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Showing 25,176 through 25,200 of 25,879 results

What Video Games Have to Teach Us about Learning and Literacy

by James Paul Gee

James Paul Gee talks about his experience of learning and using video games. He looks at major specific cognitive activities - to develop a sense of identity, to grasp meanings, to pick a role model and to perceive the world.

What Will Be

by Michael L. Dertouzos

Michael Dertouzos has been an insightful commentator and an active participant in the creation of the Information Age.Now, in What Will Be, he offers a thought-provoking and entertaining vision of the world of the next decade -- and of the next century. Dertouzos examines the impact that the following new technologies and challenges will have on our lives as the Information Revolution progresses: all the music, film and text ever produced will be available on-demand in our own homes your "bodynet" will let you make phone calls, check email and pay bills as you walk down the street advances in telecommunication will radically alter the role of face-to-face contact in our lives global disparities in infrastructure will widen the gap between rich and poor surgical mini-robots and online care will change the practice of medicine as we know it. Detailed, accessible and visionary, What Will Be&nbsp is essential for Information Age revolutionaries and technological neophytes alike.

What's New in Adobe AIR 3

by Joseph Labrecque

This book will present you with a full rundown of all the new features in the upcoming AIR 3.0 runtime. Along with each feature, if applicable, will be a demonstration of how to employ the new feature. There's also be a short introduction to AIR and a chapter dedicated to providing you with additional resources.

What's New in CSS3

by Estelle Weyl

Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) began as a clean way to separate formatting from content, but it has grown into a powerful toolkit for layout and interface design. CSS Level 3, commonly called CSS3, divides its work up into modules, many of which are available for you to use today. What's New in CSS3 provides a brief overview of the many parts of CSS3 whether they are Recommendations, Working Drafts, or pieces left aside. Transformations and Animations may be highly visible parts of new interface styles, but new selectors and layout approaches will also change the way you work. If you've been wondering which parts of the CSS3 conversation are for you, What's New in CSS3 will get you started.

What's New in Flash Player 11

by Joseph Labrecque

This book will present you with a full rundown of all the new features in the upcoming Flash Player 11 runtime. Along with each feature, if applicable, will be a demonstration of how to employ the new feature. There's also be a short introduction to Flash Player and a chapter dedicated to providing you with additional resources.

What's New in Java 7

by Madhusudhan Konda

<p>Java 7 has a number of features that will please developers. Madhusudhan Konda provides an overview of these, including strings in switch statements, multi-catch exception handling, try-with-resource statements, the new File System API, extensions of the JVM, support for dynamically-typed languages, and the fork and join framework for task parallelism.</p>

What's new in SQL Server 2012

by Rachel Clements Jon Reade

This is a hands-on book to quickly get you up to speed with SQL Server 2012. It covers all the new features of the core database engine as well as the business intelligence (BI) services.The book begins by taking you step-by-step through the installation process, showing you what to install and which services and features you need. Once you have your SQL Server in place, you learn how to administer it and then explore new T-SQL functions to expand your query-writing toolkit. You will discover how the enhancements to Integration Services, Analysis Services and Reporting Services make developing BI solutions easier. It will then introduce you to SQL Server Data Tools, your new and improved development environment for creating database and BI projects.A hands-on example guides you through the steps required to run Distributed Replay, giving you the experience you need to apply this in the field. The book then takes you through a detailed example to show you how to create a Data Quality Services project and cleanse real-world data. Easy to follow code samples provide you with the queries you need to set up Availability Groups using the new AlwaysOn technology.Once you are comfortable with these new features you will be ready to migrate your data to the cloud and into SQL Azure. An exploration of Hadoop will help you understand big data and how it really is the next big thing,This concise reference is for database administrators, SQL Server Developers and BI professionals. Anyone who is familiar with SQL Server 2008 R2 and needs to make the jump to the latest version with the shortest learning curve will find this book useful.

