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Will You Sign Here, John Hancock?

by Jean Fritz

This book is a third person account of the childhood, adolescence and adulthood of the first signer of the Declaration of Independance. The book describes his complete self centerdness as a young adult and how that led to his rather prominant signature on the historic document.

Will You Take Me As I Am

by Michelle Mercer

Joni Mitchell is one of the most celebrated artists of the last half century, and her landmark 1971 album, Blue, is one of her most beloved and revered works. Generations of people have come of age listening to the album, inspired by the way it clarified their own difficult emotions. Critics and musicians admire the idiosyncratic virtuosity of its compositions. Will You Take Me As I Am -- the first book about Joni Mitchell to include original interviews with her -- looks at Blue to explore the development of an extraordinary artist, the history of songwriting, and much more. In extensive conversations with Mitchell, Michelle Mercer heard firsthand about Joni's internal and external journeys as she composed the largely autobiographical albums of what Mercer calls her Blue Period, which lasted through the mid-1970s. Incorporating biography, memoir, reportage, criticism, and interviews into an illuminating narrative, Mercer moves beyond the "making of an album" genre to arrive at a new form of music writing. In 1970, Mitchell was living with Graham Nash in Laurel Canyon and had made a name for herself as a so-called folk singer notable for her soaring voice and skillful compositions. Soon, though, feeling hemmed in, she fled to the hippie cave community of Matala, Greece. Here and on further travels, her compositions were freshly inspired by the lands and people she encountered as well as by her own radically changing interior landscape. After returning home to record Blue, Mitchell retreated to British Columbia, eventually reemerging as the leader of a successful jazz-rock group and turning outward in her songwriting toward social commentary. Finally, a stint with Bob Dylan's Rolling Thunder Revue and a pivotal meeting with the Tibetan lama ChÖgyam Trungpa prompted Mitchell's return to personal songwriting, which resulted in her 1976 masterpiece album, Hejira. Mercer interlaces this fascinating account of Mitchell's Blue Period with meditations on topics related to her work, including the impact of landscape on music, the value of autobiographical songwriting for artist and listener, and the literary history of confessionalism. Mercer also provides rich analyses of Mitchell's creative achievements: her innovative manner of marrying lyrics to melody; her inventive, highly expressive chords that achieve her signature blend of wonder and melancholy; how she pioneered personal songwriting and, along with Bob Dylan and Leonard Cohen, brought a new literacy to the popular song. Fans will appreciate the previously unpublished photos and a coda of Mitchell's unedited commentary on the places, books, music, pastimes, and philosophies she holds dear. This utterly original book offers a unique portrait of a great musician and her remarkable work, as well as new perspectives on the art of songwriting itself.

Willa: The Story of Willa Cather, an American Writer

by Amy Ehrlich Wendell Minor

"Captivating..." - Booklist From award-winning author Amy Ehrlich comes an illustrated biography of Willa Cather, one of America's greatest and most beloved writers.Willa Cather's life was a true American success story. A pioneer and determined spirit, Willa didn't let anything stand in her way. She refused to be discouraged by the fact that in the 1880s women hadn't written before, because she had many ideas to share. By becoming a trailblazer and following her heart, Willa Cather is remembered today as one of the greatest American writers in history. Filled with captivating and historically accurate details, as well as gorgeous illustrations by Wendell Minor, this illustrated chapter book is ideal nonfiction for middle graders.

Willa Cather: A Critical Biography

by Leon Edel E. K. Brown

E.K. Brown wrote an appreciation of Cather's work which was presented on the occasion of her 70th birthday. Cather was so enamored with it that after some friendly correspondence with Brown, it was agreed that after her death, he would embark on a full length critical biography. However, at the early age of 45, Brown unexpectedly died leaving the work incomplete. In stepped Leon Edel who managed to complete the work with the help of Miss Edith Lewis -- Miss Cather's literary executrix and trustee -- and the copious notes that Brown had left behind.

Willa Cather

by Hermione Lee

Hermione Lee’s provocative and influential biography provides a sensitive reappraisal of a marvelous and often underrated writer. The Willa Cather she reveals here was a Nebraskan who spent much of her life in self-imposed exile from the prairies she celebrated in O Pioneers! and My Antonia, a woman whose life was riddled with the tension between masculine and feminine, and a writer whose naturalness of style disguised exquisite artistry. By exposing the contradictions that lie at the heart of much of Cather’s life and work, Lee locates new layers of meaning and places her firmly at the forefront of the modern literary tradition that was taking shape in her time.

