedies & Simple Pleasures

by Fred Opie

Eatonville, Florida native Zora Neale Hurston's early twentieth-century ethnographic research and writing emphasizes the essentials of food in Florida through simple dishes and recipes. It considers foods prepared for everyday meals as well as special occasions and looks at what shaped people's eating traditions in early twentieth-century Florida. Hurston did for Florida what William Faulkner did for Mississippi--provided insight into a state's history and culture through various styles of writing. Her collected food stories, folklore and remedies, and the related recipes food professor Fred Opie pairs with them, are essential reading for those who love to cook and eat.

Zora Neale Hurston: A Life in Letters

by Carla Kaplan

"I mean to live and die by my own mind," Zora Neale Hurston told the writer Countee Cullen. Arriving in Harlem in 1925 with little more than a dollar to her name, Hurston rose to become one of the central figures of the Harlem Renaissance, only to die in obscurity. Not until the 1970s was she rediscovered by Alice Walker and other admirers. Although Hurston has entered the pantheon as one of the most influential American writers of the 20th century, the true nature of her personality has proven elusive. Now, a brilliant, complicated and utterly arresting woman emerges from this landmark book. Carla Kaplan, a noted Hurston scholar, has found hundreds of revealing, previously unpublished letters for this definitive collection; she also provides extensive and illuminating commentary on Hurston's life and work, as well as an annotated glossary of the organizations and personalities that were important to it. From her enrollment at Baltimore's Morgan Academy in 1917, to correspondence with Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, Langston Hughes, Dorothy West and Alain Locke, to a final query letter to her publishers in 1959, Hurston's spirited correspondence offers an invaluable portrait of a remarkable, irrepressible talent.From the Trade Paperback edition.characters to grace American letters.

Zora Neale Hurston: Southern Storyteller

by Della A. Yannuzzi

Biography of Zora Neale Hurston. What this young southern African-American woman lacked in material wealth was balanced by a big talent and a strong will to succeed.

Zora Hurston and the Chinaberry Tree

by William Miller

As a child, African-American writer Zora Hurston would climb high up in the branches of her favorite tree and dream of living in the cities beyond the horizon. Encouraged by her mother, Zora explored her hometown and listened to the stories of its people-- stories her dying mother asked her to promise to remember always. Text copyright 2004 Lectorum Publications, Inc.

Zora and Me

by Victoria Bond T. R. Simon

A fictionalized account of Zora Neale Hurston's childhood with her best friend, Carrie, in Eatonville, Florida, as they learn about life, death, and the differences between truth, lies, and pretending. Includes an annotated bibliography of the works of Zora Neale Hurston, a short biography of the author, and a time line of important events in her life. Includes bibliographical references.

Zora and Langston: A Story Of Friendship And Betrayal

by Yuval Taylor

Zora and Langston is the dramatic and moving story of one of the most influential friendships in literature. They were best friends. They were collaborators, literary gadflies, and champions of the common people. They were the leading lights of the Harlem Renaissance. Zora Neale Hurston, the author of Their Eyes Were Watching God, and Langston Hughes, the author of “The Negro Speaks of Rivers” and “Let America Be America Again,” first met in 1925, at a great gathering of black and white literati, and they fascinated each other. They traveled together in Hurston’s dilapidated car through the rural South collecting folklore, worked on the play Mule Bone, and wrote scores of loving letters. They even had the same patron: Charlotte Osgood Mason, a wealthy white woman who insisted on being called “Godmother.” Paying them lavishly while trying to control their work, Mason may have been the spark for their bitter and passionate falling-out. Was the split inevitable when Hughes decided to be financially independent of his patron? Was Hurston jealous of the young woman employed as their typist? Or was the rupture over the authorship of Mule Bone? Yuval Taylor answers these questions while illuminating Hurston’s and Hughes’s lives, work, competitiveness, and ambition, uncovering little-known details.

Zora

by Judith Bloom Fradin

Zora Neale Hurston was confident, charismatic, and determined to be extraordinary. As a young woman, Hurston lived and wrote alongside such prominent authors as Langston Hughes and Alain Locke during the Harlem Renaissance. But unfortunately, despite writing the luminary work Their Eyes Were Watching God, she was always short of money. Though she took odd jobs as a housemaid and as the personal assistant to an actress, Zora often found herself in abject poverty. Through it all, Zora kept writing. And though none of her books sold more than a thousand copies while she was alive, she was rediscovered a decade later by a new generation of readers, who knew they had found an important voice of American Literature.

