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Touch and Blindness: Psychology and Neuroscience

by Morton A. Heller Soledad Ballesteros

This is a scholarly document concerning the neurological aspects of visual impairment.

Touch and Go Joe: An Adolescent's Experience of OCD

by Joe Wells

Part of the Reading Well scheme. 35 books selected by young people and health professionals to provide 13 to 18 year olds with high-quality support, information and advice about common mental health issues and related conditions. As many as 2 in every 100 people suffer from Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), and 16-year-old Joe Wells is one of them. In Touch and Go Joe, he tells the story of his battle with OCD from its insidious beginnings at age 9 and increasingly intrusive symptoms, to diagnosis at age 12. Having struggled to keep the condition a secret for years, he is now able to talk and write openly about OCD and how he battled to overcome it. This book is packed with advice and coping strategies, as well as first-hand accounts of available treatments such as cognitive behavioural therapy and medication. Written in an informal and accessible style, and including his own humorous illustrations, Touch and Go Joe gives an upbeat yet realistic look at the effect of OCD on adolescent life. This honest and amusing account will raise awareness of this all-too-common, yet frequently misdiagnosed disorder and will be of interest to anyone who has suffered from or knows someone who has suffered from OCD, including children and adolescents, teachers, psychologists, psychiatrists, mental health professionals, parents and carers.

The Touch of Magic

by Lorena A. Hickok

The story of Helen Keller's great teacher, Anne Sullivan Macy

Touch The Top Of The World: A Blind Man's Journey To Climb Farther Than The Eye Can See

by Erik Weihenmayer

The incredible, inspiring story of world-class climber Erik Weihenmayer, from the terrible diagnosis that foretold of the loss of his eyesight, to his dream to climb mountains, and finally his quest to reach each of the Seven Summits. Erik Weihenmayer was born with retinoscheses, a degenerative eye disorder that would progressively unravel his retinas. Erik learned from doctors that he was destined to lose his sight by age thirteen. Yet from early on, he was determined to rise above this devastating disability and lead a fulfilling, exciting life. In Touch the Top of the World, Erik recalls his struggle to push past the limits placed on him by his visual impairment--and by a seeing world. He speaks movingly of the role his family played in his battle to break through the barriers of blindness: the mother who prayed for the miracle that would restore her son's sight; the father who encouraged him to strive for that unreachable mountaintop. Erik was the first blind man to summit McKinley. Soon he became the first blind person to scale the infamous 3000-foot rock wall of El Capitan and then Argentina's Aconcagua, the highest peak outside of Asia. He was married to his longtime sweetheart at 13,000 feet on the Shira Plateau on his way to Kilimanjaro's summit, and recently Erik scaled Polar Circus, the 30,000-foot vertical ice wall in Alberta, Canada. Erik's story is about having the vision to dream big; the courage to reach for near impossible goals; and the grit, determination, and ingenuity to transform our lives into "something miraculous. "To download an audio excerpt from Touch the Top of the World, visit the American Foundation for the Blind Web site.

Touched by Jesus' Love: The 75th Anniversary Anthology of the Lutheran Blind Mission

by Rodney Rynearson

The anthology of religious poetry and prose about blindness for the 75th Anniversary of The Lutheran Braille Library for the Blind.

Touching for Knowing

by Yvette Hatwell Arlette Streri Edouard Gentaz

A number of articles exploring ways people learn. Learning through touch instead of vision is contrasted.

Touching the Rock: An Experience of Blindness

by John M. Hull

This calmly eloquent, deeply perceptive memoir of a writer and theologian who lost his vision in his mid-forties conveys the unimaginable and ushers its readers into the world of blindness--a world in which the faces of loved ones recede into memory or speculation, while the presence of God becomes supremely important.