William

by Nicholas Davies

In this sensitive and beautifully illustrated biography, royal expert Nicholas Davies explores the complex character behind this monarch of the future. Davies follows Prince William from his birth at St. Mary's, Paddington, through his happy-go-lucky childhood and awkward pre-teenage years, to his burgeoning maturity. Packed with rare, color photographs, this is the definitive biography of Prince William, the man who will be Britain's king.

William: HRH Prince William of Wales

by Tim Graham Peter Archer

As the boy prince turns into the man who would be king, interest in Prince William is at an unprecedented height in 2003, the year of his twenty-first birthday. Seen as the vital link between the traditions of the Royal Family and the more populist, modern approach of his late mother, Diana, Princess of Wales, William has become an icon and pin-up as well as the future of the monarchy. This pictorial celebration features hundreds of photographs of William at work and at play by Tim Graham, the foremost photographer in this field. These beautiful photographs are accompanied by a unique insight into William's life by Peter Archer, the only journalist to interview the prince and be accredited to Buckingham Palace and St James's Palace. Elegant and revealing, William is not just a landmark in royal publishing but a beautiful celebration of this special year in the prince's life.

William Alexander Percy

by Benjamin E. Wise

In this evocative biography, Benjamin E. Wise presents the singular life of William Alexander Percy (1885-1942), a queer plantation owner, poet, and memoirist from Mississippi. Though Percy is best known as a conservative apologist of the southern racial order, in this telling Wise creates a complex and surprising portrait of a cultural relativist, sexual liberationist, and white supremacist.We follow Percy as he travels from Mississippi around the globe and, always, back again to the Delta. Wise's exploration brings depth and new meaning to Percy's already compelling life story--his prominent family's troubled history, his elite education and subsequent soldiering in World War I, his civic leadership during the Mississippi River flood of 1927, his mentoring of writers Walker Percy and Shelby Foote, and the writing and publication of his classic autobiography, Lanterns on the Levee. This biography sets Percy's life and search for meaning in the context of his history in the Deep South and his experiences in the gay male world of the early twentieth century. In Wise's hands, these seemingly disparate worlds become one.

William and Caroline Herschel

by Michael Hoskin

This beautifully structured book presents the essentials of William and Caroline Herschel's pioneering achievements in late 18th-century astronomy. Michael Hoskin shows that William Herschel was the first observational cosmologist and one of the first observers to attack the sidereal universe beyond the solar system: Herschel built instruments far better than any being used at the royal observatory. Aided by his sister Caroline, he commenced a great systematic survey that led to his discovery of Uranus in 1781. Unlike observers before him, whose telescopes did not reveal them as astronomical objects, Herschel did not ignore misty patches of light. Hoskins points out Herschel's achievement in surveying, cataloguing, and describing them as "nebulae" and even coming to the correct conclusion that their structure evolved over time, with Newton's gravity being the agent of change. Herschel's surveys established a new astronomy - looking at the universe rather than the planets! Michael Hoskin's account includes sketches and diagrams from Herschel's manuscripts in the Royal Astronomical Society Archives in which he attempts to delineate the structure of the Milky Way galaxy. While it is well-known that Herschel was a revolutionary in telescope design who constructed the world's largest telescopes, Hoskin also gives the full picture of the man as an entrepreneur who built and traded some 400 telescopes. Hoskin also pays close attention to the role of William's sister Caroline Herschel, who is usually portrayed as a "helpmate" to her brother. But in fact she became a significant astronomer in her own right. This book also offers a wealth of information of the wider Herschel family. It is enriched by a complete set of portraits of William and Caroline Herschel with an extensive set of images of their residences and closes with a charming appendix on how visitors to the Herschels recorded their encounters. William and Caroline Herschel - Pioneers in Late 18th-Century Astronomy will appeal to amateur astronomers and all those interested in popular astronomy. This book will rapidly establish itself as the primary introductory work for students, astronomers, and scholars working on the history of natural science in the late 18th century.

