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Zubi!

by Ben Israel Danny

How to talk dirty and influence people-in Hebrew! You can study Hebrew for years, but do you really know how to talk like a native speaker? The next book in Plume's foreign language series, Zubi! will make sure you learn all the colorful vernacular words and phrases for a variety of situations,including insulting your neighbor,flirting with the hot guy or girl at the club, and even chatting online-not to mention plenty of Hebrew words that are. . . well, best not to mention. Accessible and useful to complete novices, intermediate students of Hebrew, or just anyone who enjoys cursing in other languages, this irreverent guide is packed with hilarious examples and stories to acquaint the reader not only with popular terms but how they are used in everyday speech. With clever illustrations, Zubi! covers it all-from essential basics to the hottest new slang-and proves that no language is too sacred. .

The Zincali

by George Borrow

Yufa! A Practical Guide to Mandarin Chinese Grammar

by Wen-Hua Teng

Yufa! A Practical Guide to Mandarin Chinese Grammar takes a unique approach to explaining the major topics of Mandarin Chinese grammar. The book is presented in two sections: the core structures of Chinese grammar, and the practical use of the Chinese language. Key features include: Chinese characters, pinyin and English translations Realistic scenarios to provide you with an interesting context in which to learn grammar Varied and imaginative exercises so you can review your progress easily.With straightforward descriptions, numerous exercises, and examples that are rooted in realistic situations, the author shows you how grammar is used in everyday life. This new second edition has been fully revised and updated throughout and continues to be one of the clearest and most comprehensive pedagogical grammars available.

Your Voice And Articulation (Fourth Edition)

by Ethel C. Glenn Phillip J. Glenn Sandra H. Forman

Fourth edition of a text which offers explanations of the processes by which we produce voice and speech sounds, such as consonants and vowels, in American English. Included are exercises and practice guidelines for enhancing or correcting voice quality and the pronunciation of sounds and words.

Yiddish Wisdom

by Christopher Silas Neal

Decade after decade, Yiddish proverbs continue to capture the humor, warmth, and traditions of Jewish life. Now, the beloved Yiddish Wisdom has been expanded with even more proverbs and fresh illustrations to be cherished by a new generation. With more than 150 folk sayings translated in Yiddish and English--from the whimsical and witty (Dress up a broom and it will also look nice/Az men batziert a bezem iz er oich shain) to the poignant (When one must, one can/Az me muz, ken men) and practical (When you look to the heights, hold on to your hat/Az du kukst oif hoicheh zachen, halt tsu dos hitl)--this treasured volume is the perfect gift for any celebration.

The Yiddish Historians and the Struggle for a Jewish History of the Holocaust

by Mark L. Smith

The Yiddish Historians and the Struggle for a Jewish History of the Holocaust identifies the Yiddish historians who created a distinctively Jewish approach to writing Holocaust history in the early years following World War II. Author Mark L. Smith explains that these scholars survived the Nazi invasion of Eastern Europe, yet they have not previously been recognized as a specific group who were united by a common research agenda and a commitment to sharing their work with the worldwide community of Yiddish-speaking survivors. These Yiddish historians studied the history of the Holocaust from the perspective of its Jewish victims, focusing on the internal aspects of daily life in the ghettos and camps under Nazi occupation and stressing the importance of relying on Jewish sources and the urgency of collecting survivor testimonies, eyewitness accounts, and memoirs. With an aim to dispel the accusations of cowardice and passivity that arose against the Jewish victims of Nazism, these historians created both a vigorous defense and also a daring offense. They understood that most of those who survived did so because they had engaged in a daily struggle against conditions imposed by the Nazis to hasten their deaths. The redemption of Jewish honor through this recognition is the most innovative contribution by the Yiddish historians. It is the area in which they most influenced the research agendas of nearly all subsequent scholars while also disturbing certain accepted truths, including the beliefs that the earliest Holocaust research focused on the Nazi perpetrators, that research on the victims commenced only in the early 1960s and that Holocaust study developed as an academic discipline separate from Jewish history. Now, with writings in Yiddish journals and books in Europe, Israel, and North and South America having been recovered, listed, and given careful discussion, former ideas must yield before the Yiddish historians’ published works. The Yiddish Historians and the Struggle for a Jewish History of the Holocaust is an eye-opening monograph that will appeal to Holocaust and Jewish studies scholars, students, and general readers.