Tough As They Come

by Marcus Brotherton Gary Sinise Travis Mills

Thousands have been wounded in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Five have survived quadruple amputee injuries. This is one soldier's story. Thousands of soldiers die year to defend their country. United States Army Staff Sergeant Travis Mills was sure that he would become another statistic when, during his third tour of duty in Afghanistan, he was caught in an IED blast four days before his twenty-fifth birthday. Against the odds, he lived, but at a severe cost--Travis became one of only five soldiers from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq to survive a quadruple amputation. Suddenly forced to reconcile with the fact that he no longer had arms or legs, Travis was faced with a future drastically different from the one he had imagined for himself. He would never again be able to lead his squad, stroke his fingers against his wife's cheek, or pick up his infant daughter. Travis struggled through the painful and anxious days of rehabilitation so that he could regain the strength to live his life to the fullest. With enormous willpower and endurance, the unconditional love of his family, and a generous amount of faith, Travis shocked everyone with his remarkable recovery. Even without limbs, he still swims, dances with his wife, rides mountain bikes, and drives his daughter to school. Travis inspires thousands every day with his remarkable journey. He doesn't want to be thought of as wounded. "I'm just a man with scars," he says, "living life to the fullest and best I know how."From the Hardcover edition.

Tough As They Come

by Marcus Brotherton Gary Sinise Travis Mills

Thousands have been wounded in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Five have survived quadruple amputee injuries. This is one soldier's story. Thousands of soldiers die year to defend their country. United States Army Staff Sergeant Travis Mills was sure that he would become another statistic when, during his third tour of duty in Afghanistan, he was caught in an IED blast four days before his twenty-fifth birthday. Against the odds, he lived, but at a severe cost--Travis became one of only five soldiers from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq to survive a quadruple amputation. Suddenly forced to reconcile with the fact that he no longer had arms or legs, Travis was faced with a future drastically different from the one he had imagined for himself. He would never again be able to lead his squad, stroke his fingers against his wife's cheek, or pick up his infant daughter. Travis struggled through the painful and anxious days of rehabilitation so that he could regain the strength to live his life to the fullest. With enormous willpower and endurance, the unconditional love of his family, and a generous amount of faith, Travis shocked everyone with his remarkable recovery. Even without limbs, he still swims, dances with his wife, rides mountain bikes, and drives his daughter to school. Travis inspires thousands every day with his remarkable journey. He doesn't want to be thought of as wounded. "I'm just a man with scars," he says, "living life to the fullest and best I know how."From the Hardcover edition.

The Tough Kid Social Skills Book (Tough Kid Series)

by Susan Sheridan Tom Oling

Focuses on teaching social skills to the student who displays excesses in noncompliance and aggression and deficits in self-management.

The Tourette Syndrome & OCD Checklist

by Susan Conners

Up-to-date, reliable information about Tourette Syndrome and related disorders for teachers and parentsChildren with TS are often teased and punished for the unusual yet uncontrollable symptoms of their disorder. Academic failure is common. The Tourette Syndrome/OCD Checklist helps parents and teachers to better understand children and youth with TS and/or OCD and provide the support and interventions these children need. Presented in a simple, concise, easy-to-read checklist format, the book is packed with the latest research, practical advice, and information on a wide range of topics.Provides a wealth of information on Tourette Syndrome, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, and related conditionsIncludes strategies for discipline and behavior management, advice on supporting and motivating kids with TS and OCD, homework tips, and moreShows how to educate peer students about TS and OCDLoaded with practical information, strategies, and resources, this book helps parents and teachers to better understand Tourette Syndrome and OCD and shows how every individual can reach their potential in school and in life.

The Tourettes Survival Kit: Tools for Young Adults with Tics

by Tara Murphy Damon Millar

Struggling to manage your tics in the classroom? Worried about your tics in a job interview or on a first date? This survival kit will give you the tools to survive and thrive in every location - at home, school, work or out with friends. Presenting everyday situations, from schools and exams through to driving and dates, this guide provides simple solutions to common problems and concerns. Dr Tara gives her top tips for managing tics, alongside behavioural therapy techniques for stress management and strategies for coping with commonly co-occurring conditions such as ADHD, OCD and anxiety.