Zoo Vet: Adventures of A Wild Animal Doctor

by David Taylor

In this book, Taylor shares some of his experiences as he cares for exotic animals. Not all stories have happy endings, but all are heart-warming. This is an honest look at what it was like to be a zoo vet in the fifties and sixties.

Zoo Station: The Story of Christiane F.

by Christina Cartwright Christiane F.

In 1978 Christiane F. testified against a man who had traded heroin for sex with teenage girls at Berlin's notorious Zoo Station. In the course of that trial, Christiane F. became connected with two journalists, and over time they helped to turn her story--which begins with a dysfunctional but otherwise fairly normal childhood--into an acclaimed bestseller. Christiane F.'s rapid descent into heroin abuse and prostitution is shocking, but the boredom, the longing for acceptance, the thrilling risks, and even the musical obsessions that fill out the rest of Christiane's existence will be familiar to every reader. Christiane F.'s Berlin is a strange and often terrifying place, but it's also a place that remains closer than we might think....

Zoo Station

by Christiane F Christina Cartwright

In 1978 Christiane F. testified against a man who had traded heroin for sex with teenage girls at Berlin's notorious Zoo Station. In the course of that trial, Christiane F. became connected with two journalists, and over time they helped to turn her story--which begins with a dysfunctional but otherwise fairly normal childhood--into an acclaimed bestseller. Christiane F.'s rapid descent into heroin abuse and prostitution is shocking, but the boredom, the longing for acceptance, the thrilling risks, and even the musical obsessions that fill out the rest of Christiane's existence will be familiar to every reader. Christiane F.'s Berlin is a strange and often terrifying place, but it's also a place that remains closer than we might think....

Zoo Station

by Christiane F Christina Cartwright

In 1978 Christiane F. testified against a man who had traded heroin for sex with teenage girls at Berlin's notorious Zoo Station. In the course of that trial, Christiane F. became connected with two journalists, and over time they helped to turn her story--which begins with a dysfunctional but otherwise fairly normal childhood--into an acclaimed bestseller. Christiane F.'s rapid descent into heroin abuse and prostitution is shocking, but the boredom, the longing for acceptance, the thrilling risks, and even the musical obsessions that fill out the rest of Christiane's existence will be familiar to every reader. Christiane F.'s Berlin is a strange and often terrifying place, but it's also a place that remains closer than we might think....

The Zoo on the Road to Nablus

by Amelia Thomas

The last Palestinian zoo stands on a dusty, dead-end street in the once prosperous farming town of Qalqilya, on the very edge of the West Bank. The zoo's bars are rusting; peacocks wander quiet avenues shaded by broad plane trees; a teenage baboon broods in solitary confinement; walls bear the pockmarks of gunfire. And yet the zoo is an extraordinary place, with a bizarre, troubling and inspiring story to tell. At the center of this story is Dr. Sami Khader, the only zoo veterinarian in the Palestinian territories. Family man, amateur inventor, and dedicated taxidermist, he is fiercely independent, apolitical, and resourceful in times of crisis. Dr. Sami dreams of transforming the zoo into one of an international caliber. In The Zoo on the Road to Nablus, Amelia Thomas brings the reader into a world rarely glimpsed from the outside, weaving the stories of the zoo's animals, its staff, and its visitors into a rich, colorful chronicle of the indomitability of the human-and animal-spirit.

The Zoo Memoirs: A Zoo in My Luggage, The Whispering Land, and Menagerie Manor (The Zoo Memoirs #3)