Yiddish and Power

by Dovid Katz

Yiddish and Power surveys the social, linguistic and intellectual history of the Yiddish language within the traditional civilisation of Jewish Ashkenaz in central, and then in eastern Europe, and its interaction with the surrounding non-Jewish culture. It explores the various ways in which Yiddish has empowered masses and served political agendas.

Yiddish: A Survey and a Grammar, Second Edition

by Kalman Weiser Eleazar Birnbaum S. A. Birnbaum David Birnbaum Jean Baumgarten

One of the great Yiddish scholars of the twentieth century, S.A. Birnbaum (1891-1989) published Yiddish: A Survey and a Grammar in 1979 towards the end of a long and prolific career. Unlike other grammars and study guides for English speakers, Yiddish: A Survey and a Grammar fully describes the Southern Yiddish dialect and pronunciation used today by most native speakers, while also taking into account Northern Yiddish and Standard Yiddish, associated with secularist and academic circles. The book also includes specimens of Yiddish prose and poetic texts spanning eight centuries, sampling Yiddish literature from the medieval to modern eras across its vast European geographic expanse.The second edition of Yiddish: A Survey and a Grammar makes this classic text available again to students, teachers, and Yiddish-speakers alike. Featuring three new introductory essays by noted Yiddish scholars, a corrected version of the text, and an expanded and updated bibliography, this book is essential reading for any serious student of Yiddish and its culture.

Yesterday We Had a Hurricane / Ayer Tuvimos Un Huracán

by Deirdre McLaughlin Mercier

This bilingual edition re-tells the experience of a hurricane as seen through the eyes of a young child. Young readers will learn all about these big storms that come from the ocean. They'll find out about the effects of wind and rain, as well as some of the more lighthearted and practical alternatives to doing without electricity.

Yé-Yé Girls of '60s French Pop

by Lio Jean-Emmanuel Deluxe

This delightfully illustrated exploration into '60s French pop, and the women who built it, reveals yé-yé music's hip sensuality, humor, style and wit. We hear from and about Françoise Hardy, France Gall, Brigitte Bardot, Sylvie Vartan and dozens of other modern Lolitas, and the recklessly naughty Serge Gainsbourg. Modern-day yé-yé avatar Lio has written the book's Foreword.

Yapese Alphabet (Island Alphabet Books)

by Lori Phillips

This book is part of the Island Alphabet Books series, which features languages and children's artwork from the U.S.-affiliated Pacific. Each book contains the complete alphabet for the language, four or five examples for each letter, and a word list with English translations. The series is published by PREL, a non- profit corporation that works collaboratively with school systems to enhance education across the Pacific.

...Y no se lo tragó la tierra

by Tomás Rivera

No disponible, not available

X-Treme Latin: Lingua Latina Extrema

by Henry Beard

Everything you'll need to say in Latin for hipsters, party animals, slackers, pop-culture junkies, the corporately downsized and generally disaffected

X-Treme Latin

by Henry Beard

In staff meetings and singles bars, on freeways and fairways, there are aggravating people lurking everywhere these days. But bestselling humorist Henry Beard has the perfect comeback for all prickly situations, offering a slew of quips your nemesis won't soon forget . . . or even understand. Beard's gift is his ability to make fun of popular culture and the current zeitgeist. In X-Treme Latin he provides Latin with an attitude, an indispensable phrasebook that taps the secret power of Latin to deliver, in total safety, hundreds of impeccable put-downs, comebacks, and wisecracks. Within its pages you will learn how to insult or fire coworkers; blame corporate scandals on someone else; cheer at a World Wrestling Entertainment match; talk back to your computer, TV, or Game Boy; deal with your road rage; evade threatening situations; snowboard in style; talk like Tony Soprano; and much more. With dozens more zingers for quashing e-mail pranks, psyching out your golf opponent, giving backhanded compliments, and evading awkward questions, X-Treme Latin is destined for magnus popularity and will have readers cheering, "Celebremus!"