Tourette's Syndrome: The Facts

by Mary M. Robertson Simon Baron-Cohen

Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome (or Tourettes syndrome) is an inherited neuropsychiatric disorder affecting five people inn every 10,000. It is characterized by multiple verbal and motor tic, which occur in bouts many times each day. These can be mild in some cases, but can reach a disabling extent in some sufferers, and can include some upsetting and anti-social behavior, such as involuntary swearing and obscene gestures in others. This book, written by a physiologist and a psychiatrist, who have been researching Tourette's syndrome for many years, explains the causes of the syndrome, how it is diagnosed, and the ways in which it can be treated. It includes a section providing clear answers to some of the most commonly asked questions about the disorder and another chapter devoted to coping strategies for close relatives of people diagnosed as having Tourette's syndrome.

Toward Independence: The Use of Instructional Objective in Teaching Daily Living Skills to the Blind

by Anne Yeadon

This book is an introduction to the use of instructional objectives in the teaching of severely visually impaired persons. While it happens to use a daily living skills course as an example of how a teacher might develop a course around this educational method, it is not a daily living skills teaching manual. A creative teacher should be able to adapt the approach as described in Toward Independence to many other subjects.

Towards a Contextual Psychology of Disablism (Routledge Advances in Disability Studies)

by Brian Watermeyer

In recent years, disability studies has been driven by a model of disability which focuses on the social and economic oppression of disabled people. Although an important counterbalance to a pathologising medical model, the social model risks presenting an impoverished and disembodied view of disability, one that ignores the psychological nature of oppression and its effects. This innovative work argues that a psychological framework of disability is an essential part of developing a more cohesive disability movement. Brian Watermeyer introduces a new, integrative approach, using psychoanalysis to tackle the problem of conceptualising psychological aspects of life with disablism. Psychoanalytic ideas are applied to social responses to impairment, making sense of discrimination in its many forms, as well as problems in disability politics and research. The perspective explores individual psychological experience, whilst retaining a rigorous critique of social forces of oppression. The argument shows how it is possible to theorise the psychological processes and impressions of discriminatory society without pathologising disadvantaged individuals. Drawing on sociology, social anthropology, psychology and psychoanalysis - as well as clinical material - Towards a Contextual Psychology of Disablism shapes a view of disabled subjectivity which is embodied, internal, and political. Presenting a range of conceptual ideas which describe psychological dynamics and predicaments confronting disabled people in an exclusionary and prejudiced world, this volume is an important new contribution to the literature. It will interest students and researchers of disability studies, including those working within psychology, education, health and social work.

The Tragedy Paper

by Elizabeth Laban

Perfect for fans of Thirteen Reasons Why and Looking for Alaska, Jennifer Weiner, #1 New York Times bestselling author, calls Elizabeth LaBan's The Tragedy Paper "a beguiling and beautifully written tale of first love and heartbreak." It follows the story of Tim Macbeth, a seventeen-year-old albino and a recent transfer to the prestigious Irving School, where the motto is "Enter here to be and find a friend." A friend is the last thing Tim expects or wants--he just hopes to get through his senior year unnoticed. Yet, despite his efforts to blend into the background, he finds himself falling for the quintessential "It" girl, Vanessa Sheller, girlfriend of Irving's most popular boy. To Tim's surprise, Vanessa is into him, too, but she can kiss her social status goodbye if anyone ever finds out. Tim and Vanessa begin a clandestine romance, but looming over them is the Tragedy Paper, Irving's version of a senior year thesis, assigned by the school's least forgiving teacher. Jumping between viewpoints of the love-struck Tim and Duncan, a current senior about to uncover the truth of Tim and Vanessa, The Tragedy Paper is a compelling tale of forbidden love and the lengths people will go to keep their secrets.

Train Go Sorry: Inside a Deaf World

by Leah Hager Cohen

This portrait of New York's Lexington School for the Deaf is not just a work of journalism. It is also a memoir, since Leah Hager Cohen grew up on the school's campus and her father is its superintendent. As a hearing person raised among the deaf, Cohen appreciates both the intimate textures of that silent world and the gulf that separates it from our own.