When Computers Were Human

by David Alan Grier

Before Palm Pilots and iPods, PCs and laptops, the term "computer" referred to the people who did scientific calculations by hand. These workers were neither calculating geniuses nor idiot savants but knowledgeable people who, in other circumstances, might have become scientists in their own right. When Computers Were Human represents the first in-depth account of this little-known, 200-year epoch in the history of science and technology. Beginning with the story of his own grandmother, who was trained as a human computer, David Alan Grier provides a poignant introduction to the wider world of women and men who did the hard computational labor of science. His grandmother's casual remark, "I wish I'd used my calculus," hinted at a career deferred and an education forgotten, a secret life unappreciated; like many highly educated women of her generation, she studied to become a human computer because nothing else would offer her a place in the scientific world. The book begins with the return of Halley's comet in 1758 and the effort of three French astronomers to compute its orbit. It ends four cycles later, with a UNIVAC electronic computer projecting the 1986 orbit. In between, Grier tells us about the surveyors of the French Revolution, describes the calculating machines of Charles Babbage, and guides the reader through the Great Depression to marvel at the giant computing room of the Works Progress Administration. When Computers Were Human is the sad but lyrical story of workers who gladly did the hard labor of research calculation in the hope that they might be part of the scientific community. In the end, they were rewarded by a new electronic machine that took the place and the name of those who were, once, the computers.

When Digital Becomes Human

by Steven Van Belleghem

In an age when customers have access to vast amounts of data about a company, its product and its competitors, customer experience becomes increasingly important as a sustainable source of competitive advantage. But success doesn't just rely on digital engagement and excellence, but also on combining a digital-first attitude with a human touch. In When Digital Becomes Human, Steven Van Belleghem explores and explains the new digital relationships. Packed with global examples from organizations that have successfully transformed their customer relationships, such as Amazon, Toyota, ING, Coolblue, Nike and Starbucks, When Digital Becomes Human presents a clear model that companies can easily implement to integrate an emotional layer into their digital strategy. This guide to combining two of a business's most important assets - its people and its digital strengths - covers the latest issues in digital marketing and customer experience management, including omnichannel and multichannel experiences, big data and predictive analytics, privacy concerns, customer collaboration (ie crowdsourcing) and more.

When Gadgets Betray Us

by Robert Vamosi

Writing in plain language for general readers, Vamosi, a computer security analyst and a contributing editor at PCWorld, explains what we're really signing up for when we log in and reveals the secret lives of our electronic devices, offering a commonsense approach for protecting ourselves. The book is about hardware hacking and new kinds of identity fraud: how our mobile phone conversations can be intercepted, how our credit cards and driver's licenses can be copied at a distance. The author travels from the streets of New York and LA to Johannesburg and Berlin, to talk to people who have experienced firsthand how gadgets can betray us and to examine the effects of technology in the Third World. He recommends the addition of basic authentication and strong encryption to most hardware to reduce the vulnerabilities described in the book, but notes that hardware manufacturers have so far shown little interest in securing their gadgets. Annotation ©2011 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Where Code and Content Meet

by Andreas Rueping

A practical go-to reference for Web developers programming custom software for Web sitesMost advanced Web sites or Web platforms have specific requirements that go beyond standard functionality; to meet such requirements, it's often necessary to develop custom software. This is the point where code and content meet, and where this book begins. Where Code and Content Meet presents a collection of real-world, tried and tested patterns that address content-related aspects of custom software development for advanced Web sites or platforms.Mined from a series of successful Web projects, the patterns represent collected expertise of designers from several software development teams and serve as a practical guide to designing your own content-related custom components for your Web project. The patterns are independent of specific tools and technologies, and focus on non-functional requirements, with the overall goal of defining sustainable software architecture.Presents a collection of tried and tested software patterns mined from a series of successful Web projectsIncludes checklists for managing Web projects and real-world patterns from PLoP conferencesIllustrates use of software patterns through a case study that runs throughout the book and gradually evolves as the patterns are applied to it, one by oneCovers content modeling and content organization, navigation, findability, personalization, and user participationBy employing the software patterns included in Where Code and Content Meet, you'll learn how to program custom software faster and more efficiently.

Where Wizards Stay Up Late: The Origins Of The Internet

by Katie Hafner Matthew Lyon

Twenty five years ago, it didn't exist. Today, twenty million people worldwide are surfing the Net. Where Wizards Stay Up Late is the exciting story of the pioneers responsible for creating the most talked about, most influential, and most far-reaching communications breakthrough since the invention of the telephone. In the 1960's, when computers where regarded as mere giant calculators, J.C.R. Licklider at MIT saw them as the ultimate communications devices. With Defense Department funds, he and a band of visionary computer whizzes began work on a nationwide, interlocking network of computers. Taking readers behind the scenes, Where Wizards Stay Up Late captures the hard work, genius, and happy accidents of their daring, stunningly successful venture.