Written on Water

by Eileen Chang Andrew Jones Ailing Zhang Nicole Huang

Known as "the Garbo of Chinese letters" for her elegance and the aura of mystery that surrounded her, Eileen Chang is regarded as one of the greatest and most influential modern Chinese novelists and cultural critics of the twentieth century. In Written on Water, first published in 1945 and now available for the first time in English, Chang offers essays on art, literature, war, and urban life, as well as autobiographical reflections. Chang takes in the sights and sounds of wartime Shanghai and Hong Kong, with the tremors of national upheaval and the drone of warplanes in the background, and inventively fuses explorations of urban life, literary trends, domestic habits, and historic events. These evocative and moving firsthand accounts examine the subtle and not-so-subtle effects of the Japanese bombing and occupation of Shanghai and Hong Kong. Eileen Chang writes of friends, colleagues, and teachers turned soldiers or wartime volunteers, and her own experiences as a part-time nurse. Her nuanced depictions range from observations of how a woman's elegant dress affects morale to descriptions of hospital life. With a distinctive style that is at once meditative, vibrant, and humorous, Chang engages the reader through sly, ironic humor; an occasionally chatty tone; and an intense fascination with the subtleties of modern urban life. The collection vividly captures the sights and sounds of Shanghai, a city defined by its mix of tradition and modernity. Chang explores the city's food, fashions, shops, cultural life, and social mores; she reveals and upends prevalent attitudes toward women and in the process presents a portrait of a liberated, cosmopolitan woman, enjoying the opportunities, freedoms, and pleasures offered by urban life. In addition to her descriptions of daily life, Chang also reflects on a variety of artistic and literary issues, including contemporary films, the aims of the writer, the popularity of the Peking Opera, dance, and painting.

Writing Without Words: Alternative Literacies in Mesoamerica and the Andes

by Walter D. Mignolo Elizabeth Hill Boone

The history of writing, or so the standard story goes, is an ascending process, evolving toward the alphabet and finally culminating in the "full writing" of recorded speech. Writing without Words challenges this orthodoxy, and with it widespread notions of literacy and dominant views of art and literature, history and geography. Asking how knowledge was encoded and preserved in Pre-Columbian and early colonial Mesoamerican cultures, the authors focus on systems of writing that did not strive to represent speech. Their work reveals the complicity of ideology in the history of literacy, and offers new insight into the history of writing.The contributors--who include art historians, anthropologists, and literary theorists--examine the ways in which ancient Mesoamerican and Andean peoples conveyed meaning through hieroglyphic, pictorial, and coded systems, systems inseparable from the ideologies they were developed to serve. We see, then, how these systems changed with the European invasion, and how uniquely colonial writing systems came to embody the post-conquest American ideologies. The authors also explore the role of these early systems in religious discourse and their relation to later colonial writing.Bringing the insights from Mesoamerica and the Andes to bear on a fundamental exchange among art history, literary theory, semiotics, and anthropology, the volume reveals the power contained in the medium of writing.Contributors. Elizabeth Hill Boone, Tom Cummins, Stephen Houston, Mark B. King, Dana Leibsohn, Walter D. Mignolo, John Monaghan, John M. D. Pohl, Joanne Rappaport, Peter van der Loo