Train the Brain to Hear: Understanding and Treating Auditory Processing Disorder, Dyslexia, Dysgraphia, Dyspraxia, Short Term Memory, Executive Function, Comprehension, and ADD/ADHD (Second Edition)

by Jennifer Holland

Train the Brain to Hear was written by a parent and teacher for parents and teachers. The book provides explanations of the learning disabilities dysgraphia, dyslexia, dyscalculia, dyslexia and auditory processing disorder as well as the common areas that are affected by learning disabilities including short term memory, executive function and comprehension. The treatment program utilizes brain training and neuroplasticity techniques to encourage development of the connections in the brain that strengthen these skills. The techniques can also be used to work with those who have been diagnosed with ADD/ADHD, traumatic brain injury or stroke. One of the most difficult things for a parent to hear is that there is something wrong with a child and that there is nothing that can be done to help him. That is what author Jennifer Holland and her husband Charles were told in 2001 when their oldest son was diagnosed with auditory processing disorder. This diagnosis was repeated in 2010 when their second son was diagnosed and again in 2013 when the diagnosis was confirmed in their fourth child. In Charles and Jennifer’s family, auditory processing disorder is a genetic condition inherited from Charles. Jennifer made it her mission to figure out how to help her own children succeed in the classroom and in life. This program will allow you to treat those who are learning disabled from the preschool and early reader age level through adulthood and understand and address many of the most common difficulties they face in everyday life. This book was written and the program developed for every parent who has been told there was nothing that could be done for their child and for every parent/teacher who knows more can be.

Trainwreck: My Life as an Idoit

by Jeff Nichols

Growing up a privileged Manhattan kid, Jeff Nichols should have had it all. Instead, he got a plethora of impairments: learning disabilities, a speech impediment, dyslexia, ADD, and a mild case of Tourette's syndrome. In Trainwreck, his weird and witty memoir of utter dysfunction, Nichols gives an irreverent look at how one "idoit" made good. Bounced from elite private schools, he limps through college, earning the nickname "Iron Lung" for his uncanny ability to inhale from a four-foot bong without coughing. By the skin of his teeth, he graduates and lands a job on Wall Street...as a moving target for coked-up traders tossing order cards at his head. Bumming money from his parents to pay for drugs and prostitutes, Nichols hits bottom before he discovers Alcoholics Anonymous, the perfect place to develop material for his new career in stand-up. Several disastrous twists and turns later, he finally makes good when a crazy stroke of luck leads to his story being turned into a feature film by the same production company behind indie hits like Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind and The Savages. Hilarious and oddly inspiring, Trainwreck is proof that a life disastrously lived can still turn out beyond anybody's wildest imaginings.

Trans and Autistic: Stories from Life at the Intersection

by Noah Adams Bridget Liang

This ground-breaking book foregrounds the voices of autistic trans people as they speak candidly about how their autism and gender identity intersects and the impact this has on their life.Drawing upon a wealth of interviews with transgender people on the autism spectrum, the book explores experiences of coming out, with self-discovery, healthcare, family, work, religion and community support, to help dispel common misunderstandings around gender identity and autism, whilst allowing autistic trans people to see their own neurodiverse experiences reflected in these interviews.An incisive introduction clearly sets out up-to-date research and thinking, before each chapter draws together key findings from the interviews, along with advice and support for those providing support to autistic trans individuals. Both accessible and authoritative, Trans and Autistic is an essential publication for autistic trans people, their families, and professionals wanting to understand and support their clients better.

Transition Assessment: Planning Transition and IEP Development for Youth with Mild to Moderate Disabilities

by Robert J. Miller Stephanie A. Corbey Richard C. Lombard

A practical, “hands on” book designed to provide the reader with a comprehensive understanding of how to use assessment information to develop transition plans. <P><P>Extremely practical and comprehensive, this new text demonstrates how to use transition assessment information to plan and design IEP goals and objectives. Theory, practice and application are tied together to develop the readers knowledge and skill in transition assessment. As such, the reader is provided with what to assess as well as how to assess. Finally, the book is structured to allow the reader to practice and demonstrate their understanding of transition assessment. <P><P>The text provides students with a model of transition assessment and several criterion referenced assessment instruments useful in student assessment. Plus, a chapter dedicated to each component of a holistic transition assessment model that helps students practice what and how to assess.