Where Wizards Stay Up Late: The Origins of the Internet

by Katie Hafner Matthew Lyon

"A little more than twenty-five years ago, computer networks did not exist anywhere - except in the minds of a handful of computer scientists. In the late 1960s, the Defense Department's Advanced Research Projects Agency funded a project to create computer communication among its university-based researchers. The experiment was inspired by J. C. R. Licklider, a brilliant scientist from MIT. At a time when computers were generally regarded as nothing more than giant calculators, Licklider saw their potential as communications devices." "Where Wizards Stay Up Late is the story of the small group of researchers and engineers whose invention, daring in its day, became the foundation for the Internet. With ARPA's backing, Licklider and others began the quest for a way to connect computers across the country." "In 1969, ARPA awarded the contract to build the most integral piece of this network - a computerized switch called the Interface Message Processor, or IMP - to Bolt Beranek and Newman (BBN), a small Cambridge, Massachusetts, company. A half-dozen engineers at BBN, who called themselves the IMP Guys, knew it was possible to do what larger companies - including AT&T and IBM - had dismissed as impossible. But making computer networking possible required inventing new technologies. Working around the clock, the IMP Guys met a tight deadline, and the first IMP was installed at UCLA nine months after the contract award." "A nationwide network called the ARPANET grew from four initial sites. Protocols were developed, and along the way a series of accidental discoveries were made, not the least of which was e-mail. Almost immediately, e-mail became the most popular feature of the Net and the "@" sign became lodged in the iconography of our times. The ARPANET continued to grow, then merged with other computer networks to become today's Internet. In 1990, the ARPANET itself was shut down, fully merged by then with the Internet it had spawned.

White Space Is Not Your Enemy: A Beginner's Guide To Communicating Visually Through Graphic, Web And Multimedia Design

by Kim Golombisky Rebecca Hagen

Designing a website or brochure without an art background? Then step away from the computer and read this engaging, conversational introduction to visual communications first. Written for the beginner, White Space is Not Your Enemy, Second Edition, is a practical graphic design and layout guide that introduces the concepts and practices necessary for producing effective visual communication across a variety of formats--from web to print. <P><P> This beautifully illustrated, full-color book covers all of the basics to help you develop your eye and produce evocative designs that work. Topics include: <P> * What is design? <P> * Pre-design research and brainstorming. <P> * The "works-every-time layout" and "13 layout sins." <P> * The elements and principles of design. <P> * Layouts for impact. <P> * Getting along with type. <P> * Choosing and using color. <P> * Working with photos and illustrations. <P> * Intros to infographics, storyboarding and multimedia components. <P> * Output for the web and print. <P> Visit www. whitespacedesignbook. com for additional supporting materials.

White Space is Not Your Enemy

by Kim Golombisky Rebecca Hagen

Designing a brochure or web site without an art background? Step away from the computer and read this breezy introduction to visual communications first. Written for non-designers, White Space is Not Your Enemy is a practical graphic design and layout text introducing the concepts and practices necessary for producing effective visual communications across a variety of formats, from print to Web.This beautifully illustrated, full-color book covers the basics to help you develop your eye and produce attractive work. Topics include:* The basics of effective design that communicates its intended message* Pre-design planning* 13 Layout Sins to avoid* Basic typography* Working with color* Storyboarding for video, Web, and presentions* Information graphics* Mini Art School--all the basics in one chapter* Outputting your work

Who Can You Trust?: How Technology Brought Us Together and Why It Might Drive Us Apart

by Rachel Botsman

If you can't trust those in charge, who can you trust?From government to business, banks to media, trust in institutions is at an all-time low. But this isn't the age of distrust--far from it.In this revolutionary book, world-renowned trust expert Rachel Botsman reveals that we are at the tipping point of one of the biggest social transformations in human history--with fundamental consequences for everyone. A new world order is emerging: we might have lost faith in institutions and leaders, but millions of people rent their homes to total strangers, exchange digital currencies, or find themselves trusting a bot. This is the age of "distributed trust," a paradigm shift driven by innovative technologies that are rewriting the rules of an all-too-human relationship.If we are to benefit from this radical shift, we must understand the mechanics of how trust is built, managed, lost, and repaired in the digital age. In the first book to explain this new world, Botsman provides a detailed map of this uncharted landscape--and explores what's next for humanity.