by Gerald Durrell

The British naturalist and bestselling author of the Corfu Trilogy—the inspiration for the Masterpiece production The Durrells in Corfu—founds a zoo. In this trio of delightful memoirs, British wildlife preservation pioneer and national bestselling author Gerald Durrell recounts the ups and downs he faces in transforming his lifelong dream of creating a new kind of zoo into a reality. A Zoo in My Luggage: In 1957, Durrell and his wife travel to the British Cameroons in West Africa to begin assembling his menagerie. The greater challenge proves to be in safely transporting their exotic animals back to Britain and finding a home for them. “Animals come close to being Durrell’s best friends. . . . He writes about them with style, verve, and humor.” —Time The Whispering Land: On an eight-month journey in South America to expand his menagerie, Durrell and his wife travel across windswept Patagonian shores and through tropical forests in the Argentine, encountering fur seals, ocelots, penguins, parrots, pumas, and more. “An amusing writer who transforms this Argentine backcountry into a particularly inviting place.” —San Francisco Chronicle Menagerie Manor: In 1959, on the grounds of an old manor house on the Channel Island of Jersey, Durrell finally opens the Jersey Zoo—now known as the Durrell Wildlife Park. Along with the satisfaction of providing a safe habitat for rare and endangered species come the trials of operating a fledgling zoo, including overdrawn bank accounts and escaped animals. “No one can be funnier than Mr. Durrell in relating his own adventures or the antics of the claw and paw set.” —The Christian Science Monitor

A Zoo in My Luggage (The Zoo Memoirs)

by Gerald Durrell

What happens when the charming, animal-obsessed boy of the classic memoirs 'My Family and Other Animals' and 'Birds, Beasts and Other Relatives' grows up? He founds a zoo, of course.

Zondervan NIV Matthew Henry Commentary

by Matthew Henry

Time has sealed the reputation of Matthew Henry's classic commentary as a rich source of insight into God's word. Four centuries after its first publication, it remains one of the best-loved, most popular commentaries ever written. However, while its wisdom is timeless, the English language has changed much through the years. Words that meant one thing in Matthew Henry's day have taken on different meanings today. In addition, Henry's often wordy reflections are generations removed from the crisp style that communicates most effectively to contemporary readers. The Zondervan NIV Matthew Henry Commentary is a masterful response to these concerns. It delivers the heart and soul of Henry's incomparable writings in a style that is easy to read and understand. -Dr. Leslie Church's meticulous abridgment retains the essential content of the original work. - Easily misunderstood words have been replaced with modern ones while keeping Henry's style. - Use of the New International Version (NIV) instead of the King James Version makes this edition fully compatible with today's most widely used Bible translation. In one volume, here is a wealth of exposition, metaphors, analogies, and illustrations, ideal for - Personal devotions - Bible study - Sermon and lesson preparation

Zona: A Book About a Film About a Journey to a Room

by Geoff Dyer

From a writer whose mastery encompasses fiction, criticism, and the fertile realm between the two, comes a new book that confirms his reputation for the unexpected.In Zona, Geoff Dyer attempts to unlock the mysteries of a film that has haunted him ever since he first saw it thirty years ago: Andrei Tarkovsky's Stalker, widely regarded as one of the greatest films of all time. ("Every single frame," declared Cate Blanchett, "is burned into my retina.") As Dyer guides us into the zone of Tarkovsky's imagination, we realize that the film is only the entry point for a radically original investigation of the enduring questions of life, faith, and how to live. In a narrative that gives free rein to the brilliance of Dyer's distinctive voice--acute observation, melancholy, comedy, lyricism, and occasional ill-temper--Zona takes us on a wonderfully unpredictable journey in which we try to fathom, and realize, our deepest wishes.Zona is one of the most unusual books ever written about film, and about how art--whether a film by a Russian director or a book by one of our most gifted contemporary writers--can shape the way we see the world and how we make our way through it.

Zombie Spaceship Wasteland: A Book by Patton Oswalt

by Patton Oswalt

Prepare yourself for a journey through the world of Patton Oswalt, one of the most creative, insightful, and hysterical voices on the entertain­ment scene today. Widely known for his roles in the films Big Fan and Ratatouille, as well as the television hit The King of Queens, Patton Oswalt--a staple of Comedy Central--has been amusing audiences for decades. Now, with Zombie Spaceship Wasteland, he offers a fascinating look into his most unusual, and lovable, mindscape. Oswalt combines memoir with uproarious humor, from snow forts to Dungeons & Dragons to gifts from Grandma that had to be explained. He remem­bers his teen summers spent working in a movie Cineplex and his early years doing stand-up. Readers are also treated to several graphic elements, includ­ing a vampire tale for the rest of us and some greeting cards with a special touch. Then there's the book's centerpiece, which posits that before all young creative minds have anything to write about, they will home in on one of three story lines: zom­bies, spaceships, or wastelands. Oswalt chose wastelands, and ever since he has been mining our society's wasteland for perversion and excess, pop culture and fatty foods, indie rock and single-malt scotch. Zombie Spaceship Wasteland is an inventive account of the evolution of Patton Oswalt's wildly insightful worldview, sure to indulge his legion of fans and lure many new admirers to his very entertaining "wasteland."