Writing Japanese Katakana

by Jim Gleeson

This is an introductory guide and workbook to writing Japanese Katakana.Anybody who is able to master English, with its irregular spellings and idiosyncratic pronunciations, is more than equipped to master written Japanese. The hiragana and katakana syllabaries are purely phonetic characters, which function much like the letters of the English alphabet. In this respect, kana are quite different from kanji characters, which are based on Chinese ideographs and which represent ideas. The katakana syllabary is used primarily to represent borrowed words (from languages other than Chinese), although it is also used for botanical names and is sometimes used in place of hiragana or kanji for emphasis. In some ways, the use of katakana in Japanese parallels the use of italics in English.Writing practice is the most effective method of mastering written Japanese, and the large open format of this workbook is designed to invite the student to pick up a pencil and start writing. Written Japanese comprises two phonetic syllabaries, hiragana and katakana, and a set of kanji characters that are based on Chinese ideographs. This workbook has been carefully designed to facilitate the quick and easy mastery of the 46-character katakana alphabet, making it the perfect tool to begin the process of mastering written Japanese. Each character is introduced with brushed, handwritten and typed samples that enhance character recognition. Extensive space for writing allows maximum practice to facilitate memorization and to ensure proper character formation. Entertaining illustrations and amusing examples of loan-words that use katakana in Japanese writings further reinforce memorization in a fun way. Writing Katakana is tailored to the specific needs of young students of the Japanese language, but is also well suited to beginning students of any age. This workbook contains: grayed-out, trace-over characters for correct character construction. Extensive practice in writing sentences for maximum reinforcement. Supplementary explanations, including a brief history of the origin of each character, to foster visual recall.

Writing Japanese Katakana

by Jim Gleeson

This is an introductory guide and workbook to writing Japanese Katakana.Anybody who is able to master English, with its irregular spellings and idiosyncratic pronunciations, is more than equipped to master written Japanese. The hiragana and katakana syllabaries are purely phonetic characters, which function much like the letters of the English alphabet. In this respect, kana are quite different from kanji characters, which are based on Chinese ideographs and which represent ideas. The katakana syllabary is used primarily to represent borrowed words (from languages other than Chinese), although it is also used for botanical names and is sometimes used in place of hiragana or kanji for emphasis. In some ways, the use of katakana in Japanese parallels the use of italics in English.Writing practice is the most effective method of mastering written Japanese, and the large open format of this workbook is designed to invite the student to pick up a pencil and start writing. Written Japanese comprises two phonetic syllabaries, hiragana and katakana, and a set of kanji characters that are based on Chinese ideographs. This workbook has been carefully designed to facilitate the quick and easy mastery of the 46-character katakana alphabet, making it the perfect tool to begin the process of mastering written Japanese. Each character is introduced with brushed, handwritten and typed samples that enhance character recognition. Extensive space for writing allows maximum practice to facilitate memorization and to ensure proper character formation. Entertaining illustrations and amusing examples of loan-words that use katakana in Japanese writings further reinforce memorization in a fun way. Writing Katakana is tailored to the specific needs of young students of the Japanese language, but is also well suited to beginning students of any age. This workbook contains:grayed-out, trace-over characters for correct character constructionExtensive practice in writing sentences for maximum reinforcementSupplementary explanations, including a brief history of the origin of each character, to foster visual recall.

Writing Japanese Katakana

by Jim Gleeson

This is an introductory guide and workbook to writing Japanese Katakana.Anybody who is able to master English, with its irregular spellings and idiosyncratic pronunciations, is more than equipped to master written Japanese. The hiragana and katakana syllabaries are purely phonetic characters, which function much like the letters of the English alphabet. In this respect, kana are quite different from kanji characters, which are based on Chinese ideographs and which represent ideas. The katakana syllabary is used primarily to represent borrowed words (from languages other than Chinese), although it is also used for botanical names and is sometimes used in place of hiragana or kanji for emphasis. In some ways, the use of katakana in Japanese parallels the use of italics in English.Writing practice is the most effective method of mastering written Japanese, and the large open format of this workbook is designed to invite the student to pick up a pencil and start writing. Written Japanese comprises two phonetic syllabaries, hiragana and katakana, and a set of kanji characters that are based on Chinese ideographs. This workbook has been carefully designed to facilitate the quick and easy mastery of the 46-character katakana alphabet, making it the perfect tool to begin the process of mastering written Japanese. Each character is introduced with brushed, handwritten and typed samples that enhance character recognition. Extensive space for writing allows maximum practice to facilitate memorization and to ensure proper character formation. Entertaining illustrations and amusing examples of loan-words that use katakana in Japanese writings further reinforce memorization in a fun way. Writing Katakana is tailored to the specific needs of young students of the Japanese language, but is also well suited to beginning students of any age. This workbook contains:grayed-out, trace-over characters for correct character constructionExtensive practice in writing sentences for maximum reinforcementSupplementary explanations, including a brief history of the origin of each character, to foster visual recall.