Who Goes There?: Authentication Through the Lens of Privacy

by Committee on Authentication Technologies Their Privacy Implications

Who Goes There?: Authentication Through the Lens of Privacy explores authentication technologies (passwords, PKI, biometrics, etc.) and their implications for the privacy of the individuals being authenticated. As authentication becomes ever more ubiquitous, understanding its interplay with privacy is vital. The report examines numerous concepts, including authentication, authorization, identification, privacy, and security. It provides a framework to guide thinking about these issues when deciding whether and how to use authentication in a particular context. The book explains how privacy is affected by system design decisions. It also describes government&rsquo;s unique role in authentication and what this means for how government can use authentication with minimal invasions of privacy. In addition, Who Goes There? outlines usability and security considerations and provides a primer on privacy law and policy.

Who Is Bill Gates? (Who was?)

by Ted Hammond Patricia Brennan Demuth Nancy Harrison

Bill Gates, born in Seattle, Washington, in 1955, is an American business magnate, investor, philanthropist, and author. In this Who Was...? biography, children will learn of Gates' childhood passion for computer technology, which led him to revolutionize personal computers. Through the success of his now-world-famous software company, Microsoft, Bill Gates became one of the wealthiest philanthropists in history.This fascinating story of a child technology genius is sure to captivate all audiences!

Who Owns the Future?

by Jaron Lanier

THE DAZZLING NEW MASTERWORK FROM THE PROPHET OF SILICON VALLEYJaron Lanier is the bestselling author of You Are Not a Gadget, the father of virtual reality, and one of the most influential thinkers of our time. For decades, Lanier has drawn on his expertise and experience as a computer scientist, musician, and digital media pioneer to predict the revolutionary ways in which technology has transformed our culture. Who Owns the Future? is a visionary reckoning with the effects network technologies have had on our economy. Lanier asserts that the rise of digital networks led our economy into recession and decimated the middle class. Now, as technology flattens more and more industries--from media to medicine to manufacturing--we are facing even greater challenges to employment and personal wealth. But there is an alternative to allowing technology to own our future. In this ambitious and deeply humane book, Lanier charts the path toward a new information economy that will stabilize the middle class and allow it to grow. It is time for ordinary people to be rewarded for what they do and share on the web. Insightful, original, and provocative, Who Owns the Future? is necessary reading for everyone who lives a part of their lives online.

Who Owns the Future?

by Jaron Lanier

Jaron Lanier is the father of virtual reality and one of the world's most brilliant thinkers. Who Owns the Future? is his visionary reckoning with the most urgent economic and social trend of our age: the poisonous concentration of money and power in our digital networks. Lanier has predicted how technology will transform our humanity for decades, and his insight has never been more urgently needed. He shows how Siren Servers, which exploit big data and the free sharing of information, led our economy into recession, imperiled personal privacy, and hollowed out the middle class. The networks that define our world--including social media, financial institutions, and intelligence agencies--now threaten to destroy it. But there is an alternative. In this provocative, poetic, and deeply humane book, Lanier charts a path toward a brighter future: an information economy that rewards ordinary people for what they do and share on the web. grow. It is time for ordinary people to be rewarded for what they do and share on the web. Insightful, original, and provocative, Who Owns the Future? is necessary reading for everyone who lives a part of their lives online.

WHOIS Running the Internet

by Garth O. Bruen

Discusses the evolution of WHOIS and how policy changes will affect WHOIS' place in IT today and in the futureThis book provides a comprehensive overview of WHOIS. The text begins with an introduction to WHOIS and an in-depth coverage of its forty-year history. Afterwards it examines how to use WHOIS and how WHOIS fits in the overall structure of the Domain Name System (DNS). Other technical topics covered include WHOIS query code and WHOIS server details. The book also discusses current policy developments and implementations, reviews critical policy documents, and explains how they will affect the future of the Internet and WHOIS. Additional resources and content updates will be provided through a supplementary website. Includes an appendix with information on current and authoritative WHOIS services around the world Provides illustrations of actual WHOIS records and screenshots of web-based WHOIS query interfaces with instructions for navigating them Explains network dependencies and processes related to WHOIS utilizing flowcharts Contains advanced coding for programmers WHOIS Running the Internet: Protocol, Policy, and Privacy is written primarily for internet developers, policy developers, industry professionals in law enforcement, digital forensic investigators, and intellectual property attorneys.Garth O. Bruen is an Internet policy and security researcher whose work has been published in the Wall Street Journal and the Washington Post. Since 2012 Garth Bruen has served as the North American At-Large Chair to the Internet Corporation of Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN). In 2003 Bruen created KnujOn.com with his late father, Dr. Robert Bruen, to process and investigate Internet abuse complaints (SPAM) from consumers. Bruen has trained and advised law enforcement at the federal and local levels on malicious use of the Domain Name System in the way it relates to the WHOIS record system. He has presented multiple times to the High Technology Crime Investigation Association (HTCIA) as well as other cybercrime venues including the Anti-Phishing Working Group (APWG) and the National Center for Justice and the Rule of Law at The University of Mississippi School of Law. Bruen also teaches the Fisher College Criminal Justice School in Boston where he develops new approaches to digital crime.