Transition Education and Services for Students with Disabilities (Fifth Edition)

by Patricia L. Sitlington Gary M. Clark Debra A. Neubert

This book covers the transition of individuals with mild to severe disabilities from a school-age program to all aspects of adult life. The text addresses not only the transition of students with disabilities to employment, but also the transition to future living and post-secondary educational environments. Self-determination, interpersonal, and community integration knowledge and skills are integrated throughout. Transition Education and Services for Students with Disabilities builds upon the success of past editions and continues to expand content to include students with severe disabilities and students at the elementary and middle school levels. This text addresses the ideal and the real in terms of the relationship of the field of transition education and services to the standards-based reform movement in education. This book is intended for use by those in pre-service education programs at the undergraduate and graduate level, as well as those currently teaching in secondary special education programs and/or providing transition education and services.

Transition or Transformation?

by John Clements Julia Hardy Stephanie Lord

Young people with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) can often find the step into adulthood and independence more difficult than their neurotypical peers, particularly where employment is concerned. The authors show, however, that with the right guidance and a positive attitude in schools, young people with ASDs can be every bit as happy and successful as those who are not on the spectrum. The book describes a programme developed over a number of years by teachers at a school for young people with ASDs, which successfully enabled autistic pupils to achieve their full potential. The authors explain in detail the challenges faced by the young people at the school, and show how, encouraged by a culture of optimism and hopefulness, the programme developed their confidence and skills, with the result that many of them are now in employment. The book also provides an in-depth exploration of a multitude of styles and techniques for building relationships. Concluding with a reflection on leadership and organisational culture, the authors demonstrate that if the approach is adopted by an entire school and not just a handful of teachers, it really can work. This inspiring and innovative book will be a must for educators at every level, psychologists, academics, and anybody else interested in a positive educational approach that will enable young people with ASDs to get the most out of life.

Transsexuals: Candid Answers to Private Questions

by Gerald R. Ramsey

WATCH FOR SUBMITTER'S REVIEW TO BE ADDED SHORTLY Dr. Ramsey is a member of the Henry Benjamin International Gender Dysphoria Association, Inc. HBIGDA's well-known "Standards of Care" are listed as an Appendix. Note that these were the 1990 revisions and further revisions may have occurred. Ramsey clarifies many misunderstandings or questions via his lay-person's language to answer difficult questions. He himself states he supports even more restrictive timelines for treatment requirements than the HBIGDA's Standards. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Psychological Disorders, IV (DSM-IV) section on Gender Identity Disorder is also included as an Appendix. Validator did not validate Appendices D & E or the bibliography. I think it's comprehensible, but if you need it improved, contact Cindy, popularplace@yahoo.com

Trapped: My Life with Cerebral Palsy

by Fran Macilvey

<p>An honest, unflinching, and inspiring memoir of living with a challenging disorder. <p> Fran Macilvery was born in the 1960s, when her parents were living in the Belgian Congo. Fran was the second of premature twins—and until the last moment, no one knew that twins were arriving. The complications and resulting delay led to Fran’s cerebral palsy. <p>Growing up with her siblings in Africa, Fran always felt different. When everyone else was playing and having fun, she would watch and wish she could join in. Eventually the family moved to Scotland and, as Fran grew older, her hurt turned into anger, self-hatred, and suicidal depression. Then one day, someone looked at her and saw a woman to love, and that was the start of her journey to self-acceptance. <p>A truthful and revealing look at the difficulty of maintaining the appearance of a “normal” life with CP, and the lessons learned along the way, Trapped is “an ideal firsthand account of the unique and largely unknown world of disability.</p>

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