William and Harry: Behind the Palace Walls

by Katie Nicholl

"William and Harry" is a fascinating insight into the lives and loves of two extraordinary young men who have captured not only the hearts and minds of not only the British public, but those the world over. This is the definitive book about the princes, bringing their story right up to date. It is the tale of two brothers who have carried the legacy of their mother, Diana, Princess of Wales, into the twenty-first century and on whom the future of the House of Windsor largely depends. Drawing on her unique set of contacts Katie Nicholl recounts the royal brothers' extraordinary lives and reveals William and Harry's real characters as they become front-line soldiers and modern princes. Through her network of sources, some of which have agreed to speak for the very first time, Katie tells the story of one of Prince William's earliest romances, and his struggle with his destiny as a future King of England. aAs a royal wedding between Prince William and Kate Middleton seems more probable, Katie has spoken to a wealth of contacts close to the couple who reveal how their love affair really started at St Andrews, the hurdles the pair overcame and the challenges they still face. She recounts the story of Harry's time at Eton, his relationship with Chelsy Davy, and his three months he spent on the front line in Afghanistan. She analyses William and Harry's complex relationship with their father, and the woman who will one day become Queen Camilla. She talks to their friends, contemporaries and confidants to paint a unique and revealing portrait of the two most famous brothers in the world.

WILLIAM AND HARRY

by Ingrid Seward

Biography of Prince William and Prince Harry.

William and Kate: A Royal Love Story

by Christopher Andersen

Theirs was destined from the start to be one of the most celebrated unions of the twenty-first century: he, the charismatic prince who would someday be crowned king of England; she, the stunningly beautiful commoner who won his heart. Prince William and Kate Middleton defied all odds to forge a storybook romance amid the scandals, power struggles, tragedies, and general dysfunction that are the hallmarks of Britain’s Royal Family. In the process, they became the most written about, gossiped about, admired, and envied young couple of their generation.

William and Kate: Royal Baby Edition

by Christopher Andersen

I put it to William, particularly, that if you find someone you love in life, you must hang on to that love and look after it. . . . You must protect it. --Diana, Princess of Wales The book that surprised the industry, now updated with a new chapter on the wedding and 15 wedding photographs. Theirs was destined from the start to be one of the most celebrated unions of the twenty-first century: he, the charismatic prince who would someday be crowned king of England; she, the stunningly beautiful commoner who won his heart. Prince William and Kate Middleton defied all odds to forge a storybook romance amid the scandals, power struggles, tragedies, and general dysfunction that are the hallmarks of Britain's Royal Family. In the process, they became the most written about, gossiped about, admired, and envied young couple of their generation. Yet for most of their nearly decade-long affair, William and Kate have remained famously quiet and kept their royal relationship a tantalizing mystery. Now, journalist and #1 New York Times bestselling author Christopher Andersen reveals the intimate details of their celebrated courtship and offers a mesmerizing glimpse of the man and wife--and future king and queen--they will become: · William's lifelong role as confidant and adviser to his fragile mother, and how it has shaped his relationship with Kate · The lengths the couple went to to keep their affair secret, from their first days together as university students (when he cheered her on as she modeled racy lingerie at a fashion show) · William's romantic conquests before--and during--his decade-long romance with Kate · The person who was really behind their headlinemaking breakup--and how Kate won back her prince · The shocking sex-and-drugs scandals involving Kate's wild relatives, and how the would-be queen survived them · The long-troubling influence of William's substance-abusing aristocrat friends and the depression Kate rescued him from · Stunning new information on the threats to both their lives, the nightmare scenario that haunts William's dreams to this day, and their narrow escape from repeating Diana's fate · Surprising details on the Queen's historic plans for William and Kate, which will forever change the face of the monarchy For many, William and Kate's union represents an opportunity to recapture the magic--the compelling and complicated legacy--of his beloved mother Diana, Princess of Wales. Part glittering fairy tale, part searing family drama, part political potboiler, part heart-stopping cliff-hanger, theirs is, above all else, an affair to remember. ***Theirs is the story of two young people who found each other in college, came perilously close to losing what they had forever, and pulled back from the brink at the last possible moment. Theirs is the story of private moments stolen for public consumption, of harrowing car chases, of scorching personal dramas played out behind the scenes, of calm heads prevailing in times of panic, and of a singular devotion made stronger by time. The saga of William and Kate is one thing above all else: a love story. --From William and Kate: A Royal Love Story

William Beckford

by Perry Gauci

This first-ever biography of William Beckford provides a unique look at eighteenth-century British history from the perspective of the colonies. Even in his own time, Beckford was seen as a metaphor for the dramatic changes occurring during this era. He was born in 1709 into a family of wealthy sugar planters living in Jamaica, when the colonies were still peripheral to Britain. By the time he died in 1770, the colonies loomed large and were considered the source of Britain's growing global power. Beckford grew his fortune in Jamaica, but he spent most of his adult life in London, where he was elected Lord Mayor twice. He was one of the few politicians to have experienced imperial growing pains on both sides of the Atlantic, and his life offers a riveting look at how the expanding empire challenged existing political, social, and cultural norms.