Whole Body Interaction

by David England

Whole Body Interaction is "The integrated capture and processing of human signals from physical, physiological, cognitive and emotional sources to generate feedback to those sources for interaction in a digital environment" (England 2009). Whole Body Interaction looks at the challenges of Whole Body Interaction from the perspectives of design, engineering and research methods. How do we take physical motion, cognition, physiology, emotion and social context to push boundaries of Human Computer Interaction to involve the complete set of human capabilities? Through the use of various applications the authors attempt to answer this question and set a research agenda for future work. Aimed at students and researchers who are looking for new project ideas or to extend their existing work with new dimensions of interaction.

Who's #1?

by Amy N. Langville Carl D. Meyer

A website's ranking on Google can spell the difference between success and failure for a new business. NCAA football ratings determine which schools get to play for the big money in postseason bowl games. Product ratings influence everything from the clothes we wear to the movies we select on Netflix. Ratings and rankings are everywhere, but how exactly do they work? Who's #1? offers an engaging and accessible account of how scientific rating and ranking methods are created and applied to a variety of uses.Amy Langville and Carl Meyer provide the first comprehensive overview of the mathematical algorithms and methods used to rate and rank sports teams, political candidates, products, Web pages, and more. In a series of interesting asides, Langville and Meyer provide fascinating insights into the ingenious contributions of many of the field's pioneers. They survey and compare the different methods employed today, showing why their strengths and weaknesses depend on the underlying goal, and explaining why and when a given method should be considered. Langville and Meyer also describe what can and can't be expected from the most widely used systems.The science of rating and ranking touches virtually every facet of our lives, and now you don't need to be an expert to understand how it really works. Who's #1? is the definitive introduction to the subject. It features easy-to-understand examples and interesting trivia and historical facts, and much of the required mathematics is included.

Why Engagement Matters

by Heather O'Brien Paul Cairns

User Engagement (UE) is a complex concept to investigate. The purpose of this book is not to constrain UE to one perspective, but to offer a well-rounded appreciation for UE across various domains and disciplines. The text begins with two foundational chapters that describe theoretical and methodological approaches to user engagement; the remaining contributions examine UE from different disciplinary perspectives and across a range of computer-mediated environments, including social and communications media, online search, eLearning, games, and eHealth. The book concludes by bringing together the cross-disciplinary perspectives presented in each chapter and proposing an agenda for future research in this area. The book will appeal to established and emerging academic and industry researchers looking to pursue research and its challenges. This includes scholars at all levels with an interest in user engagement with digital media, from students to experienced researchers, and professionals in the fields of computer science, web technology, information science, museum studies, learning and health sciences, human-computer interaction, information architecture and design, and creative arts.

Why Greatness Cannot Be Planned

by Kenneth O. Stanley Joel Lehman

Why does modern life revolve around objectives? From how science is funded, to improving how children are educated -- and nearly everything in-between -- our society has become obsessed with a seductive illusion: that greatness results from doggedly measuring improvement in the relentless pursuit of an ambitious goal. In Why Greatness Cannot Be Planned, Stanley and Lehman begin with a surprising scientific discovery in artificial intelligence that leads ultimately to the conclusion that the objective obsession has gone too far. They make the case that great achievement can't be bottled up into mechanical metrics; that innovation is not driven by narrowly focused heroic effort; and that we would be wiser (and the outcomes better) if instead we whole-heartedly embraced serendipitous discovery and playful creativity. Controversial at its heart, yet refreshingly provocative, this book challenges readers to consider life without a destination and discovery without a compass.

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