Writing Japanese Hiragana

by Jim Gleeson

This guide presents exercises, review practices and lively illustrations, helping the reader to learn to write Hiragana.

Writing Japanese Hiragana

by Jim Gleeson

Put simply, practice is the most effective method of mastering written Japanese. The large, open format of Writing Japanese Hiragana invites the student to pick up a pencil and get started!Two phonetic syllabaries, hiragana and katakana, and a set of kanji characters based on Chinese ideographs are what comprises written Japanese. This workbook has been carefully designed to facilitate the quick and easy mastery of the forty-six character hiragana syllabary used to write all types of native words not written in kanji. An understanding of hiragana is essential for the serious student wishing to learn Japanese effectively.Each character is introduced with brushed, handwritten, and typed samples which enhance character recognition. Extensive writing space allows for maximum practice to facilitate memorization and ensure proper character formation. Entertaining illustrations and amusing examples of onomatopoeic usage of hiragana in Japanese writings further reinforce memorization in a fun way.Writing Japanese Hiragana is an easy-to-use and practical workbook tailored to the specific needs of young students of the Japanese language. Beginning students of all ages will delight in its fresh presentation.

Writing Japanese Hiragana

by Jim Gleeson

Put simply, practice is the most effective method of mastering written Japanese. The large, open format of Writing Japanese Hiragana invites the student to pick up a pencil and get started!Two phonetic syllabaries, hiragana and katakana, and a set of kanji characters based on Chinese ideographs are what comprises written Japanese. This workbook has been carefully designed to facilitate the quick and easy mastery of the forty-six character hiragana syllabary used to write all types of native words not written in kanji. An understanding of hiragana is essential for the serious student wishing to learn Japanese effectively.Each character is introduced with brushed, handwritten, and typed samples which enhance character recognition. Extensive writing space allows for maximum practice to facilitate memorization and ensure proper character formation. Entertaining illustrations and amusing examples of onomatopoeic usage of hiragana in Japanese writings further reinforce memorization in a fun way.Writing Japanese Hiragana is an easy-to-use and practical workbook tailored to the specific needs of young students of the Japanese language. Beginning students of all ages will delight in its fresh presentation.

Writing for the IELTS

by Lin Lougheed

Discover everything you’ll need to know in order to write well for the IELTS test, whether you are planning to take the Academic or the General Training version. This book will help IELTS test takers learn several essential skills, including:Task Achievement: follow a three-step model to plan, write, and revise your essaysCoherence and Cohesion: practice organizing your writing and connecting ideasLexical Resource: build your vocabulary and use it correctlyGrammatical Range and Accuracy: review rules and practice applying them to your writingEach section leads you step-by-step through the process of writing an essay in response to a particular task. Learn how to apply what you’ve learned, familiarize yourself with the types of questions you’ll have to respond to on the test, complete your responses within the time limits, and more. An Appendix also includes a More Writing Practice section with a selection of essays written in response to IELTS writing tasks.

A Writer's Reference With Exercises

by Diana Hacker Nancy Sommers

Our best selling classic tabbed handbook is available in a version that conveniently includes nearly one hundred integrated exercise sets for plenty of practice with the grammar, style, punctuation, and mechanics topics offered in the handbook. The answers to lettered items appear in the back of the book.

The Writer's Reference Guide to Spanish

by David William Foster Daniel Altamiranda Carmen De Urioste

Writers and editors of Spanish have long needed an authoritative guide to written language usage, similar to The MLA Style Manual and The Chicago Manual of Style. And here it is! This reference guide provides comprehensive information on how the Spanish language is copyedited for publication. The book covers these major areas:- Language basics: capitalization, word division, spelling, and punctuation. - Language conventions: abbreviations, professional and personal titles, names of organizations, and nationalities. - Bibliographic format, particularly how Spanish differs from English. - Spanish language forms of classical authors' names. - Literary and grammatical terminology. - Linguistic terminology. - Biblical names and allusions. - A dictionary of grammatical doubts, including usage, grammatical constructions of particular words and phrases, verbal irregularities, and gender variations.

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