William Bradford: Plymouth's Faithful Pilgrim

by Gary D. Schmidt

Biography of the pilgrim William Bradford, who lived at the New Plymouth Colony in Massachusetts.

William Bradford: Pilgrim Boy

by Bradford Smith

This book presents the biography of William Bradford--the first Governor of Plimouth Plantation,about his difficult childhood in England and how he was being prepared by hardship and loss to face the challenges of his adult life.

William C. Van Horne: Railway Titan

by Valerie Knowles

William C. Van Horne was one of North America’s most accomplished men. Born in Illinois in 1843, Van Horne started working in the railway business at a young age. In 1881 he was lured north to Canada to become general manager of the fledgling Canadian Pacific Ralway. The railroading general pushed through construction of the CPR’s transcontinental line and then went on to become the company’s president. During his time with the CPR, Van Horne developed a telegraph service, launched the Empress line of Pacific steamships in 1891, and founded CP Hotels. He capped his career by opening up Cuba’s interior with a railway. A man of prodigious energy and many talents, he also became Canada’s foremost art collector and one of the country’s leading financiers. For all of his amazing accomplishments, Van Horne was knighted in 1894. When he died church bells throughout the length and breadth of Cuba tolled to mark his passing, and when his funeral train made its way across Canada, all traffic on the CPR system was suspended for five minutes.

William Cameron Menzies

by James Curtis

He was the consummate designer of film architecture on a grand scale, influenced by German expressionism and the work of the great European directors. He was known for his visual flair and timeless innovation, a man who meticulously preplanned the color and design of each film through a series of continuity sketches that made clear camera angles, lighting, and the actors' positions for each scene, translating dramatic conventions of the stage to the new capabilities of film. Here is the long-awaited book on William Cameron Menzies, Hollywood's first and greatest production designer, a job title David O. Selznick invented for Menzies' extraordinary, all-encompassing, Academy Award-winning work on Gone With the Wind (which he effectively co-directed). It was Menzies--winner of the first-ever Academy Award for Art Direction, jointly for The Dove (1927) and Tempest (1928), and who was as well a director (fourteen pictures) and a producer (twelve pictures)--who changed the way movies were (and still are) made, in a career that spanned four decades, from the 1920s through the 1950s. His more than 120 films include Rosita (1923), Things to Come (1936), Foreign Correspondent (1940), Kings Row (1942), Mr. Lucky (1943), The Pride of the Yankees (1943), For Whom the Bell Tolls (1943), Address Unknown (1944), It's a Wonderful Life (1947), Invaders from Mars (1953), and Around the World in 80 Days (1956). Now, James Curtis, acclaimed film historian and biographer, writes of Menzies' life and work as the most influential designer in the history of film. His artistry encompassed the large, scenic drawings of Douglas Fairbanks' The Thief of Bagdad (1924), which created a new standard for beauty on the screen and whose exotic fairy-tale sets are still regarded as pure genius. ("I saw The Thief of Bagdad when it first came out," said Orson Welles--he was, at the time, a nine-year-old boy. "I'll never forget it.") Curtis writes of Menzies' design and supervision of John Barrymore's Beloved Rogue (1927), a film that remains a masterpiece of craft and synthesis, one of the most distinctive pictures to emerge from Hollywood's waning days of silent films, and of his extraordinary, opulent appointments for Gone With the Wind (1939). It was Menzies who defined and solidified the role of art director as having overall control of the look of the motion picture, collaborating with producers like David O. Selznick and Samuel Goldwyn; with directors such as D. W. Griffith, Raoul Walsh, Alfred Hitchcock, Lewis Milestone, and Frank Capra. And with actors as varied as Ingrid Bergman, W. C. Fields, Cary Grant, Clark Gable, John Barrymore, Barbara Stanwyck, Ronald Reagan, Gary Cooper, Vivien Leigh, Carole Lombard, Mary Pickford, Gloria Swanson, and David Niven. Interviewing colleagues, actors, directors, friends, and family, and with full access to the William Cameron Menzies family collection of original artwork, correspondence, scrapbooks, and unpublished writing, Curtis brilliantly gives us the path-finding work of the movies' most daring and dynamic production designer: his evolution as artist, art director, production designer, and director. Here is a portrait of a man in his time that makes clear how the movies were forever transformed by his startling, visionary work.(With 16 pages of color illustrations, and black-and-white photographs throughout.)From the Hardcover edition.