Zombie Spaceship Wasteland: A Book by Patton Oswalt

by Patton Oswalt

Prepare yourself for a journey through the world of Patton Oswalt, one of the most creative, insightful, and hysterical voices on the entertain­ment scene today. Widely known for his roles in the films Big Fan and Ratatouille, as well as the television hit The King of Queens, Patton Oswalt--a staple of Comedy Central--has been amusing audiences for decades. Now, with Zombie Spaceship Wasteland, he offers a fascinating look into his most unusual, and lovable, mindscape. Oswalt combines memoir with uproarious humor, from snow forts to Dungeons & Dragons to gifts from Grandma that had to be explained. He remem­bers his teen summers spent working in a movie Cineplex and his early years doing stand-up. Readers are also treated to several graphic elements, includ­ing a vampire tale for the rest of us and some greeting cards with a special touch. Then there's the book's centerpiece, which posits that before all young creative minds have anything to write about, they will home in on one of three story lines: zom­bies, spaceships, or wastelands. Oswalt chose wastelands, and ever since he has been mining our society's wasteland for perversion and excess, pop culture and fatty foods, indie rock and single-malt scotch. Zombie Spaceship Wasteland is an inventive account of the evolution of Patton Oswalt's wildly insightful worldview, sure to indulge his legion of fans and lure many new admirers to his very entertaining "wasteland."

Zombie Spaceship Wasteland

by Patton Oswalt

Prepare yourself for a journey through the world of Patton Oswalt, one of the most creative, insightful, and hysterical voices on the entertain­ment scene today. Widely known for his roles in the films Big Fan and Ratatouille, as well as the television hit The King of Queens, Patton Oswalt--a staple of Comedy Central--has been amusing audiences for decades. Now, with Zombie Spaceship Wasteland, he offers a fascinating look into his most unusual, and lovable, mindscape. Oswalt combines memoir with uproarious humor, from snow forts to Dungeons & Dragons to gifts from Grandma that had to be explained. He remem­bers his teen summers spent working in a movie Cineplex and his early years doing stand-up. Readers are also treated to several graphic elements, includ­ing a vampire tale for the rest of us and some greeting cards with a special touch. Then there's the book's centerpiece, which posits that before all young creative minds have anything to write about, they will home in on one of three story lines: zom­bies, spaceships, or wastelands. Oswalt chose wastelands, and ever since he has been mining our society's wasteland for perversion and excess, pop culture and fatty foods, indie rock and single-malt scotch. Zombie Spaceship Wasteland is an inventive account of the evolution of Patton Oswalt's wildly insightful worldview, sure to indulge his legion of fans and lure many new admirers to his very entertaining "wasteland."

Zola and the Victorians: Censorship in the Age of Hypocrisy

by David Bellos Eileen Horne

London, 1888: Jack the Ripper stalks the streets of Whitechapel; national strikes and social unrest threaten the status quo; a grave economic crisis is spreading across the Atlantic . . . Yet Her Majesty's government is preoccupied with "a mere book" - or rather, a series of books: new translations of the Rougon-Macquart saga by French literary giant Émile Zola.In his time, Zola made his British contemporaries look positively pastoral; much of his work is considered shocking and transgressive even now. But it was his English publisher who bore the brunt of the Victorians' moral outrage at Zola's "realistic" depictions of striking miners, society courtesans and priapic, feuding farmers.Seventy years before Lady Chatterley's Lover broke the back of British censorship, Henry Vizetelly's commitment to publishing Zola, and to the nascent principle of free speech, not only landed him in the dock and thereafter in prison, but brought to ruin to the publishing house he had founded. Meanwhile, Zola was going from strength to strength, establishing his reputation as a literary legend and falling in love with a woman half his age.This lively, humorous and ultimately tragic tale is an exploration of the consequences of translation and censorship which remains relevant today for readers, publishers and authors everywhere.

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