William Carey Father of Modern Missions

by Walter Bruce Davis

Biography of William Carey years of exceedingly fruitful service in India during which, nearly always embroiled in controversy, he laid down modern missionary principles and developed almost every form of missionary effort.

William Carlos Williams: A New World Naked

by Paul Mariani

William Carlos Williams (1883-1963) emerged alongside Pound, Eliot, Stevens, Frost, and Yeats as one of the foremost poets of the 20th century. Paterson, Williams's epic masterpiece, raised everyday American speech to the highest levels of poetic imagination. A finalist for the national Book Award and a New York Times Notable Book, William Carlos Williams: A New World Naked is a remarkable, rich blend of art and scholarship. From a small-town doctor who delivered more than 3,000 babies to an extraordinary revolutionary, Paul Mariani unfolds Williams' life and times while simultaneously letting the reader inside the poet's mind and language in this definitive masterwork.

William Clarke Quantrill: His Life And Times

by Alfred E. Castel

The Quantrill legend is rooted in acts of savage violence throughout Kansas and Missouri during the Civil War--deeds both romanticized and vilified. In William Clarke Quantrill, Albert Castel's classic biography, the story of Quantrill and his men comes alive through facts verified from firsthand, original sources. Castel traces Quantrill's rise to power, from Kansas border ruffian and Confederate Army captain to lawless leader of "the most formidable band of revolver fighters the West ever knew." During the Civil War Quantrill and his men descended on Lawrence, Kansas, and carried out a frightful massacre of the civilian population. Some of Quantrill's bushwhackers made names for themselves at Lawrence or after the war, as outlaws: "Bloody Bill" Anderson, Cole Younger, George Todd, "Little Archie" Clement, and Frank and Jesse James.-Print ed.

William Cooper's Town: Power And Persuasion On The Frontier Of The Early American Republic

by Alan Taylor

William Cooper and James Fenimore Cooper, a father and son who embodied the contradictions that divided America in the early years of the Republic, are brought to life in this Pulitzer Prize-winning book. William Cooper rose from humble origins to become a wealthy land speculator and U.S. congressman in what had until lately been the wilderness of upstate New York, but his high-handed style of governing resulted in his fall from power and political disgrace. His son James Fenimore Cooper became one of this country’s first popular novelists with a book, The Pioneers, that tried to come to terms with his father’s failure and imaginatively reclaim the estate he had lost. In William Cooper’s Town, Alan Taylor dramatizes the class between gentility and democracy that was one of the principal consequences of the American Revolution, a struggle that was waged both at the polls and on the pages of our national literature. Taylor shows how Americans resolved their revolution through the creation of new social reforms and new stories that evolved with the expansion of our frontier.

William F. Buckley

by Jeremy Lott

Christian Encounters, a series of biographies from Thomas Nelson Publishers, highlights important lives from all ages and areas of the Church. Some are familiar faces. Others are unexpected guests. But all, through their relationships, struggles, prayers, and desires, uniquely illuminate our shared experience. William F. Buckley Jr. (1925-2008) was a voice to millions, hosting the long-running "Firing Line" TV show, writing more than 50 books, and launching National Review magazine in 1955 to "fix the newly cast conservative cannons on the enemies of collectivism, liberalism, and Communism." Jeremy Lott makes a nuanced case for the profound influence of Buckley's faith--he was a Catholic with Irish-Protestant roots--on his emergence as a modern-day Jonah, warning of "the doom to come if America didn't change course, quickly." Buckley viewed the challenges of his era as ultimately religious in nature. Like the other members of his colorful family, he believed that God, family, and country--in that order--"demanded our unswerving loyalty." Lott traces the thread of faith that ran through Buckley's public life, from his call for a return to orthodoxy at Yale University to his doomed but entertaining run for mayor of New York, from his jaw-dropping verbal joust with Gore Vidal to his surprisingly fresh final thoughts on the end of the Cold